FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITS / BIOGS

 

The Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

1891 - 1895

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester IN 46975

 1992

 


 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Wendell C. Tombaugh, his heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America.

 

 

 

 

The Rochester Sentinel

1891

Wednesday, January 7, 1891

 

            George O. REED has been appointed administrator of the estate of his father Emanuel T. REED. The stock of goods in the Tiosa store is being invoiced this week preparatory to closing out the business by the surviving partner, Mr. PERSCHBACHER.

 

            A. F. BOWERS went to Columbus Grove, Ohio, Monday, in response to a telegram announcing the death of his father Mr. W. P. BOWERS  which occurred Sunday after a brief illness. Mr. B. was eighty-three years of age, and had enjoyed good health up to the time of his last sickness. He could boast of the fact that he had not swallowed a dose of medicine in thirty-five years, and at the end of a long and active life he passed peacefully away, loved by all who knew him.

 

Wednesday, January 14, 1891

 

            Nelson WARREN died at  the poor farm last Friday. He had been an inmate for a long time, was 84 years of age and had been in poor health for several months.

 

            Miss Jennie KOOBLY died at the home of her parents two miles north of Bloomingsburg, on Sunday, Jan 11, of typhoid fever, aged 15 years. The funeral was conducted by Elder McNEELY on Monday, and the body was interred in the Reichter cemetery.

 

            A sad accident which resulted in the death of a well known and highly respected citizen of Henry Township occurred Tuesday of last week. On that day Mr. Horace McPHERSON, with some neighbors, was hunting rabbits in the neighborhood of his home. In order that he might have a better opportunity to look for game he climbed upon a small tree, and his friends passed on a short distance, when they heard the report of his gun. After waiting a few minutes for him to join them, they returned and found him getting up from the ground, clutching his gun, and the blood streaming from a wound in his head. He was taken home and physicians called, who found that the load of shot had struck one eye ranging upward carrying away all the flesh from his forehead and shattering the skull bone in several places. He was skillfully treated but the wound being a fatal one his sufferings ended in death Friday. Mr. McPherson was about 60 years old and leaves a family.

 

            Mrs. Elizabeth GOSS was born January 15, 1800, near Basil, Switzerland. Her parents came to America when she was but six months of age. They settled in Fairfield


county, Ohio, where she resided until 47 years of age. When 17 years old she was converted to God and united with the United Brethren church. When 20 years of age she married Henry GOSS, and they became the parents of seven children -- three sons and four daughters. In 1847 they came to Fulton county, where she has since resided. Three daughters preceded her to the Spirit World and four children remain -- Emanuel, Jonas and Tobias GOSS and Mrs. Anna ROUCH. The deceased was -- years 11 months and 26 days old at the time of her death, and besides the four children, leaves 34 grandchildren and 42 great grandchildren. She was a christian mother and neighbor of the most admirable kind. The funeral services occurred Sunday at Salem church and were conducted by Elder MILLER.

 

            Mr. Silas H. FARRY died at his home in Newcastle township Tuesday of last week after a short illness. He was born in Ohio July 16, 1819 and located in this county in 1840. Mr. Farry’s long life was filled with good works, and his death is lamented by all who knew him. His body was laid to rest in the Richland Center cemetery Thursday.

 

            Died, Jan 9, l891, Mary BARNETT at Frankfort, Ind. Funeral services at Kewanna, Jan 9, 1891.

            The deceased was born on the 18th of January, 1816, in Marion county, Kentucky. She was married to Thos. W. BARNETT on the 1st day of January 1837 in Fountain county, Ind. They moved to Fulton county in March of the same year. She was the first of her race to become a mother in Wayne township, of this county. To her were born eleven children, six of whom and her husband have preceded her to the Spirit World. She was a Christian from her youth, and was noted for her charity and hospitality. A mother pure and holy.

 

Wednesday, January 21, 1891

 

            Billy IZZARD, the well known member of the cigar manufacturing firm of IZZARD BROS., died at the home of his mother, Friday, after a lingering illness, from consumption. The cigar makers of the city led by the 3d Regiment band, escorted the remains to their last resting place after a funeral service by Rev. MARTZ, of the Evangelical church.

 

            While William SHAFFER and family were riding to Peru on a load of wheat, the wagon was overturned, and all of them were buried underneath. Mrs. SHAFFER received dangerous injuries, and her infant was killed.

 

            An infant child of Jacob PERSCHBACHER was buried last week.

 

            While Jackson SLAYTON was unloading logs at a saw mill near Maxinkuckee one rolled from the wagon and, falling on him, crushed his head causing instant death.

 

Wednesday, January 28, 1891

 

            Mr. FARRAR, who lives near the L. E. &W. depot, buried a six months old child yesterday.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. John GOSS, who reside near Fulton, buried a two year old child Sunday. It died of dropsy.

 

            Mary BARNETT MOW, wife of Enoch MOW, died at her home in Aubbeenaubbee township Sunday, Jan 25. Mrs. Mow was about 40 years of age and the mother of four children, three of whom preceded her to the grave, the surviving child being but two weeks of age. Her remains were laid at rest beside those of her children in the Odd Fellows cemetery Tuesday afternoon. She was a member of Naomi Lodge, No. 153, D. of R. and this Order, together with the lodge at Center and the one at Leiters Ford, conducted the burial services.

 

            The body of Peter SHEETS was found last week in the Wolf Creek swamps eight miles from Plymouth. He was a well-to-do farmer, but became demented over the loss of property and about six weeks ago wandered away from home. He was sixty years old and leaves a large family.

 

Wednesday, February 4, 1891

 

            An eight months old girl baby of Charles MITCHELL’s was buried Sunday afternoon. Its death was caused by some brain trouble.

 

            Jesse ANDERSON, a very worthy young man, died at his home four miles northeast of town Saturday, and was buried Monday. He was 26 years of age, and died of consumption of which disease he had been a long and patient sufferer. His remains were interred at Sycamore chapel in Newcastle township.

 

            Ed ZEIS returned from Oxford, Ind., yesterday, where he attended the funeral of a friend.

 

            Mrs. Mary CUFFEL, wife of Daniel Cuffel, was buried at Hoover’s Station, Sunday. Mrs. Cuffel was 60 years old, land had been sick a long time. She was a noble woman, beloved by all who knew her, and her death is mourned by a large circle of friends.

 

            The Misses VANMETER came down from Chicago Monday to attend the funeral of their father, Mr. William VANMETER, who died at his home on Sunday night. Deceased was an old resident of Wayne township. (Grass Creek)

 

Wednesday, February 11, l891

 

            P. M. SHORE and his mother attended the burial of John SHORE, at Luray, Missouri, last week. The deceased was a brother of the Shore boys of this place, and moved to Missouri a number of years ago, where he was married and had a family of seven children. He was very successful in business and leaves a large amount of valuable property. Mr. Shore and the writer were once schoolmates and he is remembered as one of the most conscientious and correct in deportment of any in the class. For many years he has been a devoted christian. His death was caused by consumption, and he was 43 years of age.

 

Wednesday, February 18, 1891

 

            Mr. & Mrs. C. C. CORNELIUS went to Covington, Ky., last week in answer to a telegram announcing the serious sickness of Mrs. C’s sister who has since died.

 

            Drs. Vernon and Chas. GOULD went to Kewanna Friday, to assist an Ann Arbor specialist in removing a tumor from Mrs. Wm. F. WILSON, which was attached to one kidney and necessitated the removal of that organ. The patient underwent the two hours operation in a successful manner, but her vitality was so severely reduced that death followed on Sunday. Deceased was a highly esteemed lady, and the funeral, which was held at the family residence yesterday, was largely attended. A husband and three children survive.

 

            Grandma LONG died at her home on south Main street, Wednesday evening, aged 83 years. Mrs. Long was born in Massachusetts and her maiden name was Typhenia COLLINS. Deceased was an active member of the Methodist church until becoming so infirm as to be unable to attend worship. The funeral servides were conducted Friday by Father Lord and the remains were interred in the Citizens grave yard.

 

            A letter from Ed. T. MILLER, of Portia, Arkansas, conveys the news of the death of Mr. Luke COOPER, which occurred in that state on the 6th of this month. Mr. Cooper was the Greenback candidate for Auditor of this county in 1882, and was quite well known here. For a number of years he has had control of a saw-mill in Arkansas, and it was while piloting a load of lumber down the river on the second of the present month that he took sick, dying four days afterward among strangers. The only clue to his identity was furnished by a letter in his pocket from his brother John COOPER of Union township, who was notified by telegraph, but failing to receive any instructions, he was buried there.

 

            Eli T. MEREDITH was born in this county March 13, 1847 and departed this life Wednesday evening, Feb 11, 1891. He was united in marriage with Maggie E. FROST, March 21, 1872, who, with two sons are left to mourn the loss of a kind and affectionate husband and father. Eleven years ago he became a member of the Yellow Creek Baptist church, of which he was a consistent christian member until death. He was one of the family of Robert and Elizabeth MEREDITH of which an aged mother, three brothers and one sister are left to mourn the loss of a dutiful son and loving brother. For more than three months he suffered intensely but he bore it all with patience and calm resignation, and he died with a bright hope of entering into that blessed rest which is everlasting. The funeral services were conducted on Friday by Elder E. J. DELP at the Yellow Creek church, after which the body was interred at Mentone.

 

Wednesday February 25, 1891

 

            An infant of L. B. CALL’s near Tiosa, was buried Thursday.

 

            Mrs. Alex RUH and Mrs. C. O. LYNK went to Peru Monday to attend the funeral of an old friend.

 

            Miss TAYLOR, daughter of J. J. TAYLOR, near Bloomingsburg, died after a short illness last week and was buried at Odd Fellows cemetery Sunday.

 

            E. A. LAMSON received a telegram Monday announcing the death of a sister, sixteen years of age, which occurred at Washington, D.C., that morning.

 


 

            Last July there was born to Mr. & Mrs. L. W. HATFIELD, a pair of twin babies, perfect in every respect except that there was but one head, both bodies receiving nourishment from the same source. This strange freak lived and seemed to thrive as well as an ordinary child. It attracted considerable attention and Mr. Hatfield received propositions to exhibit it over the country. It was shown in Indianapolis for a few weeks, and for some time past it has been in Ft. Wayne where it died Saturday, of internal hemorrhage and was brought here for burial Monday. It lived eight months and eight days.

 

            Elizabeth HODSON died near Bloomingsburg Monday of last week, aged 74 years.

 

            Mr. Levi JOHNSON, a highly respected resident of Millark, was buried last Wednesday. Mr. Johnson was -5 years old, and had been sick but a few days.

 

            Miss Rachel VANMETER, who has been employed at Chicago for nearly a year, came home to attend the funeral of her father, and while here was taken very ill with typhus fever. (Grass Creek)

 

Wednesday, March 4, 1891

 

            Wm. ORR, Sr., returned from Cicero yesterday bringing the sad intelligence of the death of his mother which occurred yesterday morning. Mr. Orr will return today to be present at the funeral which will be held tomorrow.

 

            Mr. Enoch MOW’s baby was buried last Thursday. Its death was caused by inflamation of the spine. Mr. Mow has been sorely afflicted in the loss by death of his entire family -- four children and wife.

 

            The Rev. Dr. TUCKER, of Rochester, was in town Tuesday. He was removing the remains of his adopted daughter in Oak Hill cemetery, from one lot to another. -Plymouth Republican.

 

            While the death of Mrs. Wm. DOWNEY has been expected for several months, the announcement of her spirit’s flight beyond was heard with universal sorrow Monday morning. For more than a year deceased has been a sufferer from consumption, and her Christian fortitude, and resignation to her fate, was conclusive evidence of her confidence in a Savior she had trusted for many years.

            A husband and an interesting family of four daughters are left, a son having preceded the mother to the spirit world, to mourn the irreparable loss of a devoted wife and indulgent mother. The writer personally knew Mrs. Downey to be a most exemplary and obliging christian lady, a kind and companionable neighbor, and above all a most devoted wife and mother. Her age was 42 years.

            The funeral service will be conducted today at 2 o’clock at the family residence on south Madison street, by Rev. Dr. TUCKER, of whose church deceased was a member. Interment will be made in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Mr. J. W. BROCK, who resided north of town, died Monday afternoon of consumption after a lingering illness. Mr. Brock was 65 years old. The funeral will occur this afternoon at 2 o’clock from his late residence, conducted by Rev. David MARTZ.


Wednesday, March 11, 1891

 

            Luther STRADLEY formerly a well known citizen of this county died Sunday at his home in Illinois and the remains were brought here for interment yesterday.

 

            Mrs. Boyd OVERMYER died at her home in Richland township Sunday, of consumption. She was buried at Richland Center, and leaves a husband and two small children to mourn her death.

 

            Mrs. Anthony F. SMITH died at her home in Logansport last week. Judge SMITH is a brother of Milo R. SMITH, and was one of Rochester’s most prominent citizens several years ago, and he and his wife have many friends and acquaintances here who were sorry to learn of her death. She was seventy years old.

 

            The funeral of the late Mrs. Wm. DOWNEY, Wednesday, was largely attended by friends of the family. The music furnished by Misses Lola TRUE and Debbie STRONG, and Messrs. Milo BRIGHT and John BARKDOLL, was consoling, the short discourse by Dr. TUCKER was an eloquent eulogy and the floral offerings were the richest and most profuse ever seen in the city. There were present from a distance: Mrs. KANE, Ligonier; Hon. and Mrs. Dan McDONALD, Plymouth; Mrs. HATFIELD, Michigan; Mrs. Ella MITCHELL, Peru; Mrs. PIERCE, Tolono, Ill.; and Messrs. Phillip and Adam TUESCHER and ----- HERMAN, of LaPorte.

 

            Joseph WEAVER, for many years a resident of Liberty township, died very suddenly Friday of heart disease. Deceased had been making his home, for some time, with the family of Joseph HOUSE and after eating a hearty dinner, Friday, concluded to go over to his old home on an errand. Nearly two hours afterward, one of Mr. House’s children found Mr. Weaver lying in the snow in the yard, cold in death, where he evidently fell as he was leaving the house. He had frequent attacks of heart disease and the physician who was called decided, after an examination of the remains, that the fatality was the result of one of these attacks.

            Deceased was an upright and honest, though humble citizen, and his good standing as a neighbor was attested by the large concourse of people who turnerd out to attend his funeral which was held Sunday afternoon.

 

            Grandmother FREELAND, a pensioner of the war of 1812, was buried at Macy the 6th, aged 86 years. (Green Oak)

 

            Rob REED, the teacher at Liberty school house, was called to Marmont last Thursday to the funeral of his aged father. He has the sympathy of his many friends in Wayne in the loss of his father and mother, both in less than two months. (Grass Creek)

 

Wednesday, March 18, 1891

 

            Last week Mrs. Holmes TIPTON received a telegram notifying her of the serious illness of William ASHTON, of Lima, Ohio. Mrs. Tipton was raised by Mr. & Mrs. Ashton, and immediately went to the bedside of her foster father, whom she found very low, the end coming Saturday morning at 7 o’clock when he quietly breathed his last. Mr. Ashton was for several years a banker in Rochester, and had reached the age of 70 years.


            A few minutes before seven o’clock on last Wednesday evening the residents of west Pearl street and vicinity were startled by the loud report of a pistol, followed by the exclamation, “I’m dying! I’m dying!” At the moment the shot was fired Miss Lily INGRAHAM opened the north door of Elijah MILLER’s house, which is in direct range with the road to the beginning of Pearl street, and seeing the flash of the revolver, called to Mr. MILLER, who secured a lantern, and accompanied by Miss Ingraham and his niece, Mrs. Michael OVERMYER, started to the bridge which is about fifteen rods distant and crosses the road at the termination of Pearl street, from which place continually came groans of distress. When about twenty-five feet from the bridge they discovered the form of a man lying face downward in the soft earth. As soon as turned over he was recognized as Michael OVERMYER, the husband of one of the persons discovering him, and after one or two gasps expired.

            The agonizing screams of the wife who had started out to assist a fellow being whom she thought to be in trouble, without a suspicion that the one whose life was fast going out was her husband, rang out on the still evening air until they could be heard to Main street.

            The coroner and Sheriff GAST were immediately notified and repaired to the scene of the tragedy, where a large crowd of excited individuals had gathered. The sight there witnessed was a sad one. Lying in the road with clothes covered with mud his coat and vest open disclosing a hole in the right breast of his shirt surrounded by a crimson stain, with the bride of less than a month clinging to it, was the corpse which still contained the warmth of life.

            A revolver with two of the chambers empty was lying near. The corpse was removed to the residence of Mr. Miller where the undertaker proceeded to prepare it for burial.

            The next morning a postmortem examination of the body was made by the Drs. GOULD who found that the ball had entered the right breast a short distance below the nipple and about two inches from the median line passing between two of the ribs and piercing both auricles of the heart and lodging in the pericardium. The ball was of thirty-eight calibre and fit the empty shell in the revolver picked up near the corpse.

            At the Coroner’s inquest the following facts were elicited in regard to the deceased and the circumstances surrounding the killing:

            Michael Overmyer was born in Ohio, his father being a farmer. When he was a small boy his father concluded to dispose of his property and immigrate to this state, but after bargaining his farm away he grew disatisfied and despondent to such a degree that the man to whom he had sold was moved to permit him to resume possession. He continued to occupy the property for about a year when the desire for a change again came upon him, and by increasing the price first agreed upon the farm was again sold to the original purchaser. His household goods were packed preparatory to moving to this county, when he was again seized with a fit of despondency. A short time before they were ready to start on their journey Mr. Overmyer went to pay a neighbor a farewell visit, taking his gun along. Soon after he was found in a field dead from the effects of a gunshot wound. No one witnessed the shooting, but the general supposition was that he concluded to die on his native soil rather than go to the new state. The widow soon after married a man by the name of RAMSEY, and Michael was taken to raise by John JOHNSON, who resides in Richland township. When about twenty years of age he married a daughter of the late William TRIBBITTS, who died eight years ago leaving one son, who has since made his home with the Johnson family that raised his father. Michael made a sale of his household goods and stock for which he realized about six hundred dollars. One-half of this was used to defray the expenses incurred by the sickness and burial of his wife. Since that time he continued to labor for the farmers in that neighborhood, having worked for Ezekiel OVERMYER for the past year until the first of January, when he went to


Huntington to seek employment. He remained one month, when he returned to Fulton county, and on the 14th of February was united in marriage with Margaret, daughter of E. OVERMYER, his former employer. Although of the same name they were not related. While at Huntington he bargained for a house and lot leaving a horse he had taken with him in part payment. He had also engaged to work in a trunk factory, and on last Wednesday he and his wife packed two loads of household articles which were hauled to the C. & E. depot by Schuyler OVERMYER, a brother of Mrs. Overmyer’s, and George MILLER a cousin. Mr. Miller’s son owed Michael for a buggy, and on the way to town Mr. M. offered to pay him, saying that as he was just beginning housekeeping he would likely need the money, but Michael refused it stating that he had enough cash to pay $200 on the property bargained for, and buy some articles that were yet needed to complete their household outfit. But Mr. Miller insisted upon his taking at least a part of it, and went to the bank and got $15 and gave it to him. In corroboration of this statement his wife said that she had had possession of his pocketbook, and, although she had not counted the money, she saw there was quite a large number of bills, and that he told her that morning when he placed it in his inside vest pocket that it contained over $300. After placing the goods in a car the three men separated, Mrs. Overmyer having previously gone to the residence of her uncle, Elijah MILLER, who resides a short distance south of the west termination of Pearl street. Michael then went to the home of Peter BIDDINGER, who married a sister to his first wife, where he remained for supper. While here he seemed in his usual spirits, laughing and joking with his boy who was stopping there. Mr. Biddinger lives in the northwest part of town, and after a short after-supper talk he (Overmyer) started to go to the residence of Mr. Miller to join his wife where they were to remain over night before starting for their new home in Huntington. This was the last time Michael Overmyer was seen alive.

            The revolver found near the body was recognized as the property of the deceased, which he carried continually, and it was still in the leather sheath which was open at the end. The $15 paid him by George MILLER was found in his vest pocket where it had been placed, and $2.35 in silver was found in his pants pocket but the pocketbook was gone. He was 34 years old, five feet eight inches high and of a stout build; was temperate in his habits, was of a quiet and orderly disposition, and stood well in the community in which he resided.

            The coroner’s verdict was that he came to his death at the hands of an unknown individual whose object was robbery.

            [NOTE: a further article indicating that there were no suspects]

 

Wednesday, March 25, 1891

 

            A brother of the murdered man called at the Sentinel  office Thursday to say that the report that his father committed suicide is false. In this he is corroborated by Mrs. THOMSON, of Kewanna, who gives the Herald  the following report:

            Michael OVERMYER’s father had sold his farm in Ohio and was preparing to move to this state. A few days before they were ready to start on their journey he took his gun and went half a mile through the woods to see his cousin about some business affair and returned home with his gun loaded. His boys were watering the horses at the well in the yard and wanted him to shoot the load out of the gun before going into the house. This he declined doing saying that it would scare the horses and the boys could not hold them but after they had taken them away he would. He turned and going to the house sat down on a bench upon the porch. The day had been rainy and the porch floor was slippery from the moisture that had fallen upon it. After the boys took the horses away, he arose from the bench and started to the


front of the porch to fire the gun off. As he stepped forward he slipped and threw the gun down as a support to keep himself from falling when it was discharged, the load passing into his bowels inflicting a wound from which he died in about eight hours. His wife was standing in the doorway watching him when the accident occurred.

 

Wednesday, April 1, 1891

 

            The nine months old boy baby of Mr. & Mrs. Charles GOSS died of catarrhal fever last week and was buried Friday at the Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            The little two year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Will ROUCH, of this city, died of membraneous croup Monday night and the funeral will be held today at Salem church.

 

            Mrs. Isom R. NEW attended a funeral at Denver, last week. (Green Oak)

 

            Mr. C. C. CORNELIUS, who resides southeast of town, received the sorrowful intelligence Saturday that his brother, Mr. Willis CORNELIUS, of Iowa, had died of hydrophobia, caused by the bite of a cat. He was bitten a few weeks ago and the wound healed over without much difficulty and was forgotten until last week when he was taken sick with all the dreadful symptoms of hyudrophobia. He apparently recovered from the attack and was able to get out of bed, but after bidding his family good-bye, with the statement that he was going to die, sat down on a chair and immediately expired. He was a farmer, sixty-eight years of age and leaves a wife and one daughter. Mrs. C. C. CORNELIUS had a brother die in Kentucky recently and this additional sorrow coming so unexpected makes the hearts of these excellent old people very sad indeed.

 

Wednesday, April 8, 1891

 

            Mrs. Jacob MATHIAS died at Longcliff asylum, Logansport, last Saturday, aged 32 years and the remains were brought here for interment Monday. About three years ago Mrs. Mathias showed such strong evidence of insanity that it became necessary to care for her, and she was sent to Indianapolis for treatment, where she remained until the opening of the asylum at Logansport, to which she was transferred. Her condition continued without a gleam of sanity until the first of last week. In the meantime disease fastened upon her lungs, which gradually deprived her of bodily strength. Last week she expressed to her attendant a desire to see her husband. Dr. ROGERS, Superintendent, was notified, and he immediately telegraphed Mr. MATHIAS. His emotions can better by imagined than described when upon being shown to his wife’s room she fully recognized him, receiving him with an affectionate embrace, all traces of insanity having disappeared. Their married life, during which time four children were entrusted to their care, was fully reviewed during the short time they were permitted to remain together. With the return of reason came a yearning desire to again see her children, but death came before the mother-love could be gratified.

 

            An infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. James STEVENS, of Liberty township, was buried Thursday.

 

            Grandma LACKEY, mother of Andrew and Jacob LACKEY, died at the residence of the latter, three miles south of town Thursday, at the ripe old age of 81 years. The funeral


service was conducted at the residence, Friday afternoon, and interment made in Oliver’s grave yard.

 

Wednesday, April 15, 1891

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Isaac BLACKBURN, of South Bend, brought the corpse of one of their children, aged eight years, to this city Saturday evening and the funeral was held at Mt. Zion Sunday. It died of LaGrippe.

 

            A three year old child of Mr. & Mrs. Alex COOK, Jr., who live four miles north of Akron, burned to death Monday evening in trying to build a fire with coal oil while the parents were away from home.

 

Wednesday, April 22, 1891

 

            Lewis O. BEATTIE, eldest son of Wm. BEATTIE, of Wayne township, died on the 11th inst., after six weeks suffering from hasty consumption. The funeral conducted by Rev. MORGAN, was held at Fletchers Lake on Monday when a very large concourse of people turned out to manifest the last tribute of respect to a most promising and highly esteemed young man. Deceased was nearly nineteen years old.

 

            On the 13th inst., Henry HETZNER, son of Paul HETZNER, died at the home of his parents, after a brief illness of LaGrippe, aged 16 years. The funeral service, conducted by Rev. GIFT, was held at Leiters Ford, Wednesday. The bereaved family ask the Sentinel to return their thanks for the kindness and attention shown them by neighbors and friends.

 

            George Walter TIPTON, the nine and a half year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Isaac TIPTON, of Newcastle township, died Friday. Funeral at Sycamore Chapel, Saturday, by Elder DELP.

 

            Uncle Johnny WEAVER, who has been an inmate of the Poor House for nearly twelve years, died Wednesday at the age of eighty, after a two years illness of paralysis. Interment made in the Poor Farm Pottersfield.

 

            Hiram W. BIGGS, aged 74, whose misfortune chronicled in the last issue of the Sentinel, died at his home Thursday from exhaustion, superinduced by the amputation of a limb. The funeral was held Friday at Mt. Zion.

 

            Mrs. Grace KENDALL LEONARD, a young lady, well known in this city, died at her home in Plymouth yesterday morning and the funeral will be held today.

 

            Of the horrible death of Alex COOK’s child, briefly reported in the last issue of the Sentinel, the Mentone Gazette says: The little daughter aged about two years, was left alone for a short time while the parents were somewhere out of hearing, and it is thought the child was playing with the coal oil can and spilled the contents over her clothing, which by some means took fire. When the parents returned they found their child lying out in the yard with its clothing all burned off except its stockings. The body was burned into a crisp and death resulted in a few hours. The funeral took place at Palestine.


 

            A small child of Mr. & Mrs. FINEMORE died suddenly Sunday evening, and was buried Tuesday at Macy. (Green Oak)

 

            A little child of Mr. & Mrs. Will CATON was buried last Friday at the Marshtown cemetery. (Blue Grass)

 

            Mrs. COSTELLO, a well known and respected old lady, died at her home near the Bowman school house April 16, and her remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on last Saturday. (Blue Grass)

 

Wednesday, April 29, 1891

 

            Cashier Omar SMITH, of the Rochester Bank, attended the funeral of the wife of his friend, Will LEONARD, at Plymouth, Thursday.

 

            Peter CONGER died yesterday at his home, one mile west of the city, aged 63 years. The funeral will be held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the family residence.

 

            The recent loss of a limb to Israel JOHNSON and death of Hiram BIGGS from the same misfortune, necessitated by gangrene in self doctored corns, is a warning against the application of the knife and nostrum of any knid to corns. A corn is a disease and should be treated as skillfully as any other physical disability.

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John LARGE, of near Marshland was buried Thursday.

 

Wednesday, May 6, 1891

 

            Frederick FESSER, a farmer of Bourbon, went to his fields recently to clear out some old stumps. He carried with him on his arm a basket full of dynamite cartridges. He took one out and exploded it under a stump. Either from the jar of the explosion or from some other cause the entire basket full of dynamite exploded and tore Fessler all to pieces. An affecting incident of the horrible affair was the conduct of his faithful dog. He seemed to comprehend to some extent what had occurred, and kept such faithful guard over a portion of his master’s remains which he had recognized, that he would allow no one to approach near enough to gather it up. It was reluctantly determined to shoot the faithful animal, and this was finally done before the dead man’s remains could be cared for.

 

            Mrs. Anna HURD CLAYTON was born in Canada, Dec. 23, 1825. Her parents removed to the state of Michigan in 1835 and from thence to Fulton county, Ind., in 1837.

            Deceased was married to George W. CLAYTON Feb. 9, 1842. To them were born twelve children, six of whom with the father preceded her to the Spirit World.

            Mrs. Clayton united with the U.B. church in 1853, continued with that church until 1877 when she transferred her membership to the Christian church. She was faithful in all the relations of life, and has left a grand legacy to her children in the example of the life she lived.

            Her death occurred April 30 at home of her son, Samson CLAYTON near the city. The funeral services were conducted from the Christian church on Sunday morning by Elder W. R. LOWE. Interment was made in Mt. Hope cemetery.


Wednesday May 13, 1891

 

            Argos Reflector:  The remains of David SHORES were buried near Rochester on last Thursday. He died at the home of Joseph MARYO, on the Hubbard SMITH farm west of Argos, and was aged about 76 years.

 

            When Charley MITCHELL left the court room Friday, after receiving his sentence to the Penitentiary for one year for stealing Henry HAIMBAUGH’s wheat, he said to his partner in crime, Albert CARTER, “Henry BIBLER couldn’t clear me but by G-d I’ll clear myself.” And he kept his word.

            Sheriff GAST intended taking his prisoners to the Penitentiary Saturday but owing to the fact that he could not return that night and that the convicts begged for one more day with their families, he concluded to wait until Monday. Sunday evening Carter saw Mitchell take something from a paper and swallow it, after which he (Mitchell) said he had taken poison. He was soon taken sick and the Sheriff was called but Mitchell then denied having taken anything and said he would be all right in the morning. At four o’clock the Sheriff was again called and county physician SHIELDS immediately summoned who examined the sick man and pronounced his case arsenical poison, although he still stoutly denied having taken any drug. Despite the doctor’s efforts to counteract the effects of the poison, Mitchell continued to sink until 2 o’clock when he died and his body was removed to the family residence in Iceberg by undertaker ZIMMERMAN.

            A Sentinel  reporter called at the home of the dead man soon after the removal of his body there and found evidences of deepest sorrow and extreme poverty prevalent in every corner of the little dwelling. The aged mother answered, with quivering lips, that Charley was her boy and that he was as dear to her as though he had died a natural death on the mother’s downy pillow instead of the unnatural one on the iron bedstead in the cheerless cell of the gloomy jail. The youthful widow sat, all muffled up in sorrow, on a backless chair and answered that she knew nothing of her husband’s death except what they had told her. He had never intimated to her his purpose of self destruction and she could hardly believe that he could have committed so rash an act.

 

            The Carters, who were Mitchell’s associates in crime, state that he attempted suicide one night last week by an effort to swallow some arsenic, but they jerked the powder from him and threw it on the floor. He said that the drug was a preparation used for heavy horses and that he had carried it in his pocket since buying it at Tippecanoetown in January, but that he had no more. It is likely, however, that Mitchell had the poison secreted in his clothing and when the hour approached for his departure for a year at hard labor in the Penitentiary, the ordeal appeared too severe for him and he decided to die rather than forego the punishment.

            That the suicide was fully contemplated is proven by the following will he printed on an envelope and found in the deceased’s coat pocket, Monday evening:

                April the 12, 1891.

It is Sunday Eavening About 6 o’clock And is time to make my will I giv to you everything I have got in this world and that aint much.

                C. F. MITCHELL, to his wife Maggie MITCHELL.

                The only friend I have got in this world.

                To C. F. Mitchell’s widow . . . .

 


 

Wednesday, May 20, 1891

 

            The many friends of the estimable wife of B. F. PORTER were shocked to hear of her sudden death Saturday morning at the family residence in southeast Rochester. She had been an invalid for several months from injuries received in a runaway, but had recently improved. Her husband had gone to the farm Saturday morning and she died soon after he left home.

            Deceased, Hannah COLLINS, was born in this city Dec. 2, 1839, and was married at the age of 20 to the surviving husband. She was the mother of ten children, seven of whom are living, and was always recognized as a pious and obliging neighboring friend.

            The funeral was held at Mt. Zion Sunday, Rev. PATTERSON, of Macy, conducting the services assisted by Rochester Lodge of the Eastern Star, of which deceased was an active member. One hundred and fifteen carriages, filled with friends, followed the remains to their last resting place and mingled their sorrow with the bereft family as they parted forever with wife and mother.

 

            Wm. COLLINS was born February 14, 1830, in West Morland county, Virginia. His parents moved to Wabash county, Ind., while he was quite young. Was united in marriage with Eliza S. JOHNSON in 1851. Died at his home in Liberty township, May 4, 1891, aged 61 years 2 months and 20. He was the father of eight children, three of whom preceded him to the spirit world.

            The family extends thanks to the neighbors for assistance in caring for the sick and burying the dead. While the family have lost a kind husband and father the neighborhood has lost a good neighbor. He died in full hope of eternal life. Funeral discourse was preached by Rev. Jos. MERLEY, text 14 Job and 10th verse.

 

Wednesday, May 27, 1891

 

            A daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. DILLON, of Richland township, died of diphtheria last week.

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Dora COLLINS was buried at Salem church yesterday. Its disease was brain fever.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. C. CORNELIUS started to Covington, Ky., yesterday evening where they go to assist in the final settlement of the estate of Mrs. C’s deceased sister.

 

            Miss Elma BARNHART, who makes her home with Mr. & Mrs. C. O. LYNK, received the sad intelligence Friday that her brother Horace was drowned in Red River, Texas, on the 16th inst., while fishing. Deceased was a son of John BARNHART, formerly a well known citizen of Richland township, was a married man, and aged about 36 years.

 

            The family of Jonas BIDDINGER, of Richland township, is passing through a siege of diphtheria, the ravages of which appeals for the sympathy of mankind everywhere. One week ago seven of the eight children were stricken down with this dread disease, all within two days, and on Wednesday night a boy four years old and a girl, aged seven, both died within the same hour in terrible agony. Three of the other five were dangerously afflicted and on Sunday night another boy, aged thirteen, followed the other two into the spirit world. In the midst of


all this grief and distress, the mother is prostrated with a disease similar to that of her children, while the only well daughter, through mistake, disabled herself by burning both hands in a horrible manner with carbolic acid which she mistook for brandy, used in stimulating the sick. At latest reports yesterday the afflicted ones were all improving, although the lives of two are still hanging upon very brittle threads.

 

            The infant son of Mr. & Mrs. John SPAID was buried at Odd Fellows cemetery Wednesday.

 

Wednesday, June 3, 1891

 

            Hiram ANDERSON was born in the southern part of Indiana, November 5, 1815, and died at his home in Rochester, May 31, 1891, of cancer.

            In the death of Mr. Anderson is removed one of the oldest of the Fulton county pioneers. He came here in 1834 and settled at what was called Stringtown, north of the Tippecanoe river, where he established a blacksmith shop and continued to work at his trade at that place until in the ‘50s when he came to Rochester where he has since resided. He was married in 1836 and his wife died the 5th of last August. Five children were born to them, John ANDERSON, of this place being the only survivor.

            Until a few months ago when his health began to fail “Uncle Hiram,” as he was familiarly called, worked continuously at his trade. His chief characteristic was honesty, kand in this respect he was truly one of the noblest works of God. He live a life of usefulness, without an enemy, beloved and respected by all who knew him and his death is sorely regretted.

            The funeral occurred Tuesday afternoon from the family residence on Main street, conducted by Elder J. F. WAGONER.

 

            Little Chloe, daughter of Elmer and Ella COLLINS, departed this life May 25. The disease was spinal and brain trouble. She was 13 months old. Amid the prospects of life she was taken from the family circle like a flower that withereth its season, but sometimes is plucked before the season comes.

            An able funeral discourse was delivered by Rev. Wm. WILDERMUTH. The bereft are not able to express their gratitude for the kindness they received from the people in the neighborhood of Salem church and surroundings.  -Isaac R. BARKER.

 

            After an illness lasting for several weeks caused by la grippe, Mr. E. R. HERMAN quietly passed from this life to the life behond the grave Friday, May 30. He was born near Troy, Ohio, February 15, 1831. Being left an orphan at an early age he came to this state making his home with an uncle at Burnettsville in White county.

            Upon reaching manhood he entered the profession of law, having practiced in this city for a number of years. Mr. Herman was an upright, and unostentatious citizen and had many friends. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. A. TUCKER Sunday afternoon at Grace M.E. church, of which the deceased was a member. McClung Post, G.A.R. attended, escorted by the Third Regiment Band.

 

            John H. ROBBINS died at his home north of town last Sunday, aged sixty-nine years. Deceased was an old settler of Fulton county, and was a distant relative of Dr. ROBBINS, of this city. The funeral was held at the family residence and interment was made


 

in the Sand Hill cemetery.

 

            The youngest son of Wm. DILLON, near Richland Center, died of diphtheria Sunday. No funeral was held for fear of spreading the disease and interment was made at Jordon cemetery, Marshall county.

 

            A nine year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Bud GIBBONS died at their home last Friday of diphtheria. No funeral was preached and interment was made at Richland Center cemetery Saturday at Four o’clock.

 

            The two year old son of Daniel JOHNSON succumbed to a lingering spinal disease and was buried in the family grave yard at two o’clock Sunday.

 

            Samuel RAMSEY, the twenty year old son of Rev. RAMSEY, formerly of Macy, and a circuit rider of this county, was recently drowned in the Mississinewa river in Miami county.

 

            Edgar NYE, the twenty year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Jonas NYE, who live on a farm southeast of Hoover’s Station, took his own life Wednesday afternoon by shooting himself through the head with a revolver. Just after dinner he strolled out into the orchard and the report of his revolver was heard by the family who thought he was shooting at birds. As he did not return in reasonable time one of his sisters went to see what he was doing and found him lying flat on his back and cold in death from a bullet in his brain. Coroner SHIELDS was summoned and his inquisition developed the facts that the young man had had considerbale trouble with neighbors and relatives and that he was much dissatisfied with himself and everybody else and, therefore, tired of earthly existence.

            The funeral service was conducted by Elder Noah HEETER, Thursday.

 

            Some months ago Adam GANDY lived in Rochester and traded horses for a livelihood. He was a one armed soldier and the head of a large family. Later he moved to Marmont where he lived at the time of his terrible death Wednesday night. All day Wednesday he loafed about Marshland saloon and imbibed freely of intoxicants. In the evening he started for this city and that was the last seen of him alive. A west bound freight came upon him in a drunken sleep upon the track near Leiters and, before the train could be stopped, he was struck by the pilot of the engine and hurled high into the air. When picked up by the train crew he was dead and an examination revealed the fact that his neck, arms, legs and back were broken.

            Deceased had an excellent war record and lost his arm at Port Gibson. He was a member of the 46th Regt. Ind. Vols., and served in the same company with J. R. STALLARD and C. O. SMITH, of this city.

 

Wednesday, June 10, 1891

            Two more of Bud GIBBONS’ children, aged two and four years, have died of diphtheria.

 

Wednesday, June 17, 1891

 

            Grandma Anna BRUGH, of Aubbeenaubbee township, died suddenly of paralysis yesterday morning, and the funeral will be held today.

           


Mrs. Isaac O’BLENIS died at her home in Rochester, Wednesday of last week, of erysipelas. The funeral services were conducted at the house Thursday afternoon by Elder McNEELY, of Tiosa, with interment at the Sand Hill cemetery, north of town.

 

            Death has again visited this community and called Israel FRY from among us. Deceased was born in Ohio 65 years and eight months ago and in his youth located in Miami county where he lived until nine years ago when he moved to this township. He was the father of twelve children, nine of whom, with the wife and mother, survive to mourn the loss of a loving father and kind husband. The deceased was an active member of the Dunkard church, and the funeral was conducted by Elders Noah and Frank FISHER, of that denomination. Interment of the remains in Mexico cemetery. (Fulton)

 

            Michael PERSCHBACHER was born in York county, Pennsylvania, March 14, 1835. He died at his home in Newcastle township after a lingering illness, June 9, 1891.

            In his early manhood, Mr. Perschbacher united with the Lutheran church, and remained a faithful member until his death. His daily walk was guided by the golden rule, and after a life of usefulness his death is regretted by all who were intimately acquainted with him. He leaves a wife and several children who mourn the loss of a kind and indulgent husband and father.

            The funeral services were conducted at two o’clock Wednesday afternoon at St. Paul’s Lutheran church in Newcastle township by Rev. A. E. GIFT, with interment at the Reister cemetery.

 

Wednesday, June 24, 1891

 

            Mrs. Mary STUART, sister of Mrs. Sebastian GOSS, of this city, died at her home near Fletchers Lake, Wednesday, and the funeral was held at Salem church Friday.

 

            The announcement of the very sudden death of Samuel VanBLARICUM, at his home six miles southwest of the city, was heard with universal sorrow by the large circle of friends which he so deservedly won by an honorable existence of more than 45 years in the vicinity where he died.

            On Thursday evening Uncle Sammy, as he was known to everybody, came home from Peru and, in a few hours, was stricken down with hemorrhage of the lungs of such an aggravated character that no relief could be given him and he died Saturday morning.

            Deceased was born in Ohio 73 years ago and moved to Indiana in 1845. At the age of 24 he was married to the noble wife and mother who preceded him in death by six years, and to them thirteen children were born, seven of whom survive.

            He was widely known as a christian father of the strictest integrity and most lofty ideas of morality, all of which was attested by the immense outpouring of people to attend his funeral which was preached by Rev. Wm. WILDERMUTH, at Salem church, Monday afternoon. He had been a faithful christian for 51 years and was therefore amply prepared for the great transformation awaiting all men.

 

Wednesday, July 1, 1891

 

            [no entries]


 

Wednesday, July 8, 1891

 

            The wife of Dr. Frank BITTERS, of Rensselaer, died last Tuesday and the funeral was held Wednesday. Messrs. A. T., C. K. and Major BITTERS, of this city, and Mr. & Mrs. Wm. BITTERS and daughter, Sadie, of Akron, attended the funeral. The doctor has buried four children since his marriage and the death of his wife leaves him the only one living of his once happy family.

 

            Hackman Joe SIDMORE has made his last familiar call -- “Hack for the Lake!” For many years it has been his custom to drive to the Lake crossing the L. E. & W. Ry. about the time of the arrival of the north bound passenger trains for the purpose of transferring passengers from this stopping place to the Lake hotels. He almost invariably backed his hack up close to the track, and this was his position Wednesday noon when the north bound passenger train came in. Sidmore sat in the driver’s box and George HOOVER was the only occupant of the hack. Just as the train came thundering up to the crossing and gave the signal of no stop, the team, from some unknown cause, gave a lurch and backed upon the track, cramping the hack diagonally across it. Hoover at once recognized the danger and leaped successfully for his life, at the same time crying to Sidmore to do the same but at the same instant there was a shrill scream of danger from the locomotive, a crash, and hack, horses and driver were hurled to sickening destruction. The completely demolished hack hung upon the pilot of the engine, the horses lay dead at the side of the track near the road while poor Joe was picked up, lifeless, at the north end of the platform, more than fifty feet from where he was struck. The train was running at a high rate of speed and it could not be stopped until it reached the city limits but it hastened back to the scene of the disaster where the lifeless body was placed aboard the train and conveyed to the station and thence to Hoover’s Undertaking rooms. Here the body was examined and a half dozen wounds found on the head and body either of which were fatal.

            The funeral took place from the family residence Thursday evening, when a large concourse of people assembled to sympathize with the unfortunate wife and children in their crushing grief.

            Deceased had been engaged in the Lake hack business for many years and had been about trains so much that he grew careless to the danger of stopping his hack too close to the track.

            He was a shoemaker by trade and carried a life policy of $20,500 in the Masonic Mutual Company which he renewed only two hours before his tragic death. He was 56 years old and leaves a wife and three children.

 

 

Wednesday, July 15, 1891

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Fred RICHTER, of Niles, Mich., have been in the city several days called here by the death of Mr. R’s brother, Frank.

 

            Light hearted, good natured, jolly Frank RICHTER is dead. Consumption preyed upon his vitals for two long years and on Thursday evening, after a manly battle for life, the young man quietly sank to death in the very prime of manhood and surrounded by every comfort which makes life worth living.

            Deceased was born in Fulton twenty-nine years ago and had been a resident of


Rochester for many years, where, until his health failed, he was one of the most universally popular young men in the city both in the social and business circle. Sanitariums, health resorts and medical specialists were all visited by Frank with no avail and his hosts of friends followed his remains to their last resting place in Odd Fellows cemetery Sunday. Peace to his ashes.

 

Wednesday, July 22, 1891

 

            PETER MEREDITH, A DISTINGUISHED PIONEER  [Biography]

            Few families in Fulton county are more widely known or highly respected than the Merediths of Newcastle township. At the head of this family is Uncle Peter MEREDITH, who has been living, since 1888, with his son Dr. G. W. MEREDITH at Ashland, Neb., who contributes the following eloquent tribute to a noble parent in the Mentone Gazette:

            Peter Meredith was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, on March 24, 1810. His father, Isaac MEREDITH, was a tiller of the soil, and he and his wife were blessed with nine children, two girls and seven boys, of whom Peter was the third.

            The subject of this sketch spent the early part of his life in the place of his birth. In 1837 he left the scenes of his childhood and took up his abode in the wilds of Indiana, locating in Fulton county, where he continued to live until 1888. He, like his father, was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1862 when he embarked in the mercantile business which he followed for a number of years, since which time he has lived a retired life enjoying the hospitality and affectionate regards of his children. He was married to Miss Elizabeth HAYES in 1831. The fruit of this happy union was eight children who grew up like olive branches around their table. His wife departed this earthly life in 1855. After a number of years he was again married to Mrs. Mary ADAMS who became the mother of two children, one of whom died at the age of two years. The other, Frank [MEREDITH], resides at Hiawatha, Kan., and is a conductor Pacific R.R.

            Father Meredith was converted and became a member of the Baptist church early in 1840 at Oswego. He organized the Yellow Creek Baptist church on the first Sunday in July of the same year, and thus in his christian life gave us an example of obedience to the command “go work in the vineyard.” Work for the Master has ever characterized his life. He is still a member of the church which he organized. He was a pioneer in the true sense of the term to Indiana, going there when the state was but little more than a wilderness. He with his Uncle Job [MEREDITH] and brother Thomas [MEREDITH], were the first white settlers in Newcastle township. As early as 1836 they took their government land, President VanBuren being the man who signed their papers the following year. Uncle Benj. BLUE was the nearest white man and he lived three miles east. It was ten miles to the nearest white families on the west, north or south. Before their energies, determination and hard work the forest rapidly disappeared and in its place was soon seen the fields of waving grain.

            Father has outlived the allotted time to man. He has passed the meridian of four score years. The God in whom he trusts has deemed it expedient to spare the noble life to be an example to his children, his grandchildren and his great-grandchildren and to them all he says he can recommend the God of his choice. He has thirty-six grandchildren and twenty-four great-grandchildren.

            His last days are beautifully tranquil, only waiting the summons from on high. “Well done thou good and faithful servant enter thou into the joys of thy Lord.”

            Let brothers and sisters, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, one and all, profit by and be better for the life which Grandpa Meredith has lived.


            An infant son, the first born to Mr. & Mrs. Bud WARE, of Wayne township, was buried Saturday. Mrs. Ware was formerly Miss Lulu BEALL, of Rochester.

 

            Mrs. Mary TRUSLOW died at the family residence in the northwest part of the city Friday morning after a long illness. The funeral was held Sunday.

 

            Wm. M. PLOUGH was born Sep 6, 1842, in Montgomery county, Ohio, and died at Rochester, Fulton county, Ind., July 22, 1891, aged 48 years 9 months and 16 days. At the age of nine he moved with his parents to Whitley county, Ind. He was married to Mary Emeline DAVIS, April 2, 1864, who died April 26, 1884. Seven children were the fruits of this union, two preceded them to the other world. He was married the second time to Eleanor JAMISON, Nov 11, 1885. This union was blessed with two children.

            He died in full hope of salvation. He was converted to God in 1885, under the labors of L. S. FISHER, and united with the Evangelical church of which he remained a member until death. In the civil war he served two months in Co “K” 88th Ind. Later on, Feb 14, 1865, he again enlisted in Co “I” 152 Regiment, Ind. Vol. Infantry, and was discharged Sep 30, 1865. He moved to Fulton county in 1868 and to Rochester in 1872, where he resided until his death.

            Funeral services were held in the Evangelical church, conducted by the writer.

                                                                        --  S. H. BAUMGARTNER.

 

Wednesday, August 5, 1891

 

            Dollie BRICKEL, infant daughter of Chas. W. and Mary M. BRICKEL, died Monday, Aug 3. The funeral was held this morning at 10 o’clock at the house, conducted by Revs. D. MARTZ and S. H. BAUMGARTNER.

 

            The remains of Joe McNINNY were brought from Hammond to Marshland one day last week and buried, that being the dead man’s former home. McNinny was shot and killed in a fight, but no particulars are at hand.

 

            Benajah STANTON, the venerable father of Mr. E. C. STANTON and Mrs. A. C. SHEPHERD, of this city, died at his home in LaPorte Wednesday. Biographically speaking the LaPorte Argus says of the deceased: He was one of the oldest residents of the county, having settled here in 1830, and was a man universally honored and respected. He originally located among the Indians some three miles north of the city, where he lived and farmed the greater part of his life. A few years ago he removed to LaPorte where he has since lived, and soon after he was chosen president of the Savings bank, a position he held the remainder of his life.

 

            Mrs. Sarah PACKER, consort of the late Fred B. PACKER, died at her home in Tiosa Monday after an illness of several years. Deceased was 72 years old, a faithful member of the Lutheran church for many years, was the mother of seven children, and a sister to Mrs. Louisa DUMBAULD, of this city.

            The funeral service was conducted by Rev. A. E. GIFT yesterday afternoon at the Lutheran church near Tiosa and a very large concourse of people followed the remains of aunt Sarah to the grave.

 


Wednesday, August 12, 1891

 

            [No entries]

 

Wednesday, August 19, 1891

 

            The infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Harry BERNETHA died Saturday morning of cholera infantum and the funeral was held Sunday evening.

 

            The only daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Sherman CHANDLER died of cholera infantum yesterday morning, aged fourteen months. The funeral will be held this afternoon at Brooksville.

 

            The death of William BURKETT, of Richland township, is a pathetically sad one. Little more than a year ago Mrs. BURKETT died leaving six small children and now they are left orphans.

 

            Speaking of the tragic death of Jesse GRAFF, who took his own life at Peru last week, the Peru Sentinel says: The will was found in a secret box in his trunk by Major BITTERS, of Rochester. The will bequeaths all his property to Mrs. Maria BITTERS, the Major’s wife, and is valued at probably $2,000. The house and lot is situated at northeast corner of 3rd and Hood streets. There was also $30.50 in money together with the watch which was supposed to be lost.

 

            Uncle Billy MOON, as half the people in Fulton county had learned to know him, is no more on earth. Malarial fever, congestion and old age made a hasty termination of his career last week and he passed peacefully away at his home near Bruce Lake, Thursday, aged 79 years and five months.

            Deceased came to Indiana from New York state, forty-four years ago and took up his residence in the western part of the county where he has ever since resided, excepting a few years residence in Rochester. There were no broad fields and palatial residences in this county when “Billy” Moon and his young wife settled here, but such as he brought brawn and muscle, before which forests fell like waving grain before a reaper. He knew of no way of making money except to earn it and no use for it except the betterment of mankind. He was a plain, candid, honest citizen who loved his neighbors and his God for the happiness it afforded him rather than through fear or favor and died in the blessed hope of a future reward for the good deeds of a well spent Christian life.

            An aged widow, and seven children survive, three daughters having preceded Father Moon to the spirit world. The surviving children are Sidney R., George and Henry MOON, and Mrs. Hiram LUNSFORD and Mrs. Ben BRUCE, of this county; Dewitt MOON, of Nebraska; and William MOON, of Minnesota.

            The funeral services were conducted at the family residence Sunday, Rev. BRETZ, of Angola, officiating and the remains were laid to rest in the Moon cemetery.

 

            Mrs. CRABB received a telegram announcing the death of her sister in Ohio last week. (Pleasant Valley)

 

 


Wednesday, August 26, 1891

 

            An infant son of Mr. & Mrs. “Deb” BROWN died of cholera infantum last week.

 

            Uncle Billy WHORTON, a pioneer of Newcastle township, died Sunday of heart disease. The funeral was held Monday at Yellow Creek church.

 

            The bright, two year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Hurbert QUICK died Friday of scarlet fever and was buried Saturday in the Shelton cemetery, near the family residence.

 

            Mrs. BARRET died at her home with her daughter, Mrs. Henry ZELLARS, four miles northeast of town, Tuesday morning, Aug 18, aged near 70 years.  --Kewanna Herald.

 

            Mrs. Elizabeth RANNELLS, wife of John W. RANNELLS, and mother of Dr. J. N. RANNELLS, died at the family residence on Madison street Sunday night, aged 66 years.

            Deceased was born in Ohio and on the 4th day of March, 1852, she was united in marriage with Mr. John W. Rannells, who, with four children -- James, Jacob N., Alfred and Mary [RANNELLS] -- survive. In October, 1854, Mr. & Mrs. Rannells moved to Rochester, and have been constant residents of this place. Mrs. Rannells was an unostentatious neighbor, a devoted wife and mother, and, with all, a noble christian lady.

            The funeral will be conducted at the residence at two o’clock this afternoon.

 

            I hereby acknowledge the receipt of one thousand dollars from the Union Central Life Insurance Company, by W. E. BAILEY, as payment in full of Policy No. 5, 837,700 on the life of Anna May BITTERS, my beloved wife, who died June 30, 1891. In the fondness of a mother’s heart this policy was taken out for the benefit of our little son Orton W., deceased, for his education in the event of his mother’s death. After his death the policy was assigned to me. I can cheerfully recommend this company for its fair and equitable dealings and prompt settlement of claim when due.   --F. P. BITTERS, Assignee.

 

Wednesday, September 2, 1891

 

            Mrs. Rose WILSON, mother of County Recorder Fredeus C. WILSON, died at her home in southeast Rochester, Wednesday, after a protracted illness of many months. Deceased was the consort of the late Ben. C. WILSON, and a noble christian lady.

            The funeral was held Thursday at the Christian church, when a large concourse of people paid the last tribute of respect to one whose whole life was devoted to the happiness of her family and friends.

            Mary DAY, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth STEFFEY, was born May 20, 1857, in Fulton county, Ind., and was married to John DAY, Nov 25, 1873. One son, Harvey L., was born to them April 18, 1875, and died Jan 20, 1883. Mollie DAY departed this life August 31, 1891, aged 34 years 3 months and 11 days. She was a noble woman, a good neighbor, a true friend and always ready with a willing, christian disposition to help in time of need and beloved by all who knew her. Services at Green Oak church, conducted by E. J. DELP.

 

 


 

Wednesday, September 9, 1891

 

            [no entries]

 

Wednesday, September 16, 1891

 

            Mr. C. C. WOLF, was called to Inwood Saturday to attend the funeral of a sister.

 

            Solomon WALTERS and son Frank returned from Sandusky, Ohio, Friday, where they attended the funeral of Solomon’s brother, John WALTERS.

 

            Section bosses on the C. & E. Ry., are required to make a run over their division each Sunday morning to see that the track is all right. Last Sunday foreman Carl detailed Al RUSH and David ROOKSTOOL, of his squad, to examine the track between Rochester and Germany. They started out about six o’clock and run to the western terminus of the Rochester section which is near Germany station and then undertook to turn their hand car end about for the return trip. Just as they had the car turned across the track the west bound morning express came thundering through the fog and was upon them before they could pull the hand car from the track. Rush saw the danger and started to run but Rookstool doubtless realized the danger to the lives aboard the train and continued his efforts to get the car off the track until the engine struck it. The momentum of the train hurled the hand car off the track in such a violent manner as to strike Rookstool in the face and forehead, killing him instantly. The train stopped and, taking the dead body aboard, conveyed it back to the depot in this city. The remains were then taken to Zimmerman’s undertaking house and thence to the deceased’s residence where a wife and three small children awaited its coming in such a flood of grief as aroused the whole community to a full realization of the terrible affair.

            Deceased had been engaged as a section hand for several years and was regarded as one of the most efficient and trustworthy men in the service of the road. He was a member of Canton Barnett, I.O.O.F.; a faithful minute man in the Rochester Fire Department and a devout worshiper at Trinity Evangelical church.

            The funeral was held yesterday in Trinity church with Canton Barnett and the I.O.O.F. in charge, Presiding Elder MARTZ and Rev. BAUMGARTNER conducting the service. The remains were buried in Germany Grave Yard.

 

Wednesday, September 23, 1891

 

            The six year old son of Dr. and Mrs. George M. CALVIN, of Kewanna, died last week.

 

 

            Joseph STEPHEY, son of David STEPHEY, who lives on the east bank of Manitou, died in Davenport, state of Washington, on Aug 29 from dropsy of the heart. Joe will be remembered by many readers of the Sentinel  as an industrious, popular young man who left here five years ago on account of failing health. Of his sickness and death a Davenport paper says: Friday morning last on failing to appear at his accustomed place at the workshop, a messenger was sent to his lodging house to learn the cause, and found him too sick to get up. He was at once brought to Dr. Whitney’s hospital for treatment, but it soon became evident that his condition was serious, and word was immediately sent to a brother who lives in the


Sherman country, who arrived only a few hours before his death. The remains were laid to rest in Davenport cemetery.

 

            Mr. A. A. SHOEMAKER furnishes the Sentinel  with the particulars of a horrible misfortune which befel Mr. & Mrs. John WALTERS, of near Gilead, Saturday. A little five year old son of Mr. Walters was playing in the barn when it was discovered on fire, doubtless kindled by matches in the boy’s hand, and burned to the ground, consuming the precious life of the boy in the flames. Two crops of wheat, a great quantity of hay and oats and all the farm machinery were burned. Mr. Walters was away at the time of the fire and was so crazed with despair when he returned and learned the awful fate of his little boy that it required much effort to prevent his self destruction by jumping into the flames. The charred bones of the little boy were buried Monday.

 

            Mrs. Susan J. BARKDOLL, wife of Samuel BARKDOLL, died at the family residence Monday morning after a lingering illness of more than a year with consumption.

            Deceased was a native of Fulton county, and was aged 43 years and 7 months. She was long an active member of the M.E. church and one of the few women in Rochester engaged in mercantile pursuits -- being the owner of the largest millinery and fancy goods store in the city. The husband and six children survive.

            The funeral service will be held at Grace church this afternoon, Rev. Dr. TUCKER officiating.

 

Wednesday, September 30, 1891

 

            Dr. and Mrs. AGER, of Peru, Mr. & Mrs. Chas. GLASS, of Huntington, and Mr. & Mrs. Geo. ALLMAN, of Argos, attended the funeral of Curg RANNELLS Sunday.

 

            Miss Jennie ROBBINS was called from Oxford College, Saturday morning on account of the death of her brother-in-law, L. E. RANNELLS. She returned again yesterday.

 

            Mrs. John P. HENDERSON, who, with her husband, moved to Rochester from Pleasant Hill last year, died last Tuesday of chronic ailment and was buried at Mt. Zion.

 

            There was universal surprise mingled with sorrow in Rochester Friday morning when the sad news was heralded about the city by hushed voices that Lycurgus E. RANNELLS, the widely known bookstore man, had suddenly died from a second stroke of paralysis. Eight weeks before he was stricken down with paralysis of the entire left side and remained practically helpless until his death which occurred about half past four Friday morning, with scarcely a moments warning.

 

            Curg RANNELLS, as everybody knew him, was a native of Rochester, and a son of the late R. N. RANNELLS. He was born thirty-seven years ago and married Miss Dora ROBBINS, daughter of Dr. ROBBINS, who, with an interesting son and daughter, survive.

            Deceased was the founder of the famous Central Book store and accumulated considerable property, being worth about fifteen thousand dollars to which will be added six thousand dollars life insurance. He was a wideawake progressive man, popular in social circles, active but manly in the advocacy of his political principles and, withall, a true friend and champion of honor. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias, Knights of the


Maccabees, National Union and a retired member of the I.O.O.F.

            The funeral service was conducted at the family residence on Sunday at two o’clock by Rev. ROTH, of the Presbyterian church. The remains reposed in a rich, metallic casket while banks of elegant cut flowers reached up toward the ceiling and surrounded the sleeping husband and parent with that air of luxury and comfort which his lifework for the pleasure of his family had so richly earned.

            At the conclusion of the service Fredonia Lodge Knights of Pythias, assisted by Rochester Tent K.O.T.M., took charge and conducted the remains to Odd Fellows cemetery where a brief burial service was conducted and all that was mortal of Curg Rannells was lowered to its silent rest.

 

            Lafe FENSTERMAKER and family attended the funeral of John BECK’s child in Richland township Sunday.  (Pleasant Valley)

 

            The infant child of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. MONEYSMITH was buried last Wednesday.  (Blue Grass)

 

Wednesday, October 7, 1891

 

            Benjamin F. ROSS, brother of D. S. ROSS, the foundryman, died at his home in Quincy, Ill., last week.

 

            Miss Alice EDWARDS attended the funeral of the father of her brother-in-law, Lin E. DELVIN, at Huntington, last week.

 

            Rev J. MERLEY, of Denver, was in the city Monday in the interest of the Sarah CANFIELD estate of which he is executor.

 

            Harvey BALLENGER, of Indianapolis, was called to the old homestead in Henry township last week on account of the death of his aged mother.

 

            James CALHOUN, one of Richland township’s earliest settlers, died Wednesday and was buried Friday. Deceased had passed his three score and ten.

 

            Andrew MILLER, the North Manchester druggist, transacted business in court yesterday connected with the TRUSLOW estate, of which he has been appointed administrator.

 

            CLELAND, the sorghum manufacturer, of near Macy, died very suddenly last Saturday and was buried Monday.  (Green Oak)

 

Wednesday, October 14, 1891

 

            Mr. Lou WOHLGEMUTH, the widely known manager of the Feder & Silberberg clothing establishment, received the sad intelligence Monday, of the death of his father which occurred in Germany, the result of a broken limb and paralysis. Deceased was 73 years old.

 

            Jonas CLELAND, an old and highly respected citizen of the vicinity of Gilead, died suddenly on Saturday Oct 3 of heart disease. Speaking of him as a man who he has known for


forty years the editor of the Peru Republican  says: He was the friend of all, the enemy of no one, a man with a kind heart and a good brain, genial as sunshine and approachable by the smallest child.

 

Wednesday, October 21, 1891

 

            Mrs. Bowman WEBB, formerly of Richland township, died at Long Cliff Asylum, Logansport, Friday and the remains were brought here and buried in Germany graveyard Sunday.

 

            A most piteous misfortune befell Mr. & Mrs. James WILHELM, of Urbana, Ind., while visiting the latter’s parents, Mr. & Mrs. John YOUNT, southeast of the city. Mrs. Wilhelm was visiting here when her two year old son, Carl [WILHELM], took sick and died. Two weeks later Ferdie [WILHELM], a seven weeks old babe, followed its little brother to the tomb and on Saturday the parents returned to their sad and desolate home.

 

Wednesday, October 28, 1891

 

            Mrs. Clem LEONARD was called to Ohio, Saturday, by the sad news of the death of a sister.

 

Wednesday, November 4, 1891

 

            Grandma WILKINSON, mother of Mrs. John CARRUTHERS, of Liberty township, died at the family residence near Macy on the 22d ultimo, aged 77 years.

 

            Henry KAMERER and mother, of Logansport, Frank KAMERER, of Chicago, and Frank and John SCHALL, of Monterey, attended John KAMERER’s funeral Sunday.

 

            Mrs. HILL, of near Fletchers Lake will be buried today.  (Grass Creek)

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Elihu FLETCHER buried an infant babe last Tuesday.  (Richland Center)

 

            Dr. Wm. T. CLELAND, one of our well known citizens, was buried here Sunday, having died Oct 30, aged 70 years 2 months and 11 days. He was a citizen of this town nearly 40 years and very prominent in his profession nearly all that time until age incapacitated him for professional duty. He made many friends and few enemies and was followed to his rest, the Shaffer cemetery, by a host of friends and but few relatives.  (Kewanna)

 

Wednesday, November 11, 1891

 

            The five year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John JOHNSON, died yesterday of diphtheria at the family residence, east of the L. E. & W. station.

 

            It is reported that the administrator of George CRIST’s estate will bring an action for heavy damages against the C. & E. Ry. company on the grounds that Crist lost his life through the carelessness of the company in furnishing a defective hand car, by the breaking of


which Crist lost his life.

 

            Walter GARWOOD, the oldest child of Mr. & Mrs. A. GARWOOD, was called from this life, and the little earthly form was laid away Friday afternoon, in the Odd Fellows cemetery.  (Akron)

 

            Miss Pearl Elizabeth MORGAN, daughter of Charles MORGAN, departed this life at her home, four miles south of Argos, Nov 2, aged 18 years. She leaves a father, one sister and three brothers to mourn the loss of a kind and loving daughter and sister. She was a devoted christian having joined the Baptist church two years ago and since then has lived an honest worker for the Lord. The funeral services were conducted at the Jordon church, Wednesday, by Rev. J. D. ALLERTON.  (Richland Center)

 

Wednesday, November 18, 1891

 

            That dread disease, diphtheria, took a second child from Mr. & Mrs. John JOHNSON, Saturday, and their third and only remaining child is seriously ill with the same disease.

 

            Our Green Oak correspondent writes the details of a most deplorable accident as follows: On last Saturday two of Ben COLLINS’ boys were hauling fodder and pumpkins when the youngest one, Sollie [COLLINS], wrapped the lines around the front standard and was throwing pumpkins off of the wagon as the horses were trotting. The wheel dropped into a rut, throwing him off and the hind wheel struck him behind the left ear passing over his head, and when they picked him up blood was running from his ears, nose and mouth. Dr. BOGGS, of Macy, was called when he pronounced the injuries fatal and the little sufferer died on Sunday afternoon. The funeral service was conducted Monday by Mr. Asbury HOFFMAN, a neighbor, assisted by the Macy Christian church choir and the remains were laid to rest in the Shelton cemetery. Deceased was twelve years old.

 

            The oldest child of Mr. Geo. MILLER died Saturday morning. Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon.  (Kewanna)

 

Wednesday, November 25, 1891

 

            Grandmother LANDIS, mother of Rev. D. MARTS, died at the residence of the latter Monday, at an advanced age, after a protracted illness. The funeral service will be held at the residence tomorrow afternoon and the remains will be taken to Elkhart Friday for burial.

 

 

            While working in BARKDOLL’s planing mills Thursday, Jud BENNETT seriously sprained his side which produced inflammation of the lungs, and the young man died at his home in the north part of town yesterday morning. He was an active Odd Fellow and that Order will conduct the funeral.

 

            The sad news comes from Porter county that Mart FEECE, a young man of the Grant neighborhood, Henry township, met with a distressing accident while cutting logs for Will SAYGER’s Porter county saw mill. In cutting a tree down Mart saw that it was about to


split from the stump and started to run from the danger when the tree burst and fell upon him, crushing his leg off at the knee. Amputation of the limb was made the next day and Mart withstood the trying ordeal like the nervy fellow that he is. Later: Another amputation of the limb was necessary yesterday and in the operation Feece died. He will be buried in Pulaski county.

 

            Another of Fulton county’s pioneers crossed over to the silent majority Sunday when the spirit of Mother ELAM took its flight. Deceased, with her husband, John ELAM, who died many years ago, moved to this county nearly fifty years ago and resided here continuously ever since. She was the mother of five children, two of whom, Mrs. James GAINER, of this city, and Auditor John ELAM, of Porter county, survive. The funeral took place from the residence of Mr. & Mrs. Gainer yesterday afternoon and the remains were laid to rest in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            The administrator of the estate of George CRIST, who was recently killed by his hand car breaking down near Monterey, has sued the C. & E. Ry company for $10,000 damages. The suit is filed at Winamac.

 

            Death claimed the third and last child of Mr. & Mrs. John JOHNSON Wednesday and they consigned the last of their group of loved ones just seven days after the burial of the first. Such ordeals tax the endurance of the strongest to the uttermost and the despair of that cruelly bereft father and mother is almost crushing in its terrible oppressiveness.

 

Wednesday, December 2, 1891

 

            Mrs. Wm. APT died at her home in Peru last week. She was a sister to Harvey ROSE, of Liberty township.

 

Wednesday, December 9, 1891

 

            An infant son of Mr. & Mrs. HENDRICKS died of croup Friday morning and was buried in the evening.

 

            Miss Jennie FRAZIER, of Pulaski county, died last Tuesday and was buried here Wednesday.  (Grass Creek)

 

Wednesday, December 16, 1891

 

            Mrs. Wm. TROUTMAN, a pioneer resident of Union township, died of apoplexy in Topeka, Kan., last week.

            Dennis SULLIVAN died at the home of his son-in-law, John SUTHERLIN, in Newcastle township, Sunday, aged 93 years.

 

            The little four year old daughter of Recorder and Mrs. TIPTON whose illness was mentioned last week, died suddenly Tuesday and was buried Wednesday at Odd Fellows cemetery.

 


 

            A telegram received Sunday by J. M. DAVIS from San Francisco, Cal., announced the death of Emanuel KRATZER, who for a number of years was a resident of Rochester.

 

            Hank EWING, a former saloon keeper, of Macy, has been awarded $4,000 at Hammond for the killing of his wife by a railroad train.

 

            The obituary of Elder William COOL, of Wee-Saw, appears in the last issue of the Miami county Sentinel.. Elder Cool had been an active Baptist minister for 35 years was 77 years old at the time of his death and was widely known in this county as a model citizen and devout man of God.

 

            The Akron News says . . . that John DICKERHOFF died from inflammation of the bowels after undergoing a surgical operation to remove an obstruction in the intestines.

 

            The funeral of John DICKERHOFF took place Saturday at the old cemetery. He had been sick for some time and was convalescent, but took a relapse. One day last week doctors performed a surgical operation, but it was of no avail and nothing but the icy hand of death could relieve the sufferer. Many friends and relatives followed the lifeless form to the grave to pay due respect to the deceased.  (Akron)

 

Wednesday, December 23, 1891

 

            William CARTER was born in Buckingham county, Virginia, March 8, 1820; came to Fulton county, Indiana in 1842 and died December 16, 1891, aged 71 years 6 months and 8 days.

            On the 17th of October, 1844, he was united in marriage with Miss Nancy SHRYOCK a sister to Col. K. G. SHRYOCK, to whom were born eight children, three of whom preceded the parent to the Spirit World.

            Three of the living children, Mrs. Ancil TOWNSEND, Mrs. Thomas BLACKETOR and Willis CARTER reside in this county, while Wesley CARTER and Mrs. Ollie CLARK reside at Savannah, Mo.

            Mrs. Carter died June 13, 1866, and on March 26, 1868, Mr. Carter was joined in wedlock with Miss Priscilla JONES, who has been a faithful companion during all the protracted illness of her husband.

            So reads the obituary of a man who has been a conspicuous figure in Fulton county for nearly fifty years. Thirty years ago “Bill” CARTER was the most robust, daring and original fellow in Fulton county, but his tests of strength and endurance in early life brought him to an invalid’s chair, and for ten years he suffered most excruciating agonies from a rheumatic affliction, and for fourteen months before his death he was confined to the bed upon which he died.

 

            On Wednesday morning he grew perceptibly worse, fell asleep, and his life went out peacefully and gently. The funeral sercice, conducted by Revs. DELP and TUCKER was held at the residence on south Main street Saturday afternoon, and the remains were laid to rest in a vault, as ordered by the deceased, in Odd Fellows cemetery.

            The writer knew “Uncle Billy” for many years as a model neighbor and interesting friend, and it is a consolation to his hosts of admirers to know that he died as he lived, a friend


 

to the needy and distressed; a loyal citizen and relative; and a sincere, courageous and devoted man.

 

            Mrs. Samuel BLACK (colored) was buried Wednesday. She leaves a family of four boys and husband to mourn her death.

 

            Richard LOWMAN received a telegram yesterday announcing the death of his brother-in-law, Andrew COX, a prominent farmer of Cass county.

 

            The report recently circulated that Jesse EMMONS, formerly of Newcastle township, was murdered in Kansas, was a mistake. It was his son Jesse who was killed, and he was shot by a bartender in a saloon. He was 22 years old.

 

            A child of Mr. & Mrs. Chas. BERRY near Mt. Olive, died and was buried Sunday.  (Antioch)

 

Wednesday, December 30, 1891

 

            A telegram from Spencer, Ind., yesterday morning, announced the death of Jessie HOWARD, daughter of Hon. W. I. HOWARD, formerly a resident of this city. Deceased was at one time one of the most prominent and vivacious girls in Rochester, but for nearly five years she suffered with dropsy and the intelligence of her death was a relief to her hosts of friends whose sympathy was ever with her in her terrible afflication. She was 23 years and 1 month old.

            The funeral will be held at Spencer today.

 

            Grandmother ESSICK, mother of the Hon. M. L. ESSICK, of this city, died at the home of her daughter in Gilead, Monday night, at a ripe old age. Deceased was a woman of extraordinary usefulness and prominence in charitable works in her active years and the children -- nearly all of whom are frosted with years -- are bereaved in the consciousness of the loss of Mother, and yet rejoice that she was permitted to remain with them long beyond the allotted time of mortal man.

            The funeral will be held at Gilead today at 12 o’clock.

 

            Andrew WILSON, one of the oldest and best known farmers in Cass county, was found dead, seated in an armchair. He settled on the homestead where he died fifty-one years ago.

 

            Mrs. Jesse BRIGHT, died at her home in Newcastle township Monday and will be buried at Hoover’s cemetery today. Mrs. Bright was about 30 years old and leaves a husband and two small boys to mourn their loss.

 

            John KESSLER died at his home in Newcastle township Saturday. Mr. Kessler had passed his three score and ten years, and was one of the pioneers of Fulton county. His life was an upright one and his death is lamented by all who knew him. The burial took place at Sycamore cemetery Monday.

 

 

The Rochester Sentinel

1892

 

Wednesday, January 6, 1892

 

            James KEELY was born in Butler county, O., Aug 12, 1812. He moved to Shelby county, Indiana, in 1822 and located on Blue river where he continued to reside until 1844 when he moved to Indianapolis. He was married to Mary McKEE in 1835 and they are the parents of thirteen children, three of whom died in infancy, and one, Mrs. Catharine COLLINS, after reaching the age of fifty years. Those now living are Samuel KEELY, Nancy McANALLY, Mary J. AULT, Sarah AULT, Phoebe GILCHRIST, Caroline STUBBS, --lia A. CARR, Francis BRUGH and Anthony KEELY.

            Mr. Keely moved with his family to Fulton county in August, 1853, and located on a farm west of town. He was a brick mason by trade and in order that he might better follow his profession he came to Rochester in 18-9 [1869 or 1889?], where he continued to reside until the angel of death called him to a higher life Wednesday evening, Dec. 30, 1891. The aged wife who was his companion for more than a half century still survives.

            Father Keely united with the Methodist church in 1832 and remained a consistent member until death. He was a loyal friend, an honest citizen, a genial companion and a devoted christian always active in the work of his Master, and he gladly heard the summons: “Well done, thou good and faithful servant; thou has been faithful over a few things, -- will make thee ruler over many things: enter thou into the joys of the Lord.”

            The remains were laid at rest in the Citizens cemetery at noon Sunday.

 

            William BRYANT was born in Shelbyville, Kentucky, October 18, 1815 and died at his home in Henry township, December 21, 1891. He was united in marriage with Miss Catharine ----ran March 14, 1842, and to this union were born fourteen children, --en of who survive the father.

            Mr. Bryant emigrated to Wayne county, Indiana, in 1828 and to Fulton county in 1833, where he has since resided. Being a man of sterling character, rugged honesty, and possessed of considerable ability he was twice elected by the people of this county to serve as county commissioner and he always honored every trust. Although he had reached a ripe old age his death is lamented by all who knew him.

 

            Mrs. Phillip LEFFEL died at the family home at Wooly Town Saturday, and the funeral was held at Denver Monday. Deceased was 72 years old and from early life she devoted all her talents and energy to the glorification of the cause of christianity. She leaves a husband and a large family of sons and daughters, Mrs. ---- COVER and Mrs. Frank ENDSLEY, former residents of Liberty township, being members of the family.

 

            Our Akron correspondent writes:  Mrs. John FRIEND died Friday at 4 o’clock p.m. She had been sick but --ew day. She leaves a husband and two small children, one of whom, at


present, has a severe attack of lung fever, and the other just recovering from the loss of one eye by an accident. To add to the affliction of the family the son of Mr. Friend, by his first wife, died only twelve hours after his stepmother. The young man had just returned from the south. Mrs. Friend was buried here Sunday and the young man was buried some distance from town.

 

            Mr. C. C. CORNELIUS received a telegram Monday announcing the death of his wife’s brother, Mr. ABBOT, which occurred at Lafayette, Sunday, Jan 3. Mr. Abbot was almost 82 years of age and leaves a large family.

 

            Last Tuesday afternoon Winfield SARVER, son of Wesley SARVER, a prominent farmer who lives two miles west of Perrysburg, went to the woods to chop wood and took his shot gun with him. In placing it upon a log before going to work the gun was discharged, both loads penetrating young Sarver’s body. The loads entered the right side, one just below and the other above the diaphragm. The accident occurred about one o’clock and he died seven hours after.

            Deceased was one of the brightest young men in his community, was aged nineteen years, and a brother to P. F. SARVER, formerly of this city. The funeral was held at Perrysburg, Thursday.

 

            An infant child of Mr. & Mrs. William FREAR, of Richland township, died Monday and was buried yesterday at Richland Center.

 

            A little daughter of Mr. & Mrs. L. W. HATFIELD, of Bloomingsburg, five years old, died at the home of its grandmother, Mrs. Harriet ROSS, of diphtheria on last Thursday. Mrs. Hatfield and the child were visiting here when it took sick, and its death is a very sad bereavement.

 

Wednesday, January 13, 1892

 

            A child of James BLACKETOR died Sunday and was buried Monday afternoon.

 

            Mr. J. N. McQUERN, of Canton, Ohio, is in the city, called here by the death of his niece.

 

            The Churubusco Truth  publishes the notice of the death of little Willie DOWNEY, the two year old son and only child of Mr. & Mrs. Omar DOWNEY.

 

            Death invaded the happy home of Rev. and Mrs. J. P. ROTH yesterday and called their second daughter, Bessie [ROTH], from them. The disease was diphtheretic croup and the funeral will be held at two o’clock this afternoon.

 

            Miss Ida BITTERS, daughter of John D. BITTERS, died at Decatur, Ill., last Wednesday, of pneumonia. Miss Bitters was thirty years of age, and the remains were brought here for burial.

 

            Marie [ZELLERS], the two and a half year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Will ZELLERS died Monday morning of diphtheretic croup, and the funeral will take place this


afternoon at the family residence at 2 o’clock.

 

            A. E. NEWCOMB is having a severe time with diphtheria, his wife and two children are down with it, and they lost their little baby, Sanna [NEWCOMB], last Sunday evening and laid its body away in the Shelton cemetery Monday.  (Green Oak)

 

Wednesday, January 20, 1892

 

            Cynthia C. SHORE was born in Highland county, Ohio, Aug 26, 1819, died Jan 15, 1892, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. G. H. BEEBER, in Richland township. When two years of age she moved with her parents to Shelby county, Indiana, and a few years later moved with them to Fulton county where she has since resided. The deceased was united in marriage with Clarkson SHORE, June 24, 1840, and to them were born three children, Rufus A., Ezra B. and Anna [SHORE], the latter being the only surviving member of the family. The deceased united with the Christian church more than half a century ago, since which time she has lived a faithful member. She was a true wife, a loving mother and a kind and devoted friend, and many will miss her kind words of cheer and welcome. The funeral services were held at the Christian church in Tiosa, Sunday at 10 o’clock a.m., after which the remains were interred in the I.O.O.F. cemetery in this city.

 

            Among Fulton county’s intelligent and prosperous German citizens none stood higher in the estimation of their respective communities than Frederick STINGLEY, of near Fulton. Born in Germany seventy-one and a half years ago, he emigrated to this country in 1850 and settled in Ohio where he married his surviving wife, whose maiden name was MEDARY, a year later.

            In 1866 Mr. & Mrs. STINGLEY came to Fulton county and became residents of Liberty township where they accumulated a pleasant home and raised three children, two of whom, county surveyor P. J. STINGLEY and Mrs. Neal GREEN, of Twelve Mile, are living, Fred STINGLEY, Jr., having died only two years ago.

            The subject of this notice was prostrated with la grippe two weeks ago and slowly sank to death. The funeral was held at the U.B. church in Fulton, Thursday, in the presence of a large concourse of people where Rev. A. E. GIFT, of the German Reformed church, of which Mr. Stingley had long been a member, preached an eloquent discourse which was supplemented with a richly merited tribute to the dead.

 

            Bertha E. FRANTZ, eldest daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John FRANTZ, died at the family residence nine miles southwest of town Tuesday, aged 19 years and 5 months. Her disease was consumption from which she suffered for several months. She was a devout christian and a lady in the broadest sense of the term -- the highest meed of praise to be achieved in this life.

            The funeral service was conducted at Antioch church Wednesday and interment was made in the cemetery near by.

 

            John STARK was born in Germany 80 years ago, and died at the home of John FRANTZ, southwest of Rochester, Jan 17. He emigrated to this country in 1872. He united with the Lutheran church when but 14 years of age and remained a faithful member until death. The funeral services were conducted at Salem church by Elder BELL.


 

            Miss Flora ZOLMAN died at the home of her father, Amos ZOLMAN, in Newcastle township, last Friday, of consumption, aged 83 years. The body was followed to its resting place in the Sycamore cemetery on Sunday by a large number of mourning friends.

 

            Mrs. George SCHINDLER died of pneumonia at her home in Aubbeenaubbee township last Saturday and was buried at the Citizens grave yard in Rochester on Monday. She was 33 years old and leaves a husband and one daughter.

 

            John BARR closed an honorable and upright life of 58 years at his home in Newcastle township, on January 12, after a short sickness. The funeral services were held at the Christian church in Bloomingsburg by Rev. O. MEREDITH.

 

            John HERRELL, a farmer who lived one mile west of Reed’s church, in Liberty township, died Saturday evening, aged 52 years. His disease was lung fever.

 

            Mrs. Sarah ABBOTT, wife of Chris. ABBOTT, died at the family residence, two miles north of Kewanna, Thursday after a protracted illness of consumption. The funeral was held at the Kewanna Baptist church Friday.

 

            Chauncey WALKER died at his home near Bruce Lake Wednesday aged 65 years. A wife and two children survive. Funeral at Bruce Lake Thursday and interment made in the cemetery near by.

 

            Newton WHETSTONE, aged twenty-eight, near Mentone, committed suicide by shooting himself.

 

Wednesday, January 27, 1892

 

            Effie GRUELLE, aged 19 years, died at the home of her parents, three miles southeast of Fulton, Sunday, of brain fever and was buried at We-saw yesterday. Deceased was a noble girl, beloved by all who knew her and her untimely death is universally deplored.

 

            At the home of her son-in-law, near Fulton, Grandmother FRITZ departed this life, Sunday, at a ripe old age. Interment was made in the Fulton cemetery yesterday.

 

            Mrs. Thomas FELTS, who with her husband was engaged in the restaurant business in Rochester two years ago, died at the family residence in Cass county and the remains were buried at Antioch church Sunday. Deceased was 47 years old and leaves a husband and five children.

 

            The funeral of Abraham GRINDLE took place at the Christian church Sunday. He was 62 years 8 months and 16 days old and had lived in this section of the country for many years. He was well respected by all who knew him, as was told by the great number of people who followed his body to its last repost.  (Akron)

 

            Grandpa HOOVER passed from this life Tuesday of last week. He has been lingering very low for several weeks and at various times he was thought dead. He was one of the pioneers of this section and has done much in making this country what it is. Having realized


that his life’s work was done he was found waiting for death and met it with a smile.  (Akron)

 

            Mrs. CRIPLIVER, of Leiters Ford, was buried last Friday at South Germany.  (Richland Center)

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Dan RANNELLS buried a small child Wednesday of last week.  (Richland Center)

 

            An immense crowd attended the funeral of Mrs. FELTS which was held at the church last Sunday.  (Mud Creek)

 

Wednesday, February 3, 1892

 

            On Tuesday of last week the bodies of Mr. & Mrs. Harvey THORNBERG, over in Marshall county, were laid to rest in the same grave, the funeral services being attended by a thousand people. The co-incidents in their two lives were somewhat remarkable. They were both born in the same year, and were but fifty-seven years of age. Mrs. Thornberg died on Saturday and the husband being in poor health at the time requested that her body be kept until his was ready for burial, and from that time he steadfastly refused medicines or favor, saying that he had made peace with God and as the wife whom he so dearly loved had been taken he wanted also to go. He died early Sunday morning, and on Tuesday two dapple gray teams drawing two hearses carried the bodies to their last resting place in the same vault.

 

            The five year old son of Mr. & Mrs. WHITESIDE died Sunday evening of diphtheria and was buried Monday afternoon at Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Dan AGNEW was called to Winamac Friday by a telegram announcing the serious illness of his brother, John M. who died before Dan arrived. The funeral was held Sunday.

 

            Jefferson RHODES, father of Dr. Rhodes of this city, an old and respected citizen of Newcastle township, passed the gates to the beyond at five o’clock this morning. He was aged about eighty years, and a singular incident was that his death occurred on the day of his golden wedding anniversary -- fifty years.  --Daily Republican.

 

            Philip BECKER (BAKER) was born in Germany, May 20, 1827, and died of consumption at his home near Green Oak, in this county, January 31, 1892. In 1854 he was married to the wife who survives him, and to them were born twelve children, four of whom have died. He was baptized in his infancy and after being instructed in the doctrines of the Lutheran church, was confirmed at the age of fourteen years, in which faith he lived and died. For twenty-eight years he was a resident of Fulton county where a large number of friends have learned to love and respect him. The funeral occurred yesterday, conducted by Rev. A. E. GIFT.

 

            On Thursday, February 18, Isaac E. HENDRICKSON, administrator of the estate of John HERROLD will sell at public auction at the late residence of the deceased, one and one-half miles southeast of Marshtown, three mules, three milk cows, eight hogs, farming implements, corn, hay and household goods.


 

            Mrs. Elizabeth NETCHER died at her home in Wabash January 26 of Lagrippe. Mrs. Netcher was the mother of Henry NETCHER, of this county, was born in Berks county, Penn., and was sixty-three years old at the time of her death. The funeral services were held at the Pleasant Valley church conducted by Rev. A. E. GIFT on last Thursday and the remains were interred in the Citizens cemetery at Rochester.

 

            The infant of Mr. & Mrs. LAWSON was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery Friday.

(Kewanna)

 

            Kyran WALSH was called to Cincinnati last week to attend the funeral of a near relative.  (Grass Creek)

 

            The death angel has again entered the home of Mr. & Mrs. James BLACKETOR, and taken away their little daughter, Bee [BLACKETOR], 8 years of age. She was a sweet child and loved by all who knew her. This is the second time death has visited their home in the past three weeks. They have the sympathy of the entire community.

 

Wednesday, February 10, 1892

 

            A letter from Mr. A. J. HARTZOG, of Colorado City, Colo., brings the sad intelligence that Frank P. HARTZOG, formerly of this county, was crushed to death between freight cars while engaged in switching at Prairie View, Kansas, on the 26th of January. He was forty-two years old at the time of his death and his remains were buried at Colorado Springs.

 

            Andrew ONSTOTT was born in Washington county, Pa., Aug 14, 1807; married Agnes YOUNG in 1827; came to the wilderness of Indiana in 1836; and died in Fulton county Feb 5, 1892, aged 84 years and 5 months. To this couple were born eleven children only four of whom survive.

            Upon coming to Indiana father and mother Onstott settled in Wabash county among the Indians where he was one of the organizers of Perry township of that county when, at the first township election each voter was elected to an office. In 1840 they united with the Baptist church at Niconza where they were active members until they came to Fulton county in 1891 when they changed their membership to the Ebenezer church. In 1874 mother Onstott died and two years later the subject of this sketch married Nancy REID and moved near Rochester, where he united with the Baptist church of that city, in which he died a faithful member.

            Father Onstott’s life was one of much interest. He was the son of a Revolutionary soldier who fought all through the war which gave our blessed country its liberty. He knew by the roughest kind of experience what a frontier existence meant. He was one of the celebrated Fortyniners who stampeded to California but failed to “strike it rich.” He helped to develop this section of Indiana from a wilderness to the garden spot of the west.

            But he is gone, after a long life, to his reward -- the reward which awaits the righteous. The funeral service was conducted Sunday at Ebenezer church by Elder A. J. CROY, after which his remains were lowered to a grave in Odd Fellows cemetery beside that of his first wife.    -- A Grandson.

 


 

            John F. OLDFATHER, died at his home near Bunker Hill, Feb 1. Aged about sixty-five years. He was a resident of Miami county for thirty years and a brother to E. OLDFATHER of this place.

 

            Mrs. Hattie STEIS, of Monterey, died Friday evening and was buried Sunday morning at Leiters Ford.  (Delong)

 

            Mrs. CUSIC, wife of Mathias CUSIC, who died Sunday morning from the effects of la grippe and lung fever, was buried Tuesday forenoon at Monterey. Her nieces of North Grove came to the funeral and, while here, were called home to the funeral of their brother.  (Delong)

 

            A small child of Wm. LIDECKER’s died Friday and was taken to Bremen for burial Saturday.  (Akron)

 

Wednesday, February 17, 1892

 

            Grandmother Nancy JONES was born in Pennsylvania Sep 22, 1799 and died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jacob OVERMYER, near Bruce Lake, Feb 9, 1892, aged 93 years and 4 months.

            Grandmother Jones’ maiden name was STAILEY and she was a member of a family of four boys and three girls. All of whom preceded her to the spirit world. She was married in 1818 to John J. JONES and became the mother of seven children, three of whom survive. This family moved to Fulton county about the year 1849 and the husband and father died three years later. In 1866, mother Jones moved to Kansas and lived there twenty-two years when she returned to spend her last days with her children. Both father and mother Jones were earnest devoted members of the M.E. church, the latter being an active member for seventy-two years.

            The funeral service was conducted by Rev. SCHELL at Kewanna, the text, Paul’s second letter to Timothy - 4th chapter 6th, 7th and 8th verses - having been selected by the deceased and the remains were laid to rest in Shafer’s cemetery.

 

            There was universal sorrow in the city Saturday evening when the word went out that, with the close of the week, Mrs. Ezra RANNELLS had closed her eyes in death. For many weeks she had been a sufferer from a complication of disorders -- la grippe, nervous prostration and congestion -- and her death had been expected for several days.

            Deceased, Ida SEEBOHM, was born in Ohio, Dec 22, 1863 and married her surviving husband at Union City, Ind., in 1887. Soon after their marriage they came to Rochester where they have since resided. Mrs. Rannells was an active member of Isabelle Temple, Pythian sisters, and a popular lady in her large circle of friends. The funeral took place from the residence yesterday afternoon at two o’clock, conducted by Rev. ROTH, and Isabelle Temple P.S.

 

            For more than two weeks Mr. & Mrs. J. N. ORR have resorted to every attention that parental love could suggest to battle the dreadful conflict that diphtheria was raging against the lives of their lovely twin daughters, now nearly three years old, but they were unequal to the task and little Zetta [ORR] died Sunday morning and her parents were obliged to follow the remains to the grave at five o’clock the same day. The other afflicted one is thought to be out of danger but the treacherous nature of diphtheria makes her case critical yet and the sympathy of a very large circle of friends are with the grief burdened parents who find


their affliction doubly hard to bear because of the necessity of being isolated from many friends, who are prevented from lending assistance because of the rigid rules against the possibility of spreading the contagion.

 

            Mrs. John BLUHM died at the family residence, three miles southeast of Fulton, Thursday morning, after a brief illness from congestion of the lungs. The funeral of this good lady was held at Fulton, Friday, under very sad circumstances, the husband being at the point of death at the time, but who the Sentinel learns is now slightly improved although dangerously sick yet.

 

            Fred GRAEBER was called to South Bend last week to bring the remains of his aged mother here for burial. She was eighty-one years of age at her death, and was buried in Odd Fellows cemetery Friday.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Squire BARR mourn the loss of their two year old child, which was laid to rest Wednesday in the Nicholson [Nichols] cemetery.

 

            The little eight months old daughter of George WEIR died Saturday, and was buried at Richland Center Sunday.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Will LOOMIS received a telegram Monday announcing the death of Mrs. L’s father, at New Carlisle. The funeral will take place Friday.

 

Wednesday, February 24, 1892

 

            Miss Daisy PENNY, the adopted daughter of Wm. LAWSON, died Saturday evening and was buried Monday.

 

            Surveyor MOYER, of Pulaski county, died last week from blood poisoning superinduced by a pin scratch on the back of his hand, two years ago.

 

            Lawyer J. R. RICKEL went to Auburn last week to attend the funeral of his granddaughter, the youngest child of Mr. & Mrs. W. D. RICKEL.

 

            Supt. BLACK took the two children of the late Thos. KEEL to the Orphans’ Home at LaPorte. He reports that institution to be in a very prosperous condition. Since its organization a year ago they have taken 103 orphans and found good homes for 60 of them.

 

            Grethel Marion [WEIR], the little daughter of George and Sarah WEIR, died the 13th of February and buried on Sunday at Center, aged eight months. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. ROSS.  (Richland Center)

 

            Miss Emma DIAL departed this life Feb 8, 1892 at Huntington, Ind., aged 13 years 4 months and 14 days.

            Emma was a resident of Rochester a few years ago, and her many friends and school mates of this city will read the above announcement of her death with regret. Emma was a bright and good child, and made friends wherever she was. She was a true, loving christian and died happy, was a member of the M.E. church and of the Epworth League, of Huntington.


Wednesday, March 2, 1892

 

            After a long and painful illness Peter DUMBAULD, one of the old and honorable citizens of the county, died at his home in Tiosa Thursday the 25th inst.

            Deceased was born in Pennsylvania seventy-two years ago, was confirmed in the faith of the Lutheran church at an early age and lived a consistent christian throughout his life. He was married to Catherine STOCKBERGER in 1843 and after her death, ten years later, he married her sister Susanna [STOCKBERGER] who died in 1888, after which he married his surviving wife.

            The funeral service was conducted Saturday by Rev. A. E. GIFT, of this city, when a very large concourse of neighbors and friends paid the last tribute of respect to a good man.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Joseph FISHER, of Lima, Ohio, came last week to attend the funeral of Mr. P. C. DUMBAULD, at Tiosa.

 

            Henry FAGIN was called to Ohio last week to attend the funeral of his grandmother, with whom he lived from infancy to manhood.

 

            Dr. Baily BRACKETT died at his home in Claypool Monday, and was buried yesterday. Mrs. V. GOULD, Mrs. G. W. HOLMAN and Lyman BRACKETT attended the funeral.

 

            The family of J. N. ORR is improving slowly. The surviving twin daughter is out of danger, Bertha [ORR] is gaining strength, and Mr. Orr himself is able to be up and about the home.

 

            Ralph [STAHL], the eight year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Levi STAHL died Monday evening, after a two day’s sickness of diphtheria. The little boy was laid to rest yesterday, and another home is made desolate by its horrible invasion by diphtheria.

 

            Mrs. Lina MURPHY, sister of marshal TAYLOR and Mrs. John W., died at her home in Kewanna Wednesday, aged 46 years. Deceased was born and raised in this county, married Joseph MURPHY in 1874, was a prominent and zealous member of the Baptist church and leaves a husband and two sons.

 

Wednesday, March 9, 1892

 

            Thomas BANISTER, step-son of Peter WEASNER, died Saturday, at LaGro, of consumption.

 

            Mrs. Emma SMITH, the photographer, attended her father’s funeral at Silver Lake last week.

 

            Rev. BAUMGARTNER was called to Bunker Hill Saturday to conduct the funeral services of Rev. H. FISHER.

 

            Mrs. CADER, formerly Callie GLAZE, daughter of Willis GLAZE, died Monday evening at her home at Peru, and the funeral will be held there today.


            Bloomingsburg had two funerals Sunday. The first was Grandmother RITTENHOUR, who died at the age of 72 years, and the other, Orsa COPLEN, a young man who had been of unsound mind and crippled all of his life.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Zack HOSIMYRE buried their baby last Thursday.  (Richland Center)

 

            Mr. & Mrs. EASTERDAY buried twin babies last Wednesday.  (Fulton)

 

Wednesday, March 16, 1892

 

            Frank ORR, of Plymouth, came down yesterday to attend the funeral of his niece, Bertha ORR.

 

            Treasurer and Mrs. Ben BRUCE attended the funeral of Grandma SMITH, wife of Johnathan SMITH, at Bruce Lake, Sunday. Deceased was 64 years old and one of the noble mothers of the western part of the county.

 

            Death again entered the home of Mr. & Mrs. J. N. ORR Monday and took from them their oldest daughter, Bertha [ORR], aged 9 years 8 months and 5 days. This is the second death in the family within the past month, both from diphtheria. Bertha was an unusually bright and lovable child for one of her years and the parents are almost crushed with grief. A private funeral was held at four o’clock yesterday evening and the remains were laid away beside those of little Zetta [ORR] in Odd Fellows cemetery. This death leaves but a single child in the family, the surviving twin daughter, three years old.

 

Wednesday, March 23, 1892

 

            Monterey. Special to the Sentinel:  Moses KALEY, an old gentleman living in the western part of Aubbeenaubbee township, was accidently killed Thursday by the falling of a large red oak tree which he was cutting for rail timber. No one being present at the time of the accident the manner in which Mr. Kaley came to his death is taken from the observations of those who came to take away the body which they found lying beneath the trunk of the tree. The tree had a large limb a few feet from where it was cut off and in falling on the limb caused it to spring and fly back, striking Mr. Kaley on the left arm, terribly lacertaing it, knocking him down and falling on his breast, in which position he was found by Mr. LONG at about 3 p.m. Mr. Kaley probably had been dead for three or four hours as his dinner which he had taken to the woods was still untouched. Mr. Kaley leaves a wife and five grown children to mourn his loss.

            Moses Kaley was born in West Beaver township, Snyder county, Penn., July 6, 1830, and died March 16, 1892, aged 61 years 8 months and 10 days.

            Deceased removed to Ohio Jan 6, 1863, was united in marriage with Sarah Ann RITTER, May 7, 1863, to whom were born seven children, two of which have preceded him to the spirit world.

            In 1874 he removed to Fulton county, Ind. He was a kind and indulgent husband and father. A respected and honored citizen and neighbor.

 

            E. A. NEWCOMB was born in Carysville, Champaign county, Ohio, Oct 3,  1837. Died March 8, 1892, aged 54 years five months and five days.


            He removed to Whitley county, Indiana, in 1859. Was united in marriage with Amanda WANTZ Feb 3, 1861, to whom were born five children one of whom, Mrs. Hattie BISHOP, of Ivonddave, Kan., survives.

            Mrs. Newcomb died Sep 20, 1867, leaving two daughters, Hattie and Viola [NEWCOMB].

            In 1869, deceased was married to Catharine SHANCK, to whom were born four children, two of whom, Henry M. and Elmer M. [NEWCOMB] survive.

            He removed to Marshall county, Ind., March 5, 1869. United with the Jordon Baptist church, in 1870. Transferred his membership to the Ebenezer church, in 1884, where he was a member at the time of his death.

            He was initiated into the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in Argos Lodge, No. 263, Sep 6, 1871. Withdrew by card and became a charter member of Green Oak Lodge, No. 600 in June, 1883, in which he retained his membership until death.

            He was a kind and indulgent husband and father, a devoted christian, an exemplary Odd Fellow and an honored citizen and neighbor.

            Funeral services were conducted at the Ebenezer Baptist church in the presence of a large and sympathizing congregation, after which the remains were interred in the Odd Fellows cemetery, at Rochester, by the members of Green Oak Lodge, assisted by members of the Rochester Lodge.   --Rev. J. A. CROY.

 

            Mrs. C. P. HINMAN, formerly a resident of this city, died recently at her home at Redfield, Dakota.

 

Wednesday, March 30, 1892

 

            Miss Celia JONES, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Isaac JONES, died at the home of her parents in Newcastle township, March 23, aged about 19 years. For more than a year she had battled with consumption -- sometimes hopeful of recovery, and at other times realizing that it was impossible, and when the end came it found her fully prepared for the change. Her life was brief, but it was full of christian beauty. The funeral services were conducted Friday from the Bethlehem Baptist church by Rev. Lee FISHER, of Mexico, with interment at Odd Fellows cemetery at Rochester.

 

            Peter HENDERSON, a widely known citizen and a good man died at his home near Oliver’s schoolhouse, Wednesday, after a long illness from dropsy and Brights disease, aged 49 years and 9 months. Deceased leaves a wife and three children and a circle of friends circumscribed only by the limits of his acquaintanceship. The funeral was held at Mr. Olive church, of which deceased was a member, Thursday, conducted by Rev. ROSS and interment was made in the Oliver cemetery.

 

            An infant son of Mr. & Mrs. George DUDGEON died March 17 after a few days sickness. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. ROSS, with burial at Rochester.  (RICHLAND CENTER)

 

Wednesday, April 6, 1892

 

            Harvey W. RICHARDSON was born Jan 30, 1866, departed this life at the home of his parents five miles south of Rochester, April 3, 1892, aged 26 years 2 months and 4 days.


            The funeral services were conducted at the family residence Monday by the writer, after which the remains were interred in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Rochester.  --Rev. J. H. CROY.

 

            Wednesday morning a messenger came in search of coroner SHIELDS requesting his presence at the home of James McELRATH, two and a half miles north of the city where Mrs. McELRATH had been found hanging dead in an apple tree. The coroner went out and ascertained the facts that the decedent, who was about forty years old has been of a melancholly temperament for years and recently showed unmistakable signs of mental aberation. When Mr. McElrath, who recently moved here from Marshall county, awoke Wednesday morning he missed his wife and seeing the window was raised, he at once surmised serious developments. Hastening out he made a search of Mrs. McElrath’s customary haunts and then ran over to Allen FENSTERMAKER’s, who lives near, to ask assistance in finding his wife. Mr. Fenstermaker readily complied with the request, but before he could start McElrath had returned and found the missing wife, hanging by the neck to an apple tree in the orchard, cold in death. She had stolen out at some time during the night, secured a stout rope, climbed an apple tree, fastened the rope to a limb and about her neck and leaped to death. She died of strangulation, her feet lacking only a few inches of touching the ground.

            Of the deceased’s life the Daily Republican  says: Until about a year or two years ago she was what is commonly demonstrated a joyful woman -- always happy, courteous and kind to every acquaintance. But suddenly her smiles and mirthfulness departed, and she became sad and morose, positively refusing to converse with her most intimate friends. Except, probably her husband, no one had a thought that she would attempt to take her own life, and the deed is therefore all the more appalling to the neighbors.

 

            Isaac, son of E. M. and Sarah A. SLIFER, died March 25, at the home of his brother, J. T. SLIFER, at Fountaintown, Shelby county, Indiana, aged 22 years 5 months and 14 days. The funeral services were conducted by Revs. HAIMBAUGH and PATTERSON. He was a member of the U.B. church and had lived a devoted christian life, was a dutiful son and an affectionate brother. During his sickness his sufferings were intense, but his christian faith gave him strength to cheerfully bear it all. But a few hours before his death he sang the gospel hymns he had loved so well, and the end was one of peace and joy.

 

            George CHALK, a well known resident of Liberty township, died last week.

 

            George CHALK, who was sick for eight weeks. was relieved of all pain and trouble Saturday morning by death. Funeral services at the Bethlehem M.E. church, Sunday.  (Twelve Mile)

 

Wednesday, April 13, 1892

 

            (no entries)

 

Wednesday, April 20, 1892

 

            Hiram PUTMAN was thirty years of age and lived with his father, Jacob PUTMAN, on a farm in Henry township. He had long been subjected to epileptic fits, but was entrusted to do all kinds of farm work. Last Saturday morning he drove the team hitched to a wagon


into a field for the purpose of doing some hauling. Soon after he had gone the folks at the house noticed the horses wandering about without a driver, and upon investigation found the young man lying in the wagon dead. Dr. C. F. HARTER was called and found that he had fallen in a fit striking his throat on the edge of the wagon bed and fracturing the pharynx which caused his death.

 

            There was general surprise among the very extensive circle of acquaintances of Thomas WILSON, of Union township, Monday morning, when the report was circulated that he was dead from a sudden attack of heart disease. Mr. Wilson was nearly eighty years old and had been one of Union township’s most prominent citizens for more than a half century, having located near Kewanna in 1841. He was a noble and influential man, and Uncle Tommy Wilson has been pointed out to many sons as a proper example for emulation by those who would attain to honorable and useful citizenship. The wife, who is a sister to the elder WALLACEs, of this city, survives, with the sons, William, John and James [WILSON], and an only daughter Mrs. Joseph CANNON. Deceased was a brother of Mrs. Vernon GOULD, of this city, and many of the Rochester relatives attended the funeral which was held at Kewanna yesterday.

 

            Mrs. Minnie DONNELLY died of consumption at the home of her mother in Rochester last Friday. Rev. J. H. WINANS conducted the funeral services Sunday. She leaves one child.

 

            Nathan ZOLMAN, of Newcastle township, died at his home Monday, aged 79 years. He was one of the pioneers of that township and highly respected by all who knew him. The funeral will occur at the house today, after which the remains will be interred at Hoover station.

 

Wednesday, April 27, 1892

 

            Union township lost another old and prominent citizen very suddenly Friday morning in the death of Solomon JACKSON, of heart disease. Deceased was about sixty-nine years old and the head of a most estimable family.

            The funeral service was held Saturday, the Kewanna Odd Fellows conducting the same according to the rite of that order, of which Mr. Jackson was an active member.

 

            Nathan ZOLMAN was born Feb 16, 1814, in Maryland and died April 18, 1892. He came to Fulton county in 1858 and here remained until death.

            In July 1839 he was united in marriage with Jane CRAFT, who preceded him to the spirit world in 1885. Ten children were given them four of whom survive.

            Deceased was a member of the M.E. church forty years. He was a kind and loving father, an honest, upright citizen highly esteemed by all who knew him.

            The funeral services were conducted at the home by Rev. ROSS, of Rochester, after which the remains were laid to rest in the city of the dead.

 

            Geo. WAECHTER, a pioneer of Henry township, died suddenly yesterday at his farm in Henry township, aged about 68 years. Deceased had resided in Akron for a year but frequently wished that he might die on the farm. Yesterday morning Mrs. WAECHTER hitched up and drove her invalid husband out to the farm home where he died in fifteen


minutes after alighting from the buggy.

 

            Maggie [FISHER], the 14 year old daughter of Silas FISHER, who resides northeast of Bloomingsburg, died Sunday morning of measles. She was a very lovable girl, just entering womanhood, and gave every promise of a bright and useful life. The funeral occurred Tuesday, conducted by Elder McNEELY with interment in Richter cemetery.

 

            William Wesley MOORE died at his home six miles west of the city, Monday morning, aged about fifty years. Deceased was a veteran of the late war, leaves a wife and nine children and his funeral will be held today at Leiters Ford.

 

            Frankie [VINSON], infant son of Joseph and Elizabeth VINSON, born January 28, 1892, and died April 22. “Of such is the kingdom of Heaven.”

 

            An infant son of Manassa LEEDY was buried Monday.

 

            The many friends of Jacob MILLIZER, will be pained to hear that he was brought home dead last Tuesday from Battle Creek, Mich.  (Delong)

 

Wednesday, May 4, 1892

 

            Mrs. Byrd CALVERT, wife of Bert CALVERT, died at their home in Miami county last Thursday, after a week’s sickness, of puerperal fever, aged twenty years. Mrs. Calvert was born and grew to womanhood in Fulton county and left the home of her mother, Mrs. M. J. BLACKETOR, as a bride only a little more than a year ago. She was of a modest and retiring disposition and her early death is mourned by all who knew her. In addition to a sorrowing husband she leaves an infant son who can never realize a mother’s love. The funeral was held Friday afternoon at Ebenezer where the church was filled to overflowing with the friends and neighbors of her youth. The services were conducted by Rev. H. A. TUCKER, of Rochester, and the body was laid to rest in the Shelton cemetery.

 

            Miss Laura HATCH, daughter of Jerry HATCH, died at her home in Hammond, Ind., last Sunday, of consumption, aged seventeen years. She formerly resided at Macy, where the body was brought for interment on Monday afternoon.

 

            Gracie, the three year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Edward GASKILL, died Monday afternoon at the family residence on the Wallace farm, of obstruction of the bowels. Funeral at 10:30 today.

 

            Barney KALMBACH, a popular German citizen of Newcastle township, died Monday, aged about 60 years. Deceased leaves a large family.

 

            Henry BURKETT, one of the pioneers of Richland township, died Saturday and was buried at Burr Oak Monday. Deceased was aged 86 years.

 

 

 


 

Wednesday, May 11, 1892

 

            On last Thursday evening, May 5, 1892, Miss Maria DUNLAP fell asleep in death after several months of illness, at the age of 56 years 5 months and 5 days.

            She was born near Partersville, Butler county, Penn., in 1835, and came to Rochester, Ind., with her parents in the spring of 1852. Since her father’s death she lived with her sister, Mrs. Clemenza SPERRY, southwest of Rochester, where she died and where the funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. P. ROTH on Saturday, at 10 a.m., and her remains were laid away in the Odd Fellows cemetery. From a quiet and childlike life she has risen to a world where she may have “life more abundantly.”

 

            Isaac POWNALL, as agent for the heirs, will sell at the late residence of William POWNALL, two and one-half miles west of Fulton, on Saturday, May 14th, a lot of personal property. Sale to begin at 10 o’clock.

 

            Mrs. Nancy HAIMBAUGH, wife of John HAIMBAUGH, Jr., of Newcastle township, died Monday, aged 61 years and 10 months. Deceased was a faithful member of the Baptist church and her funeral was held at the Yellow Creek church yesterday, the service being conducted by Rev. Lee FISHER. She leaves a family consisting of a husband and three boys and three girls all of whom are grown to man and womanhood.

 

            The funeral of Mrs. Barbra KOCHENDERFER, which was held at this place last Thursday was largely attended which shows the esteem in which she was held by her neighbors. She left a husband and two little boys to mourn their loss.  (Pleasant Valley)

 

Wednesday, May 18, 1892

 

            The following is the “Roll of Honor” in possession of McClung Post and the Sentinel  is requested to ask its readers to furnish such corrections of the list as they find erroneous to John M. DAVIS, at the earliest possible moment:

 

ROLL OF HONOR

 

I.O.O.F. CEMETERY

 

            Leonard DOWNS, 6th Ind Infty; Gideon TAYLOR, Peter WOLF, Mich Cav; Chas. BRACKETT, 9th Ills Cav; Chas COCHRAN, Co C 87th Ind Inf; John McKITRICK, Co I 5th Ind Cav; James GRAHAM, Co D 87th Inf; John P. MYERS, 14th Ind Light Art; George W. TRUSLOW, Co F 87th Ind Inf; Christian NEWHOUSE, 4th Ind Cav; F. DONELSON; J. H. MACKEY, Co D 29th Ind Inf; Henry CARTWRIGHT, Co I 5th Ind Cav; David MOW, Co F 87th Ind; Andrew J. HOLMES, Mexican War; Stephen PYLE, War of 1812; Wilson CHERRY, 29th Ind Inf; Parmer COLLINS, Co K 46th Ind Inf; John ROUCH; Robert WILEY, War of 1812; R. N. RANNELLS, 87th Ind Inf; Joseph BEEBER, Co F 87th Ind; Benj PATTON, Co F 87th Ind; A. N. PARKER, Co G 26th Ind; William WEIRRICK, 3d Ohio; Nathan BIBLER, Co  3 87th Ind; Henry HOOVER, Co M Ind Cav; Jonathan CLAY, Co F 87th Ind; A. W. CALHOUN; J. R. LaVAUGH; Philip ROWDEN; G. K. OWENS, Co B 40th Ind; John W. THOMPSON; Chester CHAMBERLAIN, 46th Ind; H. O. WILSON, 4th Cal Cav; E. B. CHINN, Co F 87th Ind; Melyne MILLER, Co E 130th Ind; Jacob


STEVENS; A. L. GOODRICH, Co F 87th Ind Inf; John BROCK, Co D 87th Ind; Wilson BOOTH; Eli R. HERMAN, 46th Ind; W. M. PLOUGH; A. K. PLANK, Co F 87th Ind Inf.

 

CITIZENS CEMETERY

 

            Jacob BARRET, Co A 155 Ind Inf; John CRIPE, Co F 87th Ind Inf; H. C. ANDERSON; Hudson STILES, Pa Cav; Alex CHAMBERLAIN; J. W. BOCKOVER; Ira M. SWEET, 9th Ills Cav.

 

            Joseph BORDEN, of Fulton county, who came down to attend the funeral of his old friend, Jonathan JOHNSON, and pay his brother Oliver [BORDON ?/JOHNSON ?], south of the city, a visit, returned to his home today.  --Peru Sentinel.

 

            May LONG, aged 17 years, died at the residence of her uncle, Wm. ROBBINS, near Grant, last Thursday, of consumption. Rev. Lee FISHER conducted the funeral service and a very large concourse of people followed the remains to their resting place in Mt. Hope cemetery.

 

            Miss Chloea KILMER, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Gould KILMER, died at the family residence near Argos Monday, of measles, aged nineteen years. Deceased was well known in this city, where she always lived, a quiet ladylike girl. The funeral was held at Trinity church yesterday at one o’clock.

 

Wednesday, May 25, 1892

 

            Mr. Charles ANTHONY was born May 15, 1818, in Loraine, France. He died at his home in Rochester, May 18, 1892. His aged wife survives him. Mr. Anthony became a resident of this place in 1870, and has since made it his home. He was engaged in the restaurant business for a number of years, but for the past few years had worked at his trade of carriage and wagon maker. His daily walk was one of quiet, orderly unostentation, always performing his duties promptly and honestly. He was a member of Grace M.E. church, from which the funeral was conducted on Friday by Rev. H. A. TUCKER.

 

            An infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Wendall SHULER died Saturday evening and was buried Sunday.

 

            Levi PONTIOUS, an old and widely known citizen of Henry township, died at his home last week, aged 64 years.

 

Wednesday, June 1, 1892

 

            Jacob STOCKBERGER, one of the oldest citizens in the county, died at the family residence west of town Sunday and was buried yesterday.

 

            The wives of Ed. BLACK and John ERBAUGH, who live west of Perrysburg, both died last week. Both were young, and highly esteemed ladies and their taking off in the prime of their usefulness is universally mourned.


 

            The funeral services of Isaac COOK’s little 10 year old son was conducted at the Lake church last Thursday by Rev. GIFT, of Rochester.  (Bruce Lake)

 

Wednesday, June 8, 1892

 

            Barney A. EIDSON was born in Ohio in 1817 and died at his home in Tiosa last Wednesday, aged 65 years. In early life he came with his parents to Miami county where he lived until 1850 when he moved to Richland township where he has since resided. He was a remarkably active man in his younger years and took much interest in public affairs, filling the office of county commissioner three times and holding many positions of trust and honor within the gift of his party and the people. Mr. Eidson was twice married and had a family of nine children by his first wife, one of whom, Dr. J. W. EIDSON, has risen to considerable prominence in the state.

            Barney Eidson was a man of firm convictions, loyal to his friends, and an uncompromising advocate of the principles he believed to be right. He had a single fault, that of overzealousness in any cause he championed and his friends are legion all over Fulton county and among men of all classes and all beliefs. Friends who admired him for manifesting the courage of his convictions at all times. And the county loses a grand man in his death.

 

            John Jacob STOCKBERGER was born in Westmoreland, Penn., July 9, 1820 and died at his home one mile west of Rochester, May 29, 1892, aged 71 years and 10 months.

            Deceased, with his wife, located in Fulton county in 1851. Eight children were born to the union seven of whom survive -- John and Samuel STOCKBERGER, of this city, being members of the family.

            Father Stockberger was a faithful member of the Evangelical Lutheran church all of his life, and a kind neighbor and indulgent parent.

            Peace to his ashes.

 

            Rev. N. L. LORD was called to Ravenna, Ohio, last week to attend the funeral of a sister.

 

Wednesday, June 15, 1892

 

            Lee TUCKER, son of Albert TUCKER, of Mentone, was drowned in the river at Ann Arbor Friday while bathing. Deceased was a junior in the law department of Michigan University and a very popular and promising young man. The remains were brought home for burial.

 

Wednesday, June 22, 1892

 

            Grandma THOMPSON died at the home of her son, W. O. THOMPSON, near Fulton, Saturday aged 73 years and 6 months. Deceased was the consort of James THOMPSON and was the mother of eleven children -- seven girls and five boys -- four of whom preceded their mother in death.

            The funeral was held Sunday at Bigfoot the service being conducted by Rev. COX of the Christian church, of which denomination the deceased was a faithful and almost life-long member.


 

            Lavina EDGAR was born April 7, 1826, in Wayne county, Ohio. Came to Indiana when she was twelve years old. United with the First Presbyterian church of Logansport at the age of fifteen. Married David E. McCAUGHEY August 14, 1846, and removed to their farm in Wayne township, Fulton county, where she spent the remainder of her life, and died June 8, 1892, aged sixty-three years two months and one day.

            Mrs. McCAUGHEY was one of the charter members of the West Union Presbyterian church of whom but two are now of this world, one the now bereaved husband, the other a sister residing in Texas.

            She was the mother of ten children, nine of whom survive her with fourteen grandchildren, and among their happiest recollections are memories of the cheerful, happy heart of that mother whose life was a song of glad thanksgiving, whose death was a triumph, whose peace is lasting.

            Deceased had been in poor health for more than two years, and the four weeks previous to her death were spent in great suffering, but she was patient and enduring, often quoting scripture texts or selections from old time humns. Some hours before her death she asked her children to sing “My Faith Looks up to Thee,” and as they sang the familiar words her face beamed with that peace which passeth understanding.

            Funeral services were conducted the Rev. J. E. TODD at West Union church, June 10, and the remains were then conveyed to the Lake cemetery.

 

            Clark BOWMAN, son of Hugh BOWMAN, died at his home in Chicago Saturday, aged 51 years. Death was caused from inflammation of the bowels and not from the ravages of the recent storm as reported. The remains were brought to Rochester Sunday, and the funeral was held Monday.

 

Wednesday, June 29, 1892

 

            “Henry MORRISON committed suicide yesterday by taking paris green” was the message on a postal card received by Henry REDELSHEIMER, Monday, from a relative in New York City.

            This is but the logical termination of a mis-spent life. Eight years ago Henry Morrison was the highest salaried and most popular dry goods clerk in Rochester. He moved in the most fashionable society circles and was a general favorite. But he had one bad habit and it ruined him -- gambling. He played cards for money, lost, replenished his purse from his employer’s till, forged notes on his friends, squandered the Lodge funds of which he was custodian and “skipped the town” to avoid arrest and punishment for his crime.

            From Rochester he went to New York where he was soon brought up in prison on a charge of forgery or embezzlement and that is all that is known of his career since he left here except the tragic death by his own hand. He was a big hearted, companionable fellow and many Fulton county people will feel a pang of sorrow that a life of so much promise should end in such a flood of shame.

 

            One day last week, Mrs. Jos. KEIM, of near Roann, and a cousin of Israel KEIM, of Green Oak, was at home by herself when a swarm of bees came from the hive and alighted on a tree in the yard. Mrs. Keim decided to “hive” them but they were mad and, settling upon her, stung her so severely that she died within two hours, in great agony.

            She was about fifty years old and was a woman of much prominence in the community where she lived.


            At the funeral of Mrs. Aaron MILLER, at Log Bethel church in Henry township, Sunday a week, the large crowd present was greatly mortified, according to the Akron News, by a scriptural argument, over the grave, which was engaged in by the minister in charge of the ceremonies, and a local preacher. It is said the argument was loud, angry and virulent.

 

            Obed ALLEN, aged 92, is very near death’s door at his home in this city and before this reaches the reader he may have passed out of this well spent life. He has been failing rapidly for some weeks, and his daughters, Mrs. Wm. MILLER, Mrs. George GOSS and Mrs. Fred RICHTER, and his only son, S. B. ALLEN, are with him.

 

Wednesday, July 6, 1892

 

            In corroboration of the report of Henry MORRISON’s suicide, published in last week’s Sentinel, a clipping from a New York paper received by friends of the deceased in this city says:

            Henry Morrison, of Hempstead was found by the roadside suffering untold agony which was only a forerunner of death. Morrison was, until recently, employed by a nurseryman at Floral Park. It was said that he was dismissed for dishonesty, and since he has been out of work he has been very depressed. When he returned home on Wednesday evening his wife took him to task for his trouble with his employer. He answered that the differences in his accounts had all been settled except a discrepancy of $18. After further words Mrs. Morrison handed her husband a $10 bill and told him to leave, as she did not care to see him any more. Morrison refused to take the bill, saying 50 cents was all he needed and at 10 o’clock left the house.

                He went to a drug store and bought, with the money his wife had given him, a quantity of paris green and a bottle of sarsaparilla. He left the drug store and wandered around for a while, and then took the poison washing it down with a drink from the sarsaparilla bottle, near Washington square, where he was found. He had suffered beyond all measure, and his clothes showed how he had rolled over and over in the dust. Although a physician worked with the man for an hour after he was discovered, it was of no avail. Mrs. Morrison is prostrated over her husband’s death.

 

            Father Obed ALLEN peacefully closed his long life of 92 years at his home Friday afternoon surrounded by all of the members of his family. He was born in Virginia, June 7, 1800 and fourteen years later came to Ohio where he lived until 1828 and then moved to Missouri remaining there five years and then returned to Ohio. In 1837 he moved to Fulton county and settled in Liberty township where he resided until the California gold field inducement took him to the Pacific slope where he stayed three years, and then returned to this county. His first wife died in 1857 and in 1860 he married Mrs. Mary J. MILLER, who with one daughter and three children of the first marriage, survive. He was a faithful member of the Baptist church, a true citizen, an inoffensive, cheerful neighbor and a father in the noblest sense of the term.

            Rev. WINANS conducted the funeral service at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon and a large concourse of people followed the remains to the grave in Oliver’s cemetery.

 

 


 

            Mrs. Nancy HEINEL, mother of Mrs. Edward ALLSPACH, died at the home of the latter Sunday night, very suddenly, after years of periodical suffering from heart disease. The funeral was held yesterday morning after which the remains were taken to Hammond for burial.

 

            Miss Mary HOLCOMBE, daughter of the late Thomas HOLCOMBE, of Green Oak, died at her home in this city Tuesday morning, aged about 56 years. Deceased was unmarried and died from the effect of the surgeon’s knife in removing a tumor. The funeral will be held at Mud Lake chapel today.

 

            Mrs. Harry P. APT died at her home in Kewanna, Sunday afternoon, after a protracted illness of consumption. Deceased leaves a husband and three children and a very large circle of friends with whom she was very popular.

 

            Mrs. George D. ZACHMAN, died of consumption, at the home of Grandma KEELY Monday morning, aged 23 years. Of the life of the deceased the Daily Republican  says: “On the 4th of September, 1884, Mamie McANALLY was united in marriage with George D. ZACHMAN, son of Mr. & Mrs. J. G. ZACHMAN, of this place. Ill health came to husband and wife, and the vicissitudes of life added severe burdens to the pleasures of their marital union. For the past few years they were residents of Chicago, but Mrs. Zachman’s rapidly failing health induced her to return to Rochester, to the residence of her grandmother, Mrs. James KEELY, where she received the best attention of her mother, the relatives and personal friends.”

            The funeral will be held at Grace church this afternoon at 3 o’clock.

 

            Fred RICHTER and wife, of Niles, Mich., came down to Rochester to attend the funeral of Mrs. RICHTER’s father, Obed ALLEN.

 

            Rev. J. C. McLINN, the Methodist-Protestant minister of Walnut, died on Saturday of heart failure. He was in the ministry over forty years and was well known throughout the northern half of the state.

 

            Mr. Dan MILLER, of Bloomington, Ill., and Mrs. Maggie WEAVER, of Marion, were called to Rochester by the death of their stepfather, the venerable Obed ALLEN. Mr. Miller is well acquainted with Gen. Stevenson, the democratic nominee for Vice President, and unhesitatingly declares him a grand man in every particular.

 

            Daniel LOVEJOY, near Peru started Saturday to get a physician for his sick wife. His horse ran away and Lovejoy’s neck was broken.

 

Wednesday, July 13, 1892

 

            An eighteen months’ old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John WAGONER, who live near Sugar Grove, fell into a ten-gallon jar, which was partially filled with water, Friday, and was dead when found by its mother.

 

            James W. POWELL, aged eighteen years, son of Lemuel POWELL, near Metea, Cass county, left his home Sunday afternoon for a short walk. His body was found in the bottom of a pond on his father’s farm. His clothing, found upon the bank indicates that he


went swimming and was drowned.

 

            Della [TIPTON], the fifteen year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Isaac TIPTON, of Newcastle township, died of consumption and was buried Wednesday at Sycamore church, Rev. COOK officiating at the funeral service.

 

            Jacob ZWILANDER an old resident of Union township died at the home of his son-in-law, Aaron ROUCH, the 13th inst. aged 67 years. The funeral was held in Kewanna, conducted by Bennett Post G.A.R.

 

Wednesday, July 27, 1892

 

            Frank M. RANNELLS died at his home in this city Thursday evening aged sixty years. Deceased was afflicted with rheumatism for twelve years, the last five of which he has been helpless and a pitiable sufferer. He was a brainy, active citizen, a most companionable friend and had a very wide acquaintance in both Fulton and Cass counties.

            The deceased leaves a wife, daughter of the venerable Robert AITKEN, and three children, Ezra RANNELLS and Mrs. Kline SHORE, of this city, and Irv. RANNELLS, of Chili, to mourn his death.

            The funeral was conducted Saturday, by Rev. ROTH and interment made in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Friday evening as Father Lewis MARSHALL was sitting at the supper table at the home of his son, Robert [MARSHALL], the assessor of Richland township, he suddenly grew faint and expired from heart failure. Deceased was born in Germany 83 years ago but came to this country and to Fulton county about 1860. He was a faithful member of the German Lutheran church and an humble and beloved citizen. The funeral was held at Germany, the services being conducted by Rev. REECE, of Maxinkuckee.

 

            Joshua BARKER was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, April 18, 1818, and came to Indiana, August 15, 1891, and departed this life in Wayne township, July 15, 1892, aged 74 years 3 months and 27 days. He was the father of 8 children of whom 6 are living.

 

Wednesday, August 3, 1892

 

            Wm. SAYGER, a Liberty township sawmill man, died of typhoid fever Monday night, and will be buried today at Fulton. He leaves a wife and two children.

 

            Benjamin METZLER, son of Dr. and Mrs. Anna METZLER, died Saturday evening, aged twenty-two years. Deceased had been an invalid all his life and died of heart disease and dropsy. The funeral was conducted Monday by Rev. A. E. GIFT, when a large concourse of people paid the last tribute of respect to a good boy.

 

Wednesday, August 10, 1892

 

            Special to the Sentinel:   Mentone, Aug 8, 4 p.m. -- This town is in the throes of a most deplorable sensation -- a social scandal that has resulted in a murder. Sometime ago liveryman Jim COX, who is a married man, met John MILLER’s wife, of this town, at


Alexandria, where they registered at a hotel as man and wife. Their conduct arounsed suspicion and they were arrested and fined $35 each for adultry. This scandalous news reached Mrs. Miller’s brothers, the WASHAMS, who are farmers, living near here, and they made threats of dire vengeance against Cox. In turn Cox publicly stated that he had $50 to “put up” that he could whip any Washam that ever lived. Jim WASHAM accepted the challenge and came to town Sunday evening, accompanied by his brothers, John and Lewis [WASHAM]. Jim Cox denied making the challenge when Lew Washam called him a liar and Cox struck him. John and Bob COX, brothers of Jim, here came up and took a hand. John COX thumped Lew Washam and then went to the aid of his brother Jim Cox, striking Jim Washam with a pair of “knucks” and knocking him down. Here the deadly work began. Jim Washam jumped up, drew his revolver and commenced firing. Bob Cox also pulled his gun and seven or eight shots were exchanged, as the fist fight waged horribly.

                        Jim Cox was struck by two bullets, one in the muscle of the arm and the other in the fleshy part of the breast neither wound being necessarily dangerous. John Washam received one ball in the abdomen from Bob Cox’s gun and the doctors say he must die. Bob Cox had a ball lodged in his hip and thigh which makes him quite lame but he says he doesn’t care so much for that as for the damage to his Sunday breeches. When John Washam fell the firing ceased and he was carried into a room where he lay in a dying condition when his wife and mother arrived.

                        John Cox skipped and has not yet been apprehended. Bob Cox is held without bail. Jim Washam is under $1000 bond and the Prosecuting Attorney is working on other indictments. Bob and John Cox are single men while all the others implicated are married and the heads of families. Some of the men had the reputation of being a “little tough,” but none were thought to be vicious or capable of such outlawry.

            LATER:  Authentic reports from Mentone announce that John Washam died of his wounds Monday evening.

 

            Mrs. Chas. McCONN, of Wabash, came over last week to attend the funeral of her brother, Bennie METZLER.

 

            John BAKER, an old, respected and well known resident of Fulton county, father of John BAKER, foreman of the Logansport Manufacturing Company, died Saturday morning at the advanced age of 86 years. Deceased was a resident of Aubbeenaubbee township and the father of Paul BAKER.  --Logansport Journal.

 

            Wm. SAYGER was born May 7, 1858, and died Aug 2, 1892, aged 34 years and 3 months. He leaves a wife and three small children.  (FULTON)

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. A. B. TAYLOR was buried here Sunday, Rev. J. MERLEY officiating at the funeral service. (FULTON)

 

Wednesday, August 17, 1892

 

            John H. BARKDOLL, son of Samuel BARKDOLL, died suddenly of consumption at Colorado Springs, Colo., Friday, aged 20 years and 9 months. For more than a year his health had been seriously impaired and he had scarcely arrived at the great western haven of health when he grew worse and died. His father and sister, Elsie [BARKDOLL], and little brother were with him and his remains were laid to rest where he died.

           


John Barkdoll was one of the most exemplary and industrious young men of the city before the failure of his health. He was a graduate of the High School, a popular and honored member of Co. G, Manitou Blues, an active worker in the M.E. church, and withall an unpretentious, manly young fellow.

                        His death was a sad one and the circumstance of his dying so far from home made the grief of the two sisters and brother, at home, an object of universal sympathy.

 

                        The report which went the rounds of the papers last week that John WORSHAM was dead from wounds received in the Mentone battle was slightly erroneous. The Mentone Gazette says that he is still alive and thought to be improving. The report of his death doubtless originated from the decision of the attending surgeons that his wounds were fatal and that he was thought to be dying several times.

 

                        As the Sentinel  goes to press five of Rochester’s oldest and most honorable citizens are in critical physical conditions and time only can reveal their fate. Uncle Jimmy MARTIN, whom everybody knows, was brought home from Wheatfield, Monday, where he had been visiting his sons, stricken with paralysis, the entire right side of his body and left side of his face being limp and lifeless. He suffers little pain but his physician has slight hopes of his recovery. Uncle John McBRIDE, who lives three miles southwest of the city, was likewise afflicted Monday and is lying in a helpless condition. Dr. S. S. TERRY who has been a sufferer from cancer of the face is quite feeble and he may pass away at any time. Dr. WIRT, father-in-law of F. K. KENDRICK, is practically given up to die by the attending physician, and Uncle Joe REED is seriously ill with a disease which has been preying on his vitals for years.

 

                        Rev. DELP was called to Chili Wednesday to preach the funeral of Wm. E. WOOLLEY, who was once in business in this city. He died of apoplexy, aged 76 years.

 

Wednesday, August 24, 1892

 

                        Frederick A. MEIER was born in Germany 63 years and 5 months ago and died Thursday evening at his home near Bruce Lake, having moved to this county from Pulaski about five years ago. Deceased was a devout member of the Lutheran church and Rev. A. E. GIFT conducted the funeral service according to the rite of that church, Saturday morning at Bruce Lake, interment being made in the cemetery near by.

 

                        Joshua TIPTON was a native of Bellmont county, Ohio, where he was born nearly 78 years ago. He married Miss Elizabeth FULLER in 1841 and to them nine children were born -- five sons and four daughters, -- all but two daughters being alive at the time of his death which occurred Thursday evening, at the family residence in Newcastle township. Deceased had been a resident of Fulton county for 46 years, a faithful member of the Baptist church for 50 years and was a valuable citizen and accommodating neighbor.

                        The funeral took place at Sycamore Chapel Saturday conducted by Rev. O. A. COOK when a very large concourse of people assembled to pay the last tribute of respect.

 

                        James MARTIN is dead. The stroke of prarlysis, mentioned in last week’s Sentinel, was fatal and Uncle Jimmy, as everybody knew him, sank slowly to death, the end coming just after midnight, Monday morning.

           


                        Deceased was born in Union county, this state, Feb 11, 1871 and was therefore 75 years and 6 months old at the time of his death.

                        He was married three times and was the father of fourteen children nine of whom, with the last wife and mother of six living children, survive. He was one of the purest and kindest of Fulton county’s citizens, a fact which is attested by the friendships he cultivated and held throughout his residence of nearly sixty years in the county. He was an enthusiastic Baptist, a loyal citizen, a staunch democrat and a kind and faithful husband and father.

            The funeral service at the Baptist church was largely attended yesterday afternoon when Rev. DELP preached a touching tribute to the dead and then the remains were conveyed to Oliver cemetery, their last resting place.

 

Wednesday, August 31, 1892

 

            Sunday morning the pure, sweet life of Olive “Ollie” HILL, daughter of Dr. Wm. and Mrs. HILL, took its flight from earth, and she was a corpse at the age of 31 years and 8 months. In her infancy disease destroyed her sense of hearing and she was a mute. She was always a devout christian and throughout her final illness -- consumption -- she patiently endured her affliction with resignation to the will of her Savior.

            The funeral was held yesterday, conducted by Elder J. M. REES, of Kokomo.

 

            Anton WAGONER, an Aubbeenaubbee township farmer who lived near the northwest corner of the county, died very suddenly Thursday morning of heart disease. He was 52 years old and leaves a wife and seven children.

 

            Rev. McNEALEY went to Bourbon, Monday, to officiate at the funeral of Daniel WINDBIGLER, formerly of this township. (CHIPPEWANUCK)

 

Wednesday, September 7, 1892

 

            Frank LUNSFORD and George JONES, Sr., widely known residents of the county line neighborhood southeast of Fulton, are both dead, the former aged 54 and the latter 79 years.

 

            Ray [ELLIS], the 5 year old son of Mr. & Mrs. John ELLIS, of Delong, died on Thursday, Aug 30, after very short illness and was burined on Thursday, Sept 1, in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Leiters Ford. The funeral services were conducted at the house by Rev. J. P. ROTH, of Rochester.

 

            Elmer NEFF, son of Jacob NEFF, died yesterday morning at the home of his parents northwest of town of consumption. Mr. Neff was a noble young man in every respect, and when stricken with his fatal disease was preparing for the ministry. The funeral services will be conducted at ten o’clock today at the Neff church by Rev. ROGERS.

 

            After an illness of nearly one year, Mrs. John HART passed away last Saturday morning. Funeral services were conducted at the M.E. church by Rev. STEWART, after which the remains were laid to rest at Nichols cemetery. She leaves a husband and nine children to mourn her loss. (AKRON)

 

           


                        Jas. HAUSER returned to Akron last week after a three weeks visit in Pennsylvania, where he was called home on the death of his mother.  (AKRON)

 

 

Wednesday, September 14, 1892

 

            On Sunday, the 4th inst. another of the county’s pioneers passed to the Great Beyond in the death of John HUNTER, who departed this life at the home of his brother, west of the city, aged seventy-six years. The funeral was held Tuesday when a large concourse of people paid the last tribute of respect. He was the father of Mrs. Judge SLICK and Hon. N. G. HUNTER, of Wabash. Speaking of his life the Wabash Times, which is published by the latter, says when he first emigrated to Fulton county that portion of the state was a dense forest, inhabited only by Indians and wild beasts. He saw the stately oaks melt before the woodman’s axe and in their stead reared palatial dwellings; he witnessed the little settlement of a dozen huts merge into a thriving, busy city of 4,000 inhabitants; he was a component part of the power that transformed the marshes into blooming fields of grain. Mr. Hunter lived to see all this.

 

            Sunday afternoon Dr. A. WIRT, father of Mrs. F. K. KENDRICK and Miss May WIRT, died at the family residence on South Jefferson street, aged 73 years. Deceased was long a resident of the vicinity of Argos and came to Rochester ten years ago to make his home with his daughters. When 17 years old he united with the Christian church and was a faithful and active member of that church all of his life. He was widely known as a strictly honorable and conscientious citizen and he died ripe in years and the confidence of his fellow man.

            The funeral will take place at the residence of F. K. KENDRICK at 10:30 this forenoon.

 

            John WASHAM, the Mentone man seriously hurt in the recent shooting fray is dead. Too late however to make a strong case of murder or manslaughter.

 

            Mrs. Sarah MILLER, of Mr. Vernon, Ohio, John A. TIPTON, of Knoxville, Iowa, and Thos. TIPTON, of Ebling, Kansas, are all in Newcastle township at the bedside of Grandma TIPTON.

 

Wednesday, September 21, 1892

 

            Hettie [BRUCE], the bright nine year old daughter of County Treasurer and Mrs. Benjamin BRUCE, died Thursday morning after a terrible illness from malignant diphtheria. The best medical skill and constant care of a devoted father and mother could not stay the disease and death was a welcome relief for the pitiful sufferer. The funeral was private, the remains being interred at the family churchyard at Bruce Lake.

 

            Chas. WIESE attended the funeral of an aunt at Winamac last Thursday.

 

            The infant daughter of Dr. and Mrs. RICHARDS, of Blue Grass, died Wednesday and the funeral was conducted Thursday by Rev. MERLEY.


 

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. N. R. STONER was buried last Sunday.  (AKRON)

 

            Mr. J. H. PYLE attended the funeral of his father-in-law, Mr. NEWHOUSE, at Greencastle, last week.  (AKRON)

            The baby of Mr. & Mrs. John SHUTTERLY, of Tiosa, died Sept 15. (PALESTINE)

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Wash. HORN lost their little two year old boy Sept 14 of cholera infantum. (PALESTINE)

 

Wednesday, September 28, 1892

 

            Mrs. Dorcas HUDKINS, wife of ex-County Commissioner, John C. HUDKINS, died on the night of the 17th inst. with scarcely a warning of the approach of death. For several years she had suffered with heart disease but was as well as usual when she retired the evening of her death. About midnight she gently awoke her husband and informed him that she must die and before the other members of the family could reach her bedside she was dead.

            Deceased was the mother of twelve children, seven of whom are living, a faithful member of the Baptist church and a noble wife and saintly mother. Rev. BRAGG conducted the funeral service at the Kewanna Baptist church in the presence of a large and sorrowful congregation.

 

            Many Sentinel  readers will be grieved to learn that Mrs. Lewis ZINK, formerly of this county, died very recently at her home near Oswego, Kansas. She leaves a husband and three children to mourn her loss.

 

            Elizabeth GOSS, wife of Geoge GOSS, Sr., died Thursday of lung trouble aged 66 years and ten months. Deceased was the mother of eight children and a pious devoted member of the U.B. church since she was sixteen years old. Her husband, children, twenty-eight grandchildren and one great grandchild survive. The latter when born, a year ago, represented the fifth generation living in the Father ALLEN’s family, the deceased being one of the family.

            For many years Mother Goss’s health had been delicate and she went west in ‘76 and rergained some strength, and again in ‘81 but temporary relief, only, was the result. She was one of the most kindly, sypmathetic and self-denying of women and, therefore, she was honored and respected by all who knew her.

            The funeral was conducted Saturday, by Rev. BEGHTOL, of Fulton, and the remains were consigned to their silent rest in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

Wednesday, October 5, 1892

 

            Henry SWARTZLANDER died at his home in Henry township the 28th ult. aged 78 years and 3 months.

            Deceased was born in Union county, Pa., where he married Sarah STAHL, and lived with her until her death in Ohio in 1845. Deceased was again married to Elizabeth STAHL in 1847 and moved to Henry township, this county in 1853 where he ever since resided on the same farm.

            He was a lifelong member of the Lutheran church, a kind and indulgent husband and


father, and a popular neighbor and an honorable citizen in every sense of the term. He leaves a wife, six chidren, several grandchildren and a host of friends to mourn his death.

 

            Col. J. M. McAFEE, who will be remembered by our people as having been, at one time, connected with the city schools, and who has been a resident of Vienna, Va., since leaving here, lost his life in a R.R. accident a short time ago. In passing from one coach to another with the train at a high rate of speed, he was raised from his feet, thrown against a building and instantly killed. He leaves a wife and daughter to mourn his loss.

 

            Mr. Embree STRONG, of Chicago, came home to attend the funeral of his brother, John [STRONG].  (AKRON)

 

            Mr. John STRONG died at the home of his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Ely STRONG, last Sunday morning. He was a promising young man of nineteen years; moral, upright and agreeable to all. About two years ago he married and went to Mentone to live. About three weeks ago he and his young wife came home to visit his parents, and on Sunday complained of not feeling well. He was persuaded to remain at home until he felt better but his disease developed into typhoid fever and ended his life. We deeply sympathize with the bereaved wife and other relatives. The funeral took place at M.E. church, Tuesday morning, Rev. A. M. STEWART officiating. The remains were laid to rest in Odd Fellows cemetery.  (AKRON)

 

Wednesday, October 12, 1892

 

ANANIAS BAKER (Biography)

 

            Twenty-three years ago a young man left the slow going business circles of his native state, Virginia, and started west. He drifted along until he reached Fulton county were he settled down in Rochester, and commenced the battle of life with a kit of carpenter tools and a determination to win. He worked hard, and early and late and in the course of a few years, married and bought a home. Then he bought another home and sold it at a profit. And another, and another until he had a nice living and a bank account. Then he opened up a lumber yard and the sign on the little office read: A. BAKER, Dealer in Lumber, Lath and Shingles.

            He was always at his place of business ready to buy or sell a bill of lumber and his trade increased and he prospered. He hustled for business and it came his way. Now he has six lumber yards, the two principal ones being located at Rochester and Marion.

            In addition to these large interests he is an extensive owner of town property, one of the principal stockholders in the Citizens State Bank, the heaviest stockholder in the Indiana Farmers Building and Loan Association, and a heavy investor in other securities. Ananias Baker is now widely known as a remarkably successful business man, a clever fellow, a liberal contributor to all deserving benevolences, a staunch and active democrat, and withal, a whole souled, well met gentleman.

            Attentive to the wants of his customers and careful in the management of his business, Mr. Baker’s prominence as a financier is a shining example of the possibilities of a determination to “get to the front.”

 

            After several weeks illness from that dread disease, Typhoid fever, Mr. Henry GINTHER departed this life in Rochester, Saturday, Oct 9, 1892.

            His funeral took place Sunday at Leiters Ford, Rev. ROGERS officiating. He was


laid to rest in Leiters Ford cemetery. He leaves seven children to mourn his loss, his wife and one child having preceded him to the spirit land. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.

            Henry Ginther was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 9, 1815. He came to America at an early age. On Oct 4, 1847, he was married to Mary SHADLE, who was a native of Pennsylvania. To this union was born eight children, one of which is our present County Superintendent.

            Mr. Ginther came to Fulton county in 1845, where he purchased a home and where he has resided ever since. He was a well-to-do farmer with many friends and few enemies, an honest upright man in all walks and avocations of life and was worthy of the high esteem in which he was so universally held.

            Deceased was a member of the Evangelical church.

 

            F. M. UMBAUGH, of Richland township, lost an infant child last Sunday.

 

            Amanda J. GRIMES, a widow living near Wagoner’s, died last Tuesday, having been a great sufferer from consumption. Deceased was 39 years old and leaves an only son to mourn her loss. She was a faithful member of the Christian church. Services were conducted by Rev. E. J. DELP, at Mt. Zion.

 

Wednesday, October 19, 1892

 

            Henry MATTHIESEN, a musician in the Regular Army, stationed at Ft. Leabanon, Kan., was in the city Sunday, called here by the death of his father.

 

            The funeral of Wm. PONTIUS at Akron, yesterday, was attended by Tent No. 16 K.O.T.M., and Fredonia Lodge No. 122 K. of P. Over one hundred Knights and Sir Knights joined the solemn march to the last resting place of the brother.

 

            Mary E. BRAMAN, wife of George BRAMAN, and daughter of the late Sam’l VanBLARICUM, died at the family home southwest of Rochester, Saturday, aged about forty-six years. She had been a terrible sufferer from cancer for several months and death was therefore a relief for her. She was a devout member of the U.B. church and leaves a husband and two grandchildren.

 

            Hans MATTHIESEN, whose family recently came to Rochester and opened the Bazaar store, had been an invalid for a long time with catarrh of the stomach. He had been taking treatment in Chicago for some time but grew worse last week and died Friday evening. He was fifty-eight years old and a prominent Odd Fellow which Order conducted his funeral Sunday.

 

            Rev. STEWART conducted the funeral services of the infant child of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. WALLING last Thursday.  (AKRON)

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Clarence MORRETT died last week and was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery.  (AKRON)

 


 

            Died Sunday morning, Oct 16, 1892, Wm. PONTIOUS, aged about 30 years. He was taken sick with typhoid fever about two weeks ago and in spite of all that loving care and medical aid could do, he died early Sunday morning. He being a member of the K. of P. and Macabees Lodges at Rochester, they took charge of the remains and conducted the services according to the rites of the respective lodges. He was laid to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery. (AKRON)

 

Wednesday, October 26, 1892

            Israel JOHNSON was one of the first settlers of Indiana. He came to this county in 1833 and resided here until his death, Wednesday evening, which resulted from a complication of disorders incident to old age.

            The funeral was held at Mt. Zion, Friday, when a large concourse of neighbors turned out to pay the last tribute of respect to a kindly neighbor and a good man.

 

            The personal property of the late Henry GINTHER will be sold at public sale at Leiters Ford, on Nov 19. George A. GRUPP is administrator.

 

            Miss Elma MERCER, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas MERCER, died Friday, at Logansport, and the remains were brought home for interment, Rev. Sam GOSS preaching the funeral. She had been an invalid for many years.

 

Wednesday, November 2, 1892

 

            Mrs. Belle DAWSON, wife of Dr. B. F. DAWSON, of Kewanna, died at her home Wednesday noon from consumption.

            Mrs. Dawson was the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John A. BARNETT and was born December 31, 1861. She was married to Dr. Dawson in 1881 and was the mother of two sons who mourn, with their father, the loss of mother and wife. The funeral services were conducted by the Odd Fellows and Daughters of Rebekah, the sermon being preached by Rev. BRAGG, after which the remains were brought to Rochester and interred in Odd Fellows cemetery, Friday afternoon. The deceased was a lady of rare attainments and held the respect of a very large circle of friends who join the Sentinel in expressing sympathy with the bereaved relatives.

 

            Eva WINANS, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. J. H. WINANS, of this place, died last Friday morning after a lingering illness of several months, of that dread disease consumption. Deceased was seventeen years old.

            Funeral services were held at the family residence at 10 o’clock Saturday, Rev. E. J. DELP officiating, the remains were then removed to Warsaw for interment.

            The bereaved family and friends have the sympathy of the entire community.

 

            Saturday evening Mr. Henry HERRING, a well known citizen of Newcastle township, met with a fatal accident. He had been at Rochester doing some business, and on his return home, his horse, which was blind, walked too near the edge of a little bridge over the dry ditch just this side of the Tippecanoe river bridge in Newcastle township, when the buggy upset and threw Mr. Herring into the ditch, the horse and buggy falling over on top of him, and before help could reach him he was dead. Mr. John HOLMAN, who was driving not far behind him, came up and with the assistance which soon arrived, extricated the dead man from the wreck, and summoned the coroner, who, upon examination, found that his neck was broken and that he had probably sustained other fatal injuries, although the only visible marks on his body was a cut on his face.


            Mr. Herring was 67 years of age, and was of a peculiar temperament and disposition. His relatives and friends feel his loss the more keenly on account of the shocking manner in which he met his death.

            He leaves a son and daughter to mourn the loss of a kind and loving father, and they have the sympathy of the entire community. The funeral took place Monday.

 

            Louise [MOON], wife of Wm. MOON, died at her home north of Kewanna, last Friday morning of consumption. She leaves a father, brothers and sisters, a husband and one child and a number of friends to mourn her loss. Deceased was twenty-three years old, a kind and loving wife and mother. She united with the Baptist church eleven years ago, and has always been a faithful member. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. BRAGG, and the remains were laid to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery. (KEWANNA)

 

[Memorial Resolution for Eva WINANS, daughter of Pastor J. H. WINANS, Baptist church of Rochester, who died October 28, 1892. Signed: Ena YOUNG, Mrs. MARSH, J. H. SHELTON, Minnie HOLMAN and Mr. MARSH, Ex Committee B.Y.P.U.]

 

Wednesday, November 9, 1892

 

            Uncle Likens RICHARDSON, south of town, who has been in very poor health for some time past, died at his home Tuesday morning about ten o’clock.

 

Wednesday, November 16, 1892

 

            A family by the name of HENDRICKS used to live near Bruce Lake and one of their children was a seven year old boy. Last week while cutting a bouquet of flowers for his teacher, the little fellow somehow fell upon the scissors he was using, the point penetrating his breast. He arose, pulled the scissors from his body, walked a few steps and fell dead. It was found that the blade had gone through his lung and entered his heart, producing instant death.

 

            It is with sorrow that the Sentinel announces the death of Dean WESTFALL, at his home in Washington, which sad event occurred last Thursday. His disease was quick consumption and his sickness was of but a month’s duration. Dean was one of the most popular boys that ever grew up in Rochester and his untimely death is a crushing blow to his relatives and friends.

 

Wednesday, November 23, 1892

 

            Frank [BLACK], aged 16 years, son of Samuel BLACK, died at his home, in Rochester, Sunday evening, after a short illness of congestion of the stomach and was buried yesterday.

 

 


 

                Hon. Sidney R. MOON, the next Reporter of the Supreme Court, will take his office the 13th of next January but will not move to the capital until May or June. Mr. Moon’s term of office is for four years and the salary $4,000 per year and $1,500 for deputy hire.

 

Wednesday, November 30, 1892

 

            The Sentinel  inadvertently failed to mention the death of Mrs. A. B. SHAFER, of Akron, last week. She retired in good health last Friday evening, but sometime during the night she turned herself in bed, woke her husband and expired without a struggle. She had been troubled with heart disease until within the last year, but lately she had been in exceptional good health, and her death by that disease was a shock. She died before Mr. [A. B.] SHAFER could rise from his bed.

 

            Jim BATCHELOR has been a familiar figure in Rochester as a “man about town” for many years. He butchered for a livelihood and had a wife and family but his appetite for drink dragged him down and his family deserted him and he has been living alone in a little room in the Cornelius building for several years. Recently he has been butchering for JUDY, the new proprietor of the “Old Reliable” market, and was taken sick Thursday with la grippe. As he had no fire at his room he slept in the rear room of the meat market. He was not dangerously sick, being able to be up and around until Saturday night when he took a walk up street, came back and rapidly sank to death early Sunday morning. The funeral took place from the residence of Wm. LAWSON, a fellow comrade in the Rebellion, Monday afternoon.

 

            The Ellensburg, (Washington) Register  contains a lengthy notice of the death of Dean WESTFALL in which it says:

                Few young men were gifted with the qualifications that gave such promise to his future, and his sudden, untimely death is a shock to the whole community and a terrible blow to his family. During his residence among us, Dean has made friends of all with whom he came in contact, and his life, so full of usefulness and promise, has left an influence for good that cannot soon be forgotten. The afflicted family have the sympathy and consolation of a large circle of friends and acquaintances, who mourn with them in their bereavement.

 

            Wm. KOCHENDERFER buried an infant child last Thursday. (PLEASANT VALLEY)

 

Wednesday, December 7, 1892

 

            The Bloomingsburg correspondent of the Mentone Gazette says a recent mail brought the painful intelligence to Mrs. W. H. BAUGHER that her sister Ella and her husband, who lived in Missouri, were drowned by the capsizing of a boat in which they had gone out upon the river near their home. Three children, one of them an infant, are without a loving parent’s care by the sad and distressing accident. Mrs. Baugher, who had just returned from a pleasant visit with her unfortunate sister, is almost prostrated with grief.

 

           

 


 

 

Wednesday, December 14, 1892

 

            Mrs. Eva RICHTER, consort of the late Fred RICHTER, died rather suddenly Thursday evening after a lingering illness from bronchial disease or consumption, and the funeral was conducted Sunday afternoon, Rev. A. E. GIFT officiating.

            Deceased was born in Switzerland sixty years ago and came to this country with her parents seventeen years later, locating first in Ohio and then in Fulton county where she has ever since resided. She was a lifetime member of the German Reformed church and died the peaceful death which her sweet, christian life so earnestly foretold.

            The surviving children are Mr. A. T. RICHTER, the dry goods dealer, and Mrs. John N. FLINN, of this city, Mrs. Chas. GLASS and Mrs. Chas. SMITH, of Huntington and Mr. Fred RICHTER, of Niles, Mich., four children having preceded their mother in death.

 

            Mrs. Ollie MEDARY of Logansport attended the funeral of Mrs. RICHTER, Sunday.

 

            Arch STINSON attended the funeral of his sister, Mrs. FOWLER, in Ohio, last week.

 

            Fred KROTHWOHL, son of John KROTHWOHL, died of consumption, Sunday, aged 24 years. The funeral was held at Antioch yesterday.

 

            John MATHIAS, an old resident of the Germany neighborhood, southwest of the city, died last week of consumption and was buried Tuesday.

 

            Mrs. Mary L. SWEET, aged 46 years, wife of Ben SWEET, died at her home in Iceberg, Monday, and was buried at Hoover’s, Tuesday.

 

Wednesday, December 21, 1892

 

                [No entries]

 

Wednesday, December 28, 1892

 

            Mother KEELEY, consort of James KEELEY, died Thursday morning after a protracted illness, aged about 75 years.

            Deceased was born in Ohio, came to Indiana in early life and married the late James Keeley. Thirteen children were born to the union -- nine of whom survive. She was a devout member of the Methodist church and widely known and beloved for her charity and motherly interest in the welfare of her large circle of acquaintances.

            The funeral service was conducted Saturday by Rev. BRIGGS and the remains were laid to rest in the same grave with those of her husband which were removed from the Citizens cemetery to the Odd Fellows.

 

            The Kewanna Herald  says Mrs. P. J. O’CONNER, better known by her maiden name, Miss Hanna WALSH, died at her home in Chicago Wednesday night of typhoid fever. Her remains were brought Friday to her father’s home in Wayne township and her funeral will take place from St. Ann’s church. She left home a little more than seven months ago a happy


bride and now is brought back to her loving kindred a corpse, a terrible shock to them. The family have the sympathy of all the neighborhood in their sad loss.

 

            A four year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. William DUVAL, who reside east of Rochester, was so severely burned while playing around the stove Thursday afternoon that its sufferings ended in death in about two hours. At the time the child’s clothes caught fire the mother was in the yard and the little one opened the door and ran to her, but before the fire could be extinguished it was burned to a crisp and died before a physician arrived. It is a great sorrow for the parents in which their friends sympathize.

 

            Steven D. CARPENTER practiced law in Rochester sixteen or eighteen years ago when he made many friends who have viewed with pleasure the success he has attained in his profession since moving to Peru where he has resided since leaving Rochester. His health has been poor for a number of years, and while at Urbana, Ohio, a few days ago where he had gone to witness the marriage of his daughter, he died suddenly.

 

 

The Rochester Sentinel

1893

Wednesday, January 4, 1893

 

            Death came suddenly and singularly to Mrs. Perry COVER, a well known lady of near Denver, last week one day. Desirous of attending a religious meeting to which her husband objected, Mrs. Cover ran violently to the home of neighbors, intending to go with them. She dropped dead in their presence.

 

            Jacob FIGERT, of Disko, died at North Mahchester at midnight Tuesday night under peculiarly distressing circumstances. Mr. Figert got off the late train on the Big Four, and as he entered the station was stricken with apoplexy. The agent, mistaking his affliction for inebriation, dragged him out on the platform and notified the officers. When the latter arrived to arrest the supposed drunken man they found Mr. Figert dying, and half an hour later he passed away. Mr. Figert was the proprietor of the Disco carriage works and was the leading enterpriser of the town.

 

            Miss Clara BEMENDERFER, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. BEMENDERFER of Henry township, died Sunday morning of quick consumption, aged 20 years. Deceased was a most lovable girl and the parents have the sympathy of a very large circle of friends.

 

            Ruth [WEBER], the six year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Charles WEBER, died Tuesday morning at their home southwest of town, of scarletina. She was a bright little girl who had always enjoyed robust health until a few weeks ago when attacked by that dreadful disease, and her death is a sad affliction to her parents.

 

            Miss Dessie WILSON, of Disko, aged sixteen, was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery last week. (AKRON)

 

Friday, January 13, 1893

 

            Last Saturday afternoon Peter FEECE and David HARTMAN were hauling fodder on the latter’s farm, south of Grant. Feece was on the sled and Hartman was pitching the fodder up to him. Just as they had commenced the load Hartman reeled and fell heavily upon the shock of fodder at which he was working and when Feece reached him he was dead. Being nearly a mile from any house, Mr. Feece lifted the prostrate form on the sled and drove, hastily, home but no signs of life developed and an examination demonstrated that death had resulted from heart disease or the rupture of a blood vessel. Deceased was about 70 years old had lived in the Millark neighborhood for nearly half a century, and leaves an aged wife and several children.

            The funeral was held at Mt. Hope Monday, Rev. Lee FISHER officiating.


 

            A two months old child of Mr. & Mrs. Omar CAMERER was buried Wednesday.

 

            Mrs. Vernon GOULD was called to Chicago Thursday, by the death of her sister, Mrs. CHAMBERLAIN. By this death Mrs. Gould is left the only survivor of a family of nine children.

 

            Bartley HAMLET, aged sixteen years, died of Brights disease at his home, seven miles east of Rochester Friday. The funeral services were conducted Sunday at Bethlehem church by Rev. Lee FISHER.

 

            Fay [JOHNSON], the six year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Oscar JOHNSON, of near Hoover’s Station, died Monday evening, of inflamation of the bowels. She was buried Wednesday, the funeral services being conducted by the pastor of the Progressive Thinkers.

 

Friday, January 20, 1893

 

            Catharine WALTERS, wife of John WALTERS, died at the family home south of town, Wednesday afternoon, after a lingering illness, aged 65 years.

            Mrs. Walters was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, and was united in marriage with her surviving husband in 1844. She was the mother of seven children, five of whom are living. She was an active member of the Methodist church, and as a wife, mother and neighbor won the respect and esteem of all.

            The funeral will occur today at ten o’clock at the house, the services being conducted by Rev. A. T. BRIGGS, with interment at the Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            A little daughter of Mr. & Mrs. B. F. STALEY, east of Fulton, died Saturday of diphtheria.

 

            The funeral of Rev. R. J. SMITH was held at Five Corners, Sunday afternoon. Mr. Smith was formerly pastor of the church at that place.

 

Friday, January 27, 1893

 

            Mrs. George BAKER, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Joseph BARSHIRE, died at her home south of Leiters Ford last week aged 40 years. Deceased was the mother of eight children and a kind neighbor and friend.

 

            Michael MILLER, son of John W. and Nancy E. MILLER, was born Sep 16, 1873; died Jan 17, 1893, aged 19 years 4 months and 1 day. He united with the church of Christ Nov 12, 1892, and lived a consistent christian until his death. He leaves a father and mother, two brothers and three sisters and a large circle of near relatives and friends to mourn his loss.

 

            Mrs. Jos. SEIGFRED was called to Chicago Monday to attend the funeral of Mr. & Mrs. SHAFER’s baby.

 

            Hon. S. R. MOON came up from Indianapolis last week to attend the burial of his mother-in-law, Mrs. John WALTERS, and remained over Sunday.


 

            Mrs. India BEEBER and Mrs. Charles MEYER attended the funeral of George C. DORLAND, at LaPorte, Monday. Mr. Dorland was killed in a wreck at Peru.

 

            The funeral of Mrs. Noah LARGE was held at the Christian church yesterday. Mrs. Large died of consumption, aged 49 years, and was buried at the Mt. Zion cemetery.

 

            Commissioner Asa DEWEESE was in town Monday and reported the death of the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. HENDERSON; also the dangerous illness of Robert HOLLIDAY, all of the Reed church neighborhood.

 

Friday, February 3, 1893

 

            Grandma PAINTER, mother of Sant and Dave PAINTER died Tuesday at a ripe old age.

 

            John LARGE attended the funeral of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Noah LARGE, at Rochester last Thursday. Mr. LARGE will now make his home with his brother John of this place.  (DELONG)

 

Friday, February 10, 1893

 

            The long suffering of Mrs. J. M. REITER was relieved by the welcome messenger, death, Friday morning.

            Deceased, Susan BEAR REITER was born in Ohio in 1834 and was therefore 58 years old. She was a life long member of the Reformed church until one year ago when she transferred her membership to the first Presbyterian church, of this city. She was the mother of four children, three of whom, M. C. REITER, the dry goods merchant, and Virg. S. REITER, the attorney of this city, and Ad. REITER, of Ligonier, survive.

            The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at the Presbyterian church when Rev. ROTH preached a beautiful and touching discourse and pronounced an eloquent eulogy upon the life of the deceased from which we extract these references to her pure, sweet life:

                Thus has closed a life singularly beautiful in modesty and strength of character, in faithfulness as wife and mother, in kindness to friends and neighbors, and in completeness of these graces and virtues which in their proper proportions make a symmetrical and well balanced life. She was so free from every form of ostentation that she was constantly hiding her strangth of character even from her friends, so that the calmness with which she set her house in order and awaited the end of that for which she knew there was no remedy, was a surprise to many, who thought they knew her.

 

                “Squire” Henry APT, died at his home in Kewanna, Monday, aged 79 years. He was one of the old settlers of Union township, a brother of Mrs. BIBLER, of this city, and an honorable and kindly old gentleman.

 

            Nicholas CLEMENS, one of the pioneers of Henry township, died at his home near Grant Wednesday morning. Deceased settled in this county in 1835 and was twice married being the father of 17 children 8 of whom, with the last wife, survive.


 

            Mrs. Sarah CHAMBERLAIN, widow of the late Ches. CHAMBERLAIN, fell on ice and broke her right arm near the wrist.

 

            William MEREDITH, one of the first settlers of the Beaver Dam neighborhood is dead at the age of seventy.

 

            The three year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Jerry HANNA died yesterday morning of measles and the funeral will be held today.

 

            The widow of ex-county Treasurer, James WARE, fell on the ice at Kewanna and broke her arm.

 

            An infant son of J. W. SMITH was buried last week in the Akron cemetery. (AKRON)

 

Friday, February 17, 1893

 

                [No entries]

 

Friday, February 24, 1893

 

            A large force of wood chappers have been engaged in the Taber woods southeast of Rochester, all winter and for the past three weeks David ROGERS and Louis BRETZ have been working together. Wednesday forenoon a large tree they sawed off lodged before it reached the ground and Mr. Rogers began cutting the limbs off that were holding it when, by a sudden lurch, the weight of the tree was thrown upon a large cracked limb which was directly above him and in its descent it struck him back of the shoulder, crushing him to the ground, breaking his left leg above the knee, mashing the ribs in the left side and killing him almost instantly.

            The bleeding body was left under the tree while a messenger was dispatched to notify Coroner SHIELDS who immediately repaired to the place of the accident and after a hasty examination pronounced the man dead and ordered the limb removed. The body was then placed on some straw in a sled, and what had gone forth from home a few hours before a strong, vigorous man, fully equipped for the battles of life was returned mangled, lifeless clay.

            The wife who was busily engaged preparing dinner for the absent husband had had no intimation of her sudden bereavement until the sled arrived containing his disfigured corpse. A kindly neighbor lady broke the sad news as gently as possible and her lamentations were heartrending as she refused to be comforted.

            David Rogers was 63 years old when death came to him so unexpectedly, and nearly all of his life had been spent in Fulton county. He was a sober, industrious and honest citizen, and had been married three times. He had a comfortable home east of the L. E. & W. depot which he had recently succeeded in freeing from debt. The suddenness and awfulness of his death awakened the sympathies of all our citizens.

 

            Ex-trustee Jacob HISEY, of Richland township, died at his home in Tiosa, Friday, aged 72 years. Deceased has been a terrible sufferer for several years, having lost his eyesight and become partially demented as a result of his sickness. He was twice married, five sons being the fruit of the first marriage, of whom John and Henry HISEY of this place are two.


            The funeral was held Sunday when a very large concourse of people turned out to pay the last tribute of respect to one who had earned the respect of his community by a long life of usefulness.

 

            Henry BRUCE was born in Union county, Pennsylvania, January 7, 1810. With his parents he emigrated to Ohio in 1837, and one year later came to this State where he has since resided. He was twice married, his first wife being Catharine RARICK and the second Catharine MILLER. He died last Friday and the funeral was held at Mt. Pleasant, Sunday, conducted by Elder A. E. GIFT.

            Mr. Bruce’s long life was one of great usefulness and the funeral was attended by a large number of people from both Fulton and Pulaski counties who thus attested their appreciation and respect for the deceased.

 

            Asa BATCHELOR is dead, having breathed his last at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. J. STOCKBERGER, yesterday morning after an illness of several years.

            Deceased was born in Missouri 62 years ago and came to this state with his parents where, in Randolph county, he married his surviving wife. Six children were born to the union, four of whom, with their mother, survive, viz: Frank BATCHELOR, Mrs. Oscar BALDWIN, Mrs. J. J. STOCKBERGER and Mrs. J. W. DODGE.

            Asa Batchelor came to Fulton county in 1861 and soon after enlisted in the service of his country, serving three years in the 87th Regiment, and winning high rank as a good soldier. Among men he was widely known as the “jolly butcher” having been a prominent meat dealer for nearly a quarter of century. He was a local preacher in the Methodist church and a prominent Mason and G.A.R. man.

            The funeral will be held tomorrow at 10 o’clock at Grace church and the remains will be laid to rest in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Ina REES the seven year old daughter of County Clerk and Mrs. REES, died Tuesday morning after a protracted illness of consumption of the stomach and bowels. Ina was a modest and innocently sweet little girl and a great favorite with her schoolmates and friends of the family. She was the only survivor of the Rees triplets which attracted so much attention at the time of their birth.

            The funeral service was conducted at the residence of Rev. A. E. GIFT, Wednesday afternoon and the sorrow stricken parents followed the silent form of their fifth loved one to the grave.

 

            The Akron News  says Mrs. Orlando POWEL who lived with her husband about 5 miles southwest of Akron, went out to milk last Thursday morning. She slipped and fell on the ice injuring herself so badly that she died Friday. Her funeral took place from the Gilead M.E. church Sunday noon, conducted by Rev. PATTERSON.

 

            An infant child of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. TETZLAFF was buried Saturday.

 

            Stephen NORTH aged eighty years died at his home in the west part of town Sunday and was buried from the Catholic church, Father THIELE officiating, Tuesday. Mr. North has been almost blind for several years, but was an industrious and honest man. He had been confined to the house with the grip and his death was caused by this disease and pneumonia complications.


            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. TETZLAFF was buried last week at Salem graveyard. (BEARSS)

 

            Mr. John PHILIPS, of near Bethel, an old veteran of the 89th Indiana Regiment died at his home last Sunday of heart disease. He was an old and honorable citizen and will be sadly missed in the community in which he lived. His funeral was preached in the Bethel church by Rev. McCLURE, after which his remains were laid to rest by the G.A.R. Post, of Akron, in the Bethel cemetery. (AKRON)

 

Friday, March 3, 1893

 

            Ira UMBAUGH, one of Richland township’s most promising boys, is dead at the age of 12 years.

 

            An eleven year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Theodore MOORE, of Liberty township, was buried Wednesday.

 

            Hon. John L. FARRAR, the noted criminal lawyer, of Peru, and well known in this county, died suddenly of heart disease at his home Monday.

 

            Mrs. Elizabeth SEVERNS. wife of J. R. SEVERNS, died after a brief illness of pleurisy, at her home in Newcastle township, Wednesday of last week, and was buried Thursday, at Sycamore cemetery, Rev. MERLEY officiating. The sudden death of this estimable lady is mourned by all who knew her. She was forty-seven years old and had enjoyed vigorous health until her last sickness which lasted but two days.

 

            Uncle George GRUPP, who lives over in the edge of Fulton county, was here last Saturday on business connected with the estate of Henry BRUCE, deceased, of which he is administrator, and his notice of appointment and sale will be found in this issue. It is hard to tell what the people of the eastern part of this county and the western portion of Fulton will do for an administrator of estates after Mr. Grupp shall have joined the silent majority. His experience in such matters, as well as his sterling honesty and proverbial carefulness in the handling of estates, cause him to be in demand when a case of that kind is on hand, and it has been seldom for several years that he has not been engaged in the settlement of one or more estates, though he always puts them through with all possible speed. --Winamac Democrat

 

            Mrs. Wm. WOOD’s mother, Mrs. BROWER, died in Henry county last week, and was brought to Kewanna for burial. (PLEASANT VALLEY)

 

Friday, March 10, 1893

 

            Lot CARTER, a fine young man and son of Mr. & Mrs. George CARTER, of this city, died of consumption at his home southwest of town, Monday. He was thirty-five years old and leaves a wife and one child. The funeral was held at Antioch church, Wednesday.

 

Friday, March 17, 1893

 

            Orton W. DUDGEON, the well known son of Commissioner Nathaniel DUDGEON, died Monday at his home in Richland township, aged 35 years. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Carrie MINER, and four small children, father and mother and one brother as immediate relatives. He had been a sufferer from rheumatism for five years and spent considerable time in sanitariums but gained only temporary relief.

            The funeral was conducted Wednesday by Rev. GIFT, of this city, when hundreds of friends paid the last tribute of respect.

            Ort Dudgeon was widely known as a teacher and politician and he numbered his friends in every township of the county. He was his own worst enemy, having little or no regard for his health, and thus a useful, popular and promising citizen fills a grave just as he was entering the prime of life. Peace to his ashes.

 

            The infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Sampson CLAYTON was buried Tuesday.

 

            John McGRIFF was buried Sunday at the grave yard at the Dunkard church. He died of brights disease. The funeral was conducted by Rev. SELLARS.  (PALESTINE)

 

            Trueman R. BOX, the son of Mr. & Mrs. Abram BOX, died Sunday March 12, and was buried at the Skinner cemetery. The funeral was preached by Rev. BARNHART. (LUCETTA)

 

Friday, March 24, 1893

 

            Samuel S. TERRY died at his home in Rochester Monday morning after a protracted and painful affliction with cancer.

            Mr. Terry was born in New York in 1824 and after graduating at a medical college came to Akron in this county where he was married to Miss Sarah McCLOUD in 1849. He continued to practice his profession at that place for a quarter of a century during which time he accumulated considerable property. He represented the counties of Fulton and Miami in the state senate in 1864 where his ability attracted a great deal of attention.

            Ten years ago Mrs. Terry died and soon after Mr. Terry turned his property and business over to his sons, Frank H. and Samuel P. [TERRY]. During the past several years he devoted the most of his time traveling about seeking relief for his fatal disease which was slowly but surely devouring one side of his face.

            Dr. Terry possessed a strong intellect and excellent business qualifications. His enterprise was not of that kind which seeks to make a show and win the plaudits of men, but a number of successful business men in Fulton county owe their start to assistance rendered by him. The funeral was held Wednesday at 10:30 o’clock conducted by Mrs. George B. WARNE, of Chicago.

 

            Mrs. Monroe WARREN died at her home in Richland township Friday of brain trouble. The funeral was conducted by Rev. COOK, of Mentone, with interment at Jordon cemetery in Marshall county Saturday. She was twenty-two years of age and leaves a husband and one child.

 


 

            Mrs. Belle ELLIOTT, wife of Sylvester ELLIOTT, of Wayne township, died last Thursday, of dropsy, aged 35 years. Deceased was a noble christian woman, being an active member of the Presbyterian church, and leaves a husband and two children. The funeral was held Saturday at Fletchers Lake, Rev. TODD officiating.

 

            Samuel BALL aged 82 died at his home in Tiosa Saturday. Deceased was quite prosperous in years gone by but his riches slipped away and he died an object of charity.

 

            Barbara E. [SPRACKLEN], wife of John C. SPRACKLEN died at the family residence Sunday and was buried at Antioch church Monday, Rev. E. J. DELP officiating at the funeral. The husband and three children survive.

 

            A seven year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Dallas EDWARDS died at their home in Decatur, Ind., Tuesday, of lung fever. The remains were brought to Rochester for interment yesterday with funeral services by Rev. ROTH.

 

Friday, March 31, 1893

 

            Mrs. David EDWARDS was called to Lucerne Tuesday by the death of her father, Daniel H. RUSH, who was one of the oldest residents of the county.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Dal. EDWARDS, who came to Rochester last week on the sorrowful mission of burying their eldest son, returned to their home in Decatur Tuesday.

 

            Mrs. Isaiah KRIDER, formerly a resident of Liberty township and a sister of Mrs. Rachel GREEN, of this city, dropped dead last Thursday, of rheumatism of the heart at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Wheeler LEFFEL, of Cass county.

 

            Mrs. John FITZGERALD, formerly of Wayne township but for several years a resident of Logansport, died Monday and was buried at the Catholic cemetery in Wayne, Wednesday. Deceased was a sister of ex-commissioner Ed McLOCHLIN and leaves her husband and four children.

 

            Mrs. Elizabeth CRABILL died very suddenly of heart disease at the home of her son Will [CRABILL] in the southeast part of town Sunday morning. She had lived in Rochester twenty-five years was sixty-two years of age and had been an invalid for some time. The funeral was held at the Methodist church Monday, Rev. BRIGGS officiating.

 

Friday, April 7, 1893

 

            The seventeen months old son of Mr. & Mrs. C. B. LOGAN, who live a mile and a half northeast of town, wandered away from the house Wednesday afternoon while his invalid mother was asleep, and fell into the Good ditch and was drowned, the distracted mother finding the corpse in the water an hour and a half afterward. The funeral was held yesterday afternoon.

 

            James CARR was born November 5, 1829, and died April 4, 1893, aged 64 years and 5 months.

            Deceased was twice married, the first wife being Elizabeth MORRIS, to whom nine


children were born and the second, Mrs. Lucinda ADAMSON, whom he married two years ago last fall. The nine children are all living and they with the wife mourn the loss of a kind father and a good husband. 

            The funeral service was conducted by Rev. DELP, and interment at Mr. Hope cemetery, Hoover’s Station.

 

            Mrs. Attie PENDLETON MONTGOMERY, wife of Lee MONTGOMERY, and a bride of only six months, died Wednesday night after a protracted illness from consumption at the family residence in the northwest part of town.

            Deceased was a lovable and popular young lady, one whose many graces fitted her for a long life of usefulness but she is dead at the age of twenty-four and her hosts of Rochester friends mingle their grief with the bereft husband and members of the family.

            The funeral will be held at the Presbyterian church this afternoon at two o’clock, Rev. Father LORD officiating.

 

            The little daughter of Mr. & Mrs. W. K. YEAGLEY died last Tuesday at their home, aged about six months. Rev. COX preached the funeral sermon Thursday morning, after which the little one was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery. (AKRON)

 

Friday, April 14, 1893

 

            Jacob LOY was born in Ohio in 1834 where he spent his boyhood days and was married to Miss Ellen HENRY, who with three sons and one daughter survives him. He moved to Rochester in 1866 where he continued to reside until death came last Friday morning as a welcome release after a lingering illness.

            Mr. Loy became a soldier early in the late war and on the last day of December, 1862 while in battle received a ball in the back which the surgeons were unable to remove, and during the thirty-two years he carried it, was scarcely ever free from pain. This was a long battle, but the courageous soldier was compelled at last to succumb to the poison of his adversary and now rests in peace.

            The funeral was conducted Sunday morning at the Christian church by Rev. COX, and an eulogistic oration was delivered at the grave by Comrade M. L. ESSICK.

 

Friday, April 21, 1893

 

            Grandfather DONALDSON, of Newcastle township died in the poorhouse Monday evening aged 93 years and the funeral was held at Yellow Creek church Tuesday, conducted by Rev. E. J. DELP. Deceased had a host of relatives consisting of daughters, grandchildren and other descendants but in the last months of his long life he drifted into the channel of public charity.

 

            A little son of Franz BRUCE’s, residing near Bruce Lake, died Monday night, from typhoid fever. The remains were interred Wednesday at the Bruce Lake cemetery. (KEWANNA)

 

            Augustus MONESMITH died at his home about five miles north of town last Friday. Winamac doctors held a post mortem examination that disclosed the fact that he died from the effects of three cancers, one of the stomach and two of the liver. (KEWANNA)


 

Friday, April  29, 1893

 

                (No entries)

 

Friday, May 5, 1893

 

            From the Kewanna Herald:

                An accident of a most sad and horrible nature occurred here Friday morning, when a team belonging to Ed. McLOCHLIN, Jr., who resides about five miles south of here, and which was coming to town for the purpose of getting a load of tile, driven by his little son, Lawrence [McLOCHLIN], aged eleven years, took fright and ran away. The little fellow bravely clung to the lines until they had reached the town, but when opposite A. D. Toner & Brunk’s elevator, he was violently thrown out of the wagon to the ground, and in some way caught by the lines and dragged until the team reached the railroad where the little fellow struck his head on the rail, the team breakinrg away.

                Upon picking him up life was found to be extinct, his scull and head being horribly mangled and crushed, death surely resulting instantly. The team continued on its mad course through the town and finally stopped without further damage.

                The boy was accompanied by his uncle, Will McLOCHLIN, who had charge of another team and was following close behind the runaway, but he was powerless to stay the hands of death, or to help him in any way.

                It was a most sickening and sad spectacle, and kind hands tenderly cared for the remains until the father was informed of the accident and arrived.

 

                After a long and painful illness Linda McCARTER, aged 14 years, died at her home in this city Friday evening. The funeral service was held at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon when Elder DELP preached a short discourse to a crowded house.

            The obituary read from the pulpit closed in these touching words: “Our young sister was very much attached to her church and Sunday school. She was also a member of the Young Peoples’ Baptist Union. While conscious, her thoughts were with her Redeemer and thus she died with her mind stayed on God. Farewell, loved one, for a little while, and we shall see you again.”

            By the death of Linda McCarter one of the sweetest and purest lives, which we have ever known, is ended.

            So modest and unassuming was she, that only those who best knew her, could appreciate the true beauty of character which she possessed. She was a loyal christian even though so young in years, and during her last illness, expressed her willingness and readiness to depart even while life opened before her filled with all the sweet possibilities, so dear to the young. Had she been spared to fulfill the promises of her girlhood, she must surely have been “a perfect woman, nobly planned.”

 

            Freddie [BROUILLETTE] the two year old and only son of Mr. & Mrs. Charles BROUILLETTE died of diphtheria Saturday and was buried Sunday.

 

            Mr. and Mrs. George BOGARDUS brought the dead body of their only child here from Kokomo Monday and buried it in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

 


 

Friday, May 12, 1893

 

            Mr. James HILL, of Donaldson, brother of Joe HILL, of this city, was kicked a few days ago by a stallion he owned, from the effects of which he died after two days of suffering. Mr. Hill was a prosperous horseman and farmer, was 47 years of age and leaves a wife and three children. He was a member of the Brethren church, of the G.A.R. and his sad death is regretted by all who knew him.

 

            Grandmother SMALLEY, of Wayne township, died Friday after a protracted illness, aged 72 years. She was one of the pioneers of eastern Wayne township and one of the truly good women of the county. The funeral was held Sunday in the presence of a very large concourse of relatives and neighbors and the remains laid to rest in the Brethren cemetery.

 

            Peter SWISHER who has been a resident of the Mt. Zion neighborhood for many years, is dead aged 64 years.

            He was stricken down with la grippe and lung fever two weeks ago and rapidly sank to death. He was the father of a large family of children and grandchildren and was an inoffensive, kindly citizen. The funeral was held Monday at Mt. Zion, Elder WAGONER officiating.

 

            Aaron SHOBE, father of Samuel SHOBE, who lives east of town died at the home of the latter Saturday at the ripe old age of 87 years. He was a native of Pennsylvania but located in Ohio where he spent the most of his long life. He came to reside with his son two years ago and while his enfeebled condition did not permit him to extend his acquaintanceship beyond the immediate neighborhood, was much admired for his noble manhood and traits which triumphantly round out a well spent life.

            Rev. A. T. BRIGGS, of Grace church, this city conducted the funeral, Monday, at Mt. Hope.

 

            Squire D. SMITH, a nephew of John W. and Jerry SMITH, of this city died at the home of his grandfather, David CORBIN, near Green Oak, Wednesday evening and will be buried today at 10 o’clock, at Shelton’s cemetery. He was just past twenty-one years old and his disease was consumption.

 

            Robt. WILEY, a son of Mrs. Martha WILEY, and a former resident of Union township, died at his home in Indian Territory, April 14. No particulars of his last illness or death has reached his relatives here. (KEWANNA)

 

            Mrs. Sam WOODS, of Peru, came to attend the funeral of her mother last Sunday. (BLUE GRASS)

 

Friday, May 19, 1893

 

            The four year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. MANLEY, living north of town was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery Wednesday.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Carl FISH lost their infant child by the cruel hands of death Wednesday, and it was interred in Odd Fellows cemetery yesterday.


            Mrs. Harriet KEWNEY and son-in-law, E. EHRENSTEIN, of Rochester, Ind., were in the city over night, visiting Mrs. Kewney’s son, J. F. KEWNEY. Mrs. Kewney was on her way to Kalamazoo to attend the funeral of her brother, an old and well-known resident of that city.  --Michigan City Dispatch.

 

            William PENCE, of Roann, attempted to “block” a log which was being loaded on a car, and was crushed to death. He was eighty-five years old and a pioneer of Wabash county.

 

Friday, May 26, 1893

 

            The illness of Frank BLACK, son of Mr. & Mrs. John BLACK, recently mentioned in these columns, terminated fatally Saturday afternoon. He was nearly thirty-two years old and was married eleven years ago to Miss Emma ALSPACH who, with three children survives. He was baptized into the Lutheran church in his infancy and became an active churchman three years ago. He was always a modest and retiring young man, who struggled manfully against misfortune and ill health and died highly esteemed by a very large circle of acquaintances.

            The funeral was held Monday at the home of the deceased’s parents, south of town, and a very large procession followed the remains to the grave in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            A Logansport jury has awarded Mrs. Martin BECKER a judgment of $6000, against the Vandalia Ry Company for the death of her husband who was a fireman and killed while on duty. Deceased was a brother of Chas. BECKER, of Liberty township

 

Friday, June 2, 1893

 

            Hattie THOMSON, a former Rochester girl, died at Peru, Friday, of paralysis and the remains were brought here for burial Saturday.

 

            William HARTMAN, a demented single man aged 80 years, died at the home of his brother, Wesley [HARTMAN], east of town Friday, and the funeral was conducted by Rev. COPLEN at Mt. Hope, Sunday.

 

            Willis LINE and Isaac JONES attended the funeral of Benjamin EGMAN, of Twelve Mile, Sunday, which was held at Fletchers Lake. Deceased was a resident of this county for forty years having left here to become toll-gate keeper at Metea ten years ago. He died of cancer of the face.

 

Friday June 9, 1893

 

            One week ago Monday Uncle Sol. WAGONER left Rochester for a visit with Ohio relatives. Wednesday afternoon he started out for a drive with a friend and was suddenly taken sick on the road. He gradually grew worse and died during the night. The remains were sent home Saturday and taken to the residence of his wife, from whom he had recently separated, where Rev. GIFT conducted the funeral service, Sunday, in the presence of a large congragation of friends and old neighbors. A friend contributes the following obituary:

            Solomon WAGONER was born in Perry county, Ohio, June 11, 1807, and died of neuralgia of the heart, at Lindsay, Ohio, June 2, 1893, aged 86 years


and one day.[1]

                He was married three times. His first union was with Miss Elizabeth STOCKBERGER, to whom were born six children, three surviving -- Harrietta FREAR, Solomon S. WAGONER and Elizabeth BOYER.

                The second marriage was with Harrietta KRATZER, and to this union thirteen children were born, but four of whom survive the parents -- John WAGONER, William WAGONER, Charles WAGONER and Mary BOYER.

                The first and second wives having passed to spirit life he found a third companion in the person of Mrs. Anna EBERTS, whom he married on the 16th day of December, 1876.

                Uncle Sol. Wagoner, as he was familiarly known, had his full share of the sweets and bitter of life. Soon after coming to Fulton county he purchased the large farm one mile northeast of the city which yet bears his name, and developed it into one of the most valuable farms in the county. But he had no education and as age came upon him he became an easy victim of designing men who secured his name to notes and contracts which eventually embarrassed him so seriously that he was induced to flee to Canada for safety and afterward make such a sweeping transfer of all his property as to send him to his grave a subject of charity. He was a big hearted, ruggedly honest and popular man in his prosperous days and a stranger to want, trouble or thought of future disaster but misfortune, the bane of happiness, rushed upon him with cruel and crushing severity and all that is left of the once most conspicuous and wealthy Fulton county citizen is the emaciated structure of human clay which lies at the bottom of a grave in Odd Fellows cemetery. Such is life!

 

            Susan Jane HAWKINS was born in Bartholomew county, Indiana, April 6, 1841. She was united in marriage with Joseph BORDEN, August 30, 1864. To this union there were born ten children -- nine sons and one daughter -- two of the sons having preceded her to the spirit world. The husband together with eight children survive her. At the age of about 20 years she was baptized and united with the Wesleyan Methodist church. About twenty years ago, she with her husband, joined the Protestant Methodist church, in which she remained a member until her death, May 30, 1893. Services were conducted at the Lutheran church east of Tiosa, Thursday, at two o’clock. Sermon by Rev. A. E. GIFT.

 

            Mrs. Katherine AULT died at her home, three miles east of Akron, Saturday noon, aged 83 years. Rev. BEAR preached the funeral at the M.E. church Monday morning, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery. Grandma Ault was on old lady whom everybody loved and respected and she will be sadly missed in the community in which she lived. (AKRON)

 

Friday, June 16, 1893

 

            The numerous Rochester friends of Dr. J. A. SUTTON, formerly of this city but a resident of Argos for the last twelve years, were surprised Tuesday, to hear that he had fallen dead at his home of heart disease.

            Deceased first married a sister of our townsman, Frank DILLON, who died during the Doctor’s residence in this city, and he was afterward married to an Argos lady who with her


three children survive. He was a man of studious habits, an orator of considerable ability and recently a minister in the Christian church.

            The funeral was held at Argos yesterday and the remains brought to Odd Fellows cemetery and laid to rest beside those of his first wife.

           

            Mrs. Frank DILLON was called to Marion last week by the sickness and death of her mother.

 

            Mrs. Margeret SMITH, of Whitley county, died Saturday morning, at the residence of Henry NEWCOMB in Richland township, aged 72 years. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. ROSS, Sunday afternoon, in Richland Center.

 

            Mrs. Sol. WAGONER called at the Sentinel  office to say that the rumors and published reports of her late husband’s financial and family troubles were greatly exaggerated. She emphatically denies that Uncle Sol. was driven from home a subject of charity and says his home was alway open to him and that he had ample means to provide for his every want. She insists that Mr. Wagoner’s inclination in his decling years to listen to designing counsel was the cause of all his trouble.

 

            Miss Rose KEPNER, a pleasant young lady, well known to many of Rochester’s young people, died at Noblesville, Saturday evening of typhoid fever. Her aunt, Mrs. Harry KILLEN, left Monday to attend the funeral..

 

Friday, June 23, 1893

 

            Mrs. Polly AUSTIN, formerly a resident of this city and a sister of the late Dr. A. K. PLANK, died at the home of her son in LaPorte Thursday, aged 60 years. She had been an invalid for several years and yet her death was so unexpected that she passed away during the remporary absence of her nurse from the room.

 

            Little Harry [WILSON], the one year and a half old son of Mr. & Mrs. Joe WILSON, of Disko, died at his home last Thursday and was buried at the Odd Fellows cemetery, Friday afternoon.  (AKRON)

 

Friday, June 30, 1893

 

            The infant child of Mr. & Mrs. Tom WRIGHT died suddenly while Mrs. Wright was visiting relatives and the remains were brought here Wednesday for burial.

 

            Undertaker BARGER, of Kewanna, brought the remains of the WRIGHT child to Rochester Wednesday in an elegant little white hearse drawn by a pair of snow white horses.

 

            C. O. PHILIPS, the well known teacher has just received $1300 pension money due him on account of the death of his father while in the Rebellion. Mr. Philips says that money means a thorough college education for him.

 

            John POWNALL, aged 68, died at the home of his son, Daniel [POWNALL], in Fulton, Friday morning. Deceased was one of the earliest settlers of Liberty township and


universally known and respected as a good man.

 

Friday, July 7, 1893

 

            The deceased, Philip SHANTZ, was born in Lebanon city, Lebanon county, Pa., Sep 13, 1814, and died July 3, 1893, aged 78 years 9 months and 20 days.

            On the 16th of July, 1846, he was united in marriage with Magdolina BATZ, at Miamisburg, Montgomery county, Ohio. This union was fruitful of 6 children -- four sons and two daughters -- two sons having preceded the father in death.

            About 15 years ago he united with the Lutheran church in which church he remained a faithful member until death. The funeral was attended at the Lutheran church, near Tiosa, by a large concourse of neighbors and friends. Sermon by Rev. A. E. GIFT.

 

            Mrs. Eph. CLENDENNING, an estimable lady of Macy, died Thursday after a protracted illness and was buried at Chili, Saturday. Rev. E. J. DELP, of this city, preached two funeral discourses on the occasion, one at Macy and the other at Chili.

 

Friday, July 14, 1893

 

            John CONDREY, a Kentuckian by birth, and for several years a resident of the Germany neighborhood, died Monday evening after a long illness. He was 78 years old and Rochester Lodge F. and A. M. conducted the funeral at Leiters Ford, Wednesday.

 

            Mrs. Willis CARTER died very suddenly at the family residence in Rochester yesterday of heart failure, superinduced by child-birth. Early in the day she was safely delivered of a bright boy baby and was doing nicely when, in the afternoon, she was suddenly afflicted with heart failure and lived but a few moments. Deceased was the mother of several small children and was a kindly neighbor and devoted wife and mother.

 

            A two year old child of Mr. & Mrs. Elisha BOGESS, of Newcastle township, was buried at the Richter grave yard, Sunday, Rev. MEREDITH officiating.

 

            The six year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Leander FLINN died of diphtheria at the family residence, in the northwest part of town, and was buried at Burton, Sunday.

 

            The twin babies of Mr. & Mrs. Charles WINES, died Friday and Saturday and were buried Sunday.

 

            The remains of Mrs. John DAWSON, of Peru, were brought here for burial Saturday.

 

Friday, July 21, 1893

 

            Simon DITMIRE and his mother were called to Ohio Monday by the death of Mrs. Ditmire’s sister. They will visit relatives for a fortnight.

 

 


 

 

Friday, July 28, 1893

 

            Little Mud Lake, seven miles northeast of town, was the scene of a deplorable death Sunday evening. Nelson DRUDGE, the fifteen year old and only son of Mr. & Mrs. Frank DRUDGE, who live near the lake, went down with a crowd of other boys of his age to take a bath. The crowd had been in the water but a few minutes when Nelson accidentally jumped in beyond his depth and, as none of the boys could swim he drowned right in their midst and sank to the muddy bottom. The alarm was at once given and soon a large crowd of people assembled and the search for the body was commenced. It was nearly midnight when a sulky hayrake was lowered where the body was last seen and by means of ropes it was pulled ashore, bearing the dead body. The death was a crushing blow to the parents and they have the sympathy of a very large circle of acquaintances and friends.

 

            Mrs. Lincoln CONNER, of Macy, went to a huckleberry marsh, Friday, to pick some berries. She was overcome by the heat and taken home in a very critical condition but rapidly recovered so that she was well enough on Saturday that her husband, who is a minister, left home to fill an appointment. He had not been gone long until she was suddenly taken worse and died before the husband could get home. She leaves a family of five or six children and was 34 years old.

 

            George ALLMAN, of Argos, came to Rochester yesterday evening to get some information concernine one D. M. EBERHARD who was killed by the early morning L. E. & W. passenger train. Eberhard used to live with Jefferson HUNTER, west of town but is now a married man living at Columbia City. No particulars of the death could be obtained at the time of going to press.

 

Friday, August 4, 1893

 

            The Sentinel  briefly reported the accidental death of D. M. EBERHARD, on the railroad near Argos last week, giving none of the particulars because none were at hand. The Plymouth Republican  says it is supposed that Eberhard had rode from Columbia City on the cars to Plymouth, and intended walking the remainder of the distance, and becoming tired sat down to rest and fell asleep never more to wake; but just how he came by his death will perhaps never be known. Both arms were severed from his body at the shoulder, the top of his head and the left side of his face were terribly cut, the skull being crushed in; his body was cut diagonally, exposing the entralls, and left foot cut off just above the ankle, being held to the leg only by a bit of skin.

 

            Beneville GUISE, a native of Pennsylvania but for nearly forty years a resident of this county, died at his home near Kewanna, Wednesday, aged 74 years. In 1842 he was united in marriage with Sarah WENTZEL, who died in 1865 leaving six children. He afterward married Mrs. Anna MILLER and to this union were born 10 children. Deceased was a man widely known for his integrity and generosity and his prosperity gave him additional influence as a wealthy citizen.

            The funeral was conducted at Kewanna, Friday, by Rev. A. E. GIFT, of this city. The concourse of people attending being one of the largest ever seen in Kewanna.

 


 

            Mrs. Clara YOUNT who has been typewriting in Chicago for a year, returned two weeks ago prostrated with consumption from which she died Sunday morning. She was about twenty-four years old the widow of Eli YOUNT, who died five years ago, and the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John COHLER. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. COOK at the Baptist church Monday afternoon.

 

            Mrs Mary KING died Monday at her home in Newcastle township, aged 40 years. She was a goodly lady and her demise is mourned by a large circle of friends. She was buried Tuesday afternoon at Richter’s graveyard.

 

Friday, August 11, 1893

 

            There was universal sorrow on the streets and in the homes of Rochester Monday morning when it was known that Mrs. Isaac ONSTOTT had suddenly died in child birth. The deceased, Hattie OSBORN, came to Rochester from Rensselaer a bride scarcely a year ago but she made friends rapidly and was universally esteemed as an admirable christian lady.

            The obituary read at her funeral said:

                When she was but three years old her father died, and death called her mother a year later, she was left an orphan at the age of four, since which time she made her home with her brother, John OSBORN, and her sister, Mrs. Ella COLE, until Oct 20, 1892, when she was united in wedlock with Isaac ONSTOTT. At the age of fifteen she was converted and united with the St. John’s M.E. church, of New Albany. She remained a faithful member, in full fellowship with that church until Feb 20, 1893, when she, with her husband, united with this, the First Baptist church. As mourners, there are six sisters and two brothers, together with a very large circle of friends here and at other places where she has lived.

            The funeral service was held at the First Baptist Church Tuesday afternoon when her popularity and the universal sorrow for her untimely death was attested by a turn out of an unusually large concourse of people.

 

            Oscar COPLEN, of Kansas, son of Mr. & Mrs. Isaac COPLEN, of Newcastle township, was instantly killed August 4. While hauling hay his team became frightened at some cattle and plunged and kicked him down, the horses and wagon passing over him causing instant death. The deceased was 32 years 1 month and 22 days old. He leaves a wife and two children to mourn his death.

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John GINTHER is dead of heart failure.

 

            The two and a half years old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. BEEHLER, of Richland township, was buried at Richland Center, Wednesday.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. A. N. COLE, Mr. & Mrs. J. F. WARREN, Mrs. E. L. CLARK, Miss Carrie CLARK, Mrs. Robinson SPRIGGS and Messrs J. F. and J. L. OSBORNE, of Rensselaer, attended the funeral of Mrs. Ike ONSTOTT.

 

 


 

 

Friday, August 18, 1893

 

            The Kansas Advance, published at Chetopa, Kansas, gives the following details of the horrible death of Oscar COPLEN, formerly of this county, a brief mention of which was made in the last issue.

            He was working with several others, making hay about two miles from home. He had a load of hay on his wagon and had started homeward and was passing through a gate when his horses took fright and started to run away. He ran in front of them and caught them by the reins, when they reared and gave a plunge forward, striking him in the breast with their feet causing internal injuries. He fell to the ground in a dying condition without speaking, breathed only a few minuttes and died.

            The paper’s tribute to his worth as a citizen is a high compliment to the life work of the deceased. He was a leading churchman, a devoted husband and father and leaves a young wife and two sons. He was 32 years old and the funeral was held at Cecil church near his home.

 

            The Indianapolis papers record the death of Rev. Samuel McELWEE, formerly well known at Perrysburg where he has many relatives and where he was a Methodist circuit rider.

            His death was caused by the hand of a fiend. In 1890, accompanied by his wife, he attended the wedding of a friend, the Rev. James McCARTY, at a country church near Muncie. The wedding dinner was placed on the table and all the invited guests went to the church to witness the ceremony, after which they returned to the house. Unconscious of the great danger that threatened them they sat down to partake of the dinner, which, during their absence had been poisoned. Twenty of the guests were taken sick, but all recovered with the exception of Mr. McELWEE, who after three years of suffering died.

            He was a man of considerable prominence in his church and his remains were buried at Kokomo.

 

            James SMILEY died at his home at Hammond the 6th inst. from a brief illness of congestion of the stomach. His father lives in this city.

 

            Mrs. Elizabeth BUCHANAN, widow of Boyd BUCHANAN, died at her home at Fulton Friday, and was buried in the old cemetery here on Sunday.  -- Logansport Journal.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Eli SWIHART went to Ohio last Saturday and returned Tuesday in fair health and Thursday morning at 3 a.m. the family and neighbors were shocked to be aroused by the information that Mrs. Swihart was dead, having sank to death in an apparent smothering spell from heart disease and dropsy with which she had been afflicted for some years. (PALESTINE)

 

Friday, August 25, 1893

 

            Rev. Noah HEETER, of Akron, died Friday after a short but painful illness, aged 66 years. He was one of the early and prominent settlers of Henry township and always an enthusiastic advocate of the nobler purposes of life. Of late years he has been a minister of the Progressive Dunkard Church and he has preached all over the Akron, North Manchester and Mentone vicinities.

            The funeral took place Sunday at 10 o’clock a.m., conducted by Rev. PERRY and


Rev. SUMMERS of North Manchester. Interment at Hoover’s Station.

 

            The hearses have been busy for a week hauling little white coffins hither and thither. The fatality among children has been quite extensive and if the hot, dry weather continues there is no hope of a favorable change. The list of deaths reported contains the infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Jake STINGLEY, of Fulton; the year and a half old son of Mr. & Mrs. Grant HATCH; the little daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Henry ROSS; the infant son of Willis CARTER; a six months old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Luther WAGE; an infant son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. HAYWARD; and an infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Bert HOOVER.

 

            We are pained to announce the death of Mrs. Allen BYBEE, who died at the home of her husband, two and a half miles southwest of Mentone, this county. The deceased was about fifty years of age, and leaves a family of three children besides her husband. Her death occurred on Wednesday, the 16th inst., after an illness of about four months.  -- Warsaw Times.

 

            An infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Geo. HAYWARD died Sunday of cholera infantum.

 

Friday, September 1, 1893

 

            The little son born to Mr. & Mrs. Robert MARSH, last Wednesday, lived but a day and the funeral was held Friday morning.

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Milo CHESTNUT died early Friday morning of cholera infantum. The babe was only six weeks old but being an only child its death was a severe blow to the parents.

 

            The two year old boy of Mr. & Mrs. BOCK of Green Oak, died Tuesday, of dysentary, interment at Mt. Zion, Wednesday.

 

            John MATHENY, a well known citizen of Argos, who has been a Perkins wind mill agent in Fulton and Marshall counties for many years, died at his home last Monday.

 

            Mrs. Ida MATTHEWS nee BEATTIE departed this life, last Friday, at her home near Fletchers Lake, aged about 27 years. She was well and popularly known in Rochester where she lived prior to her marriage, and a host of friends mourn her early demise. She leaves a husband and two children.

 

            Mrs. Elsie RICEBERGER, who had gone to Wisconsin for treatment for consumption, died in that far away state last Wednesday, and was brought to Akron for interment last Saturday. She was a bright, scarcely one year old bride, and her early death is a sad bereavement to her husband and friends. (AKRON)

 

Friday, September 8, 1893

 

JOE BOWEN (Biography)

            Uncle Joe BOWEN has long been known as “the man without a home” during the assessing season on account of a habit he has of wandering about in some secluded part of the


country while the tin box brigade is on duty. Formerly he only had to lose himself for sixty days, while now with the county assessor looking after the tax dodgers continually the old man has no rest. Joe had not shown his handsome countenance in Rochester since the first day of last April until Monday when he visited the office of his attorneys, and finding them out inquired where they were. When informed that they were down at the court house attending the opening of commissioners court, he wanted to know what the commissioners were in session for. He was told that they were looking after the tax business. He then asked if County Assessor ORR was in town and when informed that he was and that he looked like he hadn’t had hold of a tax dodger for a week, he hastily grabbed his precious valise and proceeded to raise a cloud of dust in the direction of the Starke county huckleberry marshes.

 

            Moses NELLANS, one of the pioneers of Newcastle township, died Wednesday morning, of dropsy of the heart, aged 67 years and the funeral will be held at Yellow Creek today.

            Deceased was one of the prominent farmers of Newcastle township, and was widely known as an honorable citizen and good man. He leaves a large family of grown children.

 

            Mrs. Jacob HARTMAN, of this city, was found cold in death in her bed yesterday morning having sank to death from a quiet sleep. She had suffered with consumption for some time and in one of the sinking spells incident to the disease, died without the knowledge of her family which surrounded her.

 

            A little grandchild of Rev. E. T. HOCHSTEDLER died Wednesday evening, at his residence, of cholera infantum. The remains were taken to Elkhart for burial.

 

            Miss Emma GRABER attended the funeral of a relative at North Judson, Tuesday.

 

Friday, September 15, 1893

 

            A little son of Mr. & Mrs. John COAKLEY, died of diphtheria, Saturday.

 

            Mr. J. K. NELLANS, of Nellans, Kansas, came to attend the funeral of his father, Moses NELLANS, but owing to a delayed train failed to reach here until after the funeral.

 

            The bright little daughter of Mr. & Mrs. A. BARRETT was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery last Thursday afternoon.

 

            The little family of Lawson TOWNSEND was sadly bereaved last Saturday night by the death of his wife who had been sick only a few days with typhoid fever. She was aged 31 years. Leaves one little girl of five and a very devoted husband. The funeral was preached at the Christian church by a dunkard minister from Manchester and her remains laid away to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery. Mrs. Townsend was a quiet, unassuming woman and won the respect of all her neighbors and friends.

 

Friday, September 22, 1893

 

            Mrs. George CARTER departed this life Tuesday evening, after a lingering illness, surrounded by her family and neighbors, aged 68 years.


            Mrs. Carter was the daughter of William and Kesiah STOCK, born in the southwest part of Indiana, March 2, 1825, where she grew to womanhood. On the 21st day of March, 1845, she was united in marriage with her now bereaved husband, George W. CARTER, in Marshall county, Indiana. To them were born sixteen children, nine of whom survive the beloved wife and mother.

            Mr. & Mrs. Carter came to this county immediately after their marriage and have resided here since, where they made many friends who mourn the loss with the bereaved family of a kind mother, a loving wife and a good neighbor.

            The funeral was held at the family residence, yesterday at 2:00 p.m.

 

            Mark KILLEN has been appointed guardian of the heirs of John NELLANS, deceased.

 

            Uncle Billy THOMPSON died at his home in Akron, Monday evening after a long and painful illness. He was one of the pioneer residents of Fulton county, and until a few years ago was one of the most energetic workers in the upbuilding of his surroundings.

 

            The ten year old son of Dayton TOWNSEND died at his home near Mentone last Sunday evening after the illness of only a few minutes. (AKRON)

 

Friday, September 29, 1893

 

            Another friendly horse race in a buggy has been run in Fulton county and a newly made grave in Wayne township is the result. Alfred MULLENS, 19 year old son of Lewis MULLENS, started to Fletchers Lake church Thursday evening in his buggy. With him were two little girls and on the road he was overtaken by his friend, Joe BEATTIE, who rode along side the buggy. The boys, for they were scarcely men yet, had frequently tried the speed of their horses in a friendly dash and as they rode along kept letting them go until they were racing. Beattie was in the lead when Mullen’s buggy struck something and was upset, throwing all of the occupants out. The horse ran away and Beattie, thinking no one was seriously hurt, ran his horse to overtake and bring back the runaway. When he got back he found the little girls uninjured but Alf was suffering frightfully from bruises on his head which were inflicted when he fell out of the buggy. He was at once taken to the home of George ROUCH where a physician done everything possible for him until midnight when he slowly sank to death.

            The funeral was one of the largest ever seen in Wayne township and the grief of the family was heartrending but such bitter lessons have little influence outside the immediate vicinity. Boys and men will continue to run horses on the highways just the same as if poor Alf Mullens had not met such a cruel death, and broken necks, broken limbs and bruised bodies will continue to horrify the people as the result of friendly horse racing on the road.

 

            The Argos Reflector  says O. B. HOLMAN, better known as “Old Bill,” the gray and grizzley veteran of a thousand sprees, is lamenting the death of his oldest son, B. F. [HOLMAN], which recently occurred at Butte City, Mont. He was 48 years old, and was a gradusate of Notre Dame University.

 

            An infant daughter of David GOOD, who resides north of town, was buried Monday, at the Nichols cemetery.


Friday, October 6, 1893

 

            Another of John COAKLEY’s children died of diphtheria Saturday. This leaves but one and that is sorely afflicted, and may not recover.

 

Friday, October 13, 1893

 

            The announcement, Sunday morning, that Mrs. Tina SMITH VIERS was dead was a shock to Rochester. She had been sick but a few days and the spirit of her new born babe accompanied her into the great Beyond. She was born in Miami county 26 years and 7 months ago, but spent most of her life in this county and city where she married Clarence VIERS, the Akron miller, in April, 1888. She was a frequent contributor to the Sentinel, some of its most argumentative and eloquent discussions on questions of morals etc. being products of her pen. She was an enthusiastic worker in the temperance cause and of her christian zeal her obituary biographer says:

                At the early age of thirteen Tina was converted and united with the Ebenezer Baptist church by Rev. A. E. BABCOCK. Since her conversion she has been a constant student of the Holy Bible -- to it she has gone for instruction, for comfort and for joy. It was her constant habit before retiring each night to pillow her soul with the comforting trust of God’s holy word. She has been true to her God and to her church. She often lamented that her home (which for some time has been at Akron) was so far from her home church, which she loved so dearly.

            The funeral services were held at the Baptist church, Monday evening, when Rev. COOK delivered a touching eulogy on the dead sister and a very large concourse of people followed the remains to their last resting place beneath the pines in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            The allotted three score and ten years of active life left John PENCE, the widely known farmer, a physical wreck and he died yesterday morning aged nearly 76 years. He was born in Shelbyville, Kentucky, but emigrated to Indiana in 1836 where he married Miss Jane BREWER, and then moved to Fulton county in 1839. Five children were born to this union only two of whom, Wm. PENCE and Mrs. Isabelle YOUNG, survive. Some years after the death of the first wife, which occurred in 1850, he was again married to Miss Mary E. FERRIS, who survives and to which union were born seven daughters, five of whom survive, viz: Mrs. Jas. P. STINSON, Mrs. Neal LOWE, Mrs. Al. KUFFEL, Mrs. John LOWE, and Mrs. John OLIVER.

            The deceased was an active member of the Methodist church for forty years and his sturdy manhood, thrifty disposition and the purity of character gave him a wide reputation as one of the noblest men in his county.

            The funeral will be held at Union church near the family residence at 2 o’clock this afternoon, Rev. E. J. DELP officiating, when the Odd Fellows will take charge of the remains and deposit them in their final resting place at Mt. Zion cemetery.

 

Friday, October 20, 1893

 

            Blanche L. EATON, aged 20 years 5 months and 4 days, passed peacefully to her rest October 13, 1893.

            She had lived in the family of Mrs. Elizabeth NEW for several years, and by her gentle, loving ways and kind disposition won for herself the love and esteem of all. She united


with the Christian church when 16 years old, before disease had claimed her for its victim, and we consign her to her rest with the full confidence that she shall receive the reward of the faithful.

            Her pure, short life is ended, but the radiance of her love will still shine on in the hearts of those whom her smile has been wont to gladden.

 

            A little girl was born to Mr. & Mrs. Alex RUH Sunday, and died Monday.

 

            The infant son of Eliash BOGGS died at Bloomingsburg Wednesday, of cholera infantum. The remains were taken to Syracuse for interment.

 

            Freeman GILMAN, formerly of this city, died at his home in Logansport, last Sunday afternoon of congestion of the lungs. He was sixty some years old. The remains will arrive here this morning for burial.

 

Friday, October 27, 1893

 

            The will of the late John PENCE has been probated and Mrs. PENCE is named as executrix.

 

            And now it is said Sylvester NIXON did not suicide with poison. The attending physician says he died a natural death.

 

Friday, November 3, 1893

 

            The Ernsperger family were advised by wire, Saturday, of the death of Mrs. Laura LEVENS, daughter of Frank ERNSPERGER, formerly of this city.

 

            Dr. PATTISON, of Winamac, who has practiced medicine there for many years and is known personally or by reputation to many of our readers, dropped dead on the street there, Thursday evening, of last week, from heart failure. He leaves a wife, two grown sons and a little daughter.

 

Friday, November 10, 1893

 

            When Joe T. STEPHENSON was brought home from Kansas City, where he had been engaged in newspaper work for two years, by his brother, Rome [STEPHENSON], two weeks ago, it was painfully evident to his numerous Rochester friends that “his days were numbered.” He had an affection of laryngitis which grew worse from day to day and on Monday morning at an early hour, he passed away.

            He was born in Wabash thirty-nine years ago and came to Rochester with his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Hugh M. STEPHENSON, in 1878. He was the personification of geniality and good fellowship and none knew him but to admire his many genteel traits of character. He was a newspaper man of ability and was getting well to the front on one of the big Kansas City dailies.

            The funeral was held Wednesday, at the residence of the deceased’s brother, Attorney Rome Stephenson, when Grace church choir rendered some appropriate selections. Rev. BRIGGS preached a short and eloquent discourse and Rev. ROTH pronounced a touching


eulogy on the dead.

            Interment was made in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            After a quiet and uneventful life of 81 years father Adam AWALT peacefully sank to death at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Leet COOPER, on Monday morning. He had been failing from old age for some years and his death came as the natural result of a worn out constitution.

            Deceased, with his wife, came to Rochester about fourteen years ago and the latter died in 1887. The children are Mrs. C. C. WOLF, Mrs. Chas. W. CAFFYN and Mrs. Leet COOPER, of this city; John AWALT, of Cincinnati; George AWALT, of Chili; Mrs. RAIDENOUR, of Arkansas City, Kansas; and Mrs. BLASSINGHAM, of Logansport.

            The funeral was conducted at the residence, Wednesday afternoon, by Rev. ROTH, of the Presbyterian church, after which a large number of friends of the family followed the remains to their last resting place in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            In the death of Joseph REED, Saturday morning, Fulton county lost another of its honored pioneers. He had been a great sufferer with paralysis and death was therefore a sweet relief to him at the age of 78. He was a Pennsylvanian by birth and married Lavina KLINGEL in 1837 who survives the husband and father. Eleven children were born to the union, only five of whom are alive, viz: Schuyler REED, the barber, Mrs. F. M. REID, Mrs. Herman METZLER, Mrs. Jacob VanTRUMP and Mrs. James ONSTOTT.

            The funeral service was held at the residence of the deceased Monday afternoon when Elder E. J. DELP preached a very touching and eulogistic discourse.

 

            Miss Nancy McBRIDE, who resided about two miles southwest of town, and whose illness was reported in the Sentinel  two weeks ago, died Sunday morning in her 75th year. She has been ill for several weeks, and her death was not entirely unexpected. She slept well until 4 o’clock Sunday morning, when some medicine was given her, shortly after which she suddenly expired. She had long been a sufferer from heart trouble and this was, no doubt, the immediate cause of her sudden demise. Miss McBride has been a resident of Fulton county for forty-four years, having removed here from Ohio. She was in all respects a good woman, and will be greatly missed, especially by the members of her family, to whom she was tirelessly and unselfishly devoted. Being of a retiring disposition she was little known outside of her own family circle, every member of whom was sincerely and deeply devoted to her. Funeral services were held at the residence at 10 o’clock a.m. Tuesday. Interment at Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Mrs. TAYLOR and Mrs. E. ADAMS, of Huntington, attended the funeral of their brother, Mr. Joseph REED.

 

            Dr. F. M. STEPHENSON, of Indianapolis, was here with his brother, Joe [STEPHENSON], for some days before he died. Frank [STEPHENSON] now owns a valuable home in Indianapolis and is prospering nicely.

 

            Mrs. Ella MITCHELL, of Peru, and Dr. F. M. HECTOR, of Indianapolis, were in Rochester Tuesday to pay the last tribute of respect to their dead friend, Joe STEPHENSON.

 


 

Friday, November 17, 1893

 

            As indicated in the last issue of the Sentinel, the paper had not reached the hands of its readers when the spirit of the noble wife of Elder E. J. DELP took its flight to the great beyond. Mrs. Delp’s ill health of several years duration culminated in bronchial consumption which quickly precipitated her to death.

            Her maiden name was Anna MOON and she was born in Ohio nearly sixty-four years ago. Early in 1850 she married E. J. Delp and they came to Indiana where the husband entered the ministry of the Baptist church in which calling he became one of his church’s most faithful and efficiant workers. In the obituary read at the funeral service the biographer of the dead wife and mother said:

                Being the mother of twelve children, nine of whom are living -- five boys and four girls -- her life was full of duties and cares of the home. And these were greatly increased because of the necessary absence of her companion a great part of the time. For two long years brother Delp was at the front battling for liberty and union, and for twenty-six years his services were given to Christ and his kingdom. During these years of absence the entire management of the household affairs, as well as the superintendence of the little farm, depended upon the wife and mother. One less devoted and strong would have faltered or given up in despair, but she did her duty nobly,  the welfare of her husband and children being the incentive to lead her on. Those twenty-eight when to many burdens were laid upon her were years of sorrow, toil, hardships and anxiety on the one hand but upon the other there was much peace and joy for she was in the bosom of her family and she loved to serve her own, and it must be said that she did what she could. Her husband, in thinking over these years of toil said that if anyone ever deserved heaven on the ground of care and burden bearing, surely she did.

                The husband, nine children, a mother eighty-four years old, two brothers, one sister and numerous other relatives survive. The funeral service at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon was conducted by Rev. COOK and Elder BABCOCK after which the Ladies Relief Corps., of which deceased was a member, paid the fraternal tribute of respect and then the largest cortage seen in the city for years followed the remains to the grave in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Daniel STERNER came to Rochester from Pierceton about 1880. He was a Pennsylvanian by birth and an active man in the prime of his manhood but disease and old age came upon him and he died at the home of his daughter Mrs. Chas. SISSON Wednesday evening aged 84 years, his last wife having preceded him in death about seven years. He was married twice, three children having been born to the first wife, and three -- Mrs. Lon RANNELLS, Mrs. Chas. SISSON and Walter STERNER -- to the latter.

            The funeral service was conducted at the residence by Rev. BRIGGS Thursday afternoon and interment was made at Odd Fellows.

 

            Maynard GOODWIN lived with his mother in the northwest part of the city where he left her in her usual health Saturday morning, when he left for his days work at Snyder & Dillon’s wagon factory. On account of the distance, he took his dinner with him and on returning in the evening found his mother lying on a half made bed cold in death. She had evidently been at work making the bed and was fatally stricken with heart failure with which she was periodically afflicted.


            Mrs. Goodwin spent most of her life in Logansport, where she had many relatives and the remains were taken there for interment Monday. She was sixty-five years and four months old.

 

            Dr. A. BROWN was called to Chicago, Saturday, by the death of his sister.

 

            In the death of Henry SHULER, of near Roann, Miami county lost one of its pioneers and most substantial citizens. He was a relative of the Shulers in this city.

 

            Miss Flo DELP, who held a lucrative position as chief typewriter and stenographer in a Chicago wholesale house, has resigned and will return to this city to live with her father, Rev. E. J. DELP.

 

            Mrs. Ann WEIGHT, wife of George WEIGHT, departed this life at 3 a.m., last Thursday morning after a brief illness. She leaves a husband, three children, two brothers, three sisters and numerous friends to mourn her loss. She was the daughter of the late Michael SHADEL. Funeral services and interment at Leiters Ford, Friday. (DELONG)

 

Friday, November 24, 1893

 

            Mrs. Rose BRACKETT WILLIAMS, wife of Prof. W. J. WILLIAMS and daughter of Mrs. Vernon GOULD, died at her home in Kokomo, Thursday evening of last week, aged thirty-five years. Consumption, superinduced by la-grippe, was her disease and neither the most skillful medical treatment, the constant care of a devoted husband and relatives, the invigorating atmosphere of the Rocky Mountain regions, nor the health giving environments of the best sanitariums could stay the steady approach of death.

            Deceased grew to womanhood in this city where she graduated from the Rochester High school and afterward finished her education in an Ohio Young ladies Seminary. She was married to her surviving husband at the age of twenty. Three lovely children are the fruit of the union and the mother leaves them the richest legacy life affords -- the example of sweet resignation, constant love of home and family and friends, and filial devotion to the church and the noblest purposes of life.

            The remains were taken to Franklin, Saturday, where the neighbors with whom she had so pleasantly associated for several years, turned out in large numbers to attest their respect for the life just closed, to mingle their grief with that of the husband, children and relatives, and to say the last farewell at a grave which was selected in the Franklin cemetery by the deceased as her ideal home of the dead.

 

            The Indianapolis Sentinel  says Joseph E. PENROSE, a switchman, employed in the Pan-Handle yards east of that city, was killed while making a coupling Thursday night. In some manner he missed his footing and fell beneath the train and was horribly mangled.

            Penrose formerly lived at Metea, a village ten miles north of Logansport. His life was insured for $1,000, payable to his wife.

 

            Ira EDWARDS, an unmarried man of thirty-five, died of consumption, Thursday, at Walnut, and was buried Friday, at Reesters, Rev. DELP officiating at the funeral.

 


 

Friday, December 1, 1893

 

            After a lingering illness from dropsy, George INGRAHAM died at the family residence west of town, Monday morning, aged 53 years. He had been a resident of this county 31 years and leaves a wife and five children.

            The funeral was largely attended at Trinity church, Tuesday afternoon, Rev. L. S. FISHER officiating.

 

            Z. C. BUNNELL, the new grocer left Tuesday for Gilead in response to a telegram announcing the death of his father. (GRANT)

 

            Last Monday morning Mr. Henry PRESSNAL walked up town, as was his usual custom, stepped into Patterson’s hardware store and while in there talking he fell over in an unconscious state. He was carried to his home and a physician was summoned and everything was done that loving hands could do but all to no avail. He never regained consciousness and on Tuesday morning died. He was buried Thursday at one o’clock by the I.O.O.F. of which he was an honorable member. He leaves a loving and devoted wife and six children to mourn his loss. (AKRON)

 

            Old Mr. BUTLER who has been making his home with his niece, Mrs. S. J. RARRICK, died very suddenly Saturday morning. He was buried at Leiters, Sunday afternoon. (DELONG)

 

Friday, December 8, 1893

 

            Liberty township lost one of its oldest and best citizens in the death of Marion DAY which occurred Friday. He was an active and effective churchman, an honest and progressive citizen, a kind father and husband and a companionable gentleman. He leaves a wife and several children one of whom is Mrs. Chas. STIVER, of this city.

 

Friday, December 15, 1893

 

            Trustee Wm. J. MILLER, of Liberty township, made a gallant fight for life, but his constitution was unable to withstand the ravages of the disease, la grippe, and he passed away Sunday morning peacefully, and surrounded by his family.

            Deceased was born in Pennsylvania 63 years and 2 months ago, and came to Indiana in 1851, soon after which his young wife died, and he returned to the east. Five years later he came with his brother, Samuel [MILLER], to this county again, and was united in marriage with Joann ALLEN, daughter of the late Father Obed ALLEN, who, with two sons, Billy and Lee [MILLER], survive.

            Four years ago he was elected by the democrats of Liberty township as trustee, and he was filling the office to such a degree of satisfaction as an official scarcely ever accomplishes. Honest, fair, candid, conscientious, progressive and economic, he possessed all of the necessary elements of a popular citizen, and his life work closed just as his great usefulness was becoming known. He was always an active churchman and a model citizen, and in his death the neighborhood, the church and the schools lose one of their strongest pillars.

            The funeral was held at the U.B. church in Fulton Tuesday, when Rev. RUPLEY preached a touching discourse and then the remains were followed to the grave in Antioch


cemetery by a large procession of friends.

 

            The community was shocked Friday morning when the word went out that John GOTTSCHALK was dead. He had been ailing for two weeks, but he was not considered dangerous. His death was the result of neuralgia of the heart, and Rev. J. T. KEESEY, his former pastor and friend, writes the following memorial on his life and death:

                John Gottschalk was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, August 28, 1844, and died at his home in Rochester, aged 49 years and 3 months. He was married to Miss Elizabeth STOCKDILL, of Adams county, Indiana, April 16, 1866. He moved to Fulton county in the fall of 1874, and on the 9th day of February, ‘79, his wife preceded him to the spirit world, leaving him with six small children to mourn the loss of a devoted mother. Thus Brother Gottschalk battled with the ills of life and succeeded in keeping his children together. In 1882 he married Mrs. Katie REYNOLDS, who survives him. In January 1880 he was happily converted and united with the United Brethren church in a revival held in Antioch school house by the writer. At his death he was a member of Grace M.E. church, of Rochester. He leaves three daughters, four sons, six grandchildren, six brothers, four sisters, a devoted wife and a host of friends to mourn his sudden departure. He was an honored member of the Knights of Honor and a comrade of McClung Post of the Grand Army of the Republic. He fought in the war of the rebellion and was a brave soldier. Brother Gottschalk was known as an industrious citizen, a kind neighbor and a faithful christian. Our loss is his gain. The battle is fought and victory won. He is resting from his labor and his works do follow him.

            The funeral was held at Grace church Sunday afternoon, Rev. KEESEY officiating, after which the G.A.R. escorted the remains to their final resting place in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Paul SCHINDLER, one of Aubbeenaubbee township’s oldest citizens, died at the residence of Mrs. McCLURE, in Richland township, Saturday, where he was taken sick with la grippe a few days before, as he was on his way to Argos. He was 76 years old, and the funeral was held at Mt. Zion.

 

            Mrs. Gertrude Aurelia YOUNG was born at Cobleskill, New york, on the 21st day of August, 1834, and died suddenly at the home of her son-in-law, Mr. M. A. BAKER, in this city, Friday evening, of paralysis of the heart. The greater part of her life was passed in her native town, where, on the 25th day of January, 1854, she was married to Hon. William H. YOUNG, a distinguished lawyer and jurist of Southern New York, who died in August, 1874. Three children, Dewin Ramsey YOUNG, Lyman Sanford YOUNG and Marie YOUNG, now the wife of M. A. BAKER, were the issue of this marriage. Mrs. Young was loved by all who knew her, and was a general favorite among her associates.

            Her kindness of heart and generosity were well known. Possessed of a cheerful and happy disposition, that always saw the bright side of things, her presence brought comfort to the afflicted with whom she came in contact. In early life she united with Zion Evangelical Luthern church, of Cobleskill, and has ever since been a faithful and consistent Christian woman.

            On Sunday afternoon, after a brief and appropriate service at the house, conducted by the Rev. Father LORD, her son left with the remains for the east where she will be buried beside her husband and deceased son. Mrs. Baker was unable to go east, by reason of her


 illness.

 

            Dr. J. M. MORRIS, of Fulton, was called to Ohio, Friday, by the death of his father.

 

            Ora JEWELL, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. W. S. JEWELL, died Sunday evening aged one year and eight months. Funeral services at Evangelical church, Wednesday.

 

            Daniel BIDDINGER, of Leiters Ford, died last week aged about fifty-one years. He was a very active citizen.

 

            Several of our people attended the funeral of Mr. Daniel BIDDINGER at Leiters last Friday. (DELONG)

 

Friday, December 22, 1893

 

            A report reached the city late yesterday evening that the four year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. James FRY, of near Fletchers Lake, had met a horrible death from fire. The mother left the house for a short time and when she returned the little one was burned to a crisp, her clothes evidently having caught fire from the stove, and she died soon after. No further particulars could be obtained.

 

            Mrs. Simon HERALD died Tuesday at her residence, about five miles northwest of Rochester, aged 58 years. She had for some time been a sufferer from dropsy, which finally caused her death. She leaves a husband and five daughters and one son, all grown.

 

            Mr. REITER, of Rochester, has been appointed administrator of the late John GOTTSCHALK’s estate.

 

            Mrs. Chas. DAVIDSON was called to Ohio, Sunday, by the death of her father.

 

Friday, December 29, 1893

 

            Peter MEREDITH was born in Coshocton county, O., March 24, 1810, and died at Bloomingsburg, Dec 23, 1893, being 83 years 9 months and 28 days. He was married to Elizabeth HAYES Aug 24, 1832, to which union were born three children in Ohio. In 1837 he moved to Indiana with his little family and located on a claim in Newcastle township, which is now owned by Henry HAIMBAUGH. He cleared and improved this farm and made it one of the finest in the county. Here his wife died July 17, 1855, leaving him with six children. On April 28, 1857, he married Mary ADAMS, to whom were born two children -- a son and daughter. In the spring of 1863 his second wife died, since which time he has lived mostly with his children. Of his ten children -- six sons: Orange and Jessie, of Bloomingsburg, Nathaniel, of Rochester, Thomas, of Augusta, Kans., George, of Ashland, Neb., and Frank of Benton, Wash., and one daughter, Mrs. Sallie JEFFRIES, of Mentone, survive him. He was a charter member of Yellow Creek Baptist church, and remained a faithful and consistent member of that church all his life. He had been a great sufferer for years but showed a wonderful spirit of patience and bore afflictions with christian fortitude. His remains were interred at the Yellow Creek church cemetery, Sunday, attended by a large concourse of his children, grandchildren and friends. Rev. DELP officiated.


 

            Mr. Thomas J. NEW died in this city last Friday, aged almost fifty-two years. He was a native of this county, resided here most of his life, and was a well known and worthy citizen enjoying the confidence and esteem of all his acquaintances. He was a soldier in the late war. The funeral services were largely attended at the residence on Sunday, and the remains were escorted to Odd Fellows cemetery by Mc Clung Post, G.A.R., Co. G., Indiana Infantry, and the Citizens Band. He leaves one sister, four brothers and many friends to mourn his death. The deceased had long been a consistent and faithful member of the Christian church. Elder E. J. DELP preached the funeral sermon.

 

            Miss Lizzie PHILLIPS, aged about 80 years, died last Tuesday at the residence of Jacob MURRELL, three miles east of town. Funeral services by Rev. Eli RODGERS, and interment at Richland Center, Wednesday.

 

            A young lady named BARRETT, aged 15 years, residing at Big Foot, died on the 21st inst. and was buried at Sycamore Chapel.

 

            The brief mention in the Sentinel  last week of the horrible death of the little daughter of Mr. & Mrs. James FRY, of Fletchers Lake, was correct except as to details. The mother left the little girl -- nearly three years old -- just long enough to step outdoors and feed the chickens, when she returned to find her clothes all burned from her. How she caught fire is a mystery, as there was but little fire in the stove, and there was no evidence of her having molested that. She showed no sign of suffering any pain whatever, and sank to death three hours after she was burned as gently as though sleeping.

 

            Editor Milo MEREDITH, of the Wabash Times, came over to attend his grandfather’s funeral at Yellow Creek, Sunday, and made a pleasant call on the Sentinel  Monday.

 

            John F. WISE, the Maxinkuckee merchant, died at Phoenix, Arizona, a few days ago.

 

            Mrs. Mary MERNAN died at the county farm on Friday. She came here from Ireland when she was young, and lived for a number of years in Wayne township. She became badly crippled, and having no relatives to care for her, was taken to the county farm, where she has been for two and a half years. The remains were taken charge of by her guardian, Kyran WALSH, and buried in the Catholic cemetery in Wayne township. She was a member of the Catholic church.

 

            Quite a large number of people attended the funeral of Father MEREDITH at Yellow Creek Church, Sunday. (BLOOMINGSBURG)

 

            The funeral of the infant child of S. L. KISSLING was preached at the Christian church last Sunday by Rev. HOPKINS, after which the little one was laid to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery.  (AKRON)

 



The Rochester Sentinel

1894

Friday, January 5, 1894

 

            Mrs. C. ANTHONY went to Elkhart in answer to a telegram announcing the death of her brother, John TITUS.

 

            In a runaway accident at Logansport, Monday evening, Frank HOWELL, the father of Glen HOWELL BARNHART, foster daughter of Mr. & Mrs. H. A. BARNHART, was instantly killed by being thrown from his buggy as it upset. He had started from the city for a short drive into the country and was found dead near the city limits soon afterward with the horse and broken buggy near him. He was 39 years old and leaves three orphan children, his wife, a sister of Mrs. Barnhart’s, having died eight years ago this month. The funeral was held yesterday.

 

            John HORTON, a pioneer of Seymour, is dead of la grippe.

 

            A little child of Mr. & Mrs. Isaac ---l [HILL], of Leiters Ford, died of diphtheria.[2]

 

            Mrs. Robert KING and Charles DAVIDSON were called to Ohio by the death of a sister. They departed Sunday night. (DELONG)

 

Friday, January 12, 1894

 

            About nine o’clock on Thursday morning of last week, Bertie TRACY, an excellent and highly esteemed young man living a few miles east of Macy, aged about 16 years, met with an accident that resulted in his death in a few hours. He was in the woods hunting, had got out of his buggy and was standing on a log with his gun in his hand, when he slipped in some way from the log and the weapon was discharged, the contents of both barrels entering his abdomen. Some men who were working in the woods near by came to his relief and conveyed him to his home, when death relieved him of his suffering about four o’clock in the evening. His parents are overwhelmed with grief over his untimely and tragic death.

            The young man showed wonderful courage and pluck in his terribly wounded condition. After being shot and while his bowels were protruding from the wound made by the fatal discharge of his gun, he arose and walked some distance, and finally reached his buggy unaided. He must have realized from the first that death was near at hand as no man could long


survive such a wound as that. The accident did not seem to be the result of carelessness on his part, as is often the case with hunters, but was occasioned by his slipping off the log on which he had been standing, and probably this could not have been guarded against.

 

            A telegram to the Brackett family in this city last week announced the dangerous illness of Col. Joseph W. BRACKETT, at Rock Island, Ill., and Mr. Lyman M. BRACKETT left at once for the bedside of his uncle, who was a brother of Capt. Charles BRACKETT, deceased, formerly a prominent resident of this city. Mr. Brackett had scarcely arrived at Rock Island when his uncle died of apoplexy, aged 79 years.

            Col. Brackett was long in the U. S. Marine service, and afterwards practiced law with marked success. He was a prominent Californian during the gold era of that great State -- fought with distinction throughout the civil war -- and then returned to Rock Island and engaged in business. He leaves three daughters, one of whom, Mrs. Cora EASTMAN, is quite well known in Rochester.

 

            The Pulaski Democrat says: Mrs. Richard BARKER, who lived in the edge of Fulton county, died last Friday after a short illness from la grippe. Her remains were interred, Sunday, at the Andrews cemetery in Van Buren township, near where her parents reside. She was about thirty-five years of age. Unfortunately for them five small children are left to mourn the loss of a mother’s care.

 

            Wm. FUNK, aged about fifty-two years, who resided one and one-half miles north of Hoover’s Station, died Saturday and was buried at Mt. Hope on Sunday last.

 

            Mrs. McGUIRE, a widow, for many years a resident of this city, died at the home of her daughter, in Hammond, Monday evening. The remains arrived in this city on Wednesday, and the funeral took place in the afternoon. The deceased was in her 56th year.

 

            The four year old son of M. L. SHIPLEY, of Disko, was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery last Thursday. (AKRON)

 

            The only son, one year old, of Mr. & Mrs. Charles THOMPSON, died last Tuesday evening at their home in Akron. Rev. LANGE preached the funeral at the M.E. church Thursday at 1 o’clock, after which the little one was laid to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery. (AKRON)

 

            Mrs. Sarah PENCE, aged 80, died Friday, at her home in Roann, from the effects of exposure. She fell in her yard and lay for several hours in the cold.

 

Friday, January 19, 1894

 

            Mrs. Mary A. TONER, one of the old settlers of this county, died at her residence, near Kewanna, a few days ago. She had been sick but a few days, and friends outside the family did not apprehend any danger. She died greatly lamented, and was followed to her last resting place by a large number of sincere mourners. Perhaps no one in the community could have been called away who would have been better prepared, or of whom more kind things could have been truthfully said. She had been a member of the M.E. church from early life. She was married to Andrew J. TONER July 26, 1849. Eight children were born to them, four of whom


preceded the mother to the spirit world.

            Miss Edith PLOW, who has for some time been a victim of consumption, died Tuesday morning. The funeral services were conducted at the Evangelical church Wednesday afternoon. She was an intelligent and dutiful little girl, and her death is a great bereavement to her relatives and friends.

 

            One morning last week Mrs. HUNTER, of Walnut, found one of their children dead in bed. The cause of death is not known, but it is supposed it had the croup and strangled and smothered. (PALESTINE)

 

Friday, January 26, 1894

 

            For the first time in its history the Sentinel  force has been invaded by death, Harry KEELY, son of ex-Clerk Samuel KEELY, the well known young compositor and pressman, being the victim. He had been in poor health for some time on account of severe pains in the head and two weeks ago notified foreman TERRY that he was not well enough to fill his position and took a lay off. As late as last Friday afternoon he was about the office but took to his bed Sunday and a swelling over the right eye developed a bad case of eresypelas and this caused congestion or inflamation of the brain and he died Tuesday afternoon. The funeral was held yesterday afternoon conducted by Rev. O. A. COOK, when the following brief history of his life was read.

                Harry S. Keely was born in Rochester, Ind., January 5, 1875; died January 23, 1894, aged 19 years and 18 days. Harry has always lived here in Rochester, and has many friends and associates among the younger people of the town. For the last two years he was an employe of the Sentinel  office, where he became accomplished in the use of printing material, and in his chosen profession the prospects were good for future usefulness. His death was very sudden and unexpected. He became slightly ill some two weeks ago, but was able to get about and was on the street last Saturday. Sunday he was afflicted with erysipelas over one of his eyes, and being severely malignant his brain was soon inflamed and caused his death Tuesday evening at five o’clock. A father, mother, three sisters and many friends mourn and weep because of the sudden demise of the only beloved son of the home.

                Harry was popular with his associates in the office, true as steel to any trust reposed in him, faithful to his employer and a good hearted, inoffensive fellow whose death creates much sadness.

 

            Sophia BEMENDERFER, mother of Wm. J. and Samuel BEMENDERFER, was born in Stark county, Ohio, March 9, 1817, and died at Akron January 22, 1894, aged almost 77 years. In 1834 she was united in marriage to Wm. BEMENDERFER and to this union were born nine children, of whom one son and three daughters, together with the father and husband, have preceded her to the better world. At the time of her death she was connected with the Presbyterian church, and has all her life given unmistakable evidence of being a child of God. She died with an unshaken trust in the Master, whom she had served so long. She was a woman whom everybody loved and respected and her death causes genuine regret among a large circle of friends. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. P. ROTH, of this city, in the Christian church at Akron on Tuesday in the presence of a very large gathering of people who had come to pay a last tribute of respect to this kind neighbor and friend. She was buried in Odd Fellows cemetery, by the side of her husband.


            Mrs. LEEDY, wife of Israel LEEDY, postmaster at Germany, died Wednesday evening of congestion, aged about 46 years. Deceased was a faithful member of the Dunkard church and a woman universally esteemed by her neighbors. The funeral will be held today.

 

            A ten year old boy by the name of SWISHER died at the home of Mr. & Mrs. MEREDITH, in Aubbeenaubbee township, and was buried in Odd Fellows cemetery yesterday.

 

            By the death of his father, in ---o [Ohio?], Wm. KERCHER, of Akron, falls heir to two thousand seven hundred dollars.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Henry KEELEY of Indianapolis, are in the city, called here by the death of Harry KEELEY.

 

Friday, February 2, 1894

 

            Agnes L. ONSTOTT was born at Niconza, Wabash county, Sep 15, 1844, and after thirteen weeks of severe sickness departed this life at her home in Converse, Jan 28, 1894. She was married to Wm. E. RICHARDSON Sep 15, 1863, and leaves a husband, four sons and three daughters, one son preceding her to the spirit world. She had been a member of the Baptist church for thirty-five years. She was a kind mother, affectionate wife and a faithful christian and had gained many friends in the short time she had lived in Converse. The funeral was from the first Baptist church in Rochester, and was conducted by Rev. O. A. COOK after which the remains were laid to rest beside her son in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Mrs. Frederick REESE died at her residence in the south part of the city last Monday night. She has been a resident since 1847, coming here from Ohio, and was the mother of six children, all of whom are dead. She was converted in her youth and united with a Baptist church in Ohio, and at the time of her death her membership was with the First Baptist church of this city. Her life has always been consistent, and she was faithful to her duties in the home and in the church. Mrs. Reese was the oldest of twelve children and of the twelve there is but one living, Mrs. Sarah BRYAN, of Fulton. She leaves this aged sister, also an aged husband, one granddaughter and many friends as the circle of mourners. Funeral services held at the Baptist church by Elder E. J. DELP yesterday. Interment at Oliver’s cemetery.

 

            Mrs. Nancy BARNETT, widow of Henry BARNETT, who was making her home with her son-in-law, Henry F. MOW, north of town, died Tuesday after a brief illness, from paralysis, aged about 74 years. She was the mother of nine children, only two of whom are living. Mrs. Henry F. MOW, of Richland township, and Mrs. Emela MUNKS, of Kansas, are living.

 

            John CLELAND, a widely known and highly respected farmer of Liberty township, died at his home near South Mud Lake Saturday, aged about 46 years. He leaves a wife and children, and the funeral was held at Four [Five?] Corners.

 

            Rebecca J. LEIDY, brief mention of whose death was made in the Sentinel  of last week, was born in Elkhart county Nov 11, 1849, and died Jan 24, 1894, aged 45 years and 3 months. She leaves four brothers and three sisters and an aged father to mourn her loss, her mother having preceded her to the spirit world. She was married to Isreal LEIDY Nov 1, 1871.


To them six children were born five of whom survive. She united with the U.B. church in 1891 and was a faithful member until her death. She was a good woman and a kind neighbor.

 

            Mrs. Ella WILHELM BOOTH, who grew to womanhood in the family of Mrs. Kate TRUE, died recently at her home in Chicago.

 

            Miss Nora LEEDY was called home from Elkhart county to the death-bed of her mother. (GERMANY)

 

            Wm. KESSLER, a prominent Cass county farmer, dropped dead in Logansport.

 

            W. W. CONSTANT, an old and much respected citizen of Peru, is dead. He met with an accident two years ago in Arkansas, from which he never fully recovered.

 

            Frank KLINGER, near Winamac, was killed by a wagon load of logs on which he was riding slipping and falling on him. He was crushed from the waist upward.

 

Friday, February 9, 1894

 

            Samuel HISSONG, a well to do farmer of near Maxinkuckee lake and well known to many Sentinel  readers, committed suicide last Friday morning by hanging himself in the barn. He had a wife and three children, and was comfortably fixed on a nice farm, but his health had been failing for some time and he had recently expressed fears that his family would come to want some time.

 

            On Friday morning he went to the barn to hitch up his horse to go to Argos with his brother, Sam [HISSONG], but as he stayed at the barn longer than necessary his wife went to see what detained him. Arriving at the barn she found him hanging beside the buggy dead. He had climbed in the buggy, tied the rope about his neck and to a beam over head and then stepped out strangling himself to death.

            He was about forty years old and a highly respected citizen. The cause of this rash act is not known unless his failing health affected his mind.

 

            Another sad death was that of Covington CORNELIUS, who died suddenly of heart disease Monday evening. He and his aged wife came to this county nearly sixty years ago, where they have resided two miles south of Rochester for nearly forty years. For some time the health of each has been failing, the husband from heart disease and the wife from brain trouble. On the day of Mr. Cornelius’ death he had greatly exerted himself to control the reason-bereft wife of his life and fell dead from the exhaustion just as he was entering his bedroom.

            He was eighty years old, a man of ripe [?] of education and a citizen of sturdy character and distinguished principle of honor and uprightness. He was a member of the Baptist church and Elder DELP preached his funeral sermon Wednesday, the funeral being in charge of the Masonic order, of which he was long an honored member.

 

            George Frederick BEEHLER was born in Gerickheim, Germany, in the kingdom of Byron, Sep 25, 1813, and died in this city Feb 4, 1894, in his eighty-second year. In 1847 he came to America and in 1849 he was united in marriage to Christenne WILE. Nine children


was the result of this union, five of whom preceded him to the grave. In his infancy he was baptized, and at the proper age was received into full membership with the Lutheran church by the right of confirmation, to which church he remained faithful to the last. Funeral services took place at the Richland Center church Monday afternoon and were attended by a large number of sympathizing friends. A feeling and appropriate sermon was delivered by Rev. A. E. GIFT. Interment at Richland Center church cemetery.

 

            Mrs. Isabel VanTRUMP, consort of Calvin VanTRUMP, died at her home in this city Wednesday morning, aged 60 years. She was born in Wayne county and came to Fulton county in 1859, soon after her marriage. The husband and a bright five year old boy preceded the wife and mother in death, and only a brother and sister remain of Mrs. VanTrump’s relatives. She was a modest but noble woman, and her life was one of admirable characteristics.

            The funeral will be held at the Adventist church at 2 o’clock this afternoon, Elder Wm. HILL officiating.

 

            Elizabeth STINGLEY, wife of Jonas STINGLEY, was born in the Canton of Basel, Switzerland, and died of chronic inflammation of the spine, near Fulton, in her sixty-second year. Deceased came to this country with her husband in 1862, and located near Fulton, where they have since resided. She died childless, leaving her aged husband and a number of relatives and friends to mourn her death. Funeral services by Rev. A. E. FISHER, of the Evangelical church. Interment at the Fulton cemetery last Sunday.

 

            Mrs. Doc BENNETT was called to Monticello Tuesday by the death of an aunt.

 

            Mr. Arthur ABBOTT, of Lafayette was here in attendance upon the funeral of his uncle, C. CORNELIUS.

 

            Milo [RETZIUS], the five year old son of Noah RETZIUS, at Royal Center, died Thursday night and was buried at Leiters Ford last Saturday.

 

            A daughter of George WOLLINGTON, who resides in the northwest part of the city, near the C. & C. depot died of diphtheria, and was buried last Saturday. Two other members of the same family were sick with the same disease, but are now out of danger.

 

            A young child of E. DAVIS, who resides in the northwest part of Richland township, died of diphtheria a few days ago.

 

            Albert PENNEY, aged 12 years, was killed while hunting near North Manchester. The whole top of his head was blown off.

 

            Samuel GRIFFITH, an old resident of Warsaw, and who was living alone, was found dead in bed. It is thought he died several days before being discovered.

 

            Mrs. HARRIS, granddaughter of Mrs. Samuel RARRICK, died in Chicago and the remains were sent to Marmont for interment. (DELONG)


 

 

            Mrs. HARISON, of Winamac, was called here to attend the funeral of her granddaughter, Emma OWENS. (DELONG)

 

            Death entered the household of Birt OWEN’s last Thursday and took their little daughter, Emma [OWEN], aged nine. The sympathy of the entire community is with the bereaved parents. (DELONG)

 

            An infant child of Mr. & Mrs. Geo. CARPENTER died Sunday. (AKRON)

 

            An infant child, four months old, of Milton UTTER, was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery last Tuesday forenoon. (Akron)

 

Friday, February 16, 1894

 

            Mary Nadine MERRICK, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Mead MERRICK, aged three years and four months, died at Peru, Thursday while with her mother in that city on a visit. The cause of her death was consumption of the brain. The remains were brought to this city for burial.

 

            Bertha WOLLINGTON, aged four years and eight months, died last Monday in this city from an attack of diphtheria. This is the second death in the same family within the last two or three weeks, and another member of the family, a son, ten years of age, is very sick from the same disease. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. O. A. COOK, of the First Baptist church.

 

            Mr. Levi OVERMYER aged 60 years died at his residence in Richland township, last Monday from a complication of la grippe and heart failure. He was a well known, prominent and substantial citizen, and his death is greatly lamented. He leaves a widow and four children comfortably provided for. The funeral took place Wednesday forenoon at Richland Center, Revs. HARMON and LEITER officiating.

 

            The Peru Republican  reports a contest of the John L. FARRAR will by two nieces -- Louisa J. FARRAR and Mrs. Mary J. MILLER, of Deedsville, daughters of Lloyd B. FARRAR. The question arises upon a clause of the will that, after providing for his wife and special legacies for others that are not in controversy, “the balance of my estate I desire to be equally divided among my brothers and sisters, and in case of the death of brother or sister, the children of the deceased have their share.”

 

            Among the heirs of Jacob DeHAVEN whose never paid loan to the government in 1877, now amounts to over $4,000,000 are Wm. DeHAVEN, Logansport; H. F. DeHAVEN, Peru; J. W. DeHAVEN and Mrs. Harriet CAIN, Kokomo, and Mrs. Susan CALLIER, Knox.

 

Friday, February 21, 1894

 

            The community was shocked Tuesday evening when the report went out that Minta MILLER RANNELLS, wife of Ezra RANNELLS was dead. She had been slightly ill for some weeks with a dropsical affection incident to maternity and was suddenly taken worse Monday night and died the following evening at 7 o’clock aged 30 years.


            Deceased was a daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Silas MILLER and grew to womanhood here, one of Rochester’s most modest, intelligent and admirable daughters. She was married only last May and had just entered the pleasure and comforts of her own home when death called her. She was noted for her industry and leaves a nice little residence in the south part of the city as a monument to the enterprise of her own hands -- built with money earned with the seamstress needle and at the compositor’s case where she worked in the Sentinel  office for several years.

            Minta’s is one of the saddest of deaths and the sympathy of the entire community goes out to the grief stricken husband and parents.

            The funeral was held yesterday at 10 o’clock when Rev. ROTH preached an appropriate discourse and a large cortege of friends followed the remains to their resting place in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Miss Nellie AULT, of Cleveland, Ohio, daughter of Jud AULT, of this city, arrived in the city yesterday to attend the funeral of her cousin, Mrs. Minta RANNELLS.

 

            Mr. Frank ORR, of Plymouth, and Mr. & Mrs. Irv RANNELLS of Chili attended the funeral of Mrs. Ez. RANNELLS yesterday.

 

            C. W. WOODCOX died last Sunday, after a lingering illness from consumption, aged 33 years 7 months and 17 days. He made a profession of faith in Christ sometime before his death, and from that hour to the moment of his demise he enjoyed the friendship and comfort of his Savior. A wife, two little children, three brothers and two sisters are left to mourn their loss. Funeral services were conducted at Burton church by Rev. O. A. COOK.

 

            A child was born last Sunday to Mrs. Ida BUSH, who is a daughter of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. CAREY, of this city, where Mrs. Bush has been making her home since the death of her husband in Mishawaka last August.

 

            Mrs. Katie BOWEN died at her residence, east of Grant, last Sunday, aged 23 years. She leaves a husband, an infant child and many relatives and friends to mourn her death. The interment took place at Mt. Hope cemetery Monday afternoon.

 

Friday, March 2, 1894

 

            There was general excitement in the city at noon Tuesday, when the report circulated that Harry HICKS, the well known and jolly retired farmer, had committed suicide.

            Harry Hicks was an Englishman by birth and came to this country about twenty-six years ago and located in Cass county. He afterward came to Fulton county and married a sister of John and Hiram CARROTHERS and located on a farm near Green Oak. He was one of the neatest and most industrious farmers in the county and made money. Some years ago he quit farming and moved to his brick residence in the southeast part of town where he lived until his death.

            Thuesday morning he came up town to look after some details of a real estate transfer in which he was interested and was about town as usual. Several of his friends “joked” him about some trades he had recently made and one or two noticed that he was not in his usual merry mood. About ten o’clock he went to Miller & Keith’s store and purchased a 32 calibre revolver and was given a few cartridges as he did not care to buy a whole box. He went directly


home, told his wife and adopted daughter that he had his papers all fixed at last and said he would go out and put the horse out in the sunshine. He was gone but a short time when a revolver shot was heard, quickly followed by another. As he remained at the barn longer than usual the daughter went out to look for him but returned after calling him without receiving an answer. Mrs. HICKS then went out to see if she could find him. She noticed that the horse acted frightened at something about the barn and she went in. Not seeing him she went up into the haymow where she found him lying unconscious with blood oozing from two bullet holes in his forehead and the new revolver in his hand. The neighbors were at once notified of the horrible find and kind hands carried the death-stricken form to the house where he died two hours afterward without recovering consciousness. He was about 56 years old and universally respected as an honorable, christian gentleman.

            No reasonable cause is known for the rash act. He had been in ill health at frequent intervals for a year or two but as it was only a form of indigestion he paid little attention to it except to complain that his condition gave him the “blues.” In addition to this slight illness which he was complaining of, he had been annoyed considerably during the past week by twittings from his friends that he had been worsted in recent real estate deals. Suicide, however, has before occurred in the Hicks family. An uncle of Harry’s and two of his cousins have died by their own hands and a brother of his is partially insane. Further than this no cause for the horrible deed is known, his family and immediate friends being as much or more dumbfounded over his unexpected deed as the general public.

            Harry Hicks was widely known as a good man and a model citizen. He was honest, intelligent, jolly and generous and had been an active member of the Methodist church for years. And all these make the final act of his life all the more mysterious.

            The funeral was held yesterday at Grace M.E. church, Rev. BRIGGS officiating, and a large concourse of people followed the remains to the grave in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            John FRANTZ, two miles south of Germany church, died last Tuesday of consumption, aged about nineteen years. Interment at Antioch cemetery.

 

            Messrs. Chas. and Wm. PETERS, of Chicago, were in the city yesterday, on their way to Macy where their father, Dr. PETERS, is reported in a dying condition.

 

            Max FEDER, of Cincinnati, father of Mr. Lou FEDER and Mrs. G. HOLZMAN, died Tuesday. The deceased was quite well and popularly known in Rochester, having frequently visited here with Mr. & Mrs. Lou WOHLGEMUTH.

 

            Mr. Timothy COAKLEY, well and favorably known to the citizens of Rochester, died at his residence in this city Friday, after a long illness. He had been a citizen of this place for many years, and was held in high esteem by those who knew him. He was especially well known in railroad circles, with which interests he had long been identified. Funeral services took place at the Catholic church Saturday, and the church was crowded to its utmost capacity by mourning relatives and sympathizing friends. Interment at the Citizens cemetery.

 

            Frank BATCHELOR, who has for the past few years resided a few miles west of Rochester, died last Friday. He was born in Randolph county, Indiana, in 1853, and in 1861 came with his parents to this county, where he has since resided most of the time. The deceased was twice married, three children being born to the first wife and one to the second wife. He was attacked by a severe case of erysipelas, resulting in blood poisoning and death,


and he leaves a wife and children, a mother, three sisters and many relatives. Funeral services were held at the residence Sunday, and interment took place at Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Cornelius MEREDITH, whose son was killed at a street crossing in Logansport a few days ago by a Pan Handle switch engine, has filed suit against the railroad company for $25000.

 

            Mrs. Wm. LIDECKER, whose husband died last week, will move her little family back to Bremen where her parents live. (AKRON)

 

            Fred FRANCE, age 19 was buried at the Antioch grave yard last Wednesday. (BEARSS)

 

Friday, March 9, 1894

 

            County Clerk REES was notified Tuesday evening that Judge Lyman WALKER, of Peru, and a non-resident member of the Fulton County bar had died at LaPorte of brights disease. A meeting of the Bar was called at Essick & Montgomery’s office when the following testimonial was adopted: [-----] signed by Sidney KEITH, K. G. SHRYOCK, M. L. ESSICK, John W. RICKEL and George W. HOLMAN.

 

            Jasper MILLISER died at his home in Union township last Friday, after a short illness.

 

            An obituary notice on the death of Mrs. Alfred BUNGER came in too late for this week’s issue, likewise the Bearss news notes.

 

            Mrs. Mary USHER died at her home in the north part of town, Tuesday after a lingering illness. The funeral was conducted by Rev. BRIGGS yesterday at the Methodist church.

 

            Mrs. MONGER attended the funeral of her aunt, Mrs. Dr. THOMPSON, of Kewanna, Monday. (DELONG)

 

WILLIAM BAILEY, (Biography)

            William BAILEY is one of the oldest settlers in Fulton county. He located in Aubbeenaubbee township in 1835. That year there were only two white families in the township. For a short time the Bailey family occupied the wigwam built by Chief AUBBEENAUBBEE near the mouth of Mud Creek. He often visited the Pottawattomies in their camp and participated in their sports. He helped build the first hotel in Rochester. His present home is comfortable and commodious, where he enjoys the fruits of a well spent life. (BRUCE LAKE)

 

Friday, March 16, 1894

 

            Father Ephraim TIPTON died at his home near Bloomingsburg, Feb 28, 1894, at the old age of 74 years. He was one of our pioneer citizens, and had gained a large and warm acquaintance among his neighbors over the large district, and was held in high esteem by all


who knew him. He leaves a wife and nine children to mourn his death. The funeral services were conducted at Yellow Creek Baptist church, by Rev. O. A. COOK, of this city. Deceased was the father of Isaac and Geo. W. TIPTON.

 

            There was much excitement on the street Saturday afternoon when the report was circulated that Frank CARTER, the popular young night clerk at the Arlington and brother of the proprietor, had died in a boxing bout. The young man worked nights and usually slept until the middle of the afternoon. Saturday he arose about three o’clock and went to the kitchen for a lunch. As he complained that he was not hungry enough to eat so soon after getting up, chief cook HOLMES suggested that they go out to the barn or woodhouse and exercise with the boxing gloves. As this was Frank’s favorite sport he agreed and they went out accompanied by several bystanders. They put on the gloves and sparred slowly and carefully, Frank using his hands so dextrously that he was scarcely touched by Holmes, neither of the boxers doing any slugging. They sparred for some minutes showing each other the clever styles of guarding, ducking and so forth and sat down for a rest. Peter MEREDITH and Ed. WALLACE then took the gloves and indulged in a round. When they were tired Holmes and Carter again put on the gloves and Holmes said he would show Frank a new turn and started toward him when Frank said to wait that he felt faint and reeled and fell into Pete Meredith’s arms and gasped like a dying man. Dr. RANNELLS was sent for but upon his arrival he pronounced the young man dead and, upon examination, readily decided that the cause of his death was apoplexy.

            The deceased was raised in Warsaw where he lived until coming to the Arlington some months ago. He was a very pleasing musician and made many friends among the young people of the city. He was a prominent member of the Warsaw company of State Infantry and Co G of this city, sent an escort of eight of the Blues with the remains to Warsaw where the funeral was held Tuesday afternoon.

            No blame attaches to anyone for the sudden death but it is thought that his weak condition from sleep and vigorous exercise so soon after arising was the cause of the fatal attack of a disease which would have, sooner or later, developed.

 

            Lucinda BURKET was born in Cass county, April 14, 1853. She was married to Alfred H. BUNGER in 1860, and died at Logansport Wednesday of last week. Mrs. Bunger had been a faithful member of the Christian church since childhood, and her life was an exemplification of Christian graces and those rare qualities of character which endeared her to a large circle of friends. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. FOWLER, of Wabash, the following Sunday at Bloomingsburg near which place Mr. & Mrs. Bunger were for many years residents.

 

            The four weeks old baby of Mr. & Mrs. John DECK died last Tuesday night and was taken to Lucerne Wednesday for interment. (DELONG)

 

            Quite a number of Akron people attended the funeral of Mr. Al SHOEMAKER, at Macy Saturday. (AKRON)

 

            Died at her residence, one mile east of Akron, last Saturday at 6 p.m., Mrs. Jane ONSTOTT. She was a victim of consumption and has been a patient sufferer of the dread disease many months. She leaves a husband and four children to mourn her loss. The funeral was preached in the Christian church on Monday by Rev. HOPKINS, after which she was laid


to rest in Odd Fellows cemetery. (AKRON)

 

Friday, March 23, 1894

 

            Miss Ocie YOUNG, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Marion YOUNG, aged 16 years, died very suddenly of quinsy at her home in Rochester, Sunday afternoon. She left school Friday in usual health. Saturday the first symptoms of the disease appeared and developed so rapidly as to end her life in less than forty hours. The funeral was held at the house Tuesday conducted by Rev. BRIGGS, six of the members of her high school class acting as pall bearers. Interment was made at Mt. Zion.

 

Friday, March 30, 1894

 

                The North Manchester papers record the death of an old lady, well known in the northern part of this county. She was known thirty years ago as Mrs. Mary Ann ADAMS. Her husband, Henry ADAMS, died in 1861 and two years later she married John BALL, and has lived most of the time since then at North Manchester. Her age was over 77 years. There is a romance in the early life of this lady that is very strange. Her first husband was named ERNSPERGER, to whom she bore three children, two girls and a boy. Henry Adams and wife were neighbors, and they had three children, two boys and a girl. They lived at that time in Ohio. One day the two men agreed to trade wifes, which was done, the mothers taking the daughters and the fathers taking the sons. About 1847 Adams moved to this county and a few years later Ernsperger moved to Fulton county. The two families maintained friendly relations as long as they lived. After the death of Mrs. Ernsperger, who had been Mrs. Adams, Miss ERNSPERGER, then a young lady living with her mother, went back home and kept house for her father. While there she took the typhoid fever. Her mother, Mrs. Adams, who had been the first Mrs. Ernsperger, went to Ernsperger’s and nursed her daughter until she died. Mrs. Adams was the mother of four children by her second husband, Henry Adams.  -- Peru Republican.

                As the Ernsperger family is widely known in Fulton county, a Sentinel man started out to hunt up the facts or fancies of the story. The oldest member of the family here is Grandmother Julia ERNSPERGER, a resident of this city and nearly eighty-two years old. Although quite feeble her intellect and cultured conversational talents are still intact and she talked frankly of the story.

            The Ernsperger referred to in the wife trade never lived in Fulton county. He was Jacob ERNSPERGER and lived in Pulaski county many years, afterward moving to Marshall where he died at Burr Oak several years ago. However the wife trade occurred in Ohio in the vicinity where Grandma Ernsperger lived and she remembered the details very well. The children were not divided as reported but kept together. Mr. Ernsperger keeping his and Adams providing for his.

            Previous to the announcement of the trade of wives it was a general report that all was not right in the two families. Jake and Mrs. Adams were old lovers and the flame never fully died down. They seemed happiest, always, in each other’s company and Adams and Mrs. Ernsperger were much alike in their general characteristics and seemed much out of place with their life partners. So the story went that a proposition to trade was made and readily accepted by all four and, to seal the contract, the broom stick was taken down and, with legendary solemnity, jumped by the newly united couples when they each went their way. But friendly family relations were maintained until the death of all concerned.

           


The parties to the transaction were all respectable people and, excepting this one sensational transgression of the marital law, they always lived lives of admirable uprightness. It is probably the most remarkable case in the history of civilized matrimony.

 

            The infant son of James REED, formerly of Blue Grass, but now of Peru, departed this life March 20, 1894, age 1 year 6 months and 21 days. Funeral services were held by Rev. RUPLEY, of Fulton, at Olive Branch church on Thursday at 2 o’clock, and the burial took place at the U.B. cemetery.

 

            The aged mother of Capt. J. R. STALLARD died at Macy, Sunday.

 

            Mrs. Susan TROUTMAN, the Wayne township insane woman, died at the Logansport Asylum last week.

 

            The friends of Mr. & Mrs. Henry FOGLESONG, of Roann, will be sorry to hear of the death of their two year old baby boy, last week, from congestion of the brain.

 

            Mrs. MILES, of Syracuse, Ind., mother of Mrs. A. F. BRIGHT and Mrs. W. N. RICHTER, died at her home last Wednesday after suffering from dropsy of the heart for nearly a year. She was a kind, good christian lady, who won many friends in Akron during her visits here and all sympathize with the children in their great loss. (AKRON)

 

            Died, Mrs. Dr. JOHNSTON, at her residence in Akron, Tuesday morning of pneumonia, after an illness of only a few days. Her funeral took place Thursday, conducted by the Daughters of Rebekah, of which lodge she was a prominent member. (AKRON)

 

Friday, April 6, 1894

 

            While attending the closing exercises of the Bloomingsburg schools, Friday afternoon, Mrs. O. B. HOLMAN suddenly fell dead from a dropsical affection of the heart. She had been in fairly good health for some time and her sudden death was therefore a sorrowful surprise to all her friends and acquaintances. Mrs. Holman was an estimable lady and enjoyed a large acquaintance, who will mourn her loss with the bereaved husband and relatives. The remains were laid at rest Sunday afternoon, in the Nichols cemetery, attended by a large number of neighbors.

 

            George SURGUY, an old citizen of Richland township, died last week from a tumor in his side. He leaves a wife and two children.

 

Friday, April 13, 1894

 

            William CALLISON, one of Fulton county’s old and respected citizens, died at his residence in the south part of town Friday evening, after a brief illness resulting from paralytic affection. Mr. Callison was born in Clark county, Ohio, seventy-four years ago, and was a member of the Methodist church from his boyhood. He was the father of ten children and an honest, conscientious and kindly citizen. Rev. DELP preached the funeral and the remains were interred Sunday afternoon in Odd Fellows cemetery.


 

Mrs. Ida E. ROGERS, of Fort Wayne, Ind., who has for the past seven months been a guest at the home of Mr. & Mrs. Lewis VAMPNER, near Dodsworth, died the 4th inst. of consumption. The funeral took place from Mr. Vampner’s home. The deceased lady’s husband and three year old son were summoned from Indiana and arrived here the 3rd. She was 27 years old and a native of Indiana. Mr. Rogers buried their infant son in Ft. Wayne, two weeks ago. --  Guthrie, Oklahoma, Ter., State Capital, of April 5th.

Mrs. Rogers will be remembered to many of our people as Miss Ida NEWCOMB, and was married to Mr. Rogers five years ago. Mr. Rogers is employed on the Ft. Wayne News.

 

Mrs. Silas HOFFMAN died at her home near Akron, Monday, after a brief illness, aged forty-two years. She was the mother of ten children, an active member of the Progressive Brethren church and a noble woman. The funeral was held Wednesday, when a large concourse of neighbors paid the last tribute of respect.

 

Absalom CLOUD, an old pioneer, died at his home in Macy Sunday evening, at the ripe old age of 70 years. He was the father of a large family of children, who with the aged wife mourn his loss with a large circle of friends. The remains were interred at Macy Tuesday from the U.B. church.

 

Chas EMMONS, son of Finley EMMONS, Jr., died Friday, aged twenty-one years. He had been an invalid for some years and his death was not unexpected. The funeral was held Saturday.

 

Mrs. William JAMISON, of Peru, died of lockjaw, resulting from the pulling of a tooth.

 

Friday, April 20, 1894

 

            The family and friends of the late Joseph REED were greatly shocked yesterday morning to hear that the surviving old wife and mother had been found dead in bed at the home of her daughter, Mrs. James ONSTOTT, west of town. She had been a sufferer from heart disease for several years and death came to her in her sleep. The funeral will take place at the Onstott residence this afternoon at two o’clock.

 

            Miss Ada VanDUYNE died at the home of her parents, Mr. & Mrs. Jack VanDUYNE, at Green Oak, Sunday, aged twenty-one years. She had been an invalid for several years.

 

            Charley McCARTER, son of Allen McCARTER, died at the home of Alex EASTERDAY Sunday and was buried at Odd Fellows cemetery, Tuesday. He was seventeen years old and Rev. REES, of Marmont, preached the funeral.

 

            A. A. KESTLER and Jas. HOUSER attended the funeral of Miss Mary ANDREAS, at Pierceton, last Wednesday. (AKRON)

 


 

Friday, April 27, 1894

 

            A party of three fishermen from Bourbon came down to the Tippecanoe Saturday and launched their boat above Bloomingsburg near Billy KING’s. The story goes that they were slightly top heavy from too much liquor and the boat was capsized throwing all three into the river. Two of them swam out but the old man called so piteously for help that one of them, an eighteen year old boy by the name of BAXTER, swam back to help him out but tired and sank in nine feet of water and was drowned. The old man had struggled to more shallow water and succeeded in keeping his head above water until he was rescued by Abe BROCKEY and his son.

            The dead body was not found until Sunday morning when it was taken from the river and laid upon the bank until a conveyance arrived from Bourbon and removed it home.[3]

 

            John M. PARSONS, for many years a well known hackman, died at his home near the L. E. & W. depot Wednesday morning, of pneumonia.

            Mr. Parsons was born near Niles, Michigan, June 9, 1833, and was first united in marriage to Miss Sarah MEREDITH, of Beaver Dam, Ind., Oct 1, 1855, which union was blessed with two sons, the youngest of whom, Simon C., [PARSONS], survives. His second marriage was with Miss Maggie DUNNING at Stanton, Mich., Oct 17, 1868 to whom was born one son, Caspar [PARSONS].

            Deceased leaves two sisters and one brother, of whom his sister, Nancy RHINESMITH, of Dallas, Ia., was at his bedside when death came. He was a member of Bloomingsburg Christian church, a kind husband and father and a good citizen.

            The funeral will take place this afternoon from the house attended by Odd Fellows, of which order he was a member.

 

            Quite a number from this locality attended the funeral of Curdie MILLER, of Kewanna, last Sunday. (BEARSS)

 

Friday, May 4, 1894

 

            There was a double funeral at the M.E. church at Walnut one day last week. Miss Nellie LONG and Mr. & Mrs. George HUNTER’s child. (PALESTINE)

 

Friday, May 11, 1894

 

            A four year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Eli BRUGH, of Leiters, was buried Friday.

 

            Cornelius BURGETT, a veteran of the civil war, died at his home in the northwest part of town Sunday night after a very brief illness. The funeral was held Tuesday, McClung Post ---d the Manitau Blues acting as escort.

 

            Coral Gladys [CLEMONS], daughter of Lincoln and Emma CLEMONS, was born Oct 14, 1899, died May 6, 1894, aged 4 years 6 months and 22 days. The funeral services


were conducted at Mt. Hope U.B. church by Rev. J. N. HARMAN of Rochester, the interment taking place in the Hoover cemetery. (GRANT)

 

Friday, May 18, 1894

 

            Smallpox news is still the all absorbing topic. Wild and ridiculous reports continue to sweep over the county in great waves but, as the Sentinel said last week, our greatest danger is passing as the people become aroused to the importance of forcing confinement of the disease.

            There are no new outbreaks of the disease in the JONES neighborhood but the Wolf families are terribly afflicted and there are a number of others almost as bad. Up to date thirty-one cases have developed and of these ten have proved fatal, as follows: Son and daughter of Frank JONES, Chesley JONES, Lewis FLAGG, John FANSLER, Ben WOLF, Frank WAY, Wm. THOMAS and one of the MONEYSMITH family. Some of the dead have been carted off to graveyards at the midnight hour, others were buried in orchards and gardens, and one lies wrapped in a sheet, in a rough box, in a grave in a barnyard.

 

            Died at his home near Sand Hill, Geo. GLAZE, an aged person of our community. Just a few days before his death he gave himself up to God. He leaves a wife, one sister and six children besides other relatives and friends to mourn his loss. The remains were taken to Green Oak for burial, Rev. HARMON conducted the services. (TIOSA)

 

Friday, May 25, 1894

 

            The Older citizens of Fulton county will learn of the death of Judge Anthony F. SMITH, with sorrow. He died at his home in Logansport, Saturday morning, after an illness of several months, aged 76 years and 6 months.

            Judge Smith came to Fulton county in 1836 and remained here for twenty-nine years, his chief business being the operation of the Rochester flour mills. He represented this legislative district in the state Legislature in ‘46 and was elected Probate Judge two years later, and then county clerk. He left the county in 1865 and went west but returned in a few years and located at Logansport where he has since resided, serving the public faithfully for many years as court clerk and finally as criminal Judge and Justice of the Peace. He was thrice married and leaves a wife and two sons.

            Speaking of his personality the Logansport Journal says, “As a citizen Judge Smith stood high in the estimation of all. He was thoroughly a gentleman of the old school and was honest, capable and faithful in the discharge of every duty. He was a very entertaining talker and his fund of reminiscence of the pioneer days of this county was inexhaustable.”

            Mr. Smith was a member of Tipton lodge F. and A. M. under whose auspices the funeral was held Sunday afternoon.

 

            The remains of Mrs. Carrie McKEE MILLER were brought here for burial Wednesday from her home at South Bend, where she had resided since her marriage three years ago. Deceased was the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Det McKEE, of this city, who with her husband, John MILLER, and a week old babe, survive to mourn her death.

            Carrie was a graduate of the Rochester schools, and had a very large circle of friends here where she grew to womanhood, and was universally respected as a noble girl. The Alumni association held a meeting yesterday eveing and adopted the following memorial: . . .


That we tender and express our heartfelt sympathy and condolence, to her husband, father, brothers, and sister, in the great loss which they have sustained by her decease, and in the separations incident to our earthly life . . . signed by committee [not named], Rochester High School Alumni Association.

            The funeral service was conducted yesterday afternoon at the McKee residence on North Main street after which a large concourse of friends followed the remains to the grave in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Milo SMITH, of Tiosa, twenty-six years old, and married, died of heart disease Wednesday morning and was buried yesterday at Richland Center. Rev. COOK, of this city, conducted the funeral service.

 

            Dr. J. W. HOOD, a brother-in-law of Oscar DECKER, stopped off in this city Monday evening on his way from California to England on a health trip. He was very feeble and rapidly grew worse after his arrival and died at midnight. The remains were taken to California for burial accompanied by Mr. Decker and Fred HOSSLER who was traveling with the doctor.

 

            Hon. and Mrs. Milo R. SMITH attended the funeral of Milo’s brother, Anthony [SMITH], at Logansport, Sunday.

 

Friday, June 1, 1894

 

            Charles H. HOOVER, son of Chris. HOOVER, and a widely known shoe dealer of this city, died at his home Monday morning, of bronchial trouble aged 34 years. Charley, as he was familiarly known, had been an invalid for two years and had tried health resorts, sanitariums and the best medical skill but all without avail.

            Deceased was born in this city and by an ever affable disposition and honorable bearing, grew into one of the most popular business men of the city. He was an active member of the order of Knights of Pythias, the elaborate floral tributes and immense turnout of the lodge members on the occasion of the funeral, eloquently attesting the high esteem in which he was held as a lodge man.

            Mr. Hoover married Miss Julia CORBETT in 1886, and she, with his father, one sister, Mrs. Milton O. REES, one brother George HOOVER, and one half-brother, John HOOVER are the only near relatives remaining. Rev. GIFT preached the funeral at the residence Tuesday afternoon, after which the K. of P. order, Fire company, of which he was a brave member, and a long line of citizens in carriages sorrowfully escorted the remains to the grave in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            The family and friends of George MYERS, of east Rochester were greatly shocked Thursday morning because of his very sudden and unexpected death. He retired in usual health, slept soundly all night and when called to get up said he would. Soon after it was discovered that he was breathing heavily and before a physician could reach him, life was extinct.

            Deceased was a brother of Milton MYERS and an industrious man. The funeral will be held today.

 


 

 

            IN MEMORIA . . . “our late brother, Sir Knight, Charles Henry HOOVER”  . . . signed by M. A. BAKER, P. M. BUCHANAN, C. K. PLANK, committee, Pythian . . . .

 

            The funeral of Mrs. BEATTIE was attended by a large concourse. (BLUE GRASS)

 

Friday, June 8, 1894

 

            Rochester was startled Wednesday afternoon by the announcement that James F. JOHNSON, the well known farmer and stockman, had died suddenly of heart failure. He had not been in his usual robust health for about a year but as he treated his occasional weak spells lightly there was no thought by his nearest friends of his condition being dangerous. Wednesday noon he ate a hearty dinner and went to the lounge for a short rest. He had been there but a short time when the hired girl called to Mrs. JOHNSON, who out in the yard, that Mr. Johnson was very sick and when the wife reached him he was gasping for breath and died in a few minutes. A messenger hastened to the city for Dr. SHAFFER, who reached the Johnson home only to find Jim, as he was familiarly known, cold in death.

            The deceased came to Rochester as a fruit tree salesman in 1883. He prospered financially and accumulated considerable city property. About seven years ago he was united in marriage with Miss Nettie AULT, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Adam AULT, and soon after purchased a large farm two miles west of the city and has since lived there and personally managed the same. He was always affable, genial and honorable and was a general favorite as a substantial business man and progressive citizen. He was 51 years old and leaves a wife, two children and several relatives in Chicago and New York.

            The time of the funeral has not yet been definitely fixed but it will likely be Sunday afternoon at Grace church. The Masons and Knights of Pythias will conduct the funeral.

 

            The illness of Father ACKERMAN, mentioned in the last issue of the Sentinel, proved fatal Friday morning. He was the father of Mrs. Geo. I. MILLER and Mrs. Geo. P. KEITH and had lived in this city since 1873. He was a very quiet, retiring citizen and his acquaintance was, therefore, not very extensive but he was a very devout and highly honorable old gentleman. The funeral was held Saturday afternoon, Rev. ROTH, of the Presbyterian church, officiating.

 

            Loyd [SMITH], the twenty months old son of J. K. and Minnie SMITH, of Kewanna, died June 1.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Ed. ZEIS, of Jonesboro, were here over Sunday attending the funeral of Mrs. Zeis’ grandfather, Mr. ACKERMAN.

 

            A daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Henry WALTZ died of spinal disease last Wednesday after a short illness. The funeral took place at the dunkard church Thursday afternoon, Rev. DEARDORF officiating. Deceased was 15 years of age. (PALESTINE)

 

Friday, June 15, 1894

 

            Mrs. Frank EMMONS died Monday at her home near Sand Hill school house, of dropsy, aged about thirty years. Deceased leaves a husband and one child. The funeral was held last Wednesday.


            Mrs. Dallas FELTS, daughter of Rev. McNEELY, died at her home in Tiosa, Friday night, aged twenty-five years. Her disease was consumption and everything that loving hands could do for her availed nothing and a promising life of usefulness went out when it had but just begun. The funeral was held Sunday, interment being made at Richland Center.

 

            Dropsy was the cause of the death of Israel OVERMYER, a Richland township farmer, which occurred Friday. Deceased was 69 years old and had raised a family of thirteen children before he moved here from Pulaski county. The funeral was held at Richland Center.

 

            Mrs. Lou BRETZ died at the family residence in east Rochester Saturday morning, after a long illness from consumption. She was the mother of two small children.

 

            Mrs. Louisiana CRAVEN died at the home of her son, Noah CRAVEN, Monday afternoon, aged 82 years. For several years she has been in ill health, but with no alarming symptoms until about a week before her death when she rapidly failed until she passed away. She was born in Washington county, Pa., Jan 27, 1812, where she grew to womanhood. In 1830 she was united in marriage to William CRAVEN, who preceded her to the grave several years ago. She was the mother of seven children, two of whom, Noah Craven, of this place, and Mrs. J. D. JONES, of Chatfield, Minn., survive her. The remains were laid to rest in Odd Fellows cemetery, Wednesday afternoon, Rev. DELP officiating.

 

            It was with universal feelings of sorrow that the announcement was heard Wednesday that death had come at early dawn and ended the earthly pilgrimage of Mrs. James F. SCULL. She had been an invalid for many years, much of the time hardly able to get about, but all who met her either in her home or in public, were impressed with her superior intellect and kindly, loving disposition. Her maiden name was Emma YOUNT, and she was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, November 4, 1841. In 1860 she was united in marriage with her bereaved husband, and has assisted in raising six children, all of whom survive her. She united with the Methodist church in her youth and sustained to the end an active relationship to the church. Mrs. Scull came to Rochester twelve years ago, when Professor SCULL accepted superintendency of our city schools, and has since made this her home. The funeral was held at the family residence yesterday afternoon, conducted by Rev. A. T. BRIGGS.

 

            A little son of Mr. & Mrs. Frank HAMLETT, of Marshall county, was buried at Reester’s grave yard, Wednesday.

 

            The funeral of the late James JOHNSON was held Sunday afternoon at Grace church. The Knights of Pythias turned out a hundred strong and conducted the funeral, Rev. BRIGGS pronouncing the eulogy. Mr. Johnson was forty-one instead of fifty-one years old as erroneously reported in the Sentinel  last week and his prominence and usefulness as a citizen was eminently attested by the large turnout at the funeral.

 

Friday, June 22, 1894

 

            Mr. Isaac S. POWELL died at his home in Miami county, June 15, ‘94, aged 60 years. Mr. Powell was well known to many Fulton county people, having come to this state in 1847. The funeral services were conducted at the Mt. Zion church by Rev. JONES of Macy. The deceased leaves a wife and four children.


            The many friends of Mrs. Ida PONTIOUS SMITH will regret to learn of her death which occurred at her home in Wichita, Texas, June 13. She leaves a husband and little son to mourn her death.

 

            RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT . . . to James F. JOHNSON, of Fredonia Lodge, No. 122, K. of P., signed by committee: F. H. CORNELIUS, C. D. SISSON, and G. W. HOLMAN.

 

Friday, June 29, 1894

 

            Abraham LEEDY died at the home of his son, Manassa [LEEDY], west of town, last week, aged 70 years. The funeral services were conducted at Richland Center. Elder RITZINS, of the Dunkard church, of which the deceased had long been a faithful member, preached the funeral discourse.

 

            John BRYANT, the old and widely known farmer of the Drudge neighborhood, died suddenly of paralysis of the heart, Monday night aged 72 years. He had not been sick but awoke feeling faint and arose to sit in a chair where he died ten minutes afterward. He leaves a large family of grown children and his funeral was held Wednesday.

 

Friday, July 6, 1894

 

            The announcement Wednesday morning that Chas. O. LYNK had died the night before in the Wabash Railway Hospital at Peru, created no surprise as his death has been expected for several weeks. He was afflicted with abscess of the liver and the L. E. & W. Ry. company, for which road he had worked for 20 years, kindly cared for him in his sickness by giving him the best possible treatment and attention at the Peru Hospital.

            Deceased was born in Rochester, New York, 43 years and 6 months ago. His father was accidently killed when Charles was five years old, his only sister died in infancy, and his aged mother is the only survivor of the family. He married his surviving wife 19 years ago and ever since that time he has been connected with the railroad line which is now controlled by the L. E. & W. company and running from Michigan City to Indianapolis. First he was ticket agent at Peru for seven years. Then he was transferred to Michigan City for two years and since then he has been the agent in Rochester.

            He was a member of the Presbyterian church, of the Masonic lodge and of the Royal Arcanum in which latter order he carried $3,000 life insurance. He was a quiet, industrious citizen, a faithful servant of his company, and a good man. He leaves a widow and foster daughter, Nellie BOECKING.

            The funeral services will be conducted at the Presbyterian church at two o’clock this afternoon and the Masonic and Royal Arcanum lodges will attend.

 

            The year and a half old son of Rev. and Mrs. Howard STEININGER died at Berne Monday and was brought to Germany for burial Wednesday.

 

Friday, July 13, 1894

 

            Joseph DICKERHOFF, of Akron, was in Rochester Tuesday and reported the death of Al BURNS’ ten year old son.


            Miss Ella CRIPE died at the home of her mother in Peru, Tuesday, of quick consumption. Miss Cripe was a niece of J. N. and Dr. KIRKENDALL, and grew to womanhood in this county where she had many friends.

 

Friday, July 20, 1894

 

            Henry POLLEY, a widely known citizen, of Aubbeenaubbee township, died suddenly of heart disease Friday evening, aged 60 6years. He had not been ailing seriously and his death created much surprise in his neighborhood. A friend writes the Sentinel  that he was born in Huron county, Ohio, July 12, 1835, and came to Aubbeenaubbee township, Fulton county, accompanied by his mother and brother, E. B. POLLEY, in 1859. In the same year he was united in marriage with Miss Eliza KRUPP to whom were born eight children -- four sons and four daughters -- all of whom, with the mother and two brothers, survive. He was one of the county’s best citizens and a large concourse of people attended his funeral.

 

            Peter WENTZELL, of near Bruce Lake, died last Wednesday, aged 41 years. Deceased was quite an exemplary citizen, a zealous member of the Reformed church near Bruce Lake, and superintendent of the Sunday School of that place. By his death the school loses its Supt., the church one of its best members, and the bereft family, a beloved son and brother.

 

            Mrs. Clara STURGEON SICKMAN died at her home in Bourbon, Monday, of consumption, and the remains were brought here for burial. She had been an invalid for several years and was bedfast seven weeks before her death.

            Deceased grew to womanhood in this city. She was a popular teacher in the Rochester schools for several years and while so engaged was married to the surviving husband, Wm. H. SICKMAN and they moved to Bourbon where they prospered on a farm. Four daughters are left to mourn the loss of a noble mother by her death.

 

            One of the oldest settlers in the county passed away last week by the death of Abner THOMPSON, of Akron. He located in Henry township in 1860. He had been a great sufferer for six years and death was welcome.

 

            An infant son of Mr. & Mrs. C. B. NORTON’s was buried Monday.

 

Friday, July 27, 1894

 

            Mary Ellen [HAIMBAUGH FENSTERMAKER], daughter of Conrad and Sarah HAIMBAUGH, was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, July 9, 1851, and died July 19, 1894. Aged 43 years and 10 days. She was united in marriage with Allen FENSTERMAKER Dec 31, 1871.

            This union was blessed with three sons and two daughters, all survived her to mourn her early departure.

            She was a faithful member of the Evangelical church at Pleasant Valley until death relieved her of her intense suffering which was caused by paralysis. All through her illness of nearly eight weeks she was patient and expressed her readiness to depart and be with the Lord. Funeral services were held at the Trinity Evangelical church, conducted by Rev. L. NEWMAN assisted by Rev. A. S. FISHER. Interment in Mount Hope cemetery.

            The deceased leaves a father, mother, five brothers, four sisters, husband, five children


and a host of friends to mourn her early departure.

 

            George A. DUSH died at his home in the north end of town Wednesday morning, of consumption, from which he had long been a sufferer. He was thirty-four years old and leaves a wife. The funeral was held yesterday.

 

            Dr. J. D. PETERS, one of the oldest and most prominent physicians in this part of the state, died at his home in Macy, Tuesday evening, aged 65 years and 9 months. His disease was dropsy and he had been an invalid for several years. For many years he practiced his profession at Logansport and Winamac and then moved to Macy. He leaves a family of grown up children, Mr. S. J. PETERS, the piano dealer of this city, being one of them. The funeral took place from the family residence yesterday afternoon.

 

            Mary Jane LaRUE, sister of B. F. NOFTSGER, died in Logansport Monday, aged 50 years and six months. The remains were brought from Logansport Tuesday, and Rev. E. J. DELP preached a funeral at Omega church.

 

            John W. RANNELLS, the widely known blacksmith and father of Dr. J. N. RANNELLS, died at the latter’s home Thursday evening. He had been an invalid for several years.

 

            Editor and Mrs. Frank A. HAIMBAUGH, of Peru, were called here by the death of Mr. H’s sister, the late Mrs. Allen FENSTERMAKER.

 

            James R. GODFREY, only surviving son of the last of the chiefs of the famous Miami tribe of Indians, died Saturday, on the reservation near Fort Wayne.

 

Friday, August 3, 1894

 

            John W. RANNELLS, whose death occurred at his home in this city Friday morning, was born in Virginia 65 years and 6 months ago. He was a blacksmith by occupation and had been a resident of Rochester for forty years. His wife preceded him in death three years ago, and four children, Dr. J. N., James and Alfred RANNELLS and Mrs. Mollie RANNELLS CHESNUTT, survive.

            The funeral services were conducted at the home of Dr. Rannells, Sunday afternoon, when Rev. BRIGGS, the deceased’s pastor, delivered the eulogy and interment was made in Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            E. E. SLICK dismissed the normal Wednesday, to attend the funeral of his niece.

 

            Misses Bell METZLER and Mae GORDON rode to Kewanna Wednesday on bicycles to attend a funeral.

 

 

            Johnny MILLER, son of Mrs. RIMES, died in Monte Vista, Colorado, two weeks ago of asthma. He was the boy who had both arms broken by being run over by a field roller at the poor farm, some years ago, and was a very bright and promising young man.

 


Friday, August 10, 1894

 

            Mrs. Isaac THOMPSON died very suddenly at her home near Akron, Sunday morning of heart disease, or an overdose of chloral, it is not definitely known which. She was in ordinary health until two hours before her death when she was suddenly striken down and before the services of a physician could be secured she was past the possibility of recovery. She was the mother of three children and a good neighbor and devoted wife. The funeral was held Tuesday.

 

            Guy RANNEY, of Columbus, Ohio, and his younger brother came to spend his vacation and enjoy country life on the farm of his uncle, Albert FIELDS, who lives west of the city. Guy was a great favorite of his uncle and loved to come and stay with him during vacation. While here he took sick, his mother was sent for and came at once, but despite all that could be done for him he rapidly sank to death. He was 13 years and 9 months old and the remains were taken to Columbus for burial after a funeral service at the home of Mr. Fields by Rev. NEWMAN.

 

            Uncle David CORBIN, one of the oldest settlers in the county and a resident of Green Oak neighborhood for nearly half a century, died on the home farm, Wednesday. He was a frank, unpretentious and industrious citizen and had reached the ripe age of 78 years. The funeral was held yesterday.

 

            Amos BOONE died suddenly at the Poor farm Friday, of apoplexy. He was about sixty-eight years old and had never been married. At one time he was fairly well fixed financially, but sickness reduced him to poverty and he had been an inmate of the county house for several months.

 

            Effie THOMPSON was born Oct 17, 1872, and died at her home at Greenwood, Ind., Aug 3, -- aged 22 years and 9 months.

            Deceased was the daughter of Wm. O. and Sarah THOMPSON, and married the surviving husband nearly four years ago. She was a faithful member of the Baptist church and a popular girl and devoted wife. The remains were brought here by rail Saturday and thence conveyed overland to Mentone, Sunday, where the funeral was held.

 

            The infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Will PATTY died Wednesday.

 

Friday, August 17, 1894

 

            William Frank COPLEN was born near Bloomingsburg, Fulton county, December 10, 1872, died Aug 10, ‘94.

            He is the son of William H. COPLEN, of New Paris, Ind. He was united in marriage with Miss Bertha PORTER, of this place, June 14, 1893. A wife, father, two brothers and three sisters sorrowfully mourn his demise.

            About a year ago he purchased the Eagle Bakery and Restaurant, and by careful attention and industry had built up a good trade and made a host of friends, and was rapidly coming to the front as one of Rochester’s prominent business men.

            He was taken sick Thursday, Aug 2, and the malady which caused his death was pronounced by Dr. IORNS to be hepatitis.


            The funeral services were conducted at Mt. Hope church, Sunday afternoon.

            Mrs. COPLEN, with the assistance of her father and Mr. Jos. SIEGFRIED, will continue the business until a favorable opportunity to sell offers itself.

 

Friday, August 24, 1894

 

            Little Ruffie [HARDEGER], son of Mr. & Mrs. Clarence HARDEGER, died Aug 16, aged 5 months and 12 days. (BEARSS)

 

Friday, August 31, 1894

 

            Young Homer SLOAN met a sickening death at Monterey Sunday night. It is not known just how the accident happened but he had been drinking and was seen going toward the railroad late in the evening. The next morning a boy found a horrible spectacle on the railroad track -- a piece of a man. A search soon revealed the extent of the accident. A night train had struck young Sloan and, evidently, instantly killed him. One leg was cut off at the body and ground into shreds of pulpy flesh, the left arm and shoulder blade were torn off and pieces of flesh were strewn along the track for two hundred yards in such quantities as to fill a large sized tobacco bucket.

            Deceased was an industrious and upright young man with the single exception that he drank to excess at intervals. He was a son of storekeeper SLOAN at Monterey, was about twenty-three years old, worked as a section hand on the railroad and was a member of the Maccabees lodge at Monterey. It is reported that he was to have been married in a month and that he told some of his friends that he was going to make this his last “spree.”

 

            Another violent death was that of Jim KESSLER, formerly of Newcastle township. Kessler lived at Porter Station, a boom manufacturing town in Porter county. He was a plasterer by trade and was working on a large factory the first of the week when his wife came to this city on her way to visit relatives in Ohio. She was stopping with her husband’s brother, Doc. KESSLER, who lives on Madison street, when on Wednesday morning she received a telegram announcing that her husband had been killed. She left for home on the first train and there learned all of the particulars of the death that is known. Jim had been to Hammond trying to collect some money. He missed the evening train and started to walk home. When near Porter he met a train and stepped off the track and stood so close to the train as to be struck by the engine side-gear or some projection from a car. He was dead when found and the remains were brought here yesterday, and taken to the Reester grave yard for burial. He leaves a wife and two daughters and was thirty-seven years old.

 

            Grandmother Eliza FENSTERMAKER died at the family homestead, two and a half miles northeast of town, Tuesday of old age being nearly 81 years old. Deceased was the consort of George FENSTERMAKER and the mother of John, Allen and Lafayette FENSTERMAKER, four more of her children having preceded her in death. The Fenstermaker family settled in this county in 1865 and established a name of honor and reared a family which is a credit to any community.

            The funeral was held at Trinity Evangelical church yesterday when Rev. NEWMAN preached to a large audience of friends and neighbors, dwelling eloquently upon the christian zeal deceased had manifested in her membership with Pleasant Valley church.


 

            Mrs. Savilla HAFFLEY, of Pennsylvania, who has been visiting her brother, Geo. STETLER, for the past few months, was called home by a telegram, this week, announcing the death of a near friend.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Will WAGONER buried one of their twin girls last Wednesday. (DELONG)

 

            The little daughter of A. GINN died last Saturday aged 7 months. (BEARSS)

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Milton WHARTON attended the funeral of Mrs. Nettie THOMPSON, at Mentone, last Monday. (BIGFOOT)

 

Friday, September 7, 1894

 

            The very sudden death of Bartley BARKMAN, of Newcastle township, Sunday morning, was shocking intelligence to his very large circle of acquaintances. He was taken sick Friday, with a violent form of inflamation of the bowels, and in spite of the best medical skill of the county, gradually sank to death.

            Deceased was about thirty-eight years old and leaves a wife and three children in comfortable circumstances, he having been a most prosperous farmer, and industrious and reputable citizen. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. McNEALEY Monday, to a very large audience of the deceased’s friends and neighbors after which burial was made in Sycamore cemetery.

 

            James HEDDENS, formerly a resident of Liberty township, buried his wife at Peru last week, she having died from a self administered overdose of morphine. They lived at Ft. Wayne.

 

Friday, September 14, 1894

 

            John SCHOLDER, son of Adam SCHOLDER, deceased, was born in Rochester, Ind., October 31, 1858, and died at his residence on Madison street, Saturday evening, Sep 8, 1894, aged 35 years 10 months and 8 days. He enjoyed a large acquaintance in this community and was respected as an honest and industrious citizen.

            The deceased leaves a wife and four children and many other relatives and friends to mourn his early demise.

            The funeral services were conducted at the residence Monday afternoon, by Rev. A. E. GIFT, and the remains were followed to the last resting place by a large concourse of people.

 

            Mrs. Eli BRUGH was buried at Leiters Ford Saturday. She died of consumption.

 

            The infant son of Mr. & Mrs. H. H. JOHNSON died yesterday.

 

            Mrs. Noah NORRIS, of Newcastle township, died of cancer of the stomach Wednesday morning and was buried at Sycamore chapel yesterday. She was a good and useful woman and leaves a large family.

 


           

            Auditor and Mrs. DENISTON were called to Cass county yesterday by the death of the latter’s mother, Grandmother HOOVER, who was 82 years old. Deceased was one of the most prominent pioneers of the Eel River Valley and mother of a large family.

 

            Thomas BARKER, of near Lucerne, died and was brought to the Salem grave yard for burial Sunday. (BEARSS)

 

Friday, September 21, 1894

 

            Word was received here Tuesday, of the death of Mrs. Lige NEFF, of Milford. She was a former resident of this city.

 

            An infant child of Mr. & Mrs. Frank ARTER was buried at the Odd Fellows cemetery Sunday a week. (AKRON)

 

Friday, September 28, 1894

 

            The two year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Andrew ICE died yesterday, after a protracted illness, and the funeral will be held this afternoon.

 

Friday, October 5, 1894

 

            The funeral of Mrs. J. M. KENNY who died of lung fever at Monticello Tuesday evening, will be held from the home of her daughter, Mrs. P. D. BENNETT, on Fulton avenue, this morning at 9 o’clock. Interment at Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Joseph WIDEMAN, an old and respected citizen of the northwest part of the township, died last Monday of dropsy and other complication of diseases. He was more than seventy-one years of age and a member of the Sanctified faith.  -- Akron News.

 

            This community was greatly shocked to hear of the death of Ely STRONG, after an illness of only two days. He was taken sick Sunday morning with a second stroke of paralysis and died Monday night. He leaves a wife and six children to mourn his irreparable loss. His funeral was held in the M.E. church, conducted by the G.A.R. Post and preached by Rev. McNEALY, of Tiosa. The funeral was one of the largest ever held in Akron. He was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery. (AKRON)

 

Friday, October 12, 1894

 

            John KEWNEY died at his home on north Main street yesterday, aged 77 years. He had been a terrible sufferer from cancer of the face for more than a year and death was, therefore, welcome to him. He leaves an aged wife and four sons and one daughter to mourn the death of a good husband and devoted father.

            Deceased was a resident of Rochester for nearly half a century, being engaged in the foundry and machine shop business for many years. He was a loyal citizen and a good neighbor and be it said to his honor, Uncle John Kewney was respected by all who knew him.

            He was an enthusiastic Odd Fellow and that order will have charge of the funeral which will be conducted by Rev. ROTH at the family residence this afternoon at 2 o’clock.


            Another death after years of patient suffering was that of Mrs. Adam AULT Friday morning. Her disease was heart failure and dropsy and her death had been expected for some time.

            Mrs. Ault was the daughter of the late James KEELY and the mother of two children -- Mrs. Nettie JOHNSON and Oliver AULT. She was a devoted christian, wife and mother and died at the age of fifty-one.

            The funeral was one of the largest ever seen in Rochester and it was conducted at Grace church, where deceased was a member, Sunday afternoon, Rev. R. D. UTTER, a former pastor officiating.

 

            Mrs. RAISH was buried at Leiters Ford Saturday, but the Sentinel could get no particulars of the event.

 

            The Kewanna Herald says, for the second time within the past two weeks death again invaded the home of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. CALVIN on last Monday night and took from their their little twin boys aged about 5 months. One of them had been ailing several days with inflamation of the lungs, but no cause can be assigned to the death of the other. The funeral service was held Wednesday forenoon from the Christian church conducted by the pastor, Rev. HUFFERD.

 

Friday, October 19, 1894

 

            John EYTCHESON, of Iceberg, died Monday after a long illness.

 

            Miss Dosia JESSEN received a telegram yesterday announcing the death of her aunt, Mrs. M. A. JONES, at Chatfield, Minn. Deceased was well known in Rochester.

 

            Miss Nora DOWNEY attended the funeral of her friend Edith EURITT, of Macy, who died of consumption, last week.

 

            Grandmother CARR died at Frank McCARTER’s, Saturday evening, of old age.

 

Friday, October 26, 1894

 

            Andrew LACKEY whose illness was frequently mentioned in these columns died Friday afternoon, aged 53 years. Mr. Lackey was a hard working citizen and an intelligent and companionable neighbor and he leaves a widow and eleven children, one of them being Miss Bertha LACKEY of the Sentinel.

            The funeral was held at the Baptist church Saturday afternoon.

 

            The two year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. McGINNIS died at Green Oak, Thursday. The little fellow was an unusually bright child, and the parents have the sympathy of the entire community in their bereavement.

 

            James GRAY died at his home on Franklin Avenue, Monday morning, at about 11 o’clock, of consumption. He had been failing for some time and his death was therefore not unexpected. His funeral took place Wednesday morning under the direction of the K.O.T.M. lodge, of which he was a member and in which he carried a $1000 life insurance policy. Jim


was a model citizen, a member of the Evangelical church, a hard working and honorable man who will be missed by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. He leaves a wife and three children to mourn his death.

 

            The family of the late Andrew LACKEY is in deep distress. Two of the boys, aged 10 and 12 years, are very low with typhoid fever, the disease Mr. Lackey died of.

 

Friday, November 2, 1894

 

            Edith [HATCH], oldest child of Mr. & Mrs. Grant HATCH, was born March 2, 1887, died Oct 26, 1894. Aged 7 years 7 months 25 days. She was at the home of her grandpaarents, Mr. & Mrs. Lyman HATCH, of Macy, and had intended to attend school at that place, but on the morning that she was to begin her school work, she was taken sick and in a few days death had done its work.

            Edith was an unusually bright and intelligent little girl and was sociable and agreeable among her playmates and was loved by all who knew her.

            Funeral services at Ebenezer church conducted by Rev. O. A. COOK, interment at Oliver cemetery.

 

            Mrs. Marion WINN died at her home in Richland township, Sunday, and was buried at Richland Center.

 

            Our last items said Mrs. Ben VANLEEN was buried at the Dunkard church. It should have been Mrs. Ben VANLOU. (PALESTINE)

 

Friday, November 9, 1894

 

            Elder Jacob BARNHART, father of the Sentinel  editor, died at the family homestead, at Twelve Mile, Tuesday morning, aged 71 years. His disease was eresypelas and he was sick but five days. He had lived at Twelve Mile, forty-seven years, was a minister and Elder in the German Baptist church for thirty-three years and died leaving his six children the blessed legacy of a father’s spotless name for honesty, industry and benevolence. His life work was a constant devotion to the welfare of his family, the relief of suffering and sorrow everywhere and the upbuilding of the church and all of its influences for good.

            The funeral was held at Mexico, Wednesday noon, Elder SHURLY, of Peru, and Rev. Samuel MURRAY, of Huntington, officiating.

 

            Frank OWENS who had been suffering from consumption for a year past died at the home of his father-in-law, Mr. Jacob HERRING, Tuesday. The funeral was under direction of the Manitau Blues and the remains laid to rest in Odd Fellows cemetery yesterday.

 

            Grandma DUNLAP died yesterday morning at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. R. P. VanDIEN. She had been failing for some time and her death was not unexpected. She was the mother of a large family, whose lives evidence her watchful care, and has been a consistent member of church for many years. The remains will be laid to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery tomorrow.

 


 

            Rochester, Ind., Nov. 5, ‘94. . .  I hereby acknowledge the receipt of the sum of $1000, in full payment of the Life Insurance policy held by my husband, James T. GRAY, in the Order of the K.O.T.M., of this city, and return thanks for the prompt payment of the same. . .Mrs. Emma S. GRAY. . .

 

Friday, November 16, 1894

 

            George G. WOODFILL was born two miles southeast of Rochester, Sep 3, 1864, and grew to manhood in this county. He was left an orphan at the early age of ten years to battle in this cold world. In 1885 he went to Iowa, where he has been a resident ever since, excepting last winter which he spent in California. He died in DesMoines, November 7, 1894, age 30 years two months and four days, leaving four sisters, Mrs. Tobias GOSS and Mrs. J. W. SNODGRASS, of this place, and Mrs. H. G. MILLER and Mrs. J. A. JONES, of Los Angeles, California, to mourn the loss of an only brother. The funeral was held Saturday at the residence of Mr. Tobias GOSS on South Main street after which the remains were laid to rest at the Mt. Zion cemetery.

 

            Rev. W. G. CALLAHAN departed this life Nov 6, 1894, aged 62 years 9 months and 25 days.

            He leaves a wife and two daughters to mourn his loss. He was an earnest worker for the salvation of souls, and was a minister in the Methodist Protestant church, and lived near Rochester four years. He served four years in the army for the freedom of his country.

            His health broke down while on Harlan circuit, Allen county, last June, at which time he was compelled to resign his work and come home. He was a kind and affectionate husband and father. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. RICKETTS, of Walnut, assisted by Rev. HALL, of Rochester, at the family residence. The burial service was conducted by the G.A.R.

 

            Mrs. William ZELLARS, Sr., died at the family residence last week, after a long illness from consumption. She was the mother of Insurance Agent ZELLARS and was a good neighbor and noble wife and mother.

 

            Dr. C. B. HIGGINS died at his home in Peru Wednesday morning. He was once a resident of Rochester, engaged in the practice of medicine with Dr. ROBBINS.

 

Friday, November 23, 1894

 

            The sad news came by telegraph Wednesday evening that May DAVIDSON -- more generally known as May NYE -- had died in Missouri.

            Deceased had gone to Nebraska some weeks ago where she expected to marry Harry KINNEY, but the next heard of her was a letter that she was not married but very sick with typhoid fever at the home of a relative. She asked for money to come home and it was promptly sent by her brother, Lou. The next heard was a telegram announcing that she would be in Chicago Wednesday morning where Mr. JENKINS, the grocer, went to meet her and bring her home to her family. But she was not aboard the train, and the trainmen said she was taken from the train at Cameron, Mo., deathly sick, and that is all known of the death which occurred soon after she left the train.

            May Davidson was seventeen years old, a bright, vivacious girl, an active member of


the Baptist church and quite popular. The remains arrived yesterday evening and the funeral will be held at 2:30 this afternoon at the Baptist church.

 

JOE BOWEN (Biography)

 

            JOE BOWEN CAUGHT AT LAST. . . . Joe Bowen has long had the reputation of being a tax dodger. He is known to have a large amount of wealth, and in one way or another he has managed to escape taxation. Joe spends much of his time in Rochester, but claims a residence in Wabash county because his wife resides there. Two years ago County Assessor ORR proceeded according to law and made a large personal assessment against him, but afterward discovered that he had been assessed for a small amount in Wabash and was compelled to cancel the one made here.

            Last spring Assessor Orr, of this county, and Assessor SINGER, of Wabash, kept their eye on Uncle Joe far as possible after he disappeared from Rochester in March, and found that he extended his travels into several counties during the assessing season. In the meantime every township assessor was instructed to gather as much evidence as possible against him, the records and judgment dockets were carefully examined and reported to Wabash county where it was determined that a legal assessment could be made. He returned to Rochester after his summer tour and the assessor at Wabash was immediately notified to be on the lookout, and succeeded in capturing him last week. He refused to answer a part of the questions propounded, but he goes on the tax duplicate for a sum that will make him feel like he had been struck by a cyclone when he pays his taxes.

 

            Robert SPERRY died at the family residence, three miles west of the city, Monday aged 34 years and 5 months. Rob’t. was a very bright young man but consumption preyed on him for several years with fatal result. The funeral was held at the Presbyterian church, Wednesday.

 

            The administrator of the estate of Geo. W. JONES, who was killed near Roann on the Eel river division recently, has brought suit against the company for $10,500 damages.

 

Friday, November 30, 1894

 

            This community was greatly shocked Friday noon when the report was rapidly circulated that Elder [E. J.] DELP had suddenly died of heart failure. He had been somewhat indisposed for several days but was not seriously sick. Just after dinner he took his mail to look through it and sat down in a rocker. Soon afterward his daughter, Flo [DELP], who has been keeping house at home since the death of her mother, heard her father breathe heavily and ran to him when she found him lying back in his chair and deathly sick. She screamed for help and Dr. SHAFER, Ed BEYER and Rev. COOK came in just in time to remove Mr. Delp from his chair to a bed when he died before any stimulant could be administered.

            Elder Delp was born in Ohio 64 years and three months ago, married Mary A. MOON in 1850 and came to Fulton county soon after and has lived here ever since except a six year’s residence in Miami county. Twelve children were born to Mr. & Mrs. Delp, nine of whom survive. Mrs. Delp died one year ago and the interesting story of the life of the dead is told in the following extracts from eulogies prepared by Rev. A. O. COOK and Hon. M. L. ESSICK:


 

 

                Comrade Delp enlisted in Company I, 90th Regiment, of the 5th Cavalry, Indiana Volunteers, and was mustered in as Sargent on the 11th day of August, 1862. The regiment with which he was connected was in twenty-two battles and skirmishes. It captured 640 prisoners, it had killed in action 34, died from wounds 13, died in rebel prisons 115, died in hospital 74, wounded in action 72, taken by the enemy as prisoners 497, officers wounded 6, officers killed 1, officers taken prisoner 17, total casualties 832.

                For his gallantry in the line of duty he was promoted from 4th Sargent to 2nd Lieutenant, and from 2nd Lieutenant to Captain. He never shirked a duty or avoided a battle. He was true, merciful and brave, a patriot and a real hero. He knew his duty and did it well. He had faith in his company and they had in him. He led them in all the engagements we have mentioned. After he came home he made one of our best citizens. In peace or war he was always Delp, the good, christian man.

                The hard school of adversity is a teacher that feeds and trains both the body and mind, hence he was a busy man. In his long years of usefulness he was a blacksmith, a carpenter, a cooper, a farmer, a soldier and a minister of the gospel.

                To far more people he was known as the christian soldier than the union soldier, and he often expressed himself as desiring to be remembered more for his christianity than for anything else. He has left us no complete record of his ministry, yet a partial record remains.

                Since 1879 he officiated at 115 marriages, preached 279 funeral discourses. During that same period he was the means of hundreds of conversions and baptized as many into the various churches which he served. But twelve years of his most active ministry preceded 1879 and of these twelve we have no record. These converts can never forget his ability in wielding “the sword of the Spirit,” his supreme faith, his power with God in prayer and his unflinching devotion to the “firm foundation.” He was able to stay with the Sword of the Spirit, the acutist arguments of every unbeliever. By his strong faith and courage he hurled every opposition to christianity to the dust. In many churches where he preached audiences filling every foot of space listened, spell-bount, to his plain, simple and yet powerful presentation of the gospel. Sometimes they were “still as death,” at other times the sobs and groans of the penitent could be heard through the congregation. If he was a brave captain, he was a braver and bolder captain of the Cross. He was iminently a preacher of the Bible. He indulged in no speculations. He catered to no cunningly devised rables. He did not drift with every wind of doctrine. He had no patience with the “Higher Critics.” Every error however powerful, penetrating or subtle, found in him an impenatrable fortress, for he always presented such a bold, commanding front, that no attack was deemed prudent on the part of the “powers of darkness.” He made no pretensions to knowledge of science, or art, or philosophy or history, outside of the Bible. He called himself a “plain preacher,” and so he was in more ways than one. He knew his Bible and he knew it well; and especially was he intimately acquainted with the central character of the Bible, Christ his Savior. Behind Christ and the Cross he hid himself, and hence his beautiful and powerful life. He was the gospel in the concrete. Every member of every church for which he preached, holds him in the highest esteem, and always looked to him as a safe spiritual advisor.

                For the past two years he acted as Moderator of the Logansport Baptist Association, and the success of the meetings was largely due to his ability as a leader. For twenty-seven years he has been a leader in the councils of the


Logansport Association, as well as the state, and no man in that period of years has offered so many prayers of ordination in ordination councils. Truly, he was a man after God’s own heart.

                He held the office of township trustee for three terms, and last, but not least, he has been since residing in Rochester, chaplain of McClung post, No. 95, G.A.R., except during the term he was commander. In all of his callings and in all of his various trusts he never failed to do his duty. He filled the full measure and never was there a breath of suspicion against him.

                On the 22d day of November, 1894, at noon, thirty-one years from the time he received his cruel wound, from which he suffered all his life, while the sun was shining, as it did upon that terrible day of carnage, his life melted away in his happy home where family, friends and neighbors had learned to love him.

            After such a life, no blackened hearse or tassel or crepe or somber mourning garb should follow his cortege to the tomb. It seems to be appropriate that the badges should be of the purest white to sypbol the white sails and bunting on the ship of everlasting life on which he has taken passage.

            The funeral was held at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon when one of the largest audiences ever congregated in the city assembled to pay the last tribute of respect. Rev. COOK pronounced a beautiful and touching eulogy and then the remains were escorted to the grave in Odd Fellows cemetery by McClung Post G.A.R., Manitau Blues and the Baptist Sunday school. There was no band, no military maneuvers and no display of any kind and so the body of Elder Delp was laid to rest in the modest, and beautiful way which his long life exemplified.

 

            J. L. PECK, a former resident of the east side of the Lake neighborhood, died at Noblesville, Wednesday and will be brought here for burial today.

 

            George WIGMORE received a telegram yesterday announcing the death of his brother, Charley [WIGMORE], at his father’s home in Monticello.

 

            Mr. Asberry WILLIAMSON, one of the leading farmers of the community, was taken sick with a severe case of lung fever and pleurisy, Saturday Nov 17, which proved fatal the 23d. The remains were conveyed to the Rochester grave yard accompanied by a large procession of relatives and friends and was laid to rest by the Masonic order of which he was a member. Deceased was 47 years of age, an industrious citizen, and obliging neighbor, a loving companion and a kind father. He leaves a wife and three children who have the sympathy of a host of friends. (PALESTINE)

 

Friday, December 7, 1894

 

            From the moment of the receipt of the sudden death of May DAVIDSON (or NYE as she was more generally known), as she was on her way home from Nebraska two weeks ago, there were suspicions aroused and rumors afloat that her death was unnatural. Nothing was known of the particulars until after the funeral when Agent B. O. WEST, of the C. & A., wrote the doctors, who treated her in her last sickness, at Cemeron, Mo., for the particulars of her death. The answer came back that she had died from the effect of some drug but they had no evidence how it came to be administered and could not say but it might have been taken in an overdose of medicine.

            But accompanying the letter was a copy of the Daily Observer, of Cameron, which


contained a notice of her sudden and mysterious death from which the following extract is taken:

                When the H. & St. Joe “Eli” passenger arrived from St. Joe about 8 o’clock last evening, one of its passengers, a young lady, was observed to be in a dangerous condition, being violently ill. Drs. SNYDER and SHAW were called and had her removed to the Cameron House. Her body was cold and limp, and it was about midnight before she was aroused to consciousness. She apparently remained so a short time, then fell into a quiet sleep, but this morning was much worse and in spite of all the doctors could do, died about 9:30.

                The only baggage she had with her was a valise and a box. Her name, Miss Mae DAVIDSON, was on the latter, and on a slip of paper in the valise was the following: “Miss Mae Davidson, taken sick, is on her way home to her brother, Lou DAVIDSON, at Rochester, Ind.”

            This report was published in the issue of Wednesday and on the following Saturday the Observer had a startling story under the headline of “A Probable Murder” in which it gives a sensational report of a conversation between Mae and the woman who cared for her on the train. In this it is said May told of how she had been betrayed by Harry KINNEY and that he had given her medicine and told her to take it and meet him in Chicago and they would be married there. But she said she took sick soon after taking the medicine and this is the last talking she did, and from the report of the conversation, it is doubtful if she was in full possession of her reason at the time.

            Letters received by F. M. JENKINS and John D. HOLMAN, who have taken an active interest in the investigation, are somewhat conflicting and, taken in connection with the letters found in the dead girl’s trunk, combine to darken the mystery rather than clear it away. One of the letters is from the lady who May worked for in Nebraska and another from the husband of the woman who heard her story on the train. The former says Mae often spoke of Harry, doubtless meaning Harry Kinney the young grocery clerk whom she left here to marry, and that she left there sick on a ticket purchased with money sent her by her brother Lou of this city. She had been sick for several days or a week and started home on the advice of her physician, having notified her brother Lou when to meet her in Chicago to accompany her home. It is learned that the newspaper report that KENNEDY or KINNEY was in Nebraska is a mistake as he has been at his home in New Albany in this state all of the time since Mae left there when his parents decided they were too young to marry and she went to Nebraska, nearly two months ago.

            It is a most mysterious case and whether May Davidson died from a broken heart or from medicine given her by someone, or from the effect of a drug taken with suicidal intent will never be known.

 

            Mrs. Harry CHINN died at the home of her father, Dr. KELSEY, in Monterey yesterday morning, after a brief illness from derangement of the brain.

 

            The widow of the late Thomas BARKER, who died at Lucern, has received one thousand dollars life insurance.

 

            Mrs. Joseph McDONALD died at her home in this city Thursday aged 31 years and 9 months. She had been an invalid for several years and leaves a husband and three children. The funeral was held Friday, Rev. COOK conducting the service.

 

 


            Mr. & Mrs. Peter RICHARD buried their baby boy last Sunday, at Monterey. Services were held at the Catholic church. (DELONG)

 

Friday, December 14, 1894

 

            Otis Billings HOLMAN is reported dead by the neighborhood press, the event having occurred near Argos on Thanksgiving day. Along with the story of the death is a sensational report that he made a confession on his death bed that he killed a man in this county some years ago for his money but as nobody has been killed here for years and Uncle Bill has had but little money since his residence here, the story is surely a newspaper slander.

            About five weeks ago uncle Bill had one eye knocked out by being struck with a stone thrown by a small boy at Argos, and that is thought to have hastened his death. Years ago Holman was a respected farmer in easy circumstances near Bloomingsburg, but his fondness for liquor deprived him of wealth, resspectability and every other desirable possession, leaving him the pitiable object that had become a familiar sight all over the northern part of the state.

 

            Application was made Monday for the admission of Mrs. Nettie CHINN to the Logansport asylum for the insane. She is the daughter of Dr. KELSEY and wife of Monterey, and is twenty-two years of age. She lived with her husband in or near Rochester until the latter went South for his health a short time ago, when she returned to Monterey temporarily. Before going to Monterey she was treated by a Rochester physician, who it is said by her husband, frightened her by telling her she was likely to suffer from St. Vitus dance, and might lose her mind. She grew very bad two weeks ago. Last week her husband was telegraphed for and came home. On Sunday a commission in lunacy composed of Esquires FREEMAN and GRAVES and Drs. G. W. THOMPSON and W. E. KELSEY held an inquest on her, and the result was as stated. The application was accepted at the asylum, and Sheriff McCAY went to Monterey for her Tuesday afternoon, but found her too bad to be moved. She grew constantly worse, and died Wednesday evening. -- Winamac Democrat.

 

            In its obituary notice of the late Charles WIGMORE, who was a resident newspaper man of Rochester three years ago, the Monticello Press says “his death resulted from Brights disease of the kidneys, superinduced by catarrhal trouble. His sickness dated from the time he took up his residence at Hartford Cit y two years ago and since then his health failed gradually until death resulted. On several occasions he had given up his employment owing to ill health and was compelled to dispose of the Kentland Democrat for the same cause.”

 

            Raymond [TRUE], the little six year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Melvin TRUE, died of inflammatory rheumatism, Tuesday of last week, and was buried at Mt. Zion cemetery on Wednesday.

 

Friday, December 21, 1894

 

            Mrs. Anna LEHMAN was born in Mechlenburg, Germany, May 16, 1833, and died in Rochester, Ind., Dec 13, 1894, at the age of 61 years 6 months and 27 days.

            On March 20, 1856, or at the age of 23, she was united in marriage to Christian F. STIGLITZ and shortly after came to America. She became the mother of five children, two sons, Charley and Samuel [STIGLITZ] and three daughters, Mary, Minna and Della


[STIGLITZ], the oldest of whom, Mary, preceded her mother to a better world by 20 years. On November 19, eleven years ago, she was married a second time to Henry A. BARCUS with whom she lived a happy life to the end of her days.

            The deceased was a member of the Lutheran church from her childhood until about twenty years ago when she united with the Presbyterian church of Rochester of which she has ever since been a faithful and consistent member.

            She was a woman of strong mind and character, outspoken in what she thought was right or wrong, yet kind and thoroughly interested in the welfare of others. She had read her Bible much and well and had no sympathy with those who are wise above what is written. In meetings of social worship she was most ready to respong to the subject of “Christian love.”

            The funeral services were conducted in the Presbyterian church by the pastor on Sunday afternoon in the presence of a very large and sympathetic gathering of people and as a scripture appropriate to the steadfastness of her christian life and character, the 4th verse of the 23rd Psalm was chosen and considered by the close attention of all. The remains were laid to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Mrs. Frank DAVIDSON died at the family residence north of town, Friday, aged 40 years. She had been an infalid for some time and leaves eight children to mourn the loss of a noble mother. The funeral was held at Mt. Nebo church, Saturday, Rev. HALL, of this city, officiating.

 

            Mrs. Mary ZARTMAN, wife of Geo. W. ZARTMAN, died Dec 12, 1894, aged 61 years, and was buried Friday at Mt. Zion cemetery. Rev. GIFT, officiating.

 

            J. E. GARWOOD was called home last Sunday on account of the death of his mother. She will be remembered as a kind, pleasant lady who made a host of friends while in Akron. (AKRON)

 

Friday, December 28, 1894

 

            George and Edward BRUGH, of near Leiters Ford, are brothers who live on adjoining farms and are of the county’s very best and most popular citizens. George had a son, Ray [BRUGH], aged 11 years and Ed a son, Emory [BRUGH], aged 9 years. The boys were together much of their lives and attended the same school. While on their way home Friday evening they had several rough and tumble, school boy scuffles and when they reached Ray’s home they were some distance behind the other scholars who paid no attention to their boyish romping.

            At the gate the boys seem to have indulged in a farewell bout and Ray ran inside screaming that he was stabbed and died from internal hemorrhage soon afterward.

            Coroner ZOOK was sent for and went down to hold an inquest. In his investigation he found that the boys had always been playmates, that they were addicted to scuffling, that Emory had a new penknife which he carried open much of the time and that the wound which caused Ray’s death was made by Emory’s new knife.

            From all of the evidence obtainable Coroner Zook was fully convinced that the death must have been the result of childish carelessness.

            The boys, according to Emory’s story, were chasing each other and when in the last dash for the evening Emory ran at Ray to scare him into a run he unexpectedly stood still and Emory struck him with the knife, the sharp point of which penetrated the breast near the heart


and severed one of the arteries.

            It was a most distressing death for the parents and relatives of both boys, but it was one of those child’s play misfortunes which will occur occasionally in the best regulated families and all concerned have the heartfelt sympathy of all who know them.

 

            The western papers are still discussing the mystery of Mae NYE’s sudden death. The first reports published of the probability of murder are now strongly disproven and the theory of suicide very much doubted by those who have investigated. The Cameron (Mo.) Sun of last Saturday, has a column and a half article on the death which will be of interest to Sentinel readers. It says:

                Mae DAVIDSON was a bright, light hearted girl commanding the respect and esteem of all who knew her. She had a mother and two brothers, one older and the other younger than she. Her father died when the children were quite small and the family being in somewhat straightened circumstances went to live with Mrs. Davidson’s father, Silas NYE. Mae had to work out ever since she was a child and had been with one family nearly a year previous to last September. While there she received attentions for Harry KENNEY, a young clerk in New Albany, Ind., and her family understood that they were to be married. She went to the latter place late in the summer expecting to become a happy bride but the young man’s parents objected on the grounds that they were both too young.

                Instead of going back home she started for Red Cloud, Neb., where her grandfather’s sister, Sarah RICHARDSON, lives. What the motive was that impelled her to that step is not known. She had been there but once before in twelve years and the first intimation they had of her coming was a telegram to Frisby N. RICHARDSON, her second cousin and the above lady’s son, one day in the latter part of September, stating that she would arrive on a certain train. She did not, however, arrive until 24 hours later, saying she had missed a train in Kansas City.

                After visiting in the Richardson family about a week she expressed a desire to go to work, and they secured a position for her in one of the best families in the city. While there she was taken sick but did not let her relatives know of it until she became convalescent. When able she went to work again, but sent to her brother for money to pay her passage home as the doctor had told her that she could not live if she stayed in Nebraska. When the money arrived she made immediate preparations for departure. The day before starting she was at the Richardson home and seemed lively and cheerful. She said she had a notion not to go home as she was feeling so much better, and thought she would take the money sent her and buy clothes. Mrs. Richardson and the lady for whom she had been working persuaded her, however, to go, as they were afraid she would again be taken sick if she stayed.

                The next morning while getting ready to take the train she fainted away, but recovered and seemed as well as ever. The lady who had employed her took her to the train and said that on the way she acted rather queer but was all right when she left her on board.

                The exact nature of the ailment does not appear. The doctor who attended her states that he did not consider her condition dangerous the last time he saw her, which was the day before she started for home. Neither does it appear that he gave her any medicine or drug, an overdose of which would have been likely to lead to fatal results.

                With the story of her sickness on the train, her arrival here, and her untimely end a few hours afterward, the Sun’s readers are already familiar. The


newspaper reports in regard to her conduct with a young man at Red Cloud are absolutely without foundation, as is also the story that Harry KENNEY had been there and was concerned in medical treatment involved as a result of improper relations.

                The local physicians who attended the girl in her last hours are at sea as to the cause of her death, except that symptoms indicated that it was due to an overdose of some drug or medicine, the nature of which they do not know.

                The Sun’s theory is that feeling sickness coming on while enroute between Red Cloud and St. Joe, she stopped off and procured some drug that would perhaps sustain her to the journey’s end, and took an overdose. She would have had plenty of time to do this at Table Rock, about five hours ride this side of Red Cloud, where trains stop ten minutes.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. James MEHAFFY buried their baby last week.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. John ANDERSON started to Leiters Ford, Friday evening, to attend the funeral of little Ray BRUGH and stopped for supper on the way. They then started on through the darkness when their buggy struck a stump and upset throwing them out breaking Mrs. Anderson’s arm. She was taken to Dr. OVERMYER’s where the fracture was reduced and she remained there several days to regain strength sufficiently to be brought home.

 

            James MOORE was born in Logan Co., Ohio, Oct 16, 1815 and died in the home of John ELKINS, in Rochester Dec 21, 1894, at the age of 79 years 2 months and 16 days.

            Deceased was an early settler and an old pioneer of Fulton county having resided in the vicinity of Hoover’s Station since 1842 until his home was broken up by the death of his aged wife four years ago.

            He leaves a large relationship and many friends to follow him to the majority side of the river of death.

            His funeral was largely attended at Hoovers, Sunday afternoon.

 

 

The Rochester Sentinel

1895

 

Friday, January 4, 1895

 

            The family of the late Andrew LACKEY seems to be engulfed in distress. Ever since Mr. Lackey’s death in September, two of the boys, aged 10 and 12 years, have been afflicted with typhoid fever and from some cause both of them became insane and were taken to Long Cliff last Monday by Sheriff DILLON. On the same day Mrs. LACKEY’s year old baby died from the same disease which had afflicted the family so long and thus three of her children were taken from her in one day.

            In conversation with Supt. ROGERS, of Long Cliff, Sheriff Dillon was assured that the boys’ cases were of such a nature that they could be cured of their mental weakness and restored to their home sound and well. Mr. Dillon also learned while at Long Cliff that Miss Minnie FROMM is no better.

 

            The remains of Mrs. L. J. BROWN arrived here Wednesday evening from Iowa, accompanied by the husband and daughter, Mrs. Adda WARREN, and taken to the residence of D. R. MARTIN, from where, after a short service, they were taken to the Odd Fellows cemetery for burial yesterday afternoon. The deceased was a sister-in-law of Mrs. Elizabeth BROWN, of this city, and was a former resident of this county.

 

            Robert CROCKETT, more generally known as “Doc” Crockett, died at his residence in the southwest part of town yesterday after many months of suffering with consumption. The funeral will be held tomorrow.

 

Friday, January 11, 1895

 

            Sam J. LOY, the lock and gunsmith, died at the home of his mother in this city Sunday morning, aged 29 years. His disease was consumption and he suffered for more than a year. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon when Evangelist KENNY preached the funeral sermon at the Christian church to a large audience.

 

            John R. HOESEL, of near Monterey, was born in Amburg, Austria, July 20, 1840. In 1854 he emigrated to America with his parents, first locating near Belvue, Ohio. In 1856 they removed to Pulaski county, Ind. The deceased was married to Miss Susan OVERMYER, in this county, Feb 6, 1864. This marriage was blessed with 10 children, 5 sons and 5 daughters, two, a son and daughter, preceding the father in death. He was a devoted member of the Lutheran church during his entire life. Funeral services by Rev. A. E. GIFT, at Monterey,


 Friday, Jan 4. He died Jan 3, 1895, aged 54 years 5 months and 13 days.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Ed ROSS lost their infant daughter, Monday morning.

 

            Frederick REESE, one of the oldest settlers in the county died at his home, in the southeast part of the city, Tuesday, after a long illness. He was a member of the Baptist church and Rev. COOK preached the funeral yesterday forenoon.

 

            Little Frances [MAHLER], infant son of Dan and Clara MAHLER, died of lung fever Monday evening, aged about four and a half months. Funeral services were conducted at the home Wednesday morning at 10 a.m. (DELONG)

 

            Little Ray [SAGERS], the four year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. SAGERS, was buried at Nichols grave yard, last Sunday. (AKRON)

 

            Died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John DAY, Mrs. Isabel MANVIL, aged 63 years. Her funeral was preached in the M.E. church by Rev. SPITZ after which she was laid peacefully to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery. Mrs. Manvil leaves one daughter and one son and a great circle of friends to mourn her loss. She was well known in Akron and vicinity and was universally loved. (AKRON)

 

            William E. SHOEMAKER, son of a wealthy farmer near Pulaski, ran away several years ago and made his way to Colorado. After amassing a snug fortune he started home New Years day with the intention of being married Sunday to the girl with whom he had maintained a correspondence during the years of his absence. While waiting for his train at Chicago, however, he accidentally stepped in front of a backing engine and was ground to pieces. He was brought home Saturday and was buried Sunday, his intended wedding day.

 

Friday, January 18, 1895

 

            The protracted illness of Francis K. KENDRICK, culminated in a peaceful death Monday morning at 8 o’clock. His health had been failing for a year or more and his life simply and beautifully faded out like a leaf in autumn.

            Mr. Kendrick was born near Circleville, Ohio, 78 years and 1 month ago and came to Rochester at the age of 28. He was a wagon maker by trade and came overland to Indiana, locating first, three miles south of South Bend. Of his trip Mr. K told the biographer of the Fulton County Atlas that “one night having encamped on the bank of the Mississinewa, they were visited by “Old Buckwheat” a noted chief of the Miamis, in that vicinity, who manifested great friendliness of disposition, and was kindly treated in return. He remained with them until a late hour. The following day they reached the banks of the Wabash opposite Miamisport (now Peru), passing the night under a great elm tree, southward from Stearn’s Factory. On the morning of the next day the river was crossed and in the evening they arrived with Thomas HOLCOMB, Esq., of whom they purchased some grain for their stock. Another day’s journey took them to the “Pottawatomie Mills,” near Lake Manitau, and that night they dined with friend JOHNSON, the “Indian Blacksmith.” The next stopping place was with Sid. WILLIAMS, where the town of Argos now stands. On the evening of the day succeeding, having passed through Plymouth on their route and stayed all night in a log cabin four miles north of town, the next night they reached Farmer’s Prairie, four miles south of South Bend.”


            Early in the spring of ‘44 he married Miss Anna WILSON, a sister of Mrs. V. GOULD of this city and of the late Thos. WILSON, of Kewanna. The bridal tour consisted of a trip to Ohio in a buggy built by the groom for the occasion. On their return to Rochester they commenced housekeeping and he opened a buggy and wagon shop and prospered. In 1849 he joined the California gold hunters and for two years gathered a liberal accumulation of “rich dust.” He then returned to Rochester, purchased a farm and engaged in the dairy and cheese industry and finally returned to this city, built the Masonic block and, in connection with D. W. LYON, deceased, enjoyed a prosperous career as a merchant.

            Mrs. Anna KENDRICK died in 1878 and two years later he married Miss Clara RALSTIN who died within two years. He was again married to his surviving wife, Miss Ada WIRT, who survives, and who, with a cousin, Mrs. J. DAWSON, are the only relatives living in the State. He was a charter member of Fulton Lodge F. & A. M., filled all the chairs of the lodge many terms and died one of the oldest and most devoted members of the Order in the State.

            Mr. Kendrick was not a great man nor a conspicuous man but, far better than either, he was ever genteel and honorable. The personification of affability and modest intellectuality his companionship was always pleasant and his associations the most dignified of his community. He lived a beautiful, christian life and died an honored citizen. What greater achievement in life could honorable ambition accomplish?

            The funeral service was conducted at the family residence Wednesday afternoon when Father LORD, of the Presbyterian church, of which denomination deceased was a faithful and prominent member, preached a short sermon and the Masonic order conducted the burial.

 

            A year old son of Mr. & Mrs. John B. SHEETS, of near Sidconger, was buried Wednesday.

 

            Mr. James M. BALDWIN, Miss Ida BALDWIN and Mr. Ken KENNEDY, of Kenton, Ohio, attended the funeral of their relative the late F. K. KENDRICK.

 

            Mrs. Levi POWNALL, a noble christian lady died at the family residence, Jan 10, aged 39 years and 4 months.

 

            Major McFADIN, Eli GREENSFELDER and Harry FRANK came over as a committee from the Masonic Lodge at Logansport, to attend Mr. KENDRICK’s funeral. The Major visited Uncle Jesse SHIELDS while here and talked of pioneer days, their associations while they were members of the Legislature and their personal experience with the Indians in other days.

 

Friday, January 25, 1895

 

            William CHAMBERS, a Liberty township farmer, died last week after a long illness from lung trouble.

 

            Wm. CHAMBERS was buried at Antioch last Sunday, Rev. RUPLEY preached his funeral to a large congregation. He was 53 years old and leaves a wife and three children to mourn the loss of a father and husband. (BEARSS)

 


 

            At Roann, Tuesday, George SHILLINGER, aged sixty-two, a prominent dealer in grain and horses, committed suicide by shooting himself, in the office of Bowman’s livery barn. He had been afflicted with melancholly for several days, owing to business reverses, and during the absence of the people about the barn, took down a buffalo robe, spread it out fully on the floor and then shot himself behind the right ear, falling on the robe.

 

Friday, February 1, 1895

 

            Mr. & Mrs. BEIDERMAN’s ten months old baby died Sunday.

 

            The father of Mrs. Fred STURKIN died at his home in Logansport, yesterday and Mr. & Mrs. Sturkin are attending the funeral today.

 

            The widow of the late Sol. MILLER, of Aubbeenaubbee township, died of heart disease Friday, and was buried Sunday. She was a sister to Mrs. Clark HICKMAN and David S. ROSS of this city.

 

Friday, February 8, 1895

 

            Early last week Lulu May WAGONER daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Jackson WAGONER, of Aubbeenaubbee township, went to Plymouth with her sister, Mrs. JOHNSON, to help fix up her new home in Plymouth. Immediately after arriving there Miss Wagoner was taken with a severe cold which developed into neuralgia of the stomach and she died Saturday, aged about 19 years. The remains were brought to Delong Monday for burial.

            A friend of the family writes: “Lulu was a bright and lovely young lady whose estimable character won her the admiration of all who knew her. She was a devoted member of the M.E. church at the time of her death. While the absence of this dear one caused many a sad heart, we are not to think of her being gone, but only passed from mortal sight to a celestial home where it will only be a question of time until she shall meet many friends who now mourn her loss.”

 

            Mary MILLER, nee ROSS, was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, April 17, 1829. She was married to Solomon MILLER Jan 4, 1846. To their union was born three children, one son and two daughters. The son preceded her to the spirit world in youth.

            Sister Miller was converted at the age of 12 and lived in the church all her life a consistent member of the M.E. church. She was a lover of good books especially the Guide to Holiness and the Bible. Her last act was to lay her glasses on the Book that had comforted her declining years. She departed this life January 25, 1895, leaving her daughters, a foster daughter, and many friends.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Melvin COPLEN buried an infant son yesterday.

 

            Mrs. Fred STURKIN has returned from Logansport where she attended the funeral of her father, Henry WHIPPERMAN, who was the oldest man in Cass county and a noble citizen. He left $12,000 worth of property to be divided between six heirs.

 

            The little daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Samuel SPENCER died Feb 1. (LUCETTA)


 

Friday, February 15, 1895

 

            A little child of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. FREEL, of Leiters, died Monday.

 

            John YOUNG, a farmer living six miles west of town, was buried yesterday.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. Rome STEPHENSON received a telegram yesterday evening, announcing the death of Mrs. Stephenson’s father, Jos. A. MAXWELL, of Upper Sandusky, Ohio, which occurred yesterday afternoon. Mr. Maxwell was one of the leading business men of that city and had accumulated a large estate. Mr. & Mrs. Stephenson left for Upper Sandusky on the evening train, yesterday.

 

            An infant of Chas. CLINE’s, of Logansport, was buried at this place today. Mrs. Cline is a daughter of Mr. S. REED. (FULTON)

 

            Robert DALZELL, of Cass county, died Thursday morning. He was an old and respected citizen and will be much mourned by friends and relatives. He will be buried at the Spring Creek cemetery Saturday. (FULTON)

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John YODERS died Feb 6. It was five months old. (LUCETTA)

 

Friday, February 22, 1895

 

            John Wesley YOUNG was born in Dark county, Ohio, Dec 25, 1838. In 1845 he came to Indiana with his parents settling in Fulton. He was united in marriage to Jemima PETTIT, April 12, 1866. This union was blessed with four children, Lewis, Franklin, Milo and Susie [YOUNG], and all survived to mourn his loss but Susie, who preceded him to the spirit world. Funeral services at the Burton church conducted by Rev. L. NEWMAN, of this city. Interment in Burton cemetery.

 

            Jacob LONG, an old pioneer of Newcastle township died at his home near Bigfoot, Feb 16, at the ripe old age of 73 years. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. HUCKLEBERRY, of Mentone, and the remains were laid to rest at Sycamore chapel.

            Jacob Long was born near Millersberg, Jan 8, 1822 where he grew to manhood. In 1846 he was united in marriage with Miss Jane DUNLAP at Coshocton, Ohio. He emigrated to Indiana in 1858 where he has since lived. In 1871 his wife died, leaving him seven children. In 1874 he was again united in marriage with Miss Sophia UHL, who with 5 children survive him.

 

            Mrs. Isaac RECKNER, who lived in the east part of town, died Saturday night, and was interred in the Kewanna cemetery Monday. She leaves a husband and four sons to mourn her death.

 

            Sassafras Jim, a Miami Indian died near Peru the other day. He was contemporary with old AUBBEENAUBBEE who was such a warm friend of Maj. McFADIN. It is said that Sassafras Jim courted the Pottawattomie squaws and was threatened with death by Aubbeenaubbee if he did not quit it.


Friday, March 1, 1895

 

            Miss Nora BARKDOLL, daughter of Samuel BARKDOLL, died at the family residence, of hasty consumption, Monday evening, aged 25 years and 6 months.

            Deceased spent the past year in the rocky mountains in the hope of restoring her waning health but no human or climatic agency could give her relief and she died two weeks after returning home.

            Nora Barkdoll was an inoffensive and modest girl whose devotion to her home and the care of a family left in her keeping by the death of her mother, endeared her to many friends and her death was the occasion of general sorrow in this the city of her birth and growth to womanhood.

            The funeral was held at the residence yesterday at 2 o’clock.

 

            A most touching death occurred Sunday afternoon when Mrs. Minnie THURSTON was called from her three small children and sick husband “across the dark river.” Her disease was nervous prostration and her suffering of several weeks duration.

            Deceased was the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John PERSCHBACHER, and she married Amos THURSTON, the carpenter eight years ago. Soon after their marriage they moved to Huntington and lived there until two years ago when they returned to this city.

            The funeral took place at the Baptist church Tuesday afternoon when a large audience of neighbors and friends of the family assembled to pay the last tribute of respect.

 

            Little Ralph Ellis VANBLARICUM, son of Mr. & Mrs. Samuel VANBLARICUM, died at their home in Peru, Feb 21, 1895, and was brought here for burial on the evening train. Age two years. Interment took place at Salem cemetery, west of Rochester.

 

            Presley BOZARTH died at the home of his son in Peru, Saturday, after a lingering illness. He was an old resident of this county having lived west of the city for many years.

 

            A child of Frank WILLHELM, of Rochester, was buried at the Fulton cemetery on last Monday. (FULTON)

 

            The funeral service of the child of Sam SPENCER was held at the U.B. church Sunday, conducted by Rev. RUPLY.

 

            An old lady by the name of SMITH, died at the home of the friendless, the other day in Logansport. She was quite well known to many in the county as the old preacher woman with a traveling mania. She stopped a few weeks ago at the Martin House from which she was taken to Logansport where she died among strangers. It is said she possessed much intellect, but through much study became crazy. (FULTON)

 

Friday, March 8, 1895

 

            William MOSSMAN, an old pioneer of Fulton county, died February 24, near Desark, Arkansas, of lagrippe. Deceased settled in this county in 1851, some five miles were of this city, where he resided for thirty-five years. He was a soldier in both the Mexican and Civil wars. He died among strangers but was kindly cared for and leaves three children in this county to mourn his loss. It may be truly said of him that he was a servant of his country, his


fellow men and his God.

 

            Word reached the city yesterday that Henry KING’s family, near Illion, is in heartrending distress. Mrs. KING died last night and her husband, lying in the same room, was so sick he knew nothing of the death. Two of the sons are also very sick, the disease of all being a form of lung and typhoid fever combined.

 

Friday, March 15, 1895

 

            Mr. WICKS received a telegram from Chicago Sunday evening conveying the sad intelligence that his mother was dead. On Monday Mr. Wicks, his wife and Earl [WICKS] went to Chicago where she was buried Tuesday afternoon. Grandma Wicks was a kind, pleasant, intelligent old lady who made many friends in Akron during her visit here last summer. (AKRON)

 

Friday, March 22, 1895

 

            Twenty years ago James O. MILLER, more generally known as bank cashier “Jim” Miller, left Rochester to try his fortune abroad and located in Australia. A few years afterward he married a beautiful land cultured Australian lady and two lovely children were born to them. They accumulated considerable property and Mr. Miller was the owner of extensive mining interests, but the panic of ‘93 greatly depreciated the value of his mine stocks and the family came to America to visit Rochester relatives, Mr. Miller being a son of Hugh MILLER, deceased. The culture and sociability of the family gave them much prominence here and their society was delightful to all who met them. Their fund of knowledge, obtained by extensive traveling and Australian experience was a rare treasure for their acquaintances here and the announcement of Mrs. Miller’s death will be heard with universal sorrow.

            Last Monday Mr. Daniel AGNEW received a letter from Australia saying that a telegram had just been received from Mr. Miller stating that Mrs. Miller had died Feb 9 of typhoid fever at Coolgardie, a mining town fifteen hundred miles from the Miller home at Broken Hill, Australia, where the two children were left with relatives that they might remain in school.

            Some time ago rich gold fields were discovered in Western Australia and thousands of the best people from the large cities flocked thither. Mr. Miller decided to go and his wife, who was very fond of travel, concluded that she wanted to accompany him. They went and located at Coolgardie, a city of thousands, which sprang into existence as if by magic. But a terrible drought came and the scarcity and impurity of the water superinduced a contagion of typhoid fever and Mrs. Miller was one of the victims.

            In a letter to her friends, written just before her death, Mrs. Miller reported pleasant associations, having just completed, she said, a wreath and cross of flowers for a lovely young American lady, Mrs. John DeBARRON, of Illinois.

            Dispatches to the newspapers report the typhoid contagion still raging and that a solid hill of quartz has been found which is 70 feet high, 250 wide at the base and 15 feet at the top, full of gold.

 

            Our Fulton correspondent reports the death of Wm. J. BLACKBURN, ex-Trustee of Liberty township and a widely known citizen. His disease was consumption and he leaves a wife and three children to mourn his death.


            The funeral was held yesterday at the U.B. church in Fulton, Rev. RUPLEY officiating, and interment was made at Oliver’s cemetery.

 

            After a long illness from dropsy and heart disease Jonas EASH, the well known farmer, northeast of town, suddenly and unexpectedly, died Tuesday night, aged 65 years. The funeral was held yesterday at Burton church.

 

            Word was received here this week that George HOAK, a former resident of Fulton county, died at his home at Pleasant Plains, Arkansas, on the 15th inst.

 

            M. WICKS received word this week that his father was very low and rapidly sinking. His mother was buried only a week ago and since her death his father seems to have no desire to live longer and the physicians say he can only live a few days at most. (AKRON)

 

Friday, March 29, 1895

 

            Miss Eldora EMMONS, daughter of Finley EMMONS, of Tiosa, died of consumption last week, aged 20 years.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. H. A. BARNHART were at Michigan City yesterday attending the funeral of Mrs. J. W. FRENCH.

 

            Mrs. Christian MAIR died Monday at the family residence in east Rochester. The funeral was held Wednesday in Henry township.

 

            Harrison GRIMES, a wealthy farmer of Denver, died last week. He was the father of Mrs. Wm. DAVIS, who formerly lived at Green Oak.

 

            Mrs. John KENLEY, of near Tiosa, died Monday morning after a protracted illness of typhoid fever. The funeral was held Tuesday at Plymouth.

 

            A grandson of Mr. & Mrs. STALEY’s died March 23, ‘95. The name of the deceased was Ervin KEPLER, son of Charles KEPLER. Ervin was born March 2, ‘94, and died March 23, ‘95, aged 1 year and 21 days. Little Ervin was laid away beside his mother and sister at Five Corners. (LUCETTA)

 

            The small child of our P.M. was buried Sunday. The baby was taken to raise by Jim STAILEYs, where it died. (LUCETTA)

 

            Mrs. James OGDEN, of near Akron, was interred at the Salem cemetery, on last Sunday. She leaves a husband and five daughters to mourn her demise. (FULTON)

 

            A child of James KEPLER’s died last Friday and was buried at the Lake cemetery. (FULTON)

 

            Isaac GRAY, one of the old pioneers of this county, departed from this vale of tears on last Sunday at 3 p.m. The funeral obsequies took place at the house, conducted by Rev. REPLEY, of the U.B. church. (FULTON)


Friday, April 5, 1895

 

            Soon after the death of Otis Billings HOLMAN last fall a story was set in circulation that he had made a death bed confession in which he said that his dissipation was the result of terrible remorse, and that he drank whiskey to destroy the pangs of guilt which he suffered for having murdered a man years ago for his money. This story went the rounds of the newspapers with considerable elaboration, and afterward it was enlarged by the slanderous tongue of gossip so as to involve Finley EMMONS, the widely and favorably known old farmer citizen of near Tiosa.

            At the time the slander was on its unholy rounds Mr. Emmons was sick for many weeks and his daughter was lying at the point of death with consumption, but death claimed the daughter and now that Finley is able to be out, he has heard of the story and proceeded to run the slander down. He went to the parties who cared for Holman in his last sickness and they emphatically denounced the story as a falsehood in every particular and substantiated their declaration with the following affidavit:

State of Indiana

Marshall County, ss:

                It having been currently reported since the death of Wm. Holman that said William Holman just prior to his death made a confession that the said Holman and Finn Emmons had several years ago killed a man.

                Now John McGIVERN and Elizabeth McGIVERN and Mrs. Joseph SMITH being by me duly sworn, according to law, depose and say that said Wm. Holman was at the home all the time during his last sickness and death, of John McGivern and Elizabeth McGivern and said John McGivern took care of Wm. Holman for 22 consecutive days prior to his death, and they each and collectively positively state that at no time during his last sickness, nor at the time of his death did said William Holman make any confession of that character or of any kind, but said when he came to die he had wronged no one and was ready to go.

                Witness our hands and seals this 2d day of April, 1895.

                                JOHN McGIVERN

                                ELIZABETH McGIVERN          Seals

                                Mrs. JOSEPH SMITH

                Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of April, 1895

                (SEAL)   DAVID HULL

                                Justice of the Peace

            From this it is seen that the reported murder confession is one of those famous pieces of gossip which has neither authorship, beginning nor ending and which had no other purpose in its inception than to slander the principals and their families.

 

            Charles DAVIDSON, of Aubbeenaubbee township, died last Saturday, aged 65 years.

            Mr. Davidson came to America with his parents in 1855 and settled in Springfield, Ohio. He was united in marriage with Sarah J. TRIMBLE, in Nov 1862, and immediately came to this county. There were born to this union six children, five of whom are living. He united with the M.E. church at Leiters Ford in 1882 and, like a traveler going home, the nearer he arrived the brighter shone the lamp.

            Funeral services were conducted at Delong M.E. church by Rev. J. E. McCLOUD and the remains were interred in the Leiters Ford cemetery, Sunday March 31.

 


 

            Jefferson CALHOUN, formerly of Richland township, jumped from a wagon at Peru while the horses were running away, and was killed by striking on his head and shoulders.

 

            “Father” Henry WISEMAN died at the home of his son Peter [WISEMAN] with whom he had been staying since January. (PALESTINE)

 

Friday, April 12, 1895

 

            Miss MEREDITH, the teacher, and Mrs. Maud TANNER LEITER were called to Franklin yesterday by the death of a step-sister.

 

            George JONES was killed, at Roann, Wabash county, last October, by a special train carrying George GOULD. Jones did not see the train because of the drawn curtains of his buggy and drove on the crossing, being struck and instantly killed. His widow brought suit for $10,000 and the Wabash company offered to compromise for $3,600, but the widow asked $5,200. Thus the matter stood until Mr. Gould was advised of the suit and promptly offered to make up the difference between $3,600 and $5,200.

 

Friday, April 19, 1895

 

            The wife of Joseph MACHLEN, of Tiosa, died suddenly Thursday night, aged 58 years old. She had been in usual good health until two hours before her death, when she was stricken with apoplexy and died before the family physician could reach her.

 

            An infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Com. MONTGOMERY died Saturday, aged about one year.

 

            Death has again entered the family of Mr. & Mrs. George WOLLINGTON. This time it claimed an eighteen months old child which had suffered much from lung trouble.

 

            A telegram was received yesterday by Mr. J. L. BRYAN announcing the death of Miss Dora COONS, sister of Mrs. J. L. BRYAN. Miss Dora was a successful teacher during the past winter in one of the public schools south of Fulton. Her mother recently moved to Mexico where she died. Funeral service today.

 

            T. B. HUNT committed suicide, near Peru, by hanging himself in the barn with a log chain.

 

            Hon. Richard F. DONALDSON, a pioneer settler of Miami county, died at his home in Peru, aged about 75 years.

 

Friday, April 26, 1895

 

            A telegram to L. HEILBRUN, Friday, announced the accidental death in Cincinnati, of Joseph EHRLICH, formerly a resident of this city and father-in-law of Ben HEILBRUN. Particulars of the death are given in a special from Cincinnati to the daily papers as follows:

                An accident attended the opening day of the baseball season here. On one of the densely crowded open summer electric cars passing up Vine street,


on its way to the grounds, an elderly man stood on the foot rail on the side of the car. When the car reached the canal bridge he was so far out that his body struck the iron work of the bridge. His ribs were broken, his skull crushed, and as the car left the bridge he fell dead on the street. He was identified as J. E. EHRLICH, a jewelry peddler of this city.

 

            Grandmother Phoebe CAFFYN MILLER, consort of Hugh MILLER, died at her home in this city Wednesday evening, aged 81 years and 8 months. She had been an invalid for several years and death was, therefore, not unexpected.

            Deceased was born in Ohio, and married Hugh Miller at the age of nineteen with whom she lived until the husband’s death twenty-eight years ago. They came to Rochester in 1837 and was one of the most prominent families in the county for many years. Twelve children were born to them, seven of whom survive, viz: Mrs. D. AGNEW, John L., Silas J. and Sam MILLER, and Mrs. DOWNEY, of Rochester, James MILLER, of Australia, and Gav MILLER, of California.

            The funeral will be held at 10 o’clock today at the family residence, Rev. ROTH officiating and interment in Odd Fellows cemetery. The remains may be viewed from 9:30 to 10 o’clock.

 

            Ellen DUMBAULD was born near Tiosa, Fulton county, March 2, 1856 and died in Rochester, April 20, 1895 at the age of 39 years 1 month and 18 days.

            She was one of a family of six chidren, having one brother, David DUMBAULD, of South Bend and four sisters, Mrs. Cyrus DAVIS and Mrs. Clinton PENDLETON, of Rochester, Mrs. Amanda LEBO, of Bruce Lake and Mrs. Ignace MEYER, of Chicago.

            On the 28th of December 1876, she was united in marriage with Myron S. ADAMS and became the mother of two daughters, Grace and Donna [ADAMS] who both survive their parents, the father having passed away in ‘89 or six years ago.

            She was baptized in infancy and brought up in christian faith in which she was a strong believer and during her prolonged sickness, as also in her character throughout her life, she gave evidence of her strong hope for future life.

            After some solicitude for the welfare of her children, she fell peacefully asleep shortly before the dawn of a new day, emblem we trust, of the eternal day into which she has awakened.

            The funeral service was conducted at the residence by Rev. J. P. ROTH in the presence of a large and sympathetic audience of relatives and friends.

 

            Isaac MEREDITH was born January 27, 1816, in Coshocton county, Ohio. He was married to Mary GROVE August 27, 1837 to whom were born seven daughters. The mother departed this life July 4, 1866. Five of these seven daughters have preceded the father to the spirit world. Of the two survivors one, Elmire KING, is a resident of Marysville, Kansas, the other, Rebecca TIPTON, resides at Terre Haute, Indiana. He again married Mary Ann COPLEN, of Coshocton county, Ohio, October 12, ‘67, and to them were born two sons, Enos and Vincent [MEREDITH]. The mother departed this life September 5, ‘82.

            Deceased and his first wife united with the Mohawk Baptist church in Ohio about 55 years ago and emigrated to Indiana in the fall of 1864, settling in Newcastle township, where they united by letter with Yellow Creek Baptist church. After his marriage with Mary Ann Coplen, Bethlehem Baptist church was organized, they being charter members.

            The funeral took place from the home, Sunday forenoon. Appropriate services were


held in the Sycamore Christian church conducted by Rev. J. B. BAIR, in the presence of a large concourse of friends and neighbors. So many in number that the large church building could not contain them. The remains were laid peacefully to rest in the Sycamore cemetery.

 

            Miss Anna INGRAHAM died Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock, of consumption, aged 32 years.

            Deceased was one of Fulton county’s best teachers and an active member of Isabelle lodge of Rathbone Sisters, which order will have charge of the funeral services to take place at 2 o’clock this afternoon at Trinity Evangelical church, Revs. HALL and SPANGLER officiating.

 

            Rev. Wm. McCLURE, formerly of Walnut, later of Plymouth, died at his home at Wakarusa on Wednesday of last week.

 

            Joseph FISHER, a wealthy and widely known citizen, of Mexico, died Friday after a long illness and was buried Sunday. He was an uncle to the Sentinel editor.

 

Friday, May 3, 1895

 

            There was much surprise on the streets Tuesday morning when the report went out that John PLUNK had dropped dead while in the act of dressing himself on arising from his night’s rest. He had not been well for some time, but he was seldom confined to his home, and his death was the result of apoplexy or heart disease.

            Deceased was born in Ohio 77 years ago, and grew to manhood in that State. He married Catherine GOSS, who survives, sister of George and Sebastian GOSS, and but one child was born to them which died in infancy. They came to Fulton county fifty years ago and Mr. Plunk has always been one of the most substantial men of the county. He was a cooper by trade and accumulated considerable property in Liberty township where he lived for many years. He was a man of sterling honesty and unswerving devotion to right, and, with all a devout christian gentleman He contributed $200 of the cost price of Salem Evangelical church and when Trinity church was built in this city he contributed $300 to the building fund.

            The funeral was held yesterday and a large concourse of people attested their esteem for the life so suddenly closed by witnessing the last sad rites.

 

            Jesse CLEMANS, a well known and highly respected citizen of east Liberty township, died Wednesday morning of Typhoid fever, aged 45 years. Mr. Clemans was for many years a resident of Henry township, and he leaves a wife and several children. He was an active member of the Dunkard church and Elders Jacob and Frank FISHER, of that church, conducted the funeral services at Fulton yesterday.

 

            Daniel ZEIGLER, the boarding house man, died very suddenly and unexpectedly Wednesday morning, from rheumatism and paralysis with which he had been afflicted for a year or more. Deceased was 51 years old, served his country faithfully during the Rebellion, and died a member of the Progressive Brethren church. He was a quiet, orderly citizen and leaves a wife and five children. Funeral this morning at the Baptist church.

 

            Noah WILTFONG, father of Mrs. Dr. SHAFFER of this city, died at his home in Marshall county Sunday aged 72 years. He was the father of ten children, six of whom are


living, and of his life the Plymouth Democrat says:

                He had been a hard working farmer all his life, an honest, upright man in every particular, a kind and obliging neighbor and friend, concerning whom nothing but good could truthfully be said. We have known him personally for thirty years and always found him a quiet, peaceable and genial gentleman, whose life and character was such as to admire and emulate. The world would be better if there were more Noah Wiltfongs in it.

 

            Our Grant correspondent writes of the death of John HEETER who has been sick for more than a year. The funeral was held yesterday at 2 o’clock.

            Mr. Heeter was widely known in the eastern part of the county where he grew to manhood and always lived. He was a brother of the late Rev. Noah HEETER.

 

            Lyman DAUGHERTY, son of Ephraim and Ann DAUGHERTY, was born April 17, 1857 in this county, and departed this life April 30, 1895, at the home of his father, aged 38 years and 13 days. He was united in marriage with Melissa BROWN, Oct 6, 1878, to whom were born seven children, three of whom have preceded him to the spirit world. He leaves a wife, four children and many relatives to mourn their loss. Under the preaching of Elder McGRAW he united with the Bethlehem Baptist church in 1881. The funeral services were conducted Wednesday at 1 o’clock at Mount Hope church by Rev. O. A. COOK.

 

            Mr. W. H. PLUNK of Monticello, Ill., is in the city to attend the funeral of his uncle, the late John PLUNK.

 

            Mrs. Linnie MITCHELL received a telegram yesterday announcing the death of a little nephew, the son of Mrs. Lon WAUGH GROVES, of Hammond.

 

            Louisa E. PLOUGH, widow of the late Madison PLOUGH, has been granted a widow’s pension by the government.

 

Friday, May 10, 1895

 

            The north bound Vandalia passenger train met with a wreck near Lucern, Saturday evening, which resulted in the death of a man and three horses. Luther SMITH, of Logansport, was stealing a ride to Maxinkuckee seated on the pilot of the engine. As the train neared Lucern several horses came upon the track and the engine struck three of them. The train was stopped and it was then discovered that a man had also been killed. His head had been cut off and it lay on one side of the track and the body on the other. The man was found to be Luther Smith, formerly a Vandalia switchman.

 

            John COOPER, a young man 18 years old, died at his home near Blue Grass, Sunday morning of dropsy. The funeral was held Monday.

 

            Richard BELL, one of Rochester’s pioneer citizens died at the family residence Friday, aged 80 years. Deceased was the father of twenty-one children and had been married three times, all of his wives having preceded him in death.

            Mr. Bell was a quiet, unpretentious citizen, and the funeral sermon by the venerable Father LORD was listened to by a large audience.


            Sanford REED a U.B. minister, died at his home in Fulton, Saturday, from consumption. He was about 50 years old and leaves a wife and three children.

 

            The funeral service of Jessie CLEMANS was largely attended. (MUD LAKE)

 

Friday, May 17, 1895

 

            Eliza Jane COLLINS was born July 25, 1827, died May 11, 1895, aged sixty-seven years nine months and sixteen days. She was united in marriage with William COLLINS August 1851, to whom were born eight children. The husband and three daughters have preceded her to the spirit world. She leaves three sons, two daughters and eight grandchildren to mourn their loss. Under the teaching of Rev. J. MERLEY she united with the Fulton Baptist church, since which time she has lived a christian life. Funeral services were conducted at the Salem church by Rev. O. A. COOK, on Sunday.

 

            Grandma COLLINS, who has been sick for some time, departed this life at her home northwest of Fulton, last Saturday morning. Interment at the Salem cemetery. The funeral was preached by Rev. COOK, of Rochester. (BEARSS)

 

            Mrs. SNYDER, an old lady living near Maxinkuckee lake, was found dead in bed the other morning. She was about 78 years old.

 

Friday, May 24, 1895

 

            Dora A. MOORE died Sunday morning, after a lingering illness of many months, at the home of her parents in Grant. Though hourly expected the announcement of her death was a shock to her numerous friends among the young and old. The deceased was the daughter of David and Louise MOORE, and was 22 years 9 months and 3 days of age. The funeral occurred at the family residence, Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, and was attended by a large concourse of people. The interment took place at the Hoover cemetery.

 

            Christopher TETZLAFF, the well known old German farmer living south of town, died Saturday, aged 72 years. He came to this country twenty years ago and has been a resident of this county for fifteen years. He was an industrious citizen and the funeral was largely attended Sunday, Rev. Father LORD conducting the service. Deceased was the father of William and Herman TETZLAFF, the well known farmers.

 

            A six year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Yost WHEATLEY, formerly of this county, was recently accidentally shot and killed at Roann, by another small boy. The boys were playing with a loaded shotgun.

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Chas. KILMER died yesterday of cholera infantum, aged about three months.

 

Friday, May 31, 1895

 

            John H. ALEXANDER was born March 27, 1810, and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Isaac LOWE, May 26, 1895. He was born in Junieta county, Pennsylvania,


and was married to Mary McKEE, August 1, 1833. They came to Ohio about 60 years ago, settled in Wayne county, where they resided until the mother died. He was the father of eleven children, four of whom preceded him to the world beyond. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church of which he lived a faithful and consistent member for many years. He bore his terrible sufferings patiently and without murmering. A devoted christian and indulgent father, a kind neighbor, loved by all who knew him is gone.

 

            Eliza EULITT was born June 2, 1836, died May 25, 1895, aged 58 years 11 months and 23 days.

            She was united in marriage with Jackson EULITT November 11, 1856. To this union there were born six children, three of whom survive her and mourn their loss. Mrs. Eulitt was received into the Stony Hill Baptist church, Jefferson county, Ind., by Rev. Joseph FERRIS, June 11, 1852, when she was but sixteen years of age. In the faith of her youth she was a firm believer, and she endeavored to live according to the Master’s will.

 

            Jacob HUGHSTON, an old soldier, died at his home Sunday afternoon. His death is attributed to overindulgence in alcoholic beverage. He leaves a nice family consisting of a son and two daughters.

 

            Amos THURSTON died of consumption at the county infirmary Wednesday night, aged 37 years. About ten months ago he fell from a building on which he was working as a carpenter, and broke both wrists. Before he recovered from this shock his wife was stricken with a nervous disease which slowly wore her life out and she died. In the meantime Mr. Thurston had contracted lung disease and became a pauper. The children were sent to an orphans home and the father to the poor house. It is a touching story of the misfortunes of life and there will be many tears at the funeral this morning, given in sorrow for the total destruction of a family circle which was happy in the enjoyment of life only a year ago.

            Funeral at 10 o’clock this morning by Rev. COOK, at the Baptist church.

 

            Clyde [DAVIS], the six year old son of Mr. & Mrs. Ira J. DAVIS, died at their home in Hammond, the 8th of May, of membraneous croup.

 

Friday, June 7, 1895

 

            Elmer POLLEY died at his home yesterday morning, from consumption, after an illness of seventeen weeks, at the age of 28 years.

            Elmer M. POLLEY was born in Fulton county, May 3, 1867, and died June 6, 1895. He was united in marriage with Harriet GORDON, July 12, 1894, and for several years past has been in the employ of Jos. LAUER. The deceased had a wide circle of acquaintances who honored and loved him for noble qualities and true manhood, which was forcible evidenced during the last days of his illness by his fortitude and patience. He often stated to his friends at his bedside that he did not fear death and asked his friends not to mourn for him, and at last fell asleep in death without a struggle. Every request he made in respect to his funeral was in keeping with his quiet, unostentatious life.

            The funeral will be held at the residence Sunday morning at 9:30, conducted by Rev. O. A. COOK, under the direction of the Knights of Pythias and Improved Order of Red Men, of which societies he was a member.

            Deceased was the adopted son of Edward B. and Sarah POLLEY, who with his wife


and numerous friends mourn his loss. The interment will take place at Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Mrs. Adeline GRAY died at her home near Green Oak, June 4, at the ripe old age of 86 years and was interred in the Odd Fellows cemetery on Wednesday. The services were conducted by Rev. HALL. Deceased was an active and devout Christian lady having united with the M.E. church when but 17 years of age. She leaves six children and a host of relatives and friends to mourn her loss.

 

            Mrs. A. M. WARD died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John WAGONER, three miles south of town, Saturday evening, and was buried from the Evangelical church, Monday, the remains being interred in the Citizens cemetery. Mrs. Ward was the widow of A. M. WARD who preceded her to the grave several years ago, and the mother of James WARD of this city and Mrs. Ida WAGONER south of town.

 

            Ella KOCHENDERFER GREGSON, wife of Chas. GREGSON who lives northeast of town, died May 27, at the age of 27 years, and was buried Thursday following in the Odd Fellows cemetery. The funeral services being conducted from the Christian church of which she was a member.

 

            Geo FISH went to Argos Wednesday, to attend the funeral of an uncle.

 

            The four year old child of Orla FANSLER, of Peru, was burned to death.

 

Friday, June 14, 1895

 

            Mrs. Fannie DAVIS RIDGELY and husband, of North Manchester, attended the Elmer POLLEY funeral.

 

            Mr. & Mrs. RIDGEWAY, of North Manchester, were here Sunday, to attend the funeral of Elmer POLLEY.

 

            While the relatives and friends were returning from the funeral services of Mrs. COLLINS, they had no idea that her late home was to be destroyed by fire that afternoon, but nevertheless when they were within a half mile they saw the flames leaping out through the roof. Most of the household goods were saved. (MUD LAKE)

 

Friday, June 21, 1895

 

            The prettiest funeral service ever given in Rochester was that of the order of Red Men at the burial of Elmer POLLEY. In addition to customary ritualistic and farewell services, the Red Men formed about the grave, each depositing a sprig of evergreen in the grave as they said “farewell brother” and then just as the Sachem closed an eloquent and fervent benediction a white dove was set free and flew far up in the sky and thence away out of sight. This is an Indian custom representing the flight of the spirit of the dead and all who saw it were impressed with its solemn beauty.

 

            Mrs. John EMMONS, Jr., died of consumption this week, and was buried at Bloomingsburg, Rev. McNEELY conducting the funeral service. She was about 45 years old


and leaves a family of six children.

 

            Joseph CARR died at the home of his brother-in-law, Isaac ALEXANDER, Wednesday evening, from a complication of diseases contracted during the war. The funeral will be preached at the Baptist church, this afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, and the remains deposited in the Odd Fellows cemetery under the direction of Imp. Order of Red Men. Deceased leaves a wife and one child.

 

Friday, June 28, 1895

 

            Another of Fulton county’s foremost fathers is gone. Wm. McMAHAN, who has been a great sufferer from asthma and heart disease for nearly a year, passed away Sunday morning, aged 79 years.

            Deceased was born in Kentucky and married Louisa LOVE, of his native state, to whom were born thirteen children, six of whom, John McMAHAN, Attorney Wm. W. McMAHAN, Clara and Tina McMAHAN, Mrs. George MYERS and Mrs. Frank MOORE, survive, the wife and mother having died many years ago. Soon after his marriage Mr. McMahan moved to Madison, Ind., and engaged in merchant tailoring for thirteen years. In 1847 the family moved to this county and located on the McMahan farm 2-1/2 miles south of town and remained there until three years ago when they sold the farm and moved to this city.

            Mr. McMahan was a leading citizen of the county for many years having served in various official capacities among which may be mentioned several terms as county commissioner. He was a sturdy, conscientious citizen all of his life and the courage of his convictions was ever prominent in his personality. He was an active member of the Methodist church for many years and always an enthusiastic and influential democrat. He had no social creed but the Golden Rule and that was the solid foundation for his wide reputation as a good citizen and an honest man.

            The funeral was held Monday afternoon, when a very large concourse of friends and old neighbors paid the last tribute of respect. Rev. Dr. BROOKE preaching the funeral sermon.

 

            Samuel HICKLE was born in Ross county, Ohio, August 29, 1813, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John RAYMER, June 21, 1895, aged 81 years 9 months and 22 days. In 1839 he was married to Harriet HARPSTER who died February 22, 1890. Mr. Hickle leaves four sons and four daughters to mourn his departure. He was a member of the United Brethren church of which he was a faithful member until death. Funeral services at Winamac, Sunday.

 

            Wm. CRUM, a prosperous young farmer of Henry township, died a terrible death from lock jaw, Wednesday. His disease developed from a bruise on his heel and it is said that his sufferings were of the most excruciating nature ever seen in the vicinity. He was an honorable, industrious young man and leaves a wife and two small children.

 

            Quite a number of the people of this place attended the funeral of William McMAHAN last Monday. (BEARSS)

 


 

 

Friday, July 5, 1895

 

                (No entries)

 

Friday, July 12, 1895

 

            Billy DEARDORF and Thomas BROWN went to Bourbon to see Abraham DEARDORF, who was very sick and has since died. Deceased was a cousin to Mr. Deardorf and brother-in-law to Mr. Brown.

 

            The Argos Reflector says Caleb RAILSBACK, the oldest citizen of Walnut township, if not of Marshall county, died on Tuesday morning, the 9th inst., at his home in Argos. The beginning of the end occurred five months ago, when he was prostrated with heart failure, and from that time his vital powers gradually gave way.

 

Friday, July 19, 1895

 

            Notwithstanding the fact that the wife of Judge CONNER has been an invalid for years, the announcement of her death, at nine o’clock yesterday morning, created general surprise in the city and universal sorrow in the hearts of all who knew her. Telitha LINE CONNER was born near Marion, Ind., nearly fifty-four years ago, and married her surviving husband, Isaiah CONNER, at the age of twenty-one. Seven years later they moved to Rochester and have ever since made this their home. And in all these years it has ever been said of Mrs. Conner “she is a good neighbor and a noble woman.” Kindly in her nature, charitable in her disposition, tidy in her home, and affable in her demeanor, she attracted the friendship of all who knew her, always seeming to live for the happiness of husband and friends rather than for herself. She was quite active in the cause of charity and prominent in social circles, but her ill health for many years very materially curtailed her ambition to do good. Ten years ago she became an invalid and despite all of the assistance of medical science and the advantages of health resort treatment her disease could not be eradicated and her suffering increased until for the past two years pen could not describe her agony, Brights disease having dragged her to the grave. Judge and Mrs. Conner had no children, and by her death the home is broken up, and universal sympathy is extended to the husband in his crushing bereavement.

            Deceased had only two near relatives living, sisters, one in Texas and the other in Nebraska. The funeral will be conducted by Rev. Dr. BROOKE at the family residence at two o’clock Saturday afternoon.

 

            Theodore MOORE died of dropsy and was buried at Lake Chapel yesterday.

 

Friday, July 26, 1895

 

            Last Sunday morning Mrs. Mary Elizabeth OWENS, who has for several years resided with her brother, Moses McGEE at Hoover’s Station, arose apparently as well as usual, and ate a hearty breakfast. About 8 o’clock she was taken suddenly ill with pleurisy and congestion of the bowels. She grew rapidly worse and died Sunday evening at 6 o’clock. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. D. A. HOPKINS, Progressive Dunkard preacher, at Mt. Hope U.B. church. Interment at the Hoover cemetery. The deceased was born in Logan


Co., Ohio, and was aged 63 years 1 month and 5 days. She was the widow of James OWENS.

 

            Grandmother Rebecca WYLIE, aged 86 years, died at the home of her son, Milton [WYLIE], west of town, Monday, and the funeral was held Wednesday, Father LORD and Rev. HALL officiating. Deceased was one of the oldest settlers in the county having located here in 1834. Her husband died just thirty-four years before the date of her death. She was the mother of Milton and Newton WYLIE and Mrs. Marion ERNSPERGER.

 

            There was much excitement on the street at six o’clock yesterday evening when Attorney John W. RICKEL fell dead on the sidewalk just north of the Feiser block. He was on his way from his office to supper and walking in his usual brisk manner when he suddenly, and without any warning whatever, fell heavily on his face and when bystanders reached him he gasped once or twice and all was over.

            The cause of his death was apoplexy. He had been considerably agitated during the afternoon because of some trouble over a family affair in which he violently assailed Jonas GOSS on a charge of interfering with his son-in-law’s business affairs, and it is the general belief that disease was preying heavily upon him at the time as he is said to have acted like one whose reason had abandoned him completely.

            The body was removed from the street to Mrs. MANN’s yard and thence to Hoover’s undertaking establishment.

            John W. Rickel was about 60 years old and has been a resident of Rochester for nearly a quarter of a century. He was an energetic man and devoted to his family which is composed of a wife, two daughters and one son. The time of the funeral has not yet been fixed.

 

            A very large concourse of sympathizing friends were present at the funeral of Mrs. CONNER, Saturday afternoon. Rev. BROOKE delivered a very beautiful eulogy to the dead and Hon. M. L. ESSICK read one of the deceased’s favorite poems.

 

Friday, August 2, 1895

 

            Mrs. Caroline SHEWARD died Tuesday noon at her home in the northeast part of the city, from neuralgia of the bowels. Mrs. Sheward, whose maiden name was MERCER, was born in Jackson county, Ohio, Dec. 22, 1826, moved with her parents to Richland county, Ohio, in 1828, was married to Nimrod D. SHEWARD in 1855, and moved to Newcastle township, Fulton county, Ind., in 1866. Her husband died in Andersonville prison, and at her home on the Tippecanoe river, four miles and a half northeast of Rochester, she by dint of economy and careful management, reared her family of little children to respected manhood and womanhood. In 1892 she moved to Rochester, where she lived with her son, Frank, till the time of her death. Two infant sons preceded the mother to the spirit world. The surviving children are Frank SHEWARD, of this city, William T. SHEWARD, of Dunkirk, Ind., Mrs. F. E. COCHRAN, of Macy, Ind., and Mrs. J. W. BONNELL, of Grant. The deceased was aged 64 years 7 months and 9 days. She united with the Christian church in 1846. She was widely known and highly respected. The funeral occurs today from the Christian church at 10 o’clock. Interment in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

 

            Mrs. Sarah JONES, wife of Isaac JONES, died at the family residence Monday morning, of consumption, aged about 60 years. Deceased was the mother of four children three


of whom are living, and she was one of the truly good women of the county. She was a member of the Baptist church and her funeral was held at Bethlehem church, Tuesday, Rev. Jonas BAIR officiating. Burial was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery in this city.

 

            “Indian Charley” [McPHERSON], the dissipated old cabinet maker who has made fine furniture and drank whiskey in Logansport, Peru, Delphi, Wabash, Huntington and Rochester for fully a half century was killed on the Tippecanoe bridge Saturday noon by the north bound L. E. & W. passenger train. He had been in Rochester during the morning and was evidently on his way to Plymouth or Bourbon when overtaken by the train. The Argos Reflector has a graphic story of the accident as follows:

                As the north bound passenger train on the L. E. & W. road was nearing the Tippecanoe river bridge, north of Rochester, at noon on Saturday, an old man was discovered lying beside the track on the bridge. The whistle was sounded, and according to the story of the engineer, the man raised up and then fell back again and made no further attempt to get out of the way. Whether he was sick and unable to move, or purposely put himself in the way of death, will never be known. He was struck by the engine and rolled up under the cars, and that death was not instantaneous is remarkable. The train was stopped and he was taken out from under the baggage car, minus his left foot, which had been cut off at the ankle and dropped into the river. The flesh was scraped off of the bone quite a way up and the projecting stump was a sickly sight to look upon. There was a deep cut in his left thigh, and an ugly hole in his head above the eye, caused by striking against the ties. He was placed on the train and brought to Argos, where he lay in semi-unconsciousness until death came to his relief Sunday afternoon, just as preparations were being made to amputate the mutilated leg. Drs. OYLER and SARBER ministered to his comfort, and trustee GORDON procured nurses who remained with him and assisted at his burial. Deceased gave his name as McPHERSON, and claimed to hail from Marion. It is thought that he was a half-breed Indian, who used to work as a cabinet maker in Rochester and Logansport. He went by the sobriquet of “Indian Charley,” and has of late years been a gentleman of the road. He was greatly emaciated and presented a distressing sight. His age was about 60 years. The railroad company refused to render him any assistance, claiming he was a trespasser. It was a sorrowful death for an old man. Surrounded by strangers, with no tender, loving hands to smooth the rough pathway of death, and with undescribable pain racking his earthly tenement, he passed out of this life into the great Beyond.

            The story of “Indian Charley’s” life is one of years of sorrow: He was a Canadian half-breed Indian and located in Logansport years and years ago. He was a bright fellow then and married a pretty young wife. She soon proved false to her marital vows, however, and eloped with another man leaving her infant daughter to the care of the father. Charley was overwhelmed with grief and tried to drown his sorrow in drink. After he was badly dissipated the truant wife returned and took her daughter and husband No. 2 to her home and that was the end of poor Charley. He degraded into a miserable sot, sobering up at intervals only long enough to accumulate enough money to buy whiskey for another spree. This way he has lived since the days of the early settler, and “Indian Charley,” with his friendly greeting, “hello, you old skunk sir,” was a familiar street spectacle in many towns in this vicinity.

            The story goes that Charley once went into court when Judge KEITH occupied the bench. He knew the Judge very well and advancing down the aisle directly in front of his Honor, halted, saluted with the grace of a Chesterfield, and then said in distant tones, “Hey there, Judge, you old skunk, sir!”


            The court smilingly acknowledged the quaint salutation and Charles turned and walked out.

 

            A telegram to Mrs. P. M. BUCHANAN, yesterday, announced the death of her mother, Mrs. RICHARDFSON, near New Waverly.

 

            The funeral of J. W. RICKEL was conducted by the Odd Fellows, Sunday morning, the deceased being an old member of that order. The members of the bar also attended in a body and the remains were tenderly and beautifully laid to rest.

 

Friday, August 9, 1895

 

            Speaking of the death of Mrs. P. M. BUCHANAN’s mother, the Logansport Journal says:

                Mrs. Catharine RICHESON, of New Waverly, died Wednesday afternoon. The deceased was the wife of Peter G. RICHESON, and was one of lthe best known and best beloved of the matrons in that section. Her death was sudden. When attacked by sickness she was engaged in the work of preparing to attend the Northwestern Indiana conference of the Christian church, which will be held next week at Argos. In a short two hours after the violent overpowered her she died of apoplexy. The children are Florence SMOOT, of Peru, Charles RICHESON, living on the old homestead, Maggie BUCHANAN, of Rochester, Edward RICHESON, a telegraph operator at Colborn, and Gibson RICHESON, a telegraph operator at Chicago.

 

            The infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Joe COWEN, died Saturday night of cholera infantum, and was buried Monday at Leiters. (DELONG)

 

Friday, August 16, 1895

 

            Joseph J. ROBBINS was born in Jennings county, Indiana, May 4, 1821, died in Rochester, Ind., Aug 10, 1892, aged 74 years 3 months and 6 days.

            In 1842 he was united in marriage with Miss Rachel PAVEY to whom were born two children, of which John ROBBINS survive the parents. Mrs. Robbins departed this life in 1846. In 1847 his second marriage was with Mrs. Nancy BUNTON. To this union six children were born, three of whom survive the parents.

            Mr. Robbins united with the Baptist church at Hardensburg, Ind., early in life, and soon after moving to Fulton county, in 1853, became a member of the Ebenezer Baptist church, south of Rochester, and remained a faithful christian during life.

            November 7, 1892, Mrs. Robbins died after great suffering as a result of an accident which occurred with fire. Brother Robbins was a quiet, peaceful citizen and an honored, christian gentleman, and the sorrow of his demise finds a place in the hearts of all good people. Four children, three brothers and three sisters survive to mourn the loss of a devoted parent and beloved brother.

            The funeral services were conducted at the Ebenezer church, Sunday, by the pastor of the Baptist church in Rochester.

 

            Mrs. Betsy CLEMENS and Mrs. Jacob HALDERMAN attended the funeral of their brother, Joseph ROBBINS, at Rochester, Sunday. (GRANT)


Friday, August 23, 1895

 

            Mrs. Ephraim BURKETT, of Richland township, died of dropsy Sunday and the funeral was held Monday at Richland Center, Rev. HALL officiating at the services.

 

Friday, August 30, 1895

 

            A horse doctor by the name of HOOKER was killed at Winamac Monday by the explosion of some chemicals in a bottle for use on a sick horse. The doctor had procured an empty beer bottle and filled it was a mixture of quicksilver, nitric acid, oil of spine and british oil. After corking the bottle securely he had gone but a short distance until it exploded. Fragments of glass pierced his breast in twenty-four different places and a large artery was severed, causing instant death. John FIRST, a farmer who was standing near by, was also dangerously wounded by the flying glass, but will recover.

 

            Death came to Maud KIRKENDALL, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Nels KIRKENDALL, last Friday after a protracted suffering with consumption. She was a popular young woman and a very large cortege of people attended the funeral at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon.

 

            Mr. HOMER and family were called to Marmont, Monday, to attend the funeral of a sister of Mrs. HOMER’s. (DELONG)

 

Friday, September 6, 1895

 

            Monday evening, Lee [JEWELL], the little nine year old son of “Cap” JEWELL, was accidently shot through the left thigh with a shot gun, on the east bank of Lake Manitou. He was immediately brought to the office of Drs. SHAFER & RANNELLS, who dressed the wound with a view to saving the limb if possible. The particulars are hard to get because the accident was so sudden that it is not known positively how it occurred. The facts, however, are about as follows: Delbert SEARCH, who lives on the CONDON place, had been out on the lake shooting snipe and on coming in the party of boys, of whom the victim was one, ran down and clambered into the boat to see the game. The gun was lying across the stern of the boat with a coat thrown over it. Mr. Search started to pick up the gun to place it out of the way of the boys, who were all neighbors’ children, and at the same time one of the little fellows, anxious to assist unloading the boat, picked up the coat which caught on the trigger of the gun, the charge going through Lee Jewell’s thigh at short lrange, breaking the bone and mangling the tender flesh in a frightful manner. The shock to the little fellow was too much for physican endurance and he died Wednesday morning, the funeral being held yesterday afternoon.

            Mr. Search is much dejected over the occurrence and severely blames himself for allowing the boys to get into the boat, but eye witnesses think no blame should attach to him, as it was purely accidental. It is a sad case, however, and the parents have the sympathy of all in this sad misfortune.

 

            Uncle Henry BLACK, an aged resident of Akron, died suddenly Monday evening, of heart disease. He and his wife celebrated their golden wedding last year.

 

 


 

            George FLORY, a former resident of this county, died in Plymouth recently. He was the father of 24 children and 90 grandchildren. One of his daughters is Mrs. Thos. KINGER of Twelve Mile, and a son, John [FLORY], lives in Richland township.

 

            John and George BLACK and families attended the funeral of Elder COON, Sunday. (PALESTINE)

 

            Elder COON, after a long spell of suffering with nervous prostration and old age, passed away Friday night and was taken Sunday to the Palestine church where Rev. J. B. BAIR preached a very able sermon to an overfilled house, and then a large procession of friends and neighbors followed the remains to the Reester graveyard, where he was laid away. Deceased was 88 years old and leaves a wife and six children to mourn their loss. (PALESTINE)

 

Friday, September 13, 1895

 

            County Commissioner Jud LUKENS, of Roann, Wabash county, died a very mysterious death last week. He went to Buffalo two weeks ago with a load of stock but, failing to return, was found in Detroit unconscious in a hotel where he had lain for some days. His wife went to Detroit and brought him home but he died soon after reaching Roann, without rallying sufficiently to tell anyone of his mysterious condition. By some it is thought he was sandbagged and robbed but reports from Buffalo indicate that he received no money there and, as his watch and pocket money were not molested, it is hinted that he met foul play at his own hands as he was financially embarrased and had taken out a ----000 life insurance policy. His friends believe that he was foully dealt with or else came to his death through neglect of the hotel people where he was taken sick.

 

            A brother of Dr. C. A. WILSON, who lived in this city several years, committed suicide in McCoy’s hotel in Chicago because, as he said, his was a misspent life.

 

Friday, September 20, 1895

 

                [NOTE: This is an issue commenorating Cornerstone Ceremonies at the New Court House]

 

ASA DEWEESE (Biography)

 

            Commissioner Asa Deweese, of the 1st district, was born in Miami county, Ohio, in 1826. Three years later his parents moved to Shelby county, Ohio, and he lived there until 1854, when he came to Fulton county and purchased the land in Liberty township, west of Fulton, which has ever since been his home. His baggage brought to the county consisted of a gripsack, in which he carried a change of clothing, two iron wedges and a grubbing hoe while on his shoulder he freighted an ax and a rifle, all necessary appurtenances for early day farming in the heavy timber of this county. After two years work on his new farm he returned to Ohio and married Emeline RUSSEL. She lived but two years, leaving her husband alone. Several years later he married Mary A. BUTLER and two children have blessed the union -- Emily [MARTIN], wife of Chas. MARTIN, of Marion, and Charles [DEWEESE], a young man of nineteen.

            Mr. Deweese has been a progressive commissioner and many of the most important


public improvements in the county are due to his idea of keeping county affairs apace with the advance of the general community. His name adorns both the new jail and new court house as one of the building commissioners. He is president of the Board and will retire from his second term of office next December.

 

NATHANIEL DUDGEON (Biography)

 

            Commissioner Nathaniel DUDGEON, of the 3d district, was born in Pennsylvania sixty-four years ago. When one year old his parents moved to Ohio and there he lived until grown to manhood. Then he came to Indiana and worked for five years at the carpenter trade in Cass county. In the spring of 1856 he married Harriet MARCH and they moved to Richland township, in the woods, cleared their farm and now enjoy a pleasant home on three hundred and seventy acres of fine land. Most of this land was purchased at $4.50 per acre and developed into a state of cultivation which increased ten or twelve fold.

            Mr. Dudgeon was elected County Commissioner in 1890 and re-elected in 1892 and will hold his office until one year from next December. He has been an enterprising and useful officer, the new jail and new court house both being monuments to his ideas of the needs of the county.

 

THOMAS F. LOVATT (Biography)

 

            One of Fulton County’s most prominent farmers is Thomas F. LOVATT, Commissioner of the 2d district. He was born in Pennsylvania Sep 7, 1845, and came to Peru, Ind., seven years later. Here he learned the founders and machinists trade and followed the vocation as laborer, foreman, superintendent and owner of twenty-five years, being connected with the famous Hackley foundry in all the capacities named. Some years after his marriage with Mrs. HACKLEY they traded for the RETTIG farm, six miles west of the city and moved thereon nine years ago. Mr. Lovatt at once set about to develop the prairie land into a fine farm and has succeeded admirable, having increased fertility of the land by drainage fully fifty percent, and divided the 846 acres into fields of one of the very neatest kept and most productive farms in the county. Mr. Lovatt was elected to the office of commissioner last fall as a republican and has taken an active interest in the new court house undertaking, the successful accomplishment of which we today celebrate.

 

KLINE G. SHRYOCK (Biography)

 

            The nestor of the Fulton County Bar is Col. Kline G. SHRYOCK, who celebrated his 84th birthday anniversary last May. Col. Shryock is easily the most distinguished pioneer in the county, and one of the most famous in northern Indiana. He came to Fulton county in 1837, a tailor by trade, but he was soon elected Justice of the Peace, and then became fascinated with the law profession which he entered soon after. Of course the law business in Rochester fifty to sixty years ago was not all fees and the Colonel found the legal Jordon a rocky and somewhat barren avenue to travel for many years, but he kept in the middle of the road and was the most prominent attorney in the county for a quarter of a century or more. He was a member of the State Legislature in ‘44, was elected county Treasurer in ‘47, and Common Pleas Judge in ‘60. The last office he resigned two years later to recruit the 87th Regiment and was appointed its Colonel. Six months later he resigned this office to become Provost Marshal for the ninth Indiana district and served in this capacity until the close of the


 war. He was appointed postmaster of Rochester in 1882, and has served almost continuously since the expiration of that term of office, as Justice of the Peace.

 

MICHAEL L. ESSICK (Biography)

 

            Michael L. ESSICK, a native of Ohio, came to Indiana when but 4 years old and learned the tanner’s trade at Gilead, Ind., with his father who was the first abolitionist in Miami county. Mr. Essick has experienced life in all its many forms. First a tanner, then a farmer, then a student at Wabash College, then as statesman he is found taking an active part in the Kansas troubles and as State Senator secures the passage of a bill through the Legislature locating an Agricultural College at Manhattan, and a member of the court of Impeachment to try the state officers for high crimes and misdemeanors. For two years he was in the Union Army as private, Lieutenant and Captain and took part in the battles of Prairie Grove, Maysville, Cane Hill and Honey Springs. At the close of the war he came to Rochester and for three years edited the Rochester Chronicle when he was elected Prosecuting Attorney for a district in Northern Indiana composed of eight counties, and has ever since made Rochester his home and the practice of law his profession. His thorough knowledge of the law and great eloquence before a jury readily won him fame until today he is one of the most prominent citizens of this section of the state.

 

ISAIAH CONNER (Biography)

 

            One of the oldest and most successful practitioners at the Fulton county bar is ex-Judge Isaiah CONNER. He was born and raised near Marion, Indiana, and is 60 years old. His primary education consisted of a thorough course in the public schools and an academic course in Marion and then he entered mercantile pursuits. This he followed successfully for several years but took up the study of law in 1858 and gradually drifted into the practice until 1869, when he located in Rochester and entered the profession. Success at once crowned his energy and devotion to the interests of his clients and he rapidly approached the leadership of the bar and in 1884 was elected Judge of this Judicial Circuit. In this official capacity he served the people faithfully for six years, when he again returned to the practice and is today the head of the firm of Conner, Rowley & McMahan. He married Miss Telitha LINE in 1862, who departed this life two years ago.

 

ENOCH MYERS (Biography)

 

            Enoch MYERS is a native of Fulton county. His earlier years were spent on the farm, his educational advantages being such only as were afforded by the common schools of his neighborhood. But he was a student and at the age of 18 years he began teaching school, and in this way obtained money with which to gratify, in a measure, his desire for learning. In 1875 he was appointed to the office of county superintendent of schools which he held for three consecutive terms. His work in this field was marked by unusual ability, and it was under his management that the common schools of the county received the first impetus towards graduation and systematic advancement. Meantime he studied law and in 1880 was admitted to the bar. The following year he retired from school work to engage in the practice of his profession, in which he has gained a position in the front rank as a cautious and safe counselor, as well as an able and successful advocate. In 1876 he married Hala E. TROUTMAN, daughter of Hon. P. S. TROUTMAN, of Kewanna, a lady of culture and


excellent social qualities. Their only child, Glendolyn [MYERS], having graduated from the Rochester High school, is now a student in the Female Seminary at Irvington, California.

 

JULIUS ROWLEY (Biography)

 

            Attorney Julius ROWLEY was born in Clarendon, Orleans county, New York, March 6, 1837, lived on a farm and attended common school during the winter months until 16 years of age, when he attended the Albion Academy from which he graduated at the age of 18 years. He then commenced teaching district school in Schoharie county, New York, following the vocation for more than ten years. During this time he read law with Hon. T. L. MAYHAM, now one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of N.Y. after which he entered the Albany Law College and at the end of three terms graduated and received his diploma May 25, 1865. He then practiced law at Schoharie until May, 1876, when he became a resident of Rochester where he has continued the practice of law with splendid success. He married his present wife, Harriet NETHOWAY, of Schoharie, July 4, 1857 and two daughters were born to them, Mrs. Clara MATTICE, of Lima, Ohio, and Mrs. Cora DAVIDSON, of this city. Mr. Rowley makes farming a side issue to his law business and owns and manages the old WAGONER farm, just northeast of the city, which is one of the finest farms in the county.

 

GEORGE W. HOLMAN (Biography)

 

            Born in Kosciusko county forty-five years ago, raised on a farm, educated in the common schools and Notre Dame University and finally graduating at Bloomington University, George W. HOLMAN had a splendid scholastic foundation for the profession of law which he adopted. He came to Rochester and commenced the practice of his profession with Col. SHRYOCK, but soon formed a partnership with Hon. M. L. ESSICK and continued the same for ten years. Then he was alone until the organization of his present firm of Holman & Stephenson. Mr. Holman has always been an active politician and his effective championship of Benjamin HARRISON for the Presidency gave him the appointment of National Bank Examiner which he held throughout the Harrison administration. He is one of the most energetic and forceful members of the Fulton county bar and has a wife -- Louise BRACKETT -- three daughters and a son, viz: Minnie, Grace, Georgia and Hugh [HOLMAN]. Mr. Holman has accumulated considerable property among which is one of the finest homes in the City.

 

ALBERTUS CLINTON CAPRON (Biography)

 

            Albertus Clinton CAPRON is the Judge of the Forty-first Judicial Circuit of Indiana and ex officio Judge of the Fulton circuit court, and resides in Plymouth. He is of New England ancestry and was born at Homer, Cortland county, New York. He was brought up on a farm and his early life was marked by no extraordinary events. He obtained a good common school education by the time he was 16 and then attended the Cortland Academy during times he could be spared from the farm. He taught school during the winter months after he became nineteen years old, and this assisted in paying his way in the Academy, from which he graduated in 1852, having taken a classical and preparatory college course. At the solitication of some of his relatives he came to LaPorte county, Indiana, in the fall of 1852 and taught school at Rolling Prairie that winter. During a visit to Plymouth in November, 1852 he was greatly taken with the situation of the town, and with the splendid timber and farming lands he


found in the county. He had made up his mind while at school to become a lawyer and during the winter of ‘52 he was offered a first class opportunity by Hon. C. H. REEVE, to become a law student in his office, which was accepted, and after three years of close application to his studies he was admitted to the Marshall county bar, and in September, 1856, hung out his shingle and opened a law office in Plymouth, and from that time until he was elected Judge in November, ‘90, he has had no other business and made himself fairly successful as a lawyer. He is, and always has been a democrat in politics but the office to which he was elected is the only one he ever sought. He has been twice married, first to Ellen S. WOODBURY, by whom he had a daughter, now the wife of Hon. M. W. SIMONS, of Plymouth; last to Jane E. DILL, by whom he has one son, John C. CAPRON, who resides in the same place. His long residence in this state has made him a thorough Indianian and he is as proud of the State as he would have been had it been his birthplace.

 

MERRITT A. BAKER (Biography)

 

            Attorney Merritt A. BAKER was born in New York state in 1854. He attended Starkey Seminary and later graduated from Hobart College at Geneva, N.Y. He then studied law for three years and entered the practice at Sharon Springs, N.Y., at the age of twenty-two, where he was also principal of Sharon Springs High school for three years. He soon after removed to Cobleskill, N.Y., where he formed a law partnership with his brother and was soon after elected police Judge and served four years. He then came west and located in Rochester in 1885, forming a law partnership with Julius ROWLEY and serving as deputy Prosecuting Attorney from 1884 to 1894. He was then nominated for Prosecuting Attorney but went down in the republican land slide with the democratic ticket. For two years he has been county Attorney and is at present engaged in the practice by himself. He married Miss Marie YOUNG in New York in 1884 and both have been active Episcopaleans for the past six years. Mr. Baker is an enthusiastic Odd Fellow, Knight of Pythias, Mason and Maccabee and believes in fraternity in all that the term implies.

 

HARRY BERNETHA (Biography)

 

            Of the young men of the Fulton county bar none has a brighter future than Harry BERNETHA. He is a native of Royal Center, this state, where he was born twenty-eight years ago. He took advantage of all the educational facilities of the graded schools of his town, and commenced teaching in 1885, following this vocation for five years. During this time he read law under Judge McCONNELL, of Logansport, finishing his scholarship under Essick & Montgomery, of this city. In 1890 he entered the practice of his chosen profession by a partnership with Hon. Milo R. SMITH, continuing there until 1893 when the firm was dissolved, and Mr. Bernetha opened business for himself, and steadily built up a practice which is both profitable and an honor to a lawyer of his years; his success being largely due to his energy and his thorough methods in the management of business entrusted to him. He married Miss Rhoda DELP and they have two daughters -- Madge and Mildred [BERNETHA], his mother and sister Belle [BERNETHA] living with him in a nice home on south Main street.

 

 

 


 

 

JAMES HENRY BIBLER (Biography)

 

            A purely selfmade member of the Fulton county bar is James Henry BIBLER. He was born in Ohio in 1858 and came to Union township, this county, with his parents when two years old and to Rochester when 10 years. He later attended the city schools and then read law with Hon. M. L. ESSICK. He entered the practice fifteen years ago and has achieved prominence as an advocate and counsellor. He also took an active part in politics and was honored with the vote of Fulton county in the congressional convention last year. He is, at present, city attorney and his family consists of a wife, formerly Miss Lolo HOWARD, and five children.

 

JOHN W. SMITH (Biography)

 

            John W. SMITH, son of Eli and Elvy (HENRY) SMITH was born near Shelbyville, Ind., Nov 9, 1846, came with his parents to Fulton county in 1857, settling on a farm near Green Oak. He was a farmer boy attending country school until he was 16 years of age when he attended school at Rochester under Prof. HAZELTON. He afterward attended school at Ladoga, Ind., in 1866 and graduated in the Scientific course in the Southwestern Normal school at Lebanon, Ohio, in 1870. He received the degree of “Bachelor of Laws” from the University of Michigan in 1870 and was married to Florence L. HEFFLEY Sep 29 of the same year. He has been industrious and economical all his life. For nearly twenty years he has been in the abstract business and loaning money, during which time he has been uniformly successful and succeeded beyond his most sanguine expectations. He owns one of the finest residences in the city, built in 1892 and a part of the Sentinel block.

 

WILLIAM W. McMAHAN (Biography)

 

            The Hon. Wm. W. McMAHAN, a native of this county, the junior member of the law firm of Conner, Rowley & McMahan graduated from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1882 and has been engaged in active practice of law in Rochester ever since. Mr. McMahan represents the strongest type of Indiana forcefulness in anything he undertakes and has therefore been quite successful as an attorney and pension solicitor. He was married to Miss Fannie SAVAGE in June 1888, and occupies a beautiful home at No. 307 Monroe street. Mr. McMahan represented Fulton county in the State Legislature in 1893 and acquitted himself with honor among his fellow legislators and the respect and confidence of his constituency.

 

ROME C. STEPHENSON (Biography)

 

            The Junior member of the law firm of Holman & Stephenson, Rome C. STEPHENSON, is a native of Wabash having been born there 30 years ago. When a small boy his parents moved to Rochester. Here he attended the city schools and at the age of 13 commenced clerical work in his father’s abstract office. On reaching his majority he read law with Hon. G. W. HOLMAN and was given a partnership in 1887, giving most of his attention to clerical practice and the business management of the firm. He has been a successful enterpriser and stands in the front rank of the professional and business men of the city. He married Miss Ella MAXWELL, of Upper Sandusky, Ohio, in 1889, and they have one son -- Joseph [STEPHENSON]. They own one of the model residences of the city and a


delightful home at Maxinkuckee.

 

PETER M. BUCHANAN (Biography)

 

            Born and raised on a farm Peter M. BUCHANAN gained his present standing as a lawyer by dint of industry and studious inclination. He came with his parents from Ohio to Wayne township in 1865 and entered Judge SLICK’s law office as a student ten years afterward. After completing his studies he was admitted to the bar and soon after married Miss Maggie RICHESON, of New Waverly, and to them two sons have been born. Mr. Buchanan was Justice of the Peace for several years and has built up a splendid practice in his profession. He is a lover of music as well as the law and has always taken an active part in the musical organizations of the city as a leader of song. He owns his home and has numerous other property interests in the county.

 

CALVIN K. BITTERS (Biography)

 

            Born in Pennsylvania 40 years ago, Calvin K. BITTERS came with his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Wm. BITTERS, to Akron one year later. After obtaining a good common school education in the Akron schools he entered the Northern Indiana Normal, and stayed there until he graduated in both the law and scientific courses. He also took stenography, and located in Rochester and commenced the practice of law in 1882. Soon after he was appointed circuit court stenographer and has held the position ever since. He also has a good practice and has an extensive patronage in probate business and clerical law work. He married Miss Mary MERCER in 1886 and the union is blessed with lovely twin daughters, Edith and Edna [BITTERS]. They own a beautiful home at the corner of Carrol and Jefferson streets.

 

JAMES KNIGHT HOUGHTON

 

            James Knight HOUGHTON, the subject of this sketch and Prosecuting Attorney of the 41st judicial district, was born in Plymouth, Indiana, Dec 7, 1870. He received an education in the city schools of Plymouth and in Chicago where he took a two years’ course at the Metropolitan Business College. He thus secured positions as bookkeeper and accountant in Chicago, and later in Manistee, Michigan. In 1893 he returned to Plymouth and engaged in the grocery business with his father. His knowledge of law was acquired by several years study and reading with lawyers of his acquaintance, thus gaining admission to the bar in June, 1894. The following fall he was nominated by the republican party and successfully elected to fill the position he now occupies.

 

AL. D. TONER, Jr. (Biography)

 

            Attorney Al. D. TONER, Jr., of Kewanna, is a native of Union township, having been born on a farm there 35 years ago. He received his education in the Kewanna schools and at Valparaiso Normal. He read law for about six years and opened an office in Kewanna in February ‘91. From the beginning Mr. Toner has had a nice law and collection business and he is considered one of the safest counselors in the state. He married Miss Jesse PHILLIPS, of Marion, Ohio, and they have a baby boy, Worth [TONER].

 


 

FRANK L. WAGONER (Biography)

 

            A selfmade lawyer of the county is Mr. Frank L. WAGONER, of Kewanna. He came here from his birth place in Starke county, Ohio, in 1874 and was principal of the Kewanna schools for two years. He then turned his attention to insurance, collections, etc., until ten years ago when he was admitted to the bar and has ever since been in the active practice of law. He has always been identified with the progressive interests of Kewanna and is one of the substantial men of that excellent town. He married Miss Ida MURRAY in 1877 and their home is blessed with two children.

 

JOHN KESLER

 

            County Auditor John KESLER is a Fulton county pioneer, having lived in Newcastle township since 1852 where he came direct from his birthplace in Richland county, Ohio. He was but sixteen years old when he came to the county and is now nearly 60, and he has spent all of these years, except several years at gunsmithing, in developing his 235 acre farm from a forest to one of the most valuable homesteads in the county. Mr. Kesler entered the service of the U.S. during the war and saw some hard times in the 87th Regiment. He first married Mary KESLER, a lady of his name, but no relation, in 1855 and after her death married Martha BYBEE HAMLET his present wife. He is the father of twelve children, has been an active member of the Baptist church for 20 years and was honored last year by the nomination for county Auditor and success at the polls. Mr. Kesler is a gentleman in the fullest sense of the term and fully merits the universal esteem he enjoys.

 

HOLMES TIPTON (Biography)

 

            County Recorder Holmes TIPTON is a native of Fulton county. Born in Newcastle township in 1854, he grew up on a farm there, and received his education in the country schools. He adopted farming as his vocation and followed it until elected Recorder in 1890. His term of office will expire next December, after which he expects to engage permanently in the livestock business at which he has been very successful. He married Etta ASHTON, of this city, and they have four daughters -- Echo, Lula, Celia and Bessie [TIPTON].

 

 JAMES R. SHELTON (Biography)

 

            James R. SHELTON, the present Clerk of the Fulton Circuit Court, son of Wilson SHELTON, is a native of Fulton county, having been born in Rochester township in 1844. He grew up on a farm but acquired a good education and followed the profession of teaching for fourteen years. Then he bought grain at Star City for three years but turned back to the farm and followed that vocation in Liberty township until elected Clerk last fall. He has always been an enthusiastic republican but was never before a candidate for office. He married Maggie MARTIN in 1872 and they have two children, Maurice C. and Fatima B. [SHELTON], both of whom are still enjoying the comforts of the paternal family circle.

 

 

 


 

 

FRANCIS A. DILLON (Biography)

 

            Sheriff Francis A. DILLON is a North Carolinian by birth but left that state when four years old in 1850 for Henry county, this state, where he grew to manhood. When sixteen years old he enlisted as a private in the 4th Indiana Battery and served two years, Sherman’s march to the sea being a part of his service. On returning to Henry county he married Miss Julia WILSON who died eleven months afterward leaving a daughter who is now Mrs. Minnie WEICK, of Columbia City. Two years later Mr. Dillon located in Akron and engaged in the blacksmith business which he followed successfully until he came to Rochester in 1892. He married Miss Mary A. ESTILL in 1872, and the two have been sufficiently active as to build six residences and three business rooms during their residence in the county. Mr. Dillon was a candidate for Sheriff in ‘88 but went down with his ticket and was again nominated last year and elected, the first republican sheriff the county ever had. He is an active G.A.R. man and Odd Fellow, being Past Commander of McClung Post G.A.R.

 

LUCIUS VERNON GOULD (Biography)

 

            The school and social influences of Rochester have an illustrious product in the person of Lucius Vernon GOULD, youngest son of Dr. Vernon GOULD. He is but 25 years old and yet he has advanced to a sphere of much public usefulness. He is a member of the graduating class of the Rochester High school of ‘89 and an alumnus of Purdue University where he spent four years in a full course in Civil Engineering. After receiving his degree in college he took service with the Standard Oil company for a time, then made a survey and plat of the town of Rochester when the corporation was enlarged, and then accepted the superintendency of construction of the Tipton Waterworks plant. He also had charge of the completion of the Columbia City plant and then became city civil engineer of Tipton and has been the overseer of the extensive street paving of that city. In the meantime he was elected county Surveyor of this county and Superintendent of the Tipton waterworks plant. He is a scholar, a gentleman and unmarried.

 

JOSHUA N. ORR (Biography)

 

            Joshua N. ORR was born in Fulton county, April 6, 1853. He resided on a farm until 1890 when he moved to Rochester and became assistant editor of the Sentinel. When the legislature of 1891 created the office of county Assessor, the county commissioners, by a unanimous voice called him to fill that position. At the general election of 1892 the people indorsed his work by giving him the largest majority received by any candidate on the ticket, and in the performance of his official duties he has instituted beneficial reforms which affect every county in the state. His term of office will expire in November 1896. December 24, 1880, he was united in marriage with Rose F. CALVERT. They have one daughter, Henriette [ORR], six years old, and own a pleasant home on Fulton avenue.

 

CARLOS FISH (Biography)

 

            Carlos FISH is essentially one of our self-made young men. He was born in Richland township, Fulton county, March 10, 1870, and is one of those sturdy men who went to school in winter and farmed in the summer. After completing his education he taught school for several years, then taking a business course at Valparaiso University, he went into


the county Treasurer’s office as deputy, where he has given satisfaction by strict business methods and courteous treatment of patrons. Mr. Fish was united in marriage with Miss Addie VAMPNER, June 2, 1892, and has one son. Since his residence in Rochester he has been identified with the general enterprise of our city and counts his friends by the score.

 

GEORGE K. BRUNDIGE (Biography)

 

            The next Recorder of Fulton county, George K. BRUNDIGE, was born near Roann, in Wabash county, and lived there for twenty-five years. Then he located in Akron and engaged in the hardware business but later made a change to a notary and collecting agent. He was nominated for Recorder by the republicans in 1894 and elected, but will not assume the duties of his office until next December. He married Miss Indiana WHITTENBERGER, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Jacob WHITTENBERGER, in 1886 and they own a pleasant residence.

 

JACOB ROSENBERG (Biography)

 

            It is not generally known in Rochester that Jacob ROSENBERG, the genial dry goods salesman and member of the city council, is a practical printer, but such is the case. Born in New York City in Sep 1849, his parents moved to Cincinnati when he was six years old, and there he attended the public schools and at twelve years old passed a successful examination in the city High school. In 1862 he was apprenticed to learn the printers trade and for eleven years worked in one office, the greater part of the time holding the position of foreman. In 1873 he moved to Rochester and for two years was employed on the Sentinel, when in 1876 he engaged with Mr. WILE as salesman in his dry goods store, which position he has held continuously, with the exception of one month. A graduate of a city high school at twelve, holding his first position for eleven years, resigning from the second and occupying the third for over eighteen years, is certainly a record to be proud of.

 

GEORGE FRANK BARCUS (Biography)

 

            Councilman George Frank BARCUS is a native of Columbiana county, Ohio, having been born there in 1859. When four years old Mr. Barcus’ parents moved to this county and he has lived here ever since. He adopted the plasterers trace and has built up a profitable patronage in that business. In addition to this he owns an interest in the Elliott lime and coal business. He was elected town councilman from his ward in the spring of ‘94 and is proving a careful and painstaking official. He married Miss Lila AULT in Oct, 1889 and they own a neat home in northwest Rochester.

 

FREED WILSON (Biography)

 

            Everybody knows Freed WILSON. During a residence of 41 years in the county, in which time he has held the position of deputy and county Recorder for twelve years, and has been a member of the city Council for two terms, he has become thoroughly acquainted with everybody. In 1891 he formed a partnership with A. J. DILLON and purchased the Levi MERCER hardware store and in less than a year bought Mr. Dillon’s interest in the business. Mr. Wilson combines all the elements which make up a reliable hardware man and while he handles the highest grade of all kinds of hardware and building material he particularly calls the attention of his friends to the Jewett Cook Stove and the Standard Lighting Gasoline Stove,


always kept on hand and guaranteed to be exactly right.

 

 

 

JAMES A. CARTER (Biography)

 

            To the traveling public Landlord James A. CARTER of the Arlington Hotel is the most widely and popularly known man in Rochester. He was born in Ohio in 1855, came to Indiana when 11 years old and practically grew up in a hotel, although a furniture finisher by trade. He was 12 years with the Hays Hotel at Warsaw, managed Hotel Ryher of Kendallville, one year, and was head clerk of the Hascall House at Goshen for seven years. Two years ago Mr. Carter, with Mel R. WILLIAMS, of Warsaw, purchased the Arlington hotel and has developed it into one of the finest hostleries in this section of the state. Mr Carter is not only a popular hotel manager but a careful business man as well and is making money enough to keep the Arlington right to the front. He married Mrs. STECKMAN, of Bourbon, four years ago, who has a lovely daughter, Mabel [STECKMAN].

 

CHARLES W. BRACKETT (Biography)

 

            One of the widely known young business men of Rochester is Chas. W. BRACKETT, the lumberman and livery stable proprietor. He was born in Rochester 33 years ago and his schooling consisted of graduation from the Rochester High school, a course in Earlham college and a medical course at Ann Arbor University. He had no desire for a professional life, however, and commenced his business career as a hardware man. From this he went to the shoe trade with the Hoosier, for several years. Then he became the local manager of Brackett & Marrett’s lumber lbusiness and succeeded well. Being a lover of horses all his life, he kept an eye out for the livery business and last spring he purchased the Stanton stables and is making a success of the business by his management, although still engaged in the lumber business. He married Miss Ella MERCER and they have three daughters -- Mary, Bernice and Ruth [BRACKETT].

 

CHARLES A WILSON (Biography)

 

            Although not a native of Fulton county, Dr. Charles A. WILSON resided in Rochester long enough to gain a wide circle of friends and still regards it as home. Dr. Wilson is now proprietor of the Wilson Surgical Institute, an orthopedic hospital located at 81 West Ohio street, Indianapolis, and is meeting with merited success. He has had years of experience in this specialty, his connection with surgical institute work beginning in 1871. In 1879 he was awarded the Faculty prize, a gold medal, by the Medical College of Ohio. Since then he has been associated with his father, Dr. C. L. WILSON, in the management of the Surgical Institute of Atlanta, Ga., and Indianapolis, and has earned the gratitude and confidence of his patients by his skill and devotion to his work, the cure of deformities and diseases causing deformity.

 

 


 

 

 

FORGOS O. GODMAN (Biography)

 

            Forgos O. GODMAN is a native Hoosier -- born in Tippecanoe county 42 years ago. He lived on a farm until twenty-two years old when he engaged to learn stone masonry. Three years later he commenced business for himself as a stone contractor and bridge builder which business he has followed ever since except three years when he engaged with his brother as a livestock commission merchant at Union Stock Yards Chicago. Mr. Godman practically became a resident of Rochester eight years ago and has made this his home ever since. He has a wife and son and is a hustler in business.

 

LEROY MYERS (Biography)

 

            Here is another interesting exemplification of what a man can do if he tries in earnest. Leroy MYERS was born a poor boy in Ohio 35 years ago and came to Rochester at the age of 15 years. He was always busy and one of the fellows who could ever find something to do. He learned the shoemaker’s trade but didn’t like it and twelve years ago purchased a barber shop. He attended closely to business and soon enlarged his shop. Then he got more customers and needed more room. Now he is in the Capt. Long Block with a five-chair shop and bath room, the beauty, convenience and comfort of which has few equals in the state. He married Miss Amanda ZACHMAN in 1882 and they have one daughter and a foster son. They own their own home and are active members of Trinity church.

 

D. H. CRARY (Biography)

 

            D. H. CRARY, the gentlemanly proprietor of the Brunswick Billiard and Ice Cream Parlors, was born in Hicksville, Ohio, in 1870, and up to two or three years ago has followed the profession of telegraph operator and station agent, having held this position on several prominent lines during his life. In 1889 he was united in marriage to Miss Maggie CHINN, of this city. About the first of this year he returned to Rochester and opened up The Brunswick, a strictly temperance billiard and ice cream parlor where he has four new Brunswick & Balke tables of the latest pattern, and handles the celebrated Reed’s ice cream, made in Chicago. Mr. Crary is winning many friends by his gentlemanly and courteous treatment of his patrons.

 

ALLEN W. HOLEMAN (Biography)

 

            One of the solid products of Fulton county is Allen W. HOLEMAN of the Fulton County Bank. He commenced business in Rochester when a boy and conducted a dry goods and grocery business for fifteen years, during which time he laid a strong foundation for an influential financial future and naturally drifted into the banking business. Some years ago he founded the Fulton County Bank and has managed it so carefully that he has never had a draft protested, a record unequaled in northern Indiana. During the panic of ‘93 Mr. Holeman’s bank came to the rescue of the county and purchased its now jail bonds at a time when the county absolutely had to have the money and when other banks and bond buyers refused to buy bonds at any price. This conclusively proved the solidity of the bank and made it many friends in business circles. Mr. Holeman conducts a business founded on absolutely safe business principles and is therefore a very prominent figure in the financial affairs of the county, being one of our most extensive money loaners and financial agents. Mr. Holeman is a gentleman in


the fullest sense of the term and richly deserves the business confidence he so fully enjoys.

 

HENRY MEYER, Sr. (Biography)

 

            Among the older business men of Rochester Henry MEYER, Sr., is a modest representative of German thrift and enterprise. He was born in Germany in 1828 and learned the weaver’s trade. He came to America in 1852 and turned his attention to earning some money at any vocation which paid good wages. He always found something to do too and accumulated some means. He located in Wabash about thirty-eight years ago and after a long service at stone quarrying turned his attention to tubular well drilling which he followed for several years. Then he engaged in the retail liquor trade and it has always been said of him that he is a square man in the business. He married Nancy HETTMANSPERGER, of Wabash, and they have four sons and five daughters nearly all of whom are fine musicians and constituting a family honored by all who know them.

 

HENRY MEYER, Jr. (Biography)

 

            A widely and popularly known young man of Rochester is Henry MEYER, Jr. He was born in Wabash 34 years ago and has clerked in his father’s liquor establishment since he arrived at his majority. He is an enthusiastic admirer of wholesome sports and the billiard table and base ball diamond are the dream of his pleasures. As a billiardist he has a state reputation having vanquished several of the crack players in brilliantly played games. He is also an authority on base ball and is an umpire of much experience. He also loves music and has been a cornet player in the Citizens’ Band for 14 years, the last six of which he has been the leader. He married Miss Ora BETZ and their family consists of two daughters, Marie and Byrle (MEYER].

 

JAMES F. SCULL (Biography)

 

            At the head of our educational facilities stands Prof. James F. SCULL, who has been Superintendent of the Rochester Schools for thirteen years. He is a native of Ohio where he was born 60 years ago, but came in his youth to Rush county, Indiana, where he received his primary education in the country schools. Later he entered Thorntown Academy and finished his college work in Asbury University, teaching school at intervals to enable him to pursue his college work. He has been in active school work, therefore, from his youth and how efficiently he has done his professional work the present lofty status of the city schools must witness. He married Miss Emma YOUNT, of Yountsville, Indiana, in 1860, who passed away 1894. His family consists of three sons and three daughters.

 

GEORGE R. FISH (Biography)

 

            In an educational sense, few men have risen more rapidly in public esteem than County Superintendent George R. FISH. The son of Dr. S. R. FISH, he was born in Marshall county 29 years ago. He always liked school work and was not satisfied with the thorough training he took in the public schools. He taught during the winter months and attended the northern Indiana Normal in summer, until he completed the scientific and classic courses and rounded up with a graduation in Padagogies. He has taught in the county for ten years, the latter two of which he has been principal of the south side branch of the city


schools. He was elected county superintendent in June and soon after married Miss Emily TREADWELL, of Ann Arbor, Mich., who had been a teacher in the Rochester schools.

 

W. H. BANTA (Biography)

 

            W. H. BANTA could hardly be introduced better than by saying that but few men are so thoroughly established and enjoy in a greater degree the confidence of the public as an educator than he. Born in Preble county, Ohio in 1846 his early education was received in the common schools of that state. Moving to Indiana he attended a normal school at Kokomo. At the age of 21 he was principal of the schools at Rochester and at 23 was made a member of the faculty of the Normal College at Valparaiso. After teaching five terms in that institution he was elected Supt. of the city schools of Valparaiso which place he filled for over 23 years. He is now a resident of our beautiful city and one of the principals of the Rochester Normal University.

 

JOSEPH F. AULT (Biography)

 

            Joseph F. AULT was born in Huntington county in 1858, and came to Rochester with his parents in 1864. Here he has ever since lived. He secured a high school education, and being of a studious nature has never ceased adding to his knowledge. He learned the carpenter’s trade under his father in his boyhood and has worked at the bench since except when contracting or studying architecture, which latter branch he expects to make a specialty, the Normal College and several fine residences being evidences of his proficiency in this work. Mr. Ault served two terms as town Clerk in ‘86 and ‘87, and was elected a member of the school board in ‘93 which office he still holds. His is one of the brightest minds in our community and Rochester is proud to claim him as one of her citizens. He married Miss Johanna FLORY, of Huntington, and they have a family of four children.

 

GEORGE SUMAN (Biography)

 

            No factor was more potent in arousing interest in the Normal University undertaking than Prof. George SUMAN, one of the principals. He came to Rochester, was impressed with its advantages for a school town and readily interested some of our best citizens in the enterprise. Prof Suman is a Marylander, 42 years old and received his education at Greenville, Ohio, Valparaiso and Otterbein College. He has been a teacher for 20 years, thirteen of which he has been engaged in college and normal school management at Portland, Fostoria and Marion. Mr. Suman married Miss Lulu GRONENDYKE, of Dunkirk, Ind., and they have two sons.

 

S. J. PETERS (Biography)

 

            One of the energetic young men of Rochester who always has a good word for his town, a smile for his friends and a bargain for his customer is S. J. PETERS, the well known piano salesman. Mr. Peters was born in Illinois thirty-two years ago, but his parents moved to Ohio when he was six months old and remained there until he was eleven. They then came to Star City where Mr. Peters’ father was a prominent physician for many years. From his youth Mr. Peters has been devoted to music and adopted that as a business, having been engaged in the sale of musical instruments for fourteen years. He is a special salaried agent for


the W. W. Kimball Piano Company, and goes wherever the firm orders him. He is a successful business man and has a nice home on south Main street. His wife, formerly Miss Stella WALTERS, is also an enthusiastic and accomplished musician.

 

JOHN W. McMAHAN (Biography)

 

            One of Rochester’s boys who has made his way to considerable prominence in local business circles is John W. McMAHAN, the founder of the popular Oak Drug Store establishment. He was born in Rochester in 1870 and has always lived here except six years temporary absence at college. He is a graduate of Union Business College of Lafayette and of Purdue University School of Pharmacy. When through with his school work he came home and purchased an interest in the Pellens drug store. Then his firm opened The Oak drug store and operated it with much enterprise until some months ago when Mr. McMahan sold out for the purpose of completing his medical studies, after which he will again return to Rochester and engage in the practice of medicine, as observation as a traveling drug salesman convinced him that Rochester is one of the best towns in the state. His extensive experience with drugs, his fine schooling in their uses and effects and his knowledge of prescriptions gives him an invaluable foundation for a successful physician. He married Miss Venia ZOOK in 1893 and they are the parents of one child, a boy.

 

ANSON LENTZ (Biolgraphy)

 

            Anson LENTZ is widely known in both Fulton and Miami counties as a member of the firm of Lentz Bros. the famous photographers. He was born in Peru 34 years ago and after finishing his school course took up a course of instruction in the art of photography and has always made that his business. He came to Rochester in 1892 and has established a splendid business being equipped with one of the best galleries in the state. He married Miss Nelle HARMOND at Liberty, Ind., in 1892 and they occupy an elegant suite of rooms in the Noftsger block.

 

PETER BIDDINGER (Biography)

 

            Peter BIDDINGER was born in Wabash county, this state, fifty years ago. With his parents, Mathias and Sarah BIDDINGER he came to Fulton county in 1861 and has ever since made this home. He married Samantha Jane TRIBBETT and they have one son, Will [BIDDINGER], a daughter having died some years ago. Mr. Biddinger lived on his farm in Richland township until eight years ago when he came to Rochester, leaving his two farms in the charge of renters. He purchased the Tribbett property on West Center street and is substantially fortified in a financial way to make him one of the solid men of the county. He is widely and popularly known as the Fulton County Real Estate Agent, and his business is growing all the time because it is generally known that his word is as good as a bond in all transactions.

 

W. S. GIBBONS (Biography)

 

            W. S. GIBBONS should receive ready recognition at the hands of our readers. He has resided here all his life, attending the common schools of the county and rounding out his education by a three years course in the schools at Logansport. Taking a deep interest in his


profession of teaching he keeps abreast of the times in all educational matters. Mr. Gibbons studied law with Essick & Montgomery and was admitted to the Fulton county Bar in 1892 and is an orator of no mean ability, but prefers his profession of teacher. He holds a three years teacher’s license and is generally recognized as one of Fulton county’s brightest young men.

 

 

 

W. S. SHAFER (Biography)

 

            Among the “men to know” in Fulton county there are few with a broader circle of acquaintances than Dr. W. S. SHAFER. He was born in Ohio 43 years ago and came to Marshall county when thirteen years old. He gained a common school education of such thoroughness that he commenced teaching at the age of 19 and taught nine consecutive terms. During this time he read medicine then operated a drug store for two years and then took a course in Rush Medical College. He located at Big Foot for the practice of medicine in 1877 and four years later came to Rochester where his professional career has been an uninterrupted rise to the zenith of medical prominence in this section of the state. During his residence here the doctor has abandoned his practice long enough to graduate from the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, to take a post graduate course at the Chicago College of Physicians and Surgeons and to spend a winter on the Pacific coast. His high standing as a physician was recently attested by his election to the Presidency of the State Medical Association. He is an enthusiastic devotee of music and education having been a member of the city school board and the founder of our new Normal University. He has an interesting family of a wife -- Sarah WILTFONG SHAFER -- and three children, Howard, Effie and Robert [SHAFER].

 

FRANK H. CRIM (Biography)

 

            Frank H. CRIM was born in Whitley county 36 years ago. Eighteen years later he came to this county and has ever since resided here. For several years he clerked in a general store but drifted into the music business which he followed for eight years, four of which he was general agent for the Esty & Camp Piano Co. Some time ago he became interested in the Maccabee Order on account of its usefulness as an insurance and fraternal society and took the road as a Tent organizer. As Lieut. Grand commander he has, within the past year, organized fifteen tents with a total membership of four hundred Maccabees. Mr. Crim has a wife and three children, is an active member of the Citizens band and one of the whole-souled fellows of the town.

 

STILLA P. BAILEY (Biography)

 

            One of the young men Rochester may well be proud of is Stilla P. BAILEY, of the planing mill and general wood work firm of Myers & Bailey. He is the son of Marshal Elliott BAILEY, and came with his parents from Ohio to Rochester in 1859. He learned the carpenter’s trade and worked at this until elected city marshal in 1889, serving two terms and acquitting himself with the most popular record of any official the town has ever had. After his official term expired he formed a partnership with his father-in-law, Jonas MYERS, in the planing mill business. He is 35 years old and his family consists of a wife and three children.


 

RENALDO P. “NOBBY” TRUE (Biography)

 

            Another successful product of Fulton County is Renaldo P. “Nobby” TRUE, who was born 36 years ago. He acquired a good education in the common schools and adopted teaching as his profession, following it for fifteen years. He also learned the trade of painting and decorating but abandoned his school and paint brush avenues a year ago when he purchased the Eagle bakery. Since that time he has had a splendid business in the bakery, lunch and confection line and his place is one of the neatest in the city. He married Miss Estella MITCHELL and they have two children, a son and a daughter.

 

PETER J. STINGLEY (Biography)

 

            Peter J. STINGLEY, widely known young man, is a native of Ohio, but came to Fulton county at the age of 19 years. He acquired a good education at High school and Logansport Business college and afterward taught school for eighteen years. Then he was elected County Surveyor and filled the position so efficiently that he was given three terms and last March, on retiring from office, purchased an interest in the Holman & Stephenson Abstract business for which his experience as Surveyor has richly qualified him. He is a lover of music and is a member of the Mascot Band. His wife was formerly Miss Mary EIKELBERNER, of Royal Center. They have two daughters.

 

NELS PHILLIPS (Biography)

 

            Nels “Standard Oil” PHILLIPS grew to manhood in Plymouth. He chose railroading as his vocation and followed it several years as a brakeman and conductor on the Ft. Wayne road. Ten years ago he came to Rochester in the employ of Beyer Bros. and three years later accepted the local agency for the Standard Oil Company and has pushed the business industriously and to the eminent satisfaction of his patrons ever since. He also does an extensive hack and transfer business and is always “up with the birds.” He married Miss Ruth FORESTER, of Toledo, and their family consists of two children, Hortense and Lester [PHILLIPS].

 

JOHN G. HILL (Biography)

 

            John G. HILL was born in Hessenstarn-Stadt, Germany, and came to this country in 1858, settling in Miami county where he lived until the war of the rebellion when he enlisted in the Union Army and served three years. After the war he came to Rochester, entered into the manufacture of carriages and wagons, and has built up such a reputation for work that his machinery is never idle. His specialty is the manufacture of fine rigs to order, and as he is a practical workman of the old school his work is practical and durable. His shops are located on North Main street where friends and patrons are always welcome. Mr. Hill has always been prominent in the advance of progress in Rochester and is one of our substantial citizens.

 

W. FRED KIRKENDALL (Biography)

 

            W. Fred KIRKENDALL was born in Ohio in 1852 and came to Indiana five years later. He lived on a farm until 19 years old when he entered the dental office of Dr. M. M. REX and has practiced his adopted profession in Rochester ever since, excepting two years


residence in Argos. The Doctor holds a certificate from the State Board of Dental Examiners and has built up a large practice, his office being equipped to perform all operations known to modern dentistry. He is married and has two bright children.

 

CHARLES A. BROOKE (Biography)

 

            The pastor of the Grace M.E. church, Dr. Chas. A. BROOKE, has been in the ministry 41 years and yet he seems in the very prime of usefulness. He has been pastor of all the principal charges in the Northwest conference and was presiding elder of the Greencastle district from ‘73 to ‘77. At Lafayette he was pastor when a $35,000 church was built and at Valparaiso he was the prime mover in the construction of a $25,000 edifice. The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by Depauw University. He is married and his family of three sons are all Chicago business men.

 

WILLIAM HILL (Biography)

 

            Elder Wm. HILL, the pastor in charge of the Seventh Day Adventists church, has been a citizen of Rochester since 1861. He practiced medicine until 1888 when he turned his attention almost entirely to church work. He has been treasurer of the state conference of his church for seventeen years, and has received and disbursed a hundred thousand dollars of church funds during the time. He is now one of the ministers of his church authorized to preach whenever and wherever duty calls him.

 

O. A. COOK (Biography)

 

            Rev. O. A. COOK, Pastor of the Baptist church was born near Denver, Indiana, 34 years ago. He was a farmer boy and acquired such primary education as to enable him to become a useful teacher. Then he attended the State Normal one year and then entered Franklin College, from which institution he graduated in 1891. He then spent a year in Divinity school of Chicago University, and then entered the ministry. He preached at Mentone two years and was called to Rochester in April 1893, since which time his work has been one constant triumph. He married Miss Lou LEONARD and they have a family of four children.

 

C. W. SPANGLER (Biography)

 

            Rev. C. W. SPANGLER, Pastor of the Evangelical church, is a young man but he promises a life of great usefulness for the church. He is a native of Adams county, Indiana, and graduated from Naperville college in 1886, taught school several years and four years ago entered the active ministry. He is but 26 years old and married an estimable christian lady in the person of Miss Sarah LEPPOLD, of McGrawsville, this state.

 

J. P. ROTH (Biography)

 

            Rev. J. P. ROTH, Pastor of the Presbyterian church, was born in Pennsylvania 45 years ago and came to Indiana at the age of 15 years. He learned the trade of carriage painting but naturally inclined to books and entered Wabash college from which he graduated with the degree of B.A. in ‘75. He then commenced preaching but afterward took a theological course at Lane’s Seminary, receiving the degree of A.M. and has ever since devoted his energy to the


ministry. He has been in Rochester 6 years and has been very active in both the moral and general welfare of the city. He married Miss Mary ORR, of Crawfordsville, and they have two children, Edna and Lena [ROTH].

 

W. M. KENNEY (Biography)

 

            W. M. KENNEY, the present pastor of the Christian church, was born April 12, 1865, near Springfield, Sangamon county, Ill., in which county he resided on a farm until his removal to this state in February, 1892. Mr. Kenney was ordained to the ministry October 15, 1886, having preached some months prior to that time. Like many others he was deprived of a college education, educating himself while laboring on a farm. He has served as pastor in this state the congregations at Windfall and Monticello, from the latter place moved to Rochester. His work, both as a pastor and evangelist, has ever been attended by success. He is married, having living one child. His present wife was Miss Lily A. STRUT, of Brookston, Ind.

 

F. M. ERNSPERGER (Biography)

 

            F. M. (Marion) ERNSPERGER, who has just stepped down and out of a five years term as township trustee succeding a like term of five years as a township assessor. Mr. Ernsperger came to Rochester with his parents nearly fifty years ago when a boy and was raised on a farm. Excepting two years in the grocery and bakery business and a year’s service in the rebellion, he has always been a farmer and a successful one, as he now owns a fine country home of 120 acres, a mile and a half northeast of the city. He married Ida WYLIE in 1859 and they have three children, Dell, Bell and Fred [ERNSPERGER]. He is an active member of McClung Post G.A.R., a conscientious, cheerful gentleman and an honorable citizen.

 

JOHN G. TROUTMAN (Biography)

 

            A native of Fulton county, John G. TROUTMAN, was born in 1851 and left an orphan at the age of six months. His youthful life was one of many hardships and he earned his own living since 10 years old. He secured a good common school education and began teaching at the age of 20 and has continued in the profession for 24 years. He moved from his farm to Rochester in 1887 and has since resided here. For 10 years he has held the farm agency for the Home Insurance Co., and is now Justice of the Peace. He takes great pride in the prompt settlement of his insurance losses, and writes deeds, mortgages, etc., makes loans and collections and guarantees satisfaction in all of his work. He married Miss Malina NEFF and they have two children, a son and a daughter. Mr. Troutman’s office is over Dawson’s Drug Store.

 

JAMES C. TIPTON (Biography)

 

            A well known face among Rochester’s galaxy of successful business men is that of James C. TIPTON, who has been in the musical merchandise business since 1886, and has built up a successful business by courteous treatment and fair dealing. His specialty is pianos and organs, and he sells them on small margins and easy payments, and has sold more instruments than any other one man in this part of the country, and has always given satisfaction. He was born in Fulton county in 1857, and was married in 1880 to Miss Mabel


 McQUERN, and they have four children -- one girl and three boys.

 

WILL ZELLER (Biography)

 

            Another of our hustling young townsmen is Will ZELLER, who was born 33 years ago, on a Fulton county farm, where he lived until early manhood. After moving to Rochester he went into the clothing business as salesman, and three years later accepted a position in Geo. H. WALLACE’s grocery where he remained for two years. He then took the agency for the Continental Insurance Co., and has, during the past three years, written a large amount of business for this company. He writes policies especially on farm property, and is rapidly coming to the front as an active insurance agent in which vocation he has a bright future.

 

CHARLES B. MOORE (Biography)

 

            Photographer Charles B. MOORE is a native of Fulton county, son of George MOORE, the widely known old farmer east of Manitau. He entered an apprenticeship at a Peru gallery sixteen years ago and after serving three years, came to Rochester and opened a gallery. Since then he has increased his facilities for high class photography until he now has the finest of equipment and room built expressly for his business. Mr. Moore is 44 years old and always happiest when making a good photo or trolling for bass, the fine string of fish shown elsewhere being one of his catches. He married Miss Belle HECTOR and they have two children, Cornelia and Lewis [MOORE].

 

WILLIAM OAKLEY HAINES (Biography)

 

            William Oakley HAINES, D.D.S., our leading dentist, is a native of Baltimore, Maryland, and is a graduate and post-graduate of the finest dental school in the world -- The Dental Department of the University of Maryland -- both of which degrees were won by hard study and conscientious work before he had attained his twenty-first year. The faculty of the University comprises the names of eminent practitioners as Gorgas, Harris and Uhler, of international fame in Dentistry, and Michael, Miles and Atkinson, in medicine and surgery. Under the splendid system of instruction of these and other distinguished men, Dr. Haines spent three years of his college life. Before his graduation he had become one of the favorite demonstrators in the operating room, winning the confidence and esteem of both students and professors, and so continued long afterwards and until his removal to Rochester. He enjoyed also the rare distinction of being appointed by the popular and progressive Governor Frank Brown, as one of the members of the Maryland State Board of Dental Examiners, and was the youngest practitioner ever appointed to such a position. He was made secretary of the Board on its organization and when, several years later, he resigned, with the view of moving to the Pacific coast, the venerable president of the Board, Dr. A. J. Volck, (who is celebrated as a sculptor as well as a surgeon) paid him the high tribute of referring to him as his “right hand man.” Although the position was without pay or emolument, Dr. Haines devoted himself to its duties with an energy and close attention that were the theme of general commendation among his associates in the profession. During his career in Baltimore it was his custom to spend a portion of the summer in the mountains of Virginia, but before he could obtain a license to practice in that state he was subjected, as required by law, to a most rigid examination by the Virginia State Board, passing triumphantly and taking home with him their hotly contested certificate. While on his tour towards the far west with his accomplished


wife, a friend suggested to him to stop and take a look at the pretty little town of Rochester. He did so and they were both so charmed with it and its hospitable, enterprising and cultivated people that they concluded to stay, and this is the way Rochester has become the home of one of the most expert dentists of the period and one of the loveliest of women. Dr. Haines is in all respects an up to date dentist, using the latest and most approved appliances and keeping up with the newest and best literature of the profession. It may be added that Dr. Haines is the oldest son of Oakley P. HAINES, editor-in-chief of that sterling and reliable newspaper, The Baltimore Sun.