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FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1914

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1998

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 

 


Rochester Sentinel

1914

Thursday, January 1, 1914

Mrs. Julia GIBBONS and Edward MOONSHOWER, two well known Rochester residents, are dead. Mrs. Gibbons died at the Woodlawn hospital Wednesday afternoon and Mr. Moonshower died at his home on Elm street this morning at nine o'clock.
Mrs. Gibbons had been ill for the past three months and was taken to the hospital about six weeks ago. She was past 73 years of age. Edward Moonshower has been sick for over six months and death came as a relief to his suffering. He was nearly 68 years of age. Several weeks ago he underwent an operation at the hospital for gall stones.
Julia A. CALHOUN, was born at Muncie, Indiana, October 4th, 1840. Her father died when she was very young and after that she made her home with her grandfather, John THORNBURG. In 1861 she was married to James B. GIBBONS and thereafter resided near Richland Center until the death of her husband, 11 years ago. She was the mother of eight children, five of whom are living. Two children died in infancy and Mary Lida [GIBBONS] died five years ago. The children living are, W. S. GIBBONS, Mrs. R. M. OSBORN, J. M. GIBBONS, Mrs. Harvey OVERMEYER, and C. M. GIBBONS of Madison, Wis. There are 10 [? - difficult to read] living grandchildren.
Mrs. Gibbons was a member of the Methodist church. She was sacrificial in all her acts and the extreme fortitude to all her trials of life and especially in her last sickness showed a devotion to a sublime faith. Her example in the community was felt.
The funeral will be held at Richland Center Friday. The procession will leave the home here at 12 noon.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983: Julia A. CALHOUN married James B. GIBBONS December 28, 1862]

Friday, January 2, 1914

Mrs. Matilda JONES, a well known resident of this city and the mother of 13 children, dropped dead at her home on Em street Thursday evening as she was preparing to retire for the night. Death was caused by heart trouble.
Mrs. Jones was past 39 years of age and was the widow of Isaac JONES, a civil war veteran who died 12 years ago. For several years she has been living at 1411 Elm street with two of her children and niece. About 11 o'clock Thursday evening she retired to her room and was preparing to go to bed when her niece heard her fall. Before reaching her side, Mrs. Jones had passed away.
Mrs. Jones was the mother of 13 children, 10 of whom are living. They are, Mrs. Sam YODER, of Logansport, Mrs. Charles DEMONT, of Michigan City, Mrs. Hugh JONES, of LaPorte, Mrs. William HARTMAN, of Rochester, Mrs. John MYERS, of Rochester, and John [JONES], Charley [JONES], Fred [JONES], Edward [JONES] and Perry [JONES] of Rochester. Mrs. William FLAGG, a daughter, died five years ago.

Saturday, January 3, 1914

The funeral services of Edward MOONSHOWER will be held at the house Sunday afternoon at two o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Edward MOONSHOWER, 1851-1914; Sophia MOONSHOWER, 1854-1925]

Monday, January 5, 1914

Ignatious "Notsie" MEYER, well known seal card manufacturer of this city, was instantly killed near Logansport, Saturday night when the automobile which he was driving, skidded into a deep ditch and upset, pinning him underneath. His neck was broken. R. K. GILLILAND, E. A. SMITH and Stephen PARCEL, who were also in the car, escaped injuries.
The accident happened in a blinding snow storm about 11 o'clock when they were driving along the Michigan pike, four miles north of Logansport. Although Mr. Meyer, who was driving, could barely see the road, the accident was probably due to the snow which caused the car to skid in a narrow place. After leaving the road the machine climbed the opposite embankment and then fell over on its side. Evidently the driver fell out of the car when it stated to turn over, as he was found on his back with the - - - - part of the machine resting on his body. The other three men were very lucky, as they escaped and with the exception of Steve Parcel, who received several scratches on the face, were unhurt.
According to the account given by the surviving members of the party they left Rochester Saturday afternoon at two o'clock for Logansport. Mr. Meyer and Steve Parcel had business in that city, and E. A. Smith, agent for Advance Harvester Company and Reub Gilliland, local business man, were invited as guests. They arrived in Logansport about four o'clock and started on the return trip at 10:30 in the evening.
The fatal accident happened in front of Hugh UELRICK'S farm, north of Loganspont. When the car turned over, Smith, Gilliland and Parcel were thrown out, free of the heavy vehicle. They at once tried to lift the machine off of Mr. Meyer, but were unable to move it. Running to the Uelrick farm, Mr. Parcel obtained help and within 15 minutes nine men living in the neighborhood were on the scene and succeeded in dragging the body from underneath the car. They were horror-stricken to find that Mr. Meyer was dead and up to that moment were laboring under the idea that life was not extinct.
Taking the body to the farm home of Mr. Uelrick, they telephoned to the coroner at Logansport who sent an ambulance and an undertaker to them. Mr. Gilliland also telephoned to Rochester and notified John HOOVER of the accident. Mr. Hoover broke the news to the Meyer family and then in a big Mitchell car made a quick trip to the Uelrick farm. In the meanwhile, the undertaker from Logansport had arrived and taken the body of Mr. Meyer and the Rochester men to Logansport, where the Cass county coroner held an inquest at once.
In a few minutes he examined the three witnesses and returned a verdict of accidental death due to a broken neck. The body was kept in the morgue until Sunday morning, when it was brought to Rochester by Mr. Hoover. Mr. Parcel accompanied Mr. Hoover, but Mr. Gilliland and Mr. Smith came home on the morning train from the south.
The accidental death of Mr. Meyer, who was known to all Rochester citizens, comes as a deep shock to the community. He was well liked by everyone. He took a deep interest in all public affairs and during the celebration of Peru Day last summer, was very active. For five or six years he has been located in Rochester where he conducted a seal card factory, giving employment during the winter months to 20 girls. Prior to this time he traveled in the West, but always made Rochester his home.
Mrs. MEYER was in Chicago when the accident took place. She was called home by her son, Julian, over the telephone. The sudden death of her husband has prostrated Mrs. Meyer.
Mr. Meyer was born in 1867. In 1892 he was married to Miss Mina DUMBAULD. To this union one child, Julian [MEYER], was born. There also survive his mother, Mrs. Nancy MEYER, his wife and one son and five brothers and sisters, Mrs. J. A. BEULL of Alaska, John MEYER of Mason City, Iowa, and Misses Rosa [MEYER] and Caroline MEYER and Henry MEYER of this city. Mr. Meyer was a member of the K. of P. lodge.
A private funeral will be held at the house Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock. All those wishing to call may come between ten and eleven Tuesday morning.
Contrary to rumor, the three men who were with Mr. Meyer when he was killed, made the statement today that when the accident happened, the car was going about 10 miles an hour. Mr. Parcel said that they left Logansport at 10:30 o'clock, they were only four miles from the city. Mr. Meyer was well known as a very careful driver and the fatal accident Saturday night was the first that he ever experienced. The ditch beside the road into which the car skidded is about six feet deep.
Francis LOUDERBACK accompanied by his son, Harry [LOUDERBACK], drove after the Meyer automobile this morning. R. K. Gilliland said this afternoon that three minutes before the accident Mr. Meyer turned to them and said, "boys, I am going to drive very slow, as the roads are in bad condition." Those were his last words.

Matilda HERRELL, born Aug. 30, 1841, at Culver, Ind., died Jan. 1, 1914, at Rochester, Ind., aged 69 years, 5 months and one day. She was united in marriage with Wm. I. JONES Sept. 26, 1868. To this union were born 13 children, three of whom, with the husband and father, have passed away. The date of the husband's death was Jan. 7, 1901. The children living are: Mrs. Samuel YODER, Logansport, Ind.; Mrs. Chas. DEMONT, Michigan City; Mrs. Hugh V. JONES, Gary; John S. JONES, Ed JONES, Fred JONES, O. P. JONES, Mrs. Wm. HARTMAN, and Mrs. John G. MYERS, all of Rochester. Brothers and sisters living are: Jefferson HERRELL, Miami; Cassius HERRELL, Wabash; Noah HERRELL, Denison, Texas; Mrs. Amanda ELLERS, Miami, Ind.; and Mrs. A. M. SMITH, Green Oak, Ind. Mrs. Jones united with the Christian church early in life. Funeral Monday, January 5, 1914, at two o'clock p.m. at the Christian church, Rev. McNEELEY, of Tiosa, officiating. Burial in the Citizens' cemetery.

The funeral of George MYERS, 72, who died Saturday evening after a paralytical illness of several years, on his farm near Leiters Ford, was held at Leiters this Monday afternoon. Mr. Myers was a brother of Attorney Enoch MYERS, who attended the funeral. Besides Mrs. Myers, there survive several children, three brothers and two sisters. The deceased was well known throughout the county.

Tuesday, January 6, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, January 7, 1914

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. KERN of Athens passed away Tuesday night. It was but three days old.

Thursday, January 8, 1914

Branch No. 22, Indiana Rural Letter Carriers Association which is the Fulton county organization, have adopted resolutions for E. S. BARRETT, an Akron carrier, who died recently, as follows:
Whereas In the death of Brother Elisha S. BARRETT, of Akron, our local branch has lost a most valuable and earnest member, a co-worker for the advancement of the mail service, and one who was always ready and willing to make self sacrifice for a brother in distress. Therefore, be it
Resolved: That we deeply mourn the loss of our brother and co-worker, and that the mail service has lost a most earnest and faithful employe.
Whereas: in the death of Brother Barrett, Akron has lost one of her best citizens, and his family a devoted husband and father. Therefore be it
Resolved: That we the members of Local Branch No. 22, extend our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved wife and children for the loss of a devoted husband and father, and to the citizens of Akron, for the loss of our exemplary neighbor.
Resolved: That a copy of these resolutions be presented to the bereaved family, and be made a part of the minutes of this meeting.
Resolved: That a copy be mailed to the R. F. D. News, Washington, D. C., and to each newspaper in Fulton county for publication.
Fraternally submitted,
G. B. W. ROBBINS,
S. A. BARNES,
Committee.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Delight BARRATT, dau of E.S. & N.D. BARRATT, died September 6, 1893, ae 4m-9d]

The funeral of Mrs. Julia GIBBONS, who died at her home in Rochester, was preached by Rev. Warriner, pastor of Rochester M.E. church, at this church Friday afternoon and interment was made in the Citizens' cemetery at this place.

Mrs. Anthony McGREW, who died in South Bend, was buried in the Citizens' cemetery at this place last Saturday afternoon. lHer funeral was preached at Argos.

George MYERS of Leiters Ford passed away Saturday night. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

The four your old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur KALEY was buried Tuesday. The funeral services were held at the Reform church here. Friends of the bereaved parents extend their sympathy. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Friday, January 9, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, January 10, 1914

Peter SLONAKER, a well known farmer living east of Delong, was fatally injured this morning when the buggy in which he was riding was struck by an Erie engine near Delong.
The accident happened about ten o'clock this morning while Mr. Slonaker was driving to Delong. When he started to cross the track east of the depot an Erie engine was coming from the west. Inclosed in a storm front he did not see the train until he was on the track. Pulling heavily on the lines he succeeded in backing the buggy partly off of the track, but the engine struck the rig and carried it for a number of feet. Mr. Slonaker was picked up unconscious with several bad bruises on the head and across the body. The buggy was demolished. The horse escaped with several bad cuts and bruises.
The engineer claims that he blew the whistle and that the bell was ringing when the engine passed the depot. Mr. Slonaker is in a very precarious condition. He is married and has two children.

Mrs. Robert WHITTENBERGER died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Abe SHILLING at 68 East Fifth street after an illness which started with an attack of apoplexy two years ago.
Moses PONTIOUS, son of Solomon and Magdaline PONTIOUS, died January 4, 1914, at his home 3-1/2 miles southwest of Akron, Indiana, aged 81 years, 9 months and 18 days.
Henry KREAMER, son of Andrew and Catharine KREAMER, died at the home of his grandson at Rosehill, Ind., Jan. 4, 1914, aged 77 years, 6 months and 11 days.
Maria [MAURRY], daughter of George and Rebecca MAURRY, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Norman OHMART, Dec. 28, 1913, aged 85 years, 3 months and 22 days. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Monday, January 12, 1914

Miss Francis Ann CURTIS, a well known resident of Athens, died very suddenly Saturday afternoon as the result of a stroke of paralysis. She lived with her brother, Jake CURTIS, a single man, who was in Rochester when she was stricken and who arrived just a few minutes before she passed away.
Brother and sister lived in the village of Athens and while Mr. Curtis was in Rochester Saturday, his sister was stricken with an attack of paralysis. She was alone at the time and would probably have passed away at once, but for the assistance given by a neighbor who lives next door and who heard Miss Curtis when she fell to the floor. Despite the aid of a physician, who was called at once, Miss Curtis died at two o'clock.
Deceased was past 40 years of age. She has only one surviving relative, her brother. Father and mother are both dead. The funeral was held this (Monday) afternoon at the home in Athens.

Peter SLONAKER, who was struck by an Erie engine Saturday at Delong, is somewhat better today, but the physicians say that he has a poor chance for recovery.

Tuesday, January 13, 1914

The funeral of Miss Francis Ann CURTIS who died Saturday was held at the home in Athens Monday afternoon at 1:30. A large number of relatives and friends were present. Miss Curtis had one brother, Eli CURTIS, who died in Hammond some time ago. The following half-brothers and sisters are living: Lora CURTIS, of Athens; A. HOOVER, of Rochester; Miss Lacrula CURTIS, of Athens; Mrs. Martha NYE, of Peru, and Albert HOOVER, of Chicago.

Wednesday, January 14, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Alexander BARRETT, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. L. O. ELY, Sunday, was held in the Christian church, at Talma, Tuesday, Rev. S. McNEELY, officiating. She was 89 years old.
Melona BARRETT was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, October 13, 1824. She was united in marriage with Alexander BARRETT, May 4, 1842. To this union were born 13 children, viz: Hannah [BARRETT], Elizabeth [BARRETT], William [BARRETT], Mary [BARRETT], John [BARRETT], Sarah [BARRETT], Melvina [BARRETT], Stephen [BARRETT], and Irene [BARRETT]. Three died in infancy. She also leaves 23 grandchildren, 35 great-grandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren.
In the year 1851, the Barretts left their native state of Ohio and settled in Newcastle township, Fulton county, where Mrs. Barrett afterward resided until her death. Many years ago she united with the Christian church at Pleasant Grove; later she placed her membership with Bloomingsburg Christian church with which she remained affiliated till death called her.
"Mother" Barrett will not be mourned by her children only, but also by a large circle of friends, who have learned to cherish her memory because of her noble example of motherhood. In her long and useful life she had many obstacles to overcome and conquered them by a strict devotion to principle and truth.

After being practically bed ridden for 20 years Mrs. Mary Ann KIME, mother of Reub GILLILAND, of this city, died Tuesday evening at the home of her son, Edward KIME, who lives north of Rochester. Mrs. Kime was past 76 years of age and death came as a relief to years of suffering.
For years she had been unable to walk due to an affliction in one of her limbs and death resulted after she had suffered with complications due to her infirmities and old age. For many years she lived in Rochester at the home of her son, Reub GILLILAND.
Mrs. Kime was born in Indiana, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel GIEGER. She was first married to Daniel KIME, who died during the war. After his death in 1862, she was married to John GILLILAND, from whom she was later divorced. Later she was married to Fred HICKS, with whom she lived for several years, when they were divorced. She then took the name of her first husband.
Mrs. Kime was the mother of four children, two by her first husband and two by John Gilliland. They are Edward KIME, Mrs. Rosa McGUIRE, Arley GILLILAND and Reub GILLILAND.
The funeral will be held at the Methodist church in this city Thursday afternoon. Rev. McNEELY of Tiosa, will have charge of the services.

Marion WYNN, a well known farmer living near Tiosa, died Wednesday morning at 7:30 o'clock after an extended illness due to consumption. He was past 57 years of age.
Mr. Wynn had always lived in this county and has many friends. He was a progressive farmer. Mr. Wynn leaves five children and a wife. The children are Milo [WYNN], Jake [WYNN], Mrs. Mary TOWNE, Mrs. Barbara FLETCHER and William WYNN. The funeral arrangements have not yet been made. Burial will take place at Richland Center.

George MYERS was born in Carrol county, April 28, 1841, died at his home near Leiters Ford, Jan. 3, 1914, aged 72 years, 8 months and 5 days. Was married to Lodisa M. McMAHAN April 12, 1877. To this union were born six children, Mrs. Wanda V. MAHLER, Culver; Bert [MYERS], near Mentone; John [MYERS] and Walter [MYERS], at home; Archibald [MYERS], Madison, Wis., and Lida [MYERS], Battle Creek, Mich. Sanitarium, all of whom with the mother survive to mourn the loss of a kind husband and indulgent father; also three brothers, Atty. Enoch MYERS and David MYERS, Rochester; two sisters, Mrs. Louisa ZELLERS, Kewanna, and Minerva [MYERS], San Jose, Calif.
Deceased had been an invalid since June having had three strokes of paralysis, the last one proving fatal. He followed the vocation of farming and for many years was Justice of the Peace. He was universally respected and enjoyed the friendship of a large circle of friends. The funeral was held at the Leiters M. E. church, Monday afternoon. Interment in Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. cemetery.

James Martin MEREDITH, son of Robert and Elizabeth MEREDITH, was born in Fulton county, July 11, 1843, on the same farm he owned at the time of his death. He died at his home Jan. 4th, 1914, aged 76 years, 5 months and 24 days. He was married to Mahala C. MONTGOMERY Feb. 21, 1867.
He leaves a wife, one son, two daughters and four grandchildren. He also leaves one sister, many neighbors and friends. He united with the Church of Christ at Sycamore chapel in June, 1873, under the gospel preaching of Elder Van VOUS and lived a Christian life from that date until death. All his life was spent near his home, where he has built up an ideal home and gained the esteem and respect of the entire community. His sickness was of a duration of about three months which he bore with patience. - - - A. A. BRUNNER.

Catherine [KERN], daughter of Jacob W. and Catherine A. KERN, was born Jan. 5th, 1914. Funeral services held at the home of parents, near Athens. Interment at Hoover cemetery.

Francis Ann CURTIS, daughter of Andrew and Matilda CURTIS, was born in Fulton county, Indiana, June 24, 1867, departed this life January 10, 1914, aged 46 years 6 months and 22 days.
Two half-sisters and three half-brothers, Mrs. LaCrula EISENHOUR of Athens, Mrs. Martha NYE of Peru, Messrs. Loren CURTIS of Athens, Abraham HOOVER of Rochester, Ind., and Albert HOOVER of Chicago, Ill., remain to mourn her demise. Her father, mother, brother, and half-brother and half-sister have preceded her to the spirit world.
Anna, as she was commonly called by her friends, possessed a kind and loving disposition and a heart full of charity which made friends with those who knew her. Her untimely death cast a gloom over the whole community. - - - January 12, 1914 - Rev. J. O. TODD.

Thursday, January 15, 1914

The funeral of Marion WYNN, who died at his home north of the city Wednesday, will be held at the Royal [sic] Center Church Saturday afternoon, at that church, Rev. S. McNEELEY officiating.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Richland Twp.: Marion WYNN, May 10, 1855 - Jan 14, 1914; Elizabeth WYNN, his wife, Oct 5, 1857 - Oct 29, 1894]

Maloney BARRETT passed away Sunday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lou ELEY, after a short illness of paralysis. She was past eighty-nine years of age. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Many of the relatives and friends of Mrs. Mary KIME from out of town attended the funeral here this afternoon.

Friday, January 16, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, January 17, 1914

Mrs. John SHAFFER, a long time resident of this county, died Friday night at her home north of the city, after an extended illness. Her death was caused by complications. Mrs. Shaffer was well known here as she was a member of the Christian church and of the Maccabee lodge. She leaves many friends.
Mrs. Shaffer [Clara FULTZ] was born in this county 54 years ago, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel FULTZ. January 18, 1876, she was married to John SHAFFER. To this union five children were born, four of whom are living, Mrs. Charles DALTON, Mrs. James EMMONS, Mrs. Roy CLAY and Miss Blanche SHAFFER. She leaves the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Colfax HEIGHWAY, Miss Mary FULTZ, Edward FULTZ and Benton FULTZ of Seattle, Wash.
The funeral will be held at the church Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. BURKETTE will have charge of the services.

All Lady Maccabees please meet at Mrs. Marion DAVIS' Sunday afternoon promptly at 1:30 to attend the funeral of Sister Clara SHAFFER at Christian church. By order of Commander, Lois CLAY.

Mrs. Ross McGUIRE of Montpelier, Ohio, Thomas McGUIRE of Peru, Wm. ZEIGLER of South Bend, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. BURCH and Joseph ZEIGLER of South Bend and John GEIGER of Albion who have been here to attend the funeral of Mrs. Mary Anna KIME, have returned home.

Monday, January 19, 1914

Mrs. Lucy STRAYER, wife of Thomas B. STRAYER, who lives west of the city, committed suicide Sunday morning at the Longcliff asylum, near Logansport.
The demented woman hung herself and was found dead several hours after life had become extinct. The authorities at once notified Sheriff COPLEN who broke the news to her husband and son. She was brought here this afternoon over the Lake Erie railroad.
Mrs. Strayer has been insane for the past three years and was taken twice to the asylum at Logansport. On her first visit she was kept there for several months and then brought home in June of last year; her condition became worse and she was again taken away. Mrs. Strayer labored under the delusion that she was being pursued by an assassin.
Mrs. Strayer was born in Kentucky, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. N. VanSANT, March 22, 1872. In September, 1900, she was married to Thomas B. STRAYER. They had one child, Vernon STRAYER. Mrs. Strayer is survived by her father, J. N. VanSANT of Huntington Virginia, her brother, W. R. VanSANT of Ashland, Kentucky, and Mrs. Susan HAYS of Huntington, Virginia, Mrs. L. S. CARPENTER of Flemingburg, Kentucky, and Mrs. Laura E. MARTIN, of Paxton, Ill., sisters.
The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at Hoovers chapel. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. Rev. F. E. BURKETTE will officiate.

After an illness of more than a year, Mrs. W. S. SOWERS, 43, died early Sunday morning at Woodlawn hospital where she has been for almost a month.
Mrs. Sowers has lived in this city for a number of years, coming here from Peru with her husband, who engaged in the cream business here after selling out in Peru. They resided over 429 North Main street.
Jeannette M. DENISTON was born at Eden in Fondulac county, Wis., on April 26, 1870, was married to Winfield S. SOWERS on Jan. 31, 1895. To this union were born five children, William H. [SOWERS], Dora Mae [SOWERS], Jeanette [SOWERS], Narcissus [SOWERS], and Mary Margaret [SOWERS], who with the husband, one sister, two brothers, are left to mourn her loss. Mrs. Sowers united with the Methodist Episcopal church at Fondulac, Wis., at the age of sixteen years, and has lived a faithful Christian, true and devoted to her family and her God.
The funeral will be held at the Methodist church at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon, leaving the house at 1:30. Rev. A. S. WARRINER will officiate.

Tuesday, January 20, 1914

Word was received here late Monday afternoon of the death, Saturday, of Olive SMITH, two year old daughter of Mrs. Walter SMITH, whose husband, a former resident here, met death a few weeks since in an Indianaolis street car accident. The little girl was stricken with diphtheria while on her way to Bruce Lake with her mother, and died near Peru. Mrs. Smith will make her home with her mother at Bruce Lake.

Mrs. George STARNER, a well known resident of Talma, died Monday evening at her home in that village, after a long illness. Mrs. Starner's death was caused by gall stones. She had been an active member of the Christian church but was highly respected by everyone.
Miss Samantha NULS was born in this state and at the age of 18 years, was married to George STARNER. They were the parents of one child who died when very young. Mrs. Starner has three

brothers and one half-brother living. Mr. Starner survives.
The funeral will be held at the house Wednesday morning at ten o'clock. Burial in the cemetery at Talma.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983: George W. STARNER married Armantha J. NULF, March 30, 1869]

Wednesday, January 21, 1914

The following people were here today to attend the funeral of Mrs. T. B. STRAYER: J. M. VanSANT and Mrs. Sue HAYS of Huntington, Mrs. Alice CARPENTER and daughter Lena [CARPENTER] of Flemingsburg, Ky., Elmer LAYTON of Cincinnati, O., J. C. MARTIN and daughter Beatrice [MARTIN], Mrs. Roy STEVENS and William MARTIN, Covington, Ind., and Sylvester MEHL, of Paxton, Ill.

Thursday, January 22, 1914 to Friday, January 23, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, January 24, 1914

The funeral of Marion WYNN, held at the Richland Center church, Saturday the 17th, at one o'clock p.m., was conducted by Rev. McNEELEY, assisted by Rev. KOONEN. Burial in the Odd Fellows cemetery, the Odd Fellows lodge of which he was a member, having charge. - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Monday, January 26, 1914

Mrs. W. H. KENDRICK, wife of architect Kendrick, died at three o'clock this afternoon in her home in the 200 block on north Main street. Mrs. Kendrick gave birth to a child several days ago, and has been ill since, but not until this morning was her case deemed serious. She leaves besides her husband, five children. The Kendricks have lived here shortly over a year.

Mrs. Hanna Jane HUDNELL, widow of Cornelious HUDNELL, civil war veteran who died nine years ago, passed away Sunday evening at her home north of the Erie railroad tracks. Mrs. Hudnell was a victim of tuberculosis and for the past year has been nearly helpless.
Mrs. Hudnell was the mother of five children, several of whom are well known in this community. The surviving children are Mrs. Viola CLIFFORD of Kokomo, Mrs. Harvey EYTCHESON, Mrs. Albert EASTERDAY and William [HUDNELL] and Rosa [HUDNELL] of this city. The funeral will be held at the home of Albert EASTERDAY Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock.

Kewanna, Ind., Jan. 26 -- Jerome HARRIS, 74 years old, a war veteran who was well known in this community, died Suday morning at eleven o'clock after suffering two strokes of paralysis, the first coming late Saturday night.
Harris was in Kewanna Saturday, was taken ill here and had to be removed to his home, which he made on a farm near Bruce Lake rented by him to William POLEN. Despite efforts of the doctors, he was unable to rally.
Harris leaves three children, his wife having died about ten years ago. The survivint three are

Mrs. Frank SMITH and Mrs Cole FINLEY of the Bruce Lake neighborhood, and L. G. HARRIS of Ft. Wayne, who is conductor on the P. Ft. W. and C. R.R. The funeral will probably be held Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry WORTHINGTON received word from Oregon that their brother-in-law of that place fell from a hay mow causing instant death. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

The twin daughter, Beatrice Roble [WADDUPS], of Mr. and Mrs. George WADDUPS, died of pneumonia, Monday morning at two o'clock. The funeral was held Tuesday at two o'clock at the U. B. Church at Grass Creek. - - - GRASS CREEK ITEMS.

Mrs. Viola GIFFORD of Kokomo arrived this morning to attend the funeral of Mrs. HUDNELL.

Tuesday, January 27, 1914

After an illness of over a year, Mrs. William SAYGER, who lives at Athens, died this morning at six o'clock. Mrs. Sayger's death was caused by gangrene with which she suffered for a long time. Mrs. Sayger was the mother of John Sayger, an employe of Beyer Brothers and Company, who lives in this city.
Mrs. Sayger was born in this county 65 years ago, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David BRYANT. About 40 years ago she was married to William SAYGER. Eight children were born to them, seven of whom are living. They are: John SAYGER, of this city; Mrs. David CLEVENGER, Charles SAYGER, Miss Cynthia [SAYGER] and Walter SAYGER of Athens, Percy SAYGER of Logansport, and Hershel SAYGER of Athens.
The funeral will be held at the Mt. Hope church in Athens, Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Wm. M. SAYGER, Apr 26, 1850 - May 22, 1935; Nancy E. SAYGER, Jan 18, 1849 - Jan 26, 1914]

The funeral of Mrs. W. H. KENDRICK will be held Wednesday at the home of her brother, C. W. WILLIAMS at Ossian, a little town near Huntington. The body will be taken there Wednesday. Mrs. Kendrick was 41 years of age and the mother of five children. Mr. and Mrs. Kendrick moved to Rochester from Hammond about one year ago.

Wednesday, January 28, 1914

Joseph W. DRUMM, aged 70 years, died at his home in Peru, Tuesday morning, after an illness of some time with paralysis and other complications. Three daughters and two sons survive. Mr. Drumm was a veteran of the civil war and was a member of the G.A.R., which lodge will have charge of the private services Thursday. He was a grandparent of William [KADER] and Earnest KADER of this city.

The funeral of Mrs. Hannah HUDNELL was held Tuesday afternoon at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Elmer EASTERDAY. Rev. A. S. WARRINER of the Methodist church was in charge. Burial in the Citizens cemetery.

Thursday, January 29, 1914

[no obits]

Friday, January 30, 1914

Frank BURNS, a former fireman at the local light plant, died Thursday night at his farm home near Akron, after a long illness. Death was caused by enlargement of the liver. He was past 45 years of age and leaves a wife.
Mr. Burns is well known here, as for years he worked for the local company. Mrs. John WEST of Rochester is a sister of the deceased. He leaves no children.

Mrs. Myrtle CROWELL, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Creighton HISEY, southwest of here, died Jan. 22, of consumption. The funeral was held at Sand Hill with burial at Argos. Mr. and Mrs. Hisey and relatives have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

Wednesday evening at 10:30 p.m. occurred the death of Mrs. Joseph CROWELL, who has been very ill for about three years. She had been staying with her parents through her illness. Mrs. Crowell was aged 32 years, 9 months and 25 days. She leaves four children, Delmer [CROWELL], Elmer [CROWELL], Otis [CROWELL] and Harold [CROWELL], a husband and a number of relatives and friends. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church at Sand Hill. Rev. KUONEN preached the funeral. Burial was made east of Argos in Oak Grove cemetery, Jan. 24. Those who attended the funeral from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. Leo MORLAND, of Bourbon; Mrs. Willard TRUEX and son Noble [TRUEX], and Thomas BECK of Twelve Mile and Lester KISLER of Whiting. - - - MT. OLIVE ITEMS.

Saturday, January 31, 1914

[no obits]

Monday, February 2, 1914

Richard LEAVELL, a well known Rochester citizen, dropped dead today at 12:00 o'clock on the street south of the court house, when he suffered a stroke of apoplexy. He was past 50 years of age.
Mr. Leavell was on his way home to dinner and was stricken in front of the house occupied by Harry GRUBBS. George SMITH and Mrs. GRUBBS were the first people to see Mr. Leavell when he fell, and ran to his assistance. With the help of Lee MOWE and several others, he was carried in the house and placed on a bed. Doctor KING arrived in several minutes, but was unable to relieve the man. He died several minutes after the physician arrived.
Mr. Leavell is well known over this county and for a number of years conducted a restaurant in this city. For the past two years he lived on a farm near Fulton. Mr. Leavell was a brother of John LEAVELL of Fulton, and a brother of Mrs. A. J. BARRETT. For several months he has lived on south Monroe street. Mrs. Leavell was notified at her home of her husband's death a few minutes after he had passed away. They have no children.

Tuesday, February 3, 1914

Lee HUNTER, a former resident of this city, died at the home of his sister, Mrs. Thos. MONESMITH, at Leiters Ford, Sunday afternoon. Mr. Hunter had been ill for some time and was taken to Leiters to better his health, but the change did not help and he became worse. He lived north of the Erie tracks and is the father of five children, all of whom are living besides his wife, a brother and two sisters. The funeral was held at the home of his sister, Mrs. Monesmith, at Leiters Ford this afternoon, burial being made in [Moon] cemetery.

The funeral of Richard LEAVELL will be held at the residence Wednesday afternoon at 2:30. Burial will be made in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, February 4, 1914

Andrew J. TONER, a pioneer resident of this county, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harriet Irwin, in Kewanna, Tuesday at one o'clock. Mr. Toner was 85 years of age and was the father of J. M. Toner of the Grand hotel in this city.
Mr. Toner moved to this county in 1842 from Ohio where he was born, and bought a tract of land near Kewanna. While the country was wild and unsettled he worked hard and was active in the progess of the community for 50 years. About 20 years ago his wife passed away, he moved to Kewanna, where he has since resided.
Mr. Toner was the father of eight children, four of whom are living: A. D. TONER, of Kewanna; J. M. TONER, of this city; Jerry TONER, of South Bend, and Mrs. Harriet IRWIN, of Kewanna. He leaves one brother, Albert D. TONER, of Kewanna, who is past 80 years of age.
The funeral will be held in Kewanna Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Mr. Toner was a member of the Methodist church.

Thursday, February 5, 1914

Chas. MOW received word last week that his cousin, Monroe O'BLENIS, of Kokomo, Ind., had died. He was known by many in this community. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Viola Ruth [MURRAY], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. MURRAY, died Jan. 30th and the funeral was held Saturday at the U.B. church. - - - GRASS CREEK ITEMS.

Several from Athens attended the funeral of Frank BURNS Sunday at Nichols cemetery. - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Friday, February 6, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, February 7, 1914

Mrs. Lucinda BURKETT, one of the oldest residents of the county, died at her home south of Wagoner Station, Friday night, age 82. She had been ill for several months.
Mrs. Burkett died on the farm where she had lived for the last 50 years. Six children are now living and Jesse [BURKETT] and Alice [BURKETT] were with their mother when she passed away. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at Mr. Zion.

Mrs. Rose STAHL, a niece of Mrs. Cathern CAPRON, of this city, and the daughter of Mrs. J. O. GINTHER, of near Delong, died Friday at her home in Huntington, Ind. The body was taken to Delong today where the funeral will be held at the home of Mrs. Ginther.

A. L. WHITMER and son, Orville [WHITMER], went to Mishawaka this morning, where they will attend the funeral of Mrs. Whitmer's mother, Sunday.
Mrs. J. D. FULMER, of Mishawaka, mother of Mrs. A. L. WHITMER, of this city, died last evening. Mrs. Whitmer was at her bedside. She will be buried Sunday.

Monday, February 9, 1914

Miss Grace LEITER, 16 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ulysses LEITER, died Sunday evening at the home on west Fourth street. Miss Leiter's death was caused by tuberculosis.
For the past three months the young woman has been very ill and unable to attend school. Previous to that time she was in very good health and her parents did not realize that death was so near. Besides the parents three children survive. Mr. Leiter is a traveling salesman for a silo company.
The funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at the home. Rev. G. C. CHANDLER of the Baptist church will have charge. Burial will take place at the Leiters Ford cemetery. Those wishing to call may come Tuesday morning between eight and ten o'clock.

Tuesday, February 10, 1914

Akron, Ind., Feb. 10 -- Dr. Ray LAMOREE, aged about 40, a well known dentist, while working on a patient, Mrs. Calvin SNYDER, suddenly threw up his hands and dropped dead at 1:15 p.m. here today. Apoplexy is believed the cause.
A doctor was summoned but life was extinct when he arrived. It is believed that he died instantly. Dr. Lamoree had seemingly been in good health and ate a most hearty dinner. He leaves a wife and three sons, aged 12, 10 and five. He came to Akron shortly before the Spanish-American war, in which he served, and has since practiced here. His home was originally in Michigan.

E. A. STANTON of Warsaw was here today to attend the funeral of Miss Grace LEITER.

Wednesday, February 11, 1914

Jacob NEYER, 64, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles WILLARD in the northeast part of the city, Wednesday afternoon. He was ill with pneumonia a little over a week. He moved here from Plymouth a little over a month ago and since then has been staying at the Willard home. His remains will be taken to Plymouth Thursday.

Word has been received from Mrs. Harry K. SHIELDS of the death at Glendora, Cal., of the latter's son, Hurst [SHIELDS], which occurred Saturday night of hemorrhage of the lungs. The Shields family moved from San Antonio, Texas, to California last fall hoping that the change of climate would benefit the son who was ill for a long time.

Thursday, February 12, 1914

The body of Jacob NEYER of Plymouth, who died here at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. WILLARD, was taken to his former home in Plymouth today. A number of relatives and friends accompanied the body.

Friday, February 13, 1914

Russell KALMBACHER, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. John KALMBACHER, who reside near Mentone, is dead at the age of 17 years. He was born in this county and leaves besides his partnts a brother and sister. He was a member of the M.E. church at Mentone, where his funeral services were conducted by Rev. LINDSAY. He was a candidate in the Sentinel's contest last fall.

Mrs. Harley TAYLOR received word last night that her grandmother, Mrs. Marietta BRUBAKER of Thorntown, Ind., had dropped dead. She is also the grandmother of Mrs. Robert MILLER, south of town. Dr. and Mrs. TAYLOR and daughter and Mr. and Mrs. MILLER will attend the funeral, Sunday.

Saturday, February 14, 1914

The funeral of Dr. Ray LAMOREE, the Akron dentist who dropped dead early this week, was held Friday afternoon at the Akron Methodist church. The K. of P. lodge had charge of the funeral and the services were conducted by Rev. A. L. WEAVER. Burial in Odd Fellows cemetery at Akron.

Mrs. Wyota WHITE, 36, for a number of years head waitress at the Arlington hotel, died at the Woodlawn hospital this morning about eleven o'clock. Mrs. White was taken to the hospital a week ago. An operation failed to relieve her sufferings and she passed away this morning.
Mrs. White was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John PRILL, who live near Athens. About 14 years ago she was married to George WHITE who is now in Buffalo, N.Y. Ray PRILL of this city, was a brother of the deceased. For the past few months Mrs. White has been living in Peru.

The infant child of Ollie BALDWIN and wife was buried Friday at the Lake cemetery. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Mrs. BURKETT, who died Saturday at her home north of town, will not be buried until the latter part of the week, on account of her son, Jesse [BURKETT], who lives in Montana, and is on the way here to attend the funeral. - - - MACY ITEMS.

D. K. OGDEN died Saturday at his home on Piety Hill, after an illness of several months duration. His funeral will not be held until the latter part of the week, on account of his son, Bert, who works on a railroad between Chicago and the Pacific coast and they have not yet heard from him. Mr. Ogden conducted a shoe shop here for a number of years, and was very skillful in his work of repairing shoes. He leaves a wife, two daughters, Mrs. Ora SHARP of Chicago, and Mrs. Pearl COLLINS of Huntington and two sons, Bert [OGDEN] of Chicago, and Clyde [OGDEN], of Macy; also a number of grandchildren. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mrs. Blaine DICKMAN and daughters of Defiance, Ohio, arrived Monday to attend the funeral of her grandmother, Mrs. BURKETT. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Monday, February 16, 1914

Robert PRILL, eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs Ray PRILL, died Sunday evening at the home on south Franklin street, after a two weeks illness of scarlet fever. The funeral was held this afternoon at one o'clock and the father and other relatives who were not quarantined were compelled to view the body through a window in the house. The family has been compelled to suffer the sorrow of two deaths within the last 36 hours, Mrs. Wyota WHITE, sister of Mr. Prill, having passed away at the hospital Saturday noon.
The son who died Sunday took sick about two weeks ago and the home was quarantined a few days later. Notwithstanding all that the medical aid could do he became steadily worse and died Sunday evening at seven o'clock. There are three other small children in the family.

The funeral of Mrs. Wyota WHITE, who died Saturday, will be held at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John PRILL, in Athens, Wednesday at one o'clock.

Tuesday, February 17, 1914

Word was received here Monday evening at 7:30 p.m. of the death of Mrs. Virgil KNAPP, daughter of Mrs. I. L. BABCOCK of this city, who recently removed to Danville, Ill., with her husband. Cause was not learned. The body was brought to Rochester today, and the funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at the Baptist church, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER officiating.
Miss Marie BABCOCK, daughter of Mr and Mrs. I. L. BABCOCK, was born Sept. 26, 1891, in this county. She attended public and high school here, and on Dec. 17, 1911, was married to Virgil KNAPP. To them one child was born, a son, who is now slightly over a year old. Mr. Knapp resigned his position at the Wile Clothing Store here in December and removed with his wife to Danville, Ill., the home of his father. Deceased leaves besides her mother and family, four brothers and sisters, Mrs. Harvey THORNTON, Alice [BABCOCK], Robert [BABCOCK] and Lawrence [BABCOCK].
The news of the death was most sudden and unexpected. Consequently it was a great shock to both family and friends.

The funeral of Mrs. Wyota PRILL WHITE will take place Wednesday at the Mt. Hope church near Athens, not at her parents' home. The funeral procession will leave the Prill home about 11 a.m. Burial in Mt. Hope cemetery.

Wednesday, February 18, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, February 19, 1914

The funeral of Edwin UTTER occurred on Sunday afternoon at the M. E. church conducted by Rev. A. L. WENCER. Mr. Utter died last Wednesday night near Athens at the age of 83 years. Four children, Jacob [UTTER], David [UTTER], Milton [UTTER] and Mrs. Ella FRIEND survive the parent. Mr. Utter had been a resident of Akron and vicinity for many years, was an industrious citizen and kindly neighbor. Interment was made in the [Akron] I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Edwin A. UTTER, father, May 1, 1825 - Feb 11, 1914; Elizabeth UTTER, his wife, mother, Feb 7, 1828 - May 22, 1906]

The funeral services for Mrs. BURKETT were held at this place Thursday. - - - Mt. ZION ITEMS.

Mrs. John PRILL is having a great deal of trouble just now. Her daughter is dead, a grandchild was buried Monday and her brother in Kansas is about dead with cancer. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Friday, February 20, 1914 to Saturday, February 21, 1914

[no obits]

Monday, February 23, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. George WILSON, who recently moved on a farm near Kouts, Indiana, were instantly killed Saturday night, west of Ora, when struck on the crossing by the Erie fast express, number 13. The train was several hours late and was traveling a mile a minute. The young couple was instantly killed and one of the horses that they were driving was later shot as the result of its injuries.
George Wilson was the son of Ephriam WILSON, who now lives in Ora and who formerly lived in this county. The aged parents of the young man ar prostrated as the result of the accident. The young couple, who met such an untimely death were married about a year ago and had moved only recently to their home near Kouts, from Ora.
It is supposed that they were totally unaware of the train which was traveling at an unusual speed. The crew picked up the bodies and brought them back to Ora where the funeral services will be held. The bodies were badly disfigured and it is evident that the train carried them for several hundred feet before they were thrown off the track. The buggy was completely demolished.

Marie Jennette BABCOCK, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. L. L. BABCOCK, born at Rochester, Ind., Sept. 26, 1891, died at the St. Elizabeth hospital, Danville, Illinois, Feb. 16, 1914, aged 22 years, 4 months, 21 days, and December 17, 1911, at Rochester, she was married to Virgil KNAPP. In early life she was converted and united with the 1st Baptist church of Rochester and

she remained a faithful member until her death, being regular in her attendance and work in the Sunday school and church. Last December, she with her husband and little son, moved to Danville, Ill. She was taken seriously ill there and breathed her last in the hospital. Those surviving her are: husband, Virgil KNAPP, and little son, Donald [KNAPP], her mother, three brothers and two sisters and a large number of relatives and friends. Her father, one brother and one sister preceded her to the other world. She was a member o the Evergreen Rebekah lodge and also of the Isabelle temple, Pythian Sisters. It seems scarcely credible that this young, vigorous life should have passed away from us so quickly. Only afew weeks ago I bade her good bye, as she with her husband and baby went to their new home near Danville, Ill. She looked so beautiful and appeared to be so vigorous. We had reason to expect that many years of service were before her. But that young, hopeful, vigorous capable life has finished it course and the new life of Heaven has opened up before her forever. I need not say that Marie was a general favorite. In her common schools, in her high school life, in her lodge relations and in her ralations as a church member, she was much beloved. As you know she had considerable ability as a reader and reciter and was in much demand for entertainments. But the sweet, thrilling voice is hushed, the gentle, personality is calm and still in death, she was awakened to a larger, fuller life in the far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory. She has departed to be with Christ, which is far better. May God comfort her bereaved husband and broken hearted mother and relatives and may He care for her motherless babe. - - - Rev. G. C. CHANDLER.

Tuesday, February 24, 1914

Perry HEATH received word Monday morning that his father was dead at his home in Portland, Ind. Mr. Heath had been sick for some time. He was past 70 years of age. The funeral will be held Thursday.

Mrs. Sarah ROSS, widow of David ROSS, pioneer resident of this county, died suddenly Monday night at her home on Monroe street. Death was caused by apoplexy. Mrs. Ross, who would have been 73 years old in April, retired Monday evening evidently in the best of health. Late in the night her sister, Mrs. RUSSEL, who has been living with her, heard her call for assistance. Before the physician arrived and even before her children, who live in the same block, could be called, she had passed away.
Mrs. Ross was well known over the entire county. The widow of David Ross, who settled in this county at an early date, she was identified with many of the changes for the better that took place during her long life. Mrs. Ross was a charter member of the Eastern Star order and until late years had been very active in lodge work. She was also a member of the Rebekah lodge.
Mrs. Sarah Ross was born in Newcastle township, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter SANDS. In October, 1857, she was married to David Ross, who had come to this county from Ohio about ten years previous. Ten children were born to them, seven of whom are now living. They are Charles ROSS, of this city, Minnie C. MURRAY, of Mishawaka, W. T. ROSS and Alfred ROSS, of this city, Ella TIPPY, of near Talma, Fred ROSS, of Pontiac, Mich., and Roy D. ROSS, of this city. Mrs. Dora HETZNER, a daughter, died about two years ago.
Three sisters survive; they are Mrs. Myra RUSSEL, of Michigan, who has been living here, Mrs. Lydia JENKINS, of this city, and Mrs. Diana CRAFT, of Newcastle township. Mrs. Ross was a member of the Methodist church.

Wednesday, February 25, 1914

In poverty, but happy in her little three-roomed log cabin at Winamac, Mrs. Nellie McKINLEY WINTERS, 82 years old, an aunt of the late President [William] McKINLEY, died Tuesday of complications caused by age. Until the end she refused medical aid, saying, "I have lived this long and had eleven children without the assistance of a doctor and I don't want one fussing about me this time of life."

The funeral of Mrs. Sarah ROSS will be held at 2:30 Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church, Rev. A. S. WARRINER officiating. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence GRAFFIS is dead and the funeral will be held at the home Thursday. They live west of Rochester about four miles.

Dorothy [MEREDITH], daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert MEREDITH, was born December 4, 1838, departed this life February 18, 1914, aged seventy-five years, two months and fourteen days. On Nov. 8th, 1860, she was united in marriage to Christian HORN, to which union seven children were born, four of them having preceded her to the spirit world. She leaves to mourn a husband, two sons, Peter [HORN] and Orlando [HORN], and one daughter, Mrs. Cora BRYANT, and also eight grandchildren, besides a host of relatives and friends. She united with the Yellow Creek Baptist church fifty-five years ago and always kept the faith. . . . .

The funeral of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. WILSON, who were struck by an Erie train near Ora Saturday, was held Tuesday afternoon at Monterey. Several people from Rochester, who were acquainted with the Wilsons, attended.

Thursday, February 26, 1914

[no obits]

Friday, February 27, 1914

Mrs. Milton SHIDAKER died Friday evening at her home near here. She was buried at [Moon] cemetery, Monday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Moon Cemetery, Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Mathias M. SHIDAKER, father, Co K 13 Ind Vol Cav, June 21, 1845 - Apr 15, 1927; Ellen A. SHIDAKER, his wife, Apr 4, 1864 - Feb 21, 1914]

Harry NEWCOMB has received word that his brother, Taylor NEWCOMB, of Peru, had died at seven o'clock Sunday evening. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS

Saturday, February 28, 1914 to Monday, March 2, 1914

[no obits]

Tuesday, March 3, 1914

Special to the Sentinel.
Elkhart, Ind., March 3. -- John WARNER, of Akron, Ind., who was spending the winter with his daughter, Mrs. J. H. PRESSNALL of this city, is dead of heart disease from which he had suffered three weeks.
A short prayer service will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs Pressnall Wednesday morning, Rev. L. S. FISHER of the First Evangelical church officiating, after which the body will then be taken to Akron where further services will be held and where the burial willt ake place.
Mr. Warner was born in Strassburg, Germany, July 4, 1821. Surviving him are his wife, Catherine WARNER, four daughters, Mrs. PRESSNALL, Mrs. Burwell HAMMOND of Akron, Mrs. Glen HUGHES of Mishawaka and Mrs. Charles AMON of St. Paul; two sons, Henry WARNER, of Roanoke, and Jacob WARNER of this city.

Isaac M. ALEXANDER, a member of the G.A.R. and a long time resident of this county, died Monday evening at his home on east Ninth street. For several years Mr. Alexander has been in feeble health and death came as a relief to him at the age of 77 years.
Mr. Alexander was well known over this county and for years engaged in the retail liquor business in this city. He moved here with his father, Henry ALEXANDER, in 1846. After living on a farm until after the war he moved to Rochester. May 18, 1856, he was married to Rebecca CARR. Three children were born to this union, two of whom are living, Mrs. Belle THALMANN and Mrs. Ida SOUTHARD. Ilda SMITH, a daughter, is dead. Besides his two children, Mr. Alexander practically raised three grandsons and also the near relatives, William DEWITT, Wesley DWEITT and Omar ALEXANDER. He was a good family man and took great pride in his children and grandchildren, and his two great-grandchildren.
In 1864 Mr. Alexander enlisted in Company "B" 142 Indiana Volunteers. After following Hood into the South, and after the close of the war, he was mustered out July 14, 1865. For years he has been a member of the local post. He was a charter member of the local organization, the Christian Science church in which he was a devoted believer.
The funeral will be held at the house Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. R. Stanhope EASTERDAY, of the Second Christian Scence church of Indianapolis, will have charge of the funeral services.

George REED, 21, second son of Charles REED, died this morning at seven o'clock. The attending physician is undecided as to the direct cause of death, but believes that it was a masked form of diphtheria.
The young man took sick about two weeks ago but it was thought by the family that he was suffering with a cold and a sore throat. He did not become worse until last week and even then the physician did not see any signs of diphtheria. Monday evening he was better, so thought his mother who told the physician that he need not call
George Reed was a clean young man and had many friends. For several years he had been employed at the Progress Grocery Company. He leaves, aside from his parents, two brothers and three sisters.

Wednesday, March 4, 1914

Because of the shock, Fred HOFFMAN, who is very ill, has not been told of the death of his wife which occurred this morning at four o'clock at their home on Madison street. The body of the aged woman has been removed to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Clara RHODES, who lives on the same street.
Mrs. Hoffman has been ill for several years and became worse last week. For the last three days she has been compelled to sit in a chair and the end finally came this morning, caused by a weak heart. Mr. Hoffman took sick last Saturday, caused by a general break down. He is now in bed, partly conscious and it is feared that the news of his wife's death, with whom he had lived for 65 years, will be too much for him to survive. His recovery is doubtful.
Mrs. Hoffman was in her 90th year and Mr. Hoffman is past 90 years of age. They have lived in Rochester for 40 years, moving here from Macy, Ind. Mr. Hoffman is well known over the entire county and is reputed to own property worth over $100,000. Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman have always lived very frugally which is in part responsible for their long life. Mr. Hoffman is probably one of the best educated men in the county, although he did not have the advantage of much schooling. He was a deep reader and took a great interest in national problems.
Fred HOFFMAN, Jr., is now in Long Beach, Calif., and is expected home for the funeral of his mother. There are two other children, Dr. Edward HOFFMAN and Mrs. Clara RHODES of this city. Mrs. Hoffman has one sister living, Mrs. Lon JONES of Mexico, Ind.

Word was received of the death in Fremont, Mich., of Dr. George W. NAFE, 66, who spent his early boyhood here, attended the Rochester high school and first studied medicine in the office of Dr. HECTOR. He was a brother of James NAFE of near Germany.
Dr. Nafe was found dead in a chair in his office by a fellow physician. Heart trouble is believed the cause. He had achieved prominence in his profession was prominent in the Methodist church and a life long democrat. The funeral was held at Fremont Friday. Dr. Nafe was born in Ohio in 1848 and later moved to this city. After graduating in medicine from the University of Pennsylvanie in 1871, he married Miss Cordelia ERNSPERGER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christopher ERNSPERGER of this city. He practiced in Cass county for a few years and then went to Fremont. He leaves besides his widow, a son and daughter and two brothers, besides James. He is well remembered by older citizens of the county.

The death of Mrs. Daniel SHOWLEY occurred in San Diego, Cal., Monday, according to word received here. She had been in poor health for some time, on account of heart trouble. The children were at the bedside at her death. It will be remembered that her husband died just a few months ago. The Showleys formerly made their home in this city.

The funeral of the late George REED will be held at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the home on north Main street. The services will be public, word having been received from the state board of health that no diphtheria germs were found in the culture submitted. Suppurative tonsilitis was the cause, according to Dr. M. O. KING, who gave the case constant attention.

The funeral of Isaac ALEXANDER will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. Those wishing to call may do so in the morning between the hours of nine and 12.

George C. McMAHAN, 70 years old, died Monday at Noblesville of injuries sustained in a runaway two weeks ago, when the horse he was driving leaped over a twelve-foot embankment.

Thursday, March 5, 1914

Mrs. Eldora SWINEHART, widow of Lyman SWINEHART, died in South Bend this morning and the funeral will be held Saturday. Mrs. Swinehart was a sister of Mrs. Sarah EMERSON and her husband was a brother of Mrs. William WRIGHT.

Oliver C. POLLEY, age 93, the oldest man in the county, died at the Woodlawn hospital today about 12 o'clock. His death was due to old age. Mr. Polley has been staying at the local institution for the past year, where he was taken from his home near Leiters Ford.
Mr. Polley is well known over the entire county and is well remembered by those active in local affairs 20 years ago and even many years before that time. A prominent democrat and active in politics, Mr. Polley was a leader in the home town and township. He was known by all his friends as "Crum" POLLEY.
Deceased was born in New London county, Conn., March 17, 1820. In 1841 he moved with his parents to Huron county, Ohio, where he lived for several years. In 1849 he moved to this county and purchased land along the river for $3.50 an acre. In 1846 he was married to Eliza M. MEHRLING. She died ten years ago. One son, George POLLEY, who lives near Leiters Ford, is the only one surviving of five children.
During the cold weather last winter, Mr. Polley decided that he wanted to be baptized and would not wait for warmer weather. He was taken to the creek by Dr. SHAFER, baptized in the cold water and taken back to the hospital no worse for the experience. He had been a member of the church for years, but never been immersed.

Mrs. Elizabeth BEIK, widow of Otto BEIK, for years a saloon keeper in Akron, died very suddenly at her home in that town Wednesday evening. She had just returned from the revival meeting. Death was caused by heart trouble.

Friday, March 6, 1914

Mrs. Sarah KESSLER, age 72, died at the Woodlawn hospital Thursday night, after an operation for strangulated hernia, which operation was performed at the last minute with the vain hope of saving her life. Mrs. Kessler had been ill for over a year, but the direct cause of her death developed last Tuesday evening.
For several years Mrs. Kessler has been living with her husband, George KESSLER, at their home north of the city. She was the mother of ten children, three of whom are living, Dell KESSLER, Martin KESSLER and Mrs. Isabel JACKSON.
Mrs. Kessler was born in Hancock county, Ind., April 26, 1841, the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth MARTINDALE. In 1854 she moved with her parents to Fulton county. On October 31st, 1861, she was married to George W. KESSLER. They enjoyed 52 years of congenial married life and during that time witnessed the death of seven of their children, five of whom died in mature years. She has two brothers living, E. C. MARTINDALE and Isaac MARTINDALE, of Plymouth.
She was a firm believer in experital religion, and united with the Methodist Episcopal church, remaining a devoted member of that church until about the year 1883 when her husband united

with the Bethlehem Baptist church. Then she procured her letter from the Methodist church and united with the Baptist church, with which church she remained a member.
Mrs. Kessler was of a cheerful disposition, very firm in her opinions, but always just and generous and always self-sacrificing, for the comfort and welfare of husband and family and always willing to lend a helping hand to those in need or distress.
The funeral will be held Saturday at 1:30 o'clock. Fev. G. C. CHANDLER, of the Baptist church, will have charge.

Mrs. Ella SWINEHART, widow of the late Lyman SWINEHART, died Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock at her home in South Bend, after an illness of ten weeks. Born Oct. 23, 1863, in Fulton county, Ind., Mrs. Swinehart was 51 years old. She lived in South Bend ten years, going there from Tiosa, Ind. Surviving her are three sons, Charles [SWINEHART], Clayton [SWINEHART] and Harold [SWINEHART] and four daughters, Nora [SWINEHART] and Hollica [SWINEHART], Mrs. A. F. REYNOLDS and Mrs. M. LEISTER, all of South Bend. The following brothers and sisters also survive: Mrs. Emma St. PETERS of Chicago, Mrs. T. E. BLACK and Otto MECHLING of South Bend; Mrs. Sarah EMERSON of Rochester, Ind.; James MECHLING of Grand Rapids, Mich., and Isaac [MECHLING] and Henry MECHLING of Tiosa, Ind. The funeral will be held in Tiosa, Saturday.

Mrs. Mabel MOSSMAN of Leiters Ford died at the Logansport hospital Thursday afternoon. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles MOSSMAN. Mr. Mossman is a half-brother of John E. TROUTMAN. She will be buried in the Liters Ford cemetery Sunday afternoon.

Fred RHODES is home from Cornell university, Ithaca, N.Y., to attend the funeral of his grandmother, Mrs. Fred HOFFMAN. The time is not yet definitely settled. The condition of Mr. Hoffman is believed slightly improved. He has not been told of the death of his wife.

According to the will of Mrs. Dorothy HORN of Talma, her husband is to have the rents and profits of the farm during his life time, then it is to be sold and divided equally between her three children and grandson, Fred HORN. The personal property to be divided between the children above mentioned. Marion HEIGHWAY by the will is made executor.

Miss Fern LEAR returned home Sunday after attending the funeral of her uncle, William POWNELL, at Marion, Ind. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Saturday, March 7, 1914

The funeral of Oliver C. POLLEY will be held at the Methodist church at Leiters Ford Sunday morning at 10 o'clock.

Fred HOFFMAN, Jr., will arrive with his family from California, Sunday afternoon. The funeral of his mother, Mrs. HOFFMAN, has not been set. Fred HOFFMAN, Sr., who has been very ill is not improved.

Word has been received from Jonesboro, Ark., of the death of Scott WILSON, a former Peru man who was killed at that place Saturday. Details of Mr. Wilson's death were not received and relatives are waiting the same.

Monday, March 9, 1914

[no obits]

Tuesday, March 10, 1914

Mrs. Rebecca FLYNN, wife of Lemuel FLYNN, died at her home on north Jefferson street Wednesday evening after a long sickness. Her death was directly due to pneumonia.
She was 75 years old, being born May 10, 1839. She is the mother of five children, who with her husband, survive. Most of the children live in or near Rochester.
The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. The services will be in charge of the United Brethren minister. Interment will be made in Reichter cemetery.

Wednesday, March 11, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Lemuel FLYNN will be held at the residence of her daughter, 130 W. 2nd St., Thursday morning at 10:00. Interment in Reichter cemetery at Talma. Mr. and Mrs. H. GOOD and Carl MOORE of Marion are here to attend the funeral. Ray FLYNN of Kalamazoo, Mich., will arrive this evening.

The funeral of Mrs. Fred HOFFMAN was held Tuesday afternoon at the Christian church. A number of out of town people attended the services. Mr. Hoffman's condition is improving.

Mable Leona [MOSSMAN], daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charley MOSSMAN, was born in Fulton county, Ind., January 8th, 1897, and departed this life March 6th, 1914, age 17 years, 1 month and 26 days.
She leaves to mourn her untimely departure, a loving father and mother, four sisters, Laura SCOTT, of Logansport, Ind.; Zina ORTH of Dayton, O.; Annie [MOSSMAN] and Ethel [MOSSMAN], who are at home, and three brothers, Chalmer [MOSSMAN] of Luceland, Canada; Grover [MOSSMAN] of Huntington, Ind., besides many relatives and a host of friends. Mable was a friend to all who knew her. That she had a Christian spirit was shown during her sickness, when she sang the entire hymn, "No Not One," while the fever was raging at the highest. The funeral was preached at the Leiters Ford M. E. church by Rev. HANKINS. The Pocahontas lodge, of which she was a member, had charge of the funeral at the church and cemetery. Interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery at Leiters Ford.

Bourbon, Ind., March 11 -- Fred REICHERT'S head was cut off and Gus PETERSON was severely injured by Pennsylvania train No. 17 Tuesday evening. Peterson saved himself by gripping the pilot as it struck him and was dragged two squares before the train stopped. The men were in a single buggy. The horse drawing the vehicle was not injured.

Thursday, March 12, 1914

The wills of Isaac ALEXANDER and Oliver C. POLLEY, well known Fulton county citizens who died last week, were probated in the court here Wednesday.
All of the personal property and real estate clear of all indebtedness was given by Mr. Alexander to his wife, Rebecca ALEXANDER to hold during her life. After her death the property is to be divided equally between Mr. Alexander's two daughters, Mrs. Ida SOUTHARD and Mrs. Susan B. THALMANN and his grandchild, Gladys GORDON, the daughter of his daughter, Mrs. Mary I. SMITH, deceased. The will was drawn up and signed March 11th, 1908, by M. L. ESSICK.
The last will of Oliver C. Polley was made on the 19th day of May, 1910, in the presence of John E. TROUTMAN and Charles WALLACE. He leaves all of his property to his son, George W. POLLEY, and provides that after his death the balance shall be divided equally between his grandchildren.

The youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. TOWNE died last week, of membranous croup. Funeral was conducted at the home and burial was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery at this place on Thursday. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Rebecca FLYNN was born in Zanesville, Ohio, May the 10th, 1839, and died March 9th, 1914, age 74 years, 9 months and 28 days. She moved with her parents to Fulton county in the year 1841. On Feb. 21st, 1851, she was united in marriage to L. P. FLYNN, who died March 15, 1909. To this union was born 12 children, five of whom are living, three sons, Frank [FLYNN], Leander [FLYNN] and Wilson [FLYNN]; two daughters, Mrs. Anderson MOORE of Rochester and Mrs. William GOOD of Marion, Ind. She leaves 12 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. There are three brothers, Richard [STARNER], George [STARNER] and Henderson STARNER. She was a member of the Christian church at Talma, Ind., but later her membership was transferred to the United Brethren church in this city. During the latter part of ner life her health did not permit her to attend a church, but she died in the Christian faith.

Oliver Cromwell POLLEY, son of Oliver Cromwell and Abigail POLLEY, was born March 17th, 1830, near Lisbon, Conn., where he resided until ten years of age, when he moved with his father to Huron county, Ohio.
Oliver C. Polley was united in marriage to Eliza Matilda MEHRLING, at Sherman, Huron county, Ohio, on Nov. 1st, 1846, where they resided until 1850, when they moved to Fulton county, Indiana, where they lived the remainder of their lives. To this union were born three sons and two daughters, Mary Ellen [POLLEY], Oliver Perry [POLLEY], Andrew [POLLEY], an infant, and George W. [POLLEY]. Mrs. Polley preceded her husband to the better world, having passed out of this life on Nov. 19, 1903. He was also preceded by his four children first born.
Bro. Polley leaves to mourn his death one son, George W. POLLEY and one half-brother, William Kimball POLLEY of Menomonee, Wis., also a host of relatives and friends. Bro. Polley died at Rochester, Ind., where he has resided for the past four years. He died March 5th, 1914, aged 93 years, 11 months and 18 days.
Bro. Polley united with the Methodist church in his young manhood and remained a faithful member and exemplary Christian character until his last days. . . . .
He was a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge No. 618, Leiters Ford, Ind.

The funeral services were held at Leiters M. E. church at 10 a.m. Sunday, March 8, Rev. Oren HANKINS officiated, preaching from Psa. 116:15 and Job 16:31.

Mrs. Elizabeth BEIK died Sunday morning at the residence on east Main street. Mrs. Beik was about 60 years of age and had lived half that time in Akron. Two children, Miss Mary [BEIK] and Frank [BEIK], both at home, survive her. She was a good neighbor and a devoted wife and mother. She has been ill for the past two years, was taken to Longcliff at one time for treatment, but soon came home as her nervous trouble was beyond treatment. Funeral will occur Tuesday afternoon and interment by side of husband in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

George W. REED was born Sept. 25, 1891, and departed this life March 3, 1914, at the age of 22 years, 5 months and 8 days. He was the son of Charles and Katherine REED, who together with three sisters, Lucile [REED], Mabel [REED] and Edith [REED], and two brothers, Alvin [REED] and William [REED], are left to mourn their great loss. He was an honest and industrious young man, one who won the confidence and respect of those with whom he was associated.

Friday, March 13, 1914

Mrs. C. T. MINER, well known former resident of this city, died Wednesday at her home in Marion, Ind., and will be buried here Saturday at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Mrs. Miner is well known here and for years her husband, who died several years ago, conducted a blacksmith shop on east Seventh street. They were the parents of Mrs. Carrie DUDGEON, who lives in Toledo, Ohio. They have another daughter living in Erie, Penn.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Lucy MINER, mother, 1836-1914; C. T. MINER, father, 1832-1909; Mary MINER, wife of C. T., d. March 19, 1866, ae 30y-1m-1d]

Saturday, March 14, 1914

Word has been received here of the death in New York city, Thursday, of Harry FEDER, brother of Mrs. Ernestine HOLZMAN of this city, and of Lou FEDER of Cincinnati, formerly of FEDER and SILBERBERG, who had a clothing store here for years. Mr. Feder has been ill for some time. His sister, Mrs. Holzman, and her daughter, Mrs. Ida WOHLGEMUTH, who have made their home with him for some time, were with him when he died. The body will be cremated Sunday.

Monday, March 16, 1914

Four well known men of this county died Sunday. They are Samuel SMALLES, William OLIVER, Isaac BATZ and Thomas McPHERRON. All are past the sixty mark and Mr. Oliver and Mr. Smalles were veterans of the civil war.

Samuel SMALLES has been ill for some time and death came as a relief Sunday. He was past 74 years of age. For years Mr. Smalles made his home on his farm north of Rochester.

Isaac BATZ, 64 years old, died Sunday at his home near Leiters Ford, after an illness of three weeks. Death was caused by paralysis. Mr. Batz was a well known farmer of this county and leaves many friends. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at Talma. He leaves four children. Mr. Batz was a member of the Masonic lodge at Talma.

William OLIVER, one of the well known pioneer settlers of this section of the country, died Sunday morning at his home near Macy after a short illness. Mr. Oliver was past 79 years of age and was a veteran of the civil war. The funeral will be held at the home Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock.

Thomas McPHERRON died at his home five miles north of Rochester Sunday night. He was a middle aged man and leaves a large family and a wife. He was the son-in-law of William BIDDINGER, a well known farmer of near Rochester.

Tuesday, March 17, 1914

Charles F. BROWN, an aged former resident of this city, died Friday night in El Monte, Cal., and the body will be brought here for burial Thursday or Friday, according to word received here. Mr. Brown was well known here. He was the father of Dan BROWN, former Wells Fargo express agent, now living in Hammond.

Wednesday, March 18, 1914

David HOOVER, a member of the local G.A.R. and for 15 years a resident of this city, is dead. He died this morning at the home of his brother in Disko.
"Davy" as he was known to everyone was a familiar character on the streets of Rochester. For years he was porter at the Cottage and Grand hotels. Previous to that he worked several years at the local hospital where he took care of the furnaces. He was a likable old man and always had a pleasant word for everyone. It is thought that he was about 76 years old.
According to his comrades here, David Hoover was a good soldier and served three years in the civil war. He was a member of an Ohio company and several years ago wrote a history of his company which was published in book form. He was well educated, but during his declining years, was willing to do anything in the way of work. The local G.A.R. has made application recently to send him to the soldiers home and had filed the papers only last week. Little of his past life is known here except that his wife is dead and that he has a son living in Peru.

John BLACK, father of George BLACK of this city and of Mrs. Bruce LOWE, died this morning at his farm home south of Rochester. He was 76 years of age.
For 20 years Mr. Black was superintendent of the county farm where he made an excellent record. He was active in politics and worked hard for the democratic party throughout his life. The funeral will be held at the home Friday afternoon at one o'clock.

Thursday, March 19, 1914

An UNIDENTIFIED MAN was killed this afternoon at the Erie depot while trying to ride the rods on the express car on the east bound Erie train due here at 1:46. The man was horribly mangled and nothing was found upon his body to identify him.

The accident happened in full view of a number of people who were boarding the train. Those who saw it say the man crossed track number one and sided along the train to the express car. He then climbed upon the rods and in doing so slipped and fell to the track. The train was already in motion and before he could climb out from beneath, the wheels caught him. He was dragged for about thirty feet before the train could be stopped. The man was dead when picked up. Val Zimmerman's establishment was called and he was taken to the morgue where he was searched for any identification papers. None were found. His body was cut badly in several places exclusive of the main cut across the abdomen which ran the whole width of his body. His hands were also severly cut, he having evidently endeavored to grasp some object to protect himself from the wheels.
The man was seen by several people around town prior to the accident. Foster Haslett saw him in front of his packing house on north Main at about 12:00. He wore a dark gray coat with dark striped trousers and a black overcoat. He also had a redish mustache. The man was evidently between fifty and fifty-five years old.
No identification cards of any sort was found after a thorough search of the body, although the sum of $57.05 in silver and paper money was found on his body. A black cap was also picked up which evidently belonged to him.

Wm. GARVER died Tuesday of last week, at the home of his wife's sister in Plymouth. A large crowd attended the funeral at this place on Thursday. Burial was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery. The sorrowing relatives have the sympathy of this community. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

M. F. JENKINS and wife attended the funeral of his brother's wife at Star City, Wednesday. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Thomas McPHERRON, respected resident of the Sand Hill neighborhood, died at his home, Monday, March 16, aged 58 years. He leaves a wife, several small children, besides a host of friends and relatives to mourn his loss. Funeral will be held at Sand Hill Wednesday afternoon at ten o'clock. Burial at Reichter cemetery. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

Word was received here Saturday that Mrs. Daniel CONRAD's mother, Mrs. HUGHES of Argos, is dead. Funeral services were held Monday. - - - MT. ZION ITEMS.

Mrs. Jacob OVERMYER died Friday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Sarah MONGER, and she was buried Sunday in the Bruce Lake cemetery. Sympathy is extended the bereaved relatives. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Samuel Harrison SMAILES was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, June 7, 1839, and departed this life at Rochester, Ind., March 15, 1914, aged 74 years, 9 months and 8 days. When the civil war broke out, he was among the first to answer his county's call and went to the front as a member of company I, 97th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was in a number of important engagements, including Stone River, Peach Tree Creek and others, was with Sherman on his memorable march from "Atlanta to the Sea." After 3 months active service he received an honorable discharge and returned to his native state much broken in health. After recuperating a few years, he engaged in the mercantile business at New Moscow, Ohio, until 1881, when he lost all by fire. He came to Indiana and went into the fruit growing business at Pierceton and later at Rochester. As a young man, he united with the Methodist Episcopal church and later life with the

Presbyterian church under the pastorate of Rev. George A. HILL. He was an earnest, sincere believer in the Christian religion. As a parent and husband he was very patient and kind as a friend and neighbor, was seeking to bring comfort and happiness to those about him.
In the year 1868 he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth SPAYDE at Pierceton, Ind., who remained his faithful companion to the end. To this union were born 5 children, Mrs. Gemella HILL, Albert SMAILES, Frank SMAILES, Mrs. Ben RAICH, Mrs. Leo ZIMMERMAN. Four of whom are living. Frank Smailes having preceded him to the beyond at 9 years of age. Funeral at the residence Wednesday 2 p.m.

Susan JONES OVERMYER was born Nov. 22, 1830 on a farm near Marion, Ohio. She had two sisters and three brothers, one of whom, Zephaniah JONES, of Robinson, Kan., survives. When a small child, her parents moved to Indiana and settled on a farm just east of Kewanna. Here she grew to young womanhood.
In 1856 she was married to Jacob OVERMYER. They settled on a farm near Bruce Lake which they entered with the United States government in those early pioneer days of this state. Here they lived for 54 years. Her husband died 12 years ago. To this union were born 9 children, 2 of whom died in infancy. Those living are: Katherine HENDERSHOT of The Dalles, Oregon, Sarah MONGER, Harriett OSWALT, Frank OVERMYER, John OVERMYER, Schuyler OVERMYER and Mollie STROUP. There are 16 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren.
For the last 9 years Mrs. Overmyer made her home with her daughter in Delong.
She knew the hardships of those early pioneer days in raising a family and being a help and insipration to her husband. She was always a neighbor to all who ever came for help and was ready to care for the sick; she was a faithful mother as well as a kind neighbor. She united with the Methodist Episcopal church when but a little girl and lived a consistent Christian life all her days. During these last years she has been a member of the Methodist church in Delong.

The body of Charles BROWN was brought here today from California. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 10:00 in the Evangelical church. Burial will be made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Friday, March 20, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. Clark THOMPSON of Plymouth arrived this morning to attend the funeral of John BLACK.

Saturday, March 21, 1914

As the result of running a splinter into her hand which caused blood poisoning, Mrs. William EISENHOUR, of near Athens, died Friday evening at five o'clock.
The accident which caused her death happened two weeks ago. Blood poisoning set in last week. Besides her husband, she leaves one son, Ezra EISENHOUR, about 21 years of age. She was 56 years of age.

Charles N. STAHL of Culver died suddenly Wednesday morning at his home. He had just left his room, when he fell to the floor and expired almost instantly.

The funeral of Charles BROWN was held this morning at the Evangelical church. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, March 23, 1914

Harvey N. KEIM died this (Monday) morning at his home near Green Oak at the age of 38 years. The well known farmer passed away very unexpectedly. Strong and very healthy, the friends and family had little thought that he would be a victim of pneumonia which attacked him suddenly last Sunday evening. All that medical aid could do failed to bring relief. He leaves a wife and three children.
Mr. Keim had many friends as was testified today by the remarks of everyone who heard of his untimely death. For years he was connected with the Fulton County Horse Thief Detective Association and took a deep interest in the welfare of the Fulton County Fair Society. He was a progressive farmer and a good citizen. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isreal KEIM and two brothers, William [KEIM] and Chas. [KEIM], are living. He was a member of the Methodist church and the I.O.O.F. lodge.

Tuesday, March 24, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, March 25, 1914

T. J. RUSLER, 41, Erie conductor, well known here, was buried in Huntington Tuesday. Death Sunday followed an illness of two years with tuberculosis. He was forced to give up his work February 12, 1914, and since that time had gradually declined.
He had lived in Huntington about thirteen years, and during that time he was employed in train service by the Erie railroad. The wife and one son are dead. Five sons, William [RUSLER], George [RUSLER], Robert [RUSLER], Charles [RUSLER] and Herman [RUSLER], survive.

John C. WONDERLY, 23, son of Erie Engineer John WONDERLY, of Huntington, was also buried Tuesday, having died Sunday morning in Huntington. Death was caused by tuberculosis. The fatal ailment was contracted during services in the United States navy several years ago.

Mrs. Ed DITTON of Wawasee lake was buried Tuesday afternoon at Wabash, her death having occurred early Monday morning, after an illness of six months. She was the step-mother of Con DITTON of this city, and leaves besides her husband, a sister and a brother, both of whom reside in Marion.

Mrs. John SWIHART, 89, one of the oldest residents of Wabash county, who died Friday at the home of her daughter, north of North Manchester, was buried Sunday. She was the mother of Elias SWIHART of Akron and left six children besides him.

Thursday, March 26, 1914

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. Mary DUNLAP at the St. Joseph hospital, Fort Wayne Ind. Mrs. Dunlap is well known here, being the mother of Heber DUNLAP of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Dunlap went today to Fort Wayne, where the funeral will be held.

Those who attended the funeral of Thomas McPHERRON from a distance: Mr. and Mrs. Charles McPHERRON, Mishawaka; Mrs. John HENDERSON, Culver, Oscar McPHERRON, Mentone; Harry BIDDINGER, Missouri; Frank HOUGE, Cleveland; Silas McPHERRON, Joliet, Ill.; Frank BIDDINGER, Converse. - - - SAND HILL ITEMS.

Chas. EISENHOUR of Chicago was here, called on account of the death of his brother's wife, Mrs. Wm. EISENHOUR.
Oliver CURTIS and wife of Leiters attended the funeral Monday here of Mrs. Wm. EISENHOUR.
Uncle Will CURTIS of Rochester was here Monday attending the funeral of Mrs. Wm. EISENHOUR. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Something that not very often happens was on the 10th of February, Miss Annie CURTIS died on Saturday about 1:20, buried on Monday at 2, and now comes her half-sister, Mrs. EISENHOUR, died March 21, Saturday at 4:40 a.m., buried Monday at 2 p.m., same minister and same pall bearers and both out of same house here at Athens. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Art SMITH, 22 years old, son of Frank SMITH, was killed Wednesday by an accident in the Delp flour mill in Bourbon.

Friday, March 27, 1914

"Uncle Del" WARD, 86, is dead.
He passed away suddenly this (Friday) morning at 11:30 o'clock at the home of his son on Madison street.
He died as he had lived, without complaint, and his last words to his great-granddaughter, Henryietta WARD, were: "I am sick, but don't bother anyone." When Mrs. Ward arrived at his side he had passed away. Pursuing the usual program of the day, he arose this morning, fed his horses and went down to his office where he remained for several hours. Going back to the house, a distance of one block, he told his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Delmon WARD, about the death of old friend George PERSCHBACHER, remarked on other news, and went upstairs to his room. Taking off his boots he lay down on the bed to rest as he usually does at that time. A few minutes later, his granddaughter heard a peculiar noise and went up to his room. Before help could arrive the 86 years of a well spent life were ended.
William A. WARD was a native of New York state, the son of Ebenezer WARD, and moved to this county in 1831. His father at one time was one of the associate judges of the county and died in 1847. They came here when the Indian wigwam was the only sign of habitation and the country around was a pathless wilderness. Local residents have often heard "Uncle Del" tell about the last Indians. On January 3, 1853, he was married to Adeline H. HOWES, who died at the age of 55, 24 years ago. Several children were born to this union, of whom only one, Henry H.

WARD, survives. There is one grandson, Delmon WARD, of South Bend.
Mr. Ward was known before his death as the oldest liveryman in the state. At the age of 16 he entered the livery business here and up until five years ago was active in the business. For years he owned the barns now occupied by CLARY and ONSTOTT. He was better known over the county as a veterinary and as the result of his years of experience and knowledge was an expert in regard to diseases peculiar to horses and cattle. He was a Mason, a life long democrat. He served as county sheriff 1876-8.
There are no funeral arrangements yet.

A county pioneer turned his face to the wall at 5:30 o'clock this (Friday) morning, when George PERSCHBACHER, aged 80 years, passed away at his home, 306 W. Ninth Street, after an illness of nearly three months. Members of the immediate family were at his bedside when he died.
Mr. Perschbacher, who up until the first of the year, had been active for a man of his age, was taken ill about New Years, and grew steadily worse. Hardening of the arteries and senility, physicians say, caused his death which had been expected for several days. He was rational only at times, but recognized his near relatives before he died.
In politics, Mr. Perschbacher was a democrat; in religion as Evangelical Lutheran, having been baptized when he was born and confirmed at his farm home by Rev. STURKEN in 1857. He was one of the promoters of the Fulton County Agricultural and Mechanical Society and was active in all other ventures with which he was connected.
George Perschbacher was born near Baltimore, Md., July 7, 1833, of parents, Mr. and Mrs. John George PERSCHBACHER, who had removed to this country from Germany, arriving in port just two days before the birth of the son. The next year, the family located in York county, Pennsylvania, and in 1839 immigrated to Wayne county, Indiana, thence to this county in 1845. The father died in March, 1886, and the mother in April, 1881. They were the parents of nine children, of whom George was the fourth.
George made all the changes of location with his parents, being under 13 when they came to this county. His early life was spent on his father's farm. He improved his opportunities at school, excelled in his studies, and became one of the leading teachers of his day, occupying that position for four consecutive terms. In his fifth year, he was united in marriage to Miss Jane WRIGHT, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James WRIGHT, April 2, 1857. She was born July 2, 1837, and was the first white child to see the light of day in Newcastle township.
After his marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Perschbacher located on his farm of 120 acres, lying six miles northeast of the city, and began to improve their home. He felled much timber, bought and sold stock and by dint of hard work increased his holdings to 640 acres, and made his farm one of the most beautiful in the county. In the fall of 1872, he was elected county assessor and land appraiser, holding the office for two years.
Mrs. Perschbacher died Feb. 3, 1887, at the farm home. She was the mother of seven children, all of whom, save one, Catherine [PERSCHBACHER], are living. On March 10, 1891, Mr. Perschbacher married Mrs. Martha J. PLANK, widow of Dr. A. K. PLANK. They moved to Rochester in the fall of that year and have lived here ever since.
There survive, besides the wife, a brother, Jacob PERSCHBACHER, 75, of this city; a sister, Mrs. Eva C. REED, 71, of Tiosa; the children, Mrs. Ed BAIR of Tiosa; Mrs. George KILER, who lives northwest of the city; Mrs. O. HAIMBAUGH, of Mentone; Mrs. C. D. SHOBE of this city; Miles W. [PERSCHBACHER], who lives on the home place; and Mrs. Wylie BONINE of this city; and many other relatives.

The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at two o'clock in the Presbyterian church, of this city, Rev. GERBERDING officiating, assisted by Rev. STEWART and Rev. HANN. Interment in the Reichter cemetery.
The family has requested that no floral offerings be sent.

Harboring the delusion that he had little to live for, Elmore DAVIS, age 61, and a bachelor, committed suicide this morning, at three o'clock, using a shot gun, the load tearing away the top of his head. The act was committed in the store room on College Ave., just one door south of the residence of his brother, Columbus DAVIS, who heard the shot.
The family can give no motive for the act, but think from the remarks that he made during the past few days that he premeditated suicice. For the last two months, Mr. Davis made his home with his brother, coming here from Oklahoma, where he has been for the past 12 years and where he proved 160 acres of government land.
Arriving here in the winter, he worked around the house and seemed contented until the last few days, when he made the remark that he had little to live for. Thursday he asked the family if his nephew, Edward DAVIS, who had been sleeping with him and who was then working in the country, would be home that night. He was told that he was going to stay at the farm.
Three o'clock this morning Columbus Davis heard a shot and getting out of bed saw a light in a ngighbor's house, which led him to believe that they were responsible for the noise. When breakfast was ready, he went over to the store to call his brother and then found the door locked to the room where he had been sleeping. Going down stairs he met a neighbor and together they forced the door. It was evident that the man met his death instantly. He lay on the bed partly undressed and with the gun still clasped in his hands.
Elmore Davis was a son of Absolem DAVIS and was born on a farm near Akron. He followed farming all his life. He leaves three brothers, Columbus of this city, John [DAVIS] and Schuyler [DAVIS] of Akron, three sisters, Margaret E. MORGAN of Akron, Mrs. Cecilia WHITE of Canton, Ohio, and Mary MULL, who lives in California.

Saturday, March 28, 1914

The funeral of William HATTERY, for years a Longcliff inmate, was held at Akron, Thursday. Hattery died at the asylum on Tuesday.

A telegram was received here this morning from Quebec, Canada, telling of the death of Mrs. Charles HAGAN, age 33, daughter-in-law of John HAGAN, of this city. The body will arrive here Monday and the funeral will take place in South Bend, Tuesday.
Mrs Nellie HAGAN was the wife of Charles HAGAN who went to Canada eight years ago where he is employed by the Singer Sewing Machine Co. The couple was married in South Bend, the home of Mrs. Hagan, about four years ago. Her mother is living in that city. Mrs. Hagan's death was caused by typhoid fever.

After hearing the evidence County Coroner LOUGH returned a verdict of suicide in he case of Elmore DAVIS who killed himself with a shot gun Thursday morning. The funeral will be held Sunday morning at Omega church, near Akron. The procession will leave the home at ten o'clock.

Death came Tuesday night to Edward HYDE, 75, well known farmer living just north of Kewanna. Mr. Hyde has been in poor health for some time and last Saturday was taken critically ill with heart trouble.

The funeral of Uncle Del WARD will be held at the house Sunday afternoon. Rev. G. C. CHANDLER, of the Baptist church, will conduct the services and the Masonic lodge here will have charge.

Mrs. Cruly EISENHOUR was born in Fulton county, Ind., Aug. 25, 1856. Departed this life March 21, 1914, at her home in Athens, Ind., age 57 years, 6 months, 20 days. She leaves to mourn her departure 3 brothers, 1 sister, a husband and an only son, besides many friends and relatives. She was united in marriage with Mr. William EISENHOUR April 3, 1888, in Fulton county, where she resided until her death. A father and mother, 5 sisters and 2 brothers have preceded her to the spirit world. She was a faithful companion, a loving mother and a good neighbor. A vacancy will be in the lives of those who know her. . . . .
Funeral service held at Mt. Hope U. B. church, March 23, 1914. Sermon by Rev. J. O. TODD. Interment at Hoover cemetery.

Isaac BATZ, son of Reuben and Anna BATZ, was born in Fulton county near Talma, April 28, 1849, and departed this life Sunday, March 15, 1914, aged 64 years, 11 months and 17 days. He leaves to mourn his departure two brothers, Henry [BATZ] and Reuben [BATZ] of near Talma, and five sisters, Mrs. Catherine LARGE, Rochester; Mrs. Sarah KESLER, Herbst, Ind.; Mrs. Anna GOODMAN, Mentone, Ind.; Mrs. Clara GROVE, Alden, Mich.; and Mrs. Lizzie THOMAS, Marion, Ind. One sister, Mrs. Ellen WINDBIGLER, of Kansas, died about four years ago, and one brother, William [BATZ], died in infancy. He also leaves four children, ten grandchildren and many relatives and friends.
He was united in marriage to Eliza KESSLER July 23, 1876, and to this union were born six children, Gano [BATZ], Fred [BATZ], Maude [BATZ], Verda [BATZ], Mary [BATZ], and Myrtle [BATZ]. Verda and Myrtle died in infancy. His wife died March 30, 1888.
He was a member of the Masonic lodge and in the year 1878 united with the Yellow Creek Baptist church and held his membership there until death. At the time of his death he was living with his son and daughter, Gano and Mary, his one aim in life being to keep his children together. The funeral was conducted at the Christian church in Talma by Rev. F. B. NAFE, and the body was laid to rest in the Sycamore cemetery.

Monday, March 30, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Charles W. HAGAN, who died in Canada last week, will be held at the Evangelical church Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock, Rev. BAUMGARDNER in charge. Burial will take place at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The last rites over the body of William A. WARD, who died Friday, were held Sunday afternoon at three o'clock at the home. The Masonic lodge had charge of the services. Friends and relatives from over the state were present.

The funeral of George PERSCHBACHER was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Presbyterian church. Burial at Reichter cemetery. Many relatives and friends from out of town attended.

Charles ZOLMAN, 39, a well known farmer who lived near the Christian church, at Talma, passed away Sunday night at midnight, after an illness which has extended over two years, but which has only been serious for the past week. His disease was pernicious anemia.
He was born in 1875, and was one of the five surviving children of Mr. and Mrs. John ZOLMAN, who lived in the Talma neighborhood. Practically his entire life was spent on a farm. His father died in 1910, but his mother, Mrs. Susan TOWNSEND, survives. He also leaves a wife and one son, Lloyd [ZOLMAN], aged 14 years. The brothers living are Willard [ZOLMAN] of Warsaw, and Oliver [ZOLMAN] and Dallas [ZOLMAN] of Talma; and the sister is Mrs. Harley KOCHENDERFER.
The funeral will take place at the Christian church at Talma, Wednesday, at 11 a.m. Rev McNEELEY, of Tiosa, will officiate.
Del HUDKINS, a neighbor of the deceased, is reported seriously ill with dropsy.

John McMAHAN, aged 92 years, a retired farmer and one of the oldest citizens in Miami county, is dead at Peru.

The appearance of a heretofore unheard of daughter of the late William SURGUY, veteran, threatens to cause a law suit over his estate.
The woman appeared Sunday evening, giving her name as Mrs. Wilda KRUSE of Port Mitchell, Ind. She is 41 years old and is married, having several children. Mrs. Kruse claims to be the daughter of the first wife of William SURGUY, a blind soldier, who formerly lived on south Jefferson St. She says she was born in Port Mitchell, that her parents were divorced before she was five years old, and that she remained with her mother.
Mr. Surguy, she says, then moved to Rochester and married for the second time. His second wife died, however, before he did. Surguy died about 13 months ago and Mrs. Kruse claims that she was not informed of the death of her father until three weeks ago. She went to Meyers and Emmons with her case and they are investigating her claims to the estate. Surguy owned two houses in the south part of the city and one on Fourth street. He also had considerable money as he drew a large pension.
The relatives of William Surguy in this city deny that the woman is any relative of his, claiming that he never had a daughter. Mrs. Kruse however says that she has been here several times to visit her father. It is probable that the matter will be taken into court.

Mrs. Samuel BADER of Basil, Ohio, arrived this morning to attend the funeral of her niece, Mrs. Charles HAGAN.

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton AUGHINBAUGH will attend the funeral of an aunt, Mrs. Lucy KRASHER, in North Manchester.

Tuesday, March 31, 1914

Mrs. Dorothy P. STEVENS of Mentone died Sunday at midnight at the Stevens residence. The deceased was aged 67 years.

Wednesday, April 1, 1914

Lyman HATCH, a well known farmer died at Macy Monday. Mr. Hatch was one of the pioneers of the north part of Miami county and enjoyed an extensive acquaitance.

Word has been received here of the death on March 16, of Margaret [MacFADDEN], wife of George W. MacFADDEN of Oak Park, Ill. She was a Christian, happy, hopeful, entertaining, comforting the needy, a brilliant writer and a sincere friend. Her childhood was spent in Rochester where she has many friends and relatives who mourn their loss.

Thursday, April 2, 1914

UNIDENTIFIED MAN BURIED
The man killed about two weeks ago by the east bound Erie passenger train was buried this afternoon in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. A short service was held over the body at the cemetery, Rev. STEWART of the Presbyterian church presiding. The money found on the man was used for the purchase of the lot and undertaker's expenses. The body has been held longer than usual but there has been no clue given as to his identity and the headstone was marked Unknown.

Elmore DAVIS, son of Absolom and Priscilla DAVIS, was born in Fulton county, Ind., March 7, 1853, departed this life March 27, 1914, age 61 years, 20 days. He was honest and upright in all his dealings with his fellowmen. About 15 years ago he went to Oklahoma where he lived until about one year ago, when he returned to Indiana and remained until his death. He leaves to mourn his departure three brothers, three sisters, and a host of relatives and friends. Funeral services were held at Omega, March 29, 1914, 11:30 a.m. Rev. J. O. TODD of the U. B. church in charge. Interment at Omega cemetery.

Friday, April 3, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, April 4, 1914

Frederick NEFF, 89 years old, died at his home on east 8th street early this (Saturday) morning. Mr. Neff has been ill for some time and the cause of his death was advanced old age. He was the oldest man in the city and one of the oldest in the county.
Frederick Neff was born in Williamsport, Pa., October 15, 1825, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick NEFF. He lived in Williamsport until 1885, when he moved to Indiana, finally settling in Rochester. He was married in 1852 to Mrs. Sarah HITE, also of Williamsport. She moved here with her husband and died in 1899. Mr. Neff was a veteran of the Civil war having seen service in many important engagements. While residing here he ran a small repair shop back of his home. He was the father of four children, three of whom are dead, leaving the oldest son, George [NEFF], who runs the shop.
The funeral service will be held at the home Monday afternoon, Rev. BAUMGARTNER of the Evangelical church, officiating. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. John J. KUBLEY, age 74, who died last Thursday, was held at Talma this afternoon, Saturday. Burial took place at the Reichter cemetery. Mrs. Kubley leaves five children. Her death was caused by pneumonia.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Reichter Cemetery, Newcastle Twp.: Charlotte KUBLEY, mother, Apr. 20, 1839 - Apr 1, 1914; J. Jacob KUBLEY, 1837-1919]

Special to the Sentinel
Lyman HATCH departed this life at his home in Macy Monday morning at 4:30 o'clock, aged about 70 years. During the civil war he served as a private in the 12th Infantry in the regular army. Most of his life was spent in farming until three years ago he moved to town, where his home has been made since. He was of a kindly disposition, having a pleasant smile for all who knew him, and will be sadly missed by a large circle of friends. He leaves two sons, Harry HATCH, of north of town, and Grant HATCH of Hammond, one daughter, Mrs. Daisy ENGLISH, of Indianapolis, and a number of grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at the Christian church Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Chas. ZOLMAN, of Talma, died Monday morning of tuberculosis. The funeral will take place Wednesday at 11 o'clock in the Christian church at Talma, conducted by Rev. McNEELY. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Monday, April 6, 1914

Mrs. William REID, wife of William REID, a prominent retired farmer of this county, died in Logansport Sunday while visiting relatives there. Mrs. Reid has been ill for some time but it is thought that heart failure was the direct cause of her death.
Little could be learned of Mrs. Reid's obituary, she having no children and Mr. Reid being in Longcliff. The nearest relative the couple have is a sister of Mr. Reid. Mr. and Mrs. Reid came here about 10 years ago, moving from a large farm west of the city. Since then they have resided in the north part of Rochester, Mr. Reid having been caretaker of the Citizens cemetery. The body of Mrs. Reid will be brought here from Logansport Tuesday. The funeral will be held Wednesday and burial will be made in the Citizens cemetery.

Mary Barbara KRAUSE was born March 25, 1836, and died April 1, 1914. She was born in Wurtenberg, Germany. At 15 years of age she came to the United States with her parents and settled in Schuylkill county, Pa. In 1855 she was married to Louis BIRNER, who died 1870. This union was blessed with four sons and one daughter, who are living. In 1891 she married Jacob PETRY of Beaver Dam, who died 17 years ago. She is survived by her four brothers, Mike KRAUSE of Oklahoma; Leonard KRAUSE, of Kansas; Adam [KRAUSE] and Will KRAUSE, of New york; and one sister, Mrs. Emma TUCKER. She was a faithful Christian and died in the faith. Funeral services were held at the Akron M.E. church, Saturday, April 4, 1914. Rev. J. O. TODD in charge. The body was sent to Pennsylvania for burial.

Tuesday, April 7, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. William REID will take place at the Presbyterian church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. George HILL, of Chicago, former Rochester pastor, assisted by Rev. S. A. STEWART, being in charge. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: William P. REID, 1839-1916; Salina REID, his wife, 1848-1914]

The funeral services over the body of the late Mrs. John (Sarah) STAMM, which were held at the Pleasant Hill Evangelical church, west of the city, Sunday, with interment in the cemetery adjoining, marked the passing of another of the county's aged residents. Rev. C. W. SCHEMMER officiated.
Sarah CRITES, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry CRITES, was born Dec. 26, 1841, in Wyandotte county, Ohio, and passed away April 2nd, 1914, at Lake Bruce, Ind., age 72 years, 3 months, 7 days.
She was married to Wm. H. CONE, March 4th, 1859, there being two sons and one daughter: Franklin CONE, now of Hammond, Ind.; John Wesley [CONE] and Elizabeth Ann [CONE], having preceded her in death. Mr. Cone enlisted in the three months service of the Civil war in 1861. He returned wounded, later re-enlisted for three years and rose to the rank of second lieutenant. He was mortally wounded, in the battle at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., June 22, 1864. On Oct. 28, 1866, she was united in marriage with John H. STAMM, of Winamac. This union was blessed with six children, namely: Mrs. Luetta D. WISE; John [STAMM], of Hanna, Ind.; Jessie M. STAMM, Kewanna, Ind., and Albert N. STAMM of South Bend, Ind., Mary Ella [STAMM], William U. [STAMM] and Jacob S. [STAMM], deceased. She leaves her husband, four children, twelve grandchildren, two step-sons, Emanuel [STAMM] and John STAMM of Topeka, Kan.; two sisters, Mrs. Mary A. CAREY of Winamac, and Mrs. Hannah STERLING of Ohio, and Miss Mae CLARK, whom she raised from childhood, besides many relatives and friends.
At the age of thirteen she united with the church of the Evangelical Association, in Ohio, and on moving to this community about forty-five years ago, placed her membership with the church now known as Pleasant Hill, of which she remained a devoted and faithful member. She began to fail in health over four years ago, and since last October had been confined to her bed continuously, death resulting from chronic bronchial and lung trouble. Mrs. Stamm was a faithful wife, devoted to her husband, home and children, carrying with her always the beautiful Christian attitude toward all she met.
Those from a distance attending the funeral were Albert WIESJOHN and family of Hanna, Ind., Miss Dessie WIESHOHN of Purdue University, Albert STAMM and family, South Bend, B. F. CONE and wife, Hammond, Earl CONE, Spring Harbor, Mich., and other relatives from Winamac, Culver, Akron, Fulton, Logansport, Hammond, Lawton and Beardstown.

Wednesday, April 8, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, April 9, 1914

Mrs. P. J. STINGLY received word this morning that her niece, Mrs. Jessie SNYDER, of Converse, died Wednesday night in a hospital in Logansport following an operation. Mrs. Snyder was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Boyd EIKLEBERNER, south of Royal Center, and the funeral will be held at their home. The Stinglys will attend. Mrs. Snyder was the wife of a veterinary surgeon.

Friday, April 10, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. Charles BROCKEY and children returned to their home in South Bend after attending the funeral of Charles ZOLMAN. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. MULLICAN received a message Saturday from Dr. and Mrs. O. W. DARNELL, in Sumner Iowa, that their little son, Russell [DARNELL], was dying. Mr. Mullican left that afternoon for the home of his daughter, where he will stay several weeks before returning. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Morris RUNNELLS of Plymouth, Allie BRUBAKER and Elizabeth HOOVER of Rochester, Mrs. Tonie ZIMMERLY of Huntington and Alden CLOUD of Peru, attended the funeral of Mrs. STETSON, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lewis FOOR last week. Mentone Gazette.

Mr. and Mrs. Lee MOORE went to Culver Sunday to attend the funeral of a relative. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Saturday, April 11, 1914

Mrs. Belle POFFENBARGER, wife of Clarence POFFENBARGER who lived near Germany, died Friday afternoon after an illness of several months. Death was caused by tuberculosis.
Mr. and Mrs. Poffenbarger were married a year ago last November and were the parents of one child. She leaves two sisters, Mrs. Jennie SHEETS, who lives near Rochester, and Mrs. Nellie JACKSON of South Bend. Her parents are dead. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at Leiters Ford.

Monday, April 13, 1914

For the second time in six weeks death called at the home of Charles REED in East Rochester, Sunday, when the 15 year old daughter, Lucile [REED], was stricken with the same disease that caused her brother's death on March 3rd.
The attending physicians are mystified by the symptoms of the malady which brought death so quickly. The young girl attended school last Monday and was taken sick on Tuesday. Physicians were called and pronounced the trouble tonsilitis. She became steadily worse, the throat swelling until the patient could hardly swallow. Sunday morning at one o'clock she passed away.
George REED, the brother, died under the same circumstances six weeks ago and the state pathologists at Indianapolis who tested the culture from his throat, said that he was not afflicted with diphtheria. Another sister took sick shortly after her brother's death, but was quickly cured. No quarantine has been established, although one of the attending physicians is now of the opinion that the disease is diphtheria and that the men in Indianapolis who tested the culture were mistaken.
Mr. and Mrs. REED are prostrated with the death of the second child. They have four remaining, two girls and two boys.
Lucile Catherine REED was born May 14, 1899, the daughter of Charles and Catherine REED. The funeral will be held at the residence Tuesday at two o'clock.

Mrs. Salina REID, wife of W. P. REID, died Sunday at 12 o'clock at her sister's home, Mrs. N. J. FRY, in Indianapolis, aged 66 years, 2 months and 8 days. She was born in Stark county, Ohio. She moved to Cass county with her father and mother, John and Sara TILTON, when 3 years old. She was united in marriage to W. P. REID in 1878. She was buried in I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester.

Tuesday, April 14, 1914

Silver Lake, Ind., April 14 -- Monroe KREITER, age 75, is dead, following a sickness of ten years. He was a veteran of the civil war, serving in Company L, Twelfth Indiana volunteer infantry. He suffered a stroke of paralysis five years ago. A widow, two sons and four daughters survive.

Wednesday, April 15, 1914 to Thursday, April 16, 1914

[no obits]

Friday, April 17, 1914

Joseph MOSS, of Tiosa, this (Thursday) morning, received word of the death of his mother, Mrs. Catherine MOSS, aged 90 years, on the old home farm, west of Denver. Demise was caused by heart disease and dropsy. There are six children living, the father having died 20 years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Moss and daughter went to Denver at once.

Saturday, April 18, 1914

Special to the Sentinel
Kewanna, Ind., Apr. 18 -- Mrs. Martha E. WILEY, one of the oldest inhabitants of Fulton county, is dead at her home here. She would have been 93 years old, had she lived until August. Senility caused her demise.
For years, Mrs. Wiley lived on a farm west of town, but more recently moved here. She has been a widow for 37 years. She has been feeble, an attendant being with her most of the time. The end came Thursday afternoon. She leaves but two children, both sons, Harvey [WILEY], of South Dakota, and William [WILEY], of Valparaiso. There are many surviving relatives.
The funeral will be held Sunday in the Christian church of which she was for years a member. Burial in the old Presbyterian cemetery, west of town.

Monday, April 20, 1914

The following story related by Francis LOUDERBACK, shows how unexpectedly one man lost his life in Mud Lake near Macy:
"About 26 years ago, on the same Sunday that Frank TAYLOR of this city, broke his neck, after jumping from a springing board, Elleson STUDEBAKER of Fulton and I drove to Mud Lake to spend Sunday. Getting a boat we rowed out into the center of the lake to go in swimming. After undressing I let myself down into the water. My friend took a header across the end of the boat, shoving it for several rods. Suddenly from out of a clear sky a stiff breeze sprung up taking my boat toward the shore at a rapid pace. We were poor swimmers and realized our danger in the deep

water, started after the runaway craft. But the boat kept gaining on us and after what seemed to me a century, I spied a stake, but on letting my weight on it, the pole sank into the mud. Studebaker by this time was nearly exhausted and I was about in the same condition. The boat had reached the shore, a distance of one mile and our only hope lay in being able to reach shallow water.
Suddenly, as it seemed, I gave up and the only thing that saved my life was the depth of the water. I could just touch the ground with the tips of my toes. Wading out I quickly reached the shore. Studebaker was not so fortunate. He cried for help and I made a wild scramble along the beach trying to find a board. Nothing of the kind could be found and running back in the water, I saw my friend go down for the first time. Without another cry he came up twice again and then sank for the last time. As my clothes were in the boat which had landed at the extreme end of the lake I ran through the brush, regardless of the scratches. At last help was secured and about two hours after, the body was found. Never again will I jump from a boat which is not anchored."

Tuesday, April 21, 1914 to Wednesday, April 22, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, April 23, 1914

Frank LOUDERBACK, 62, of east 9th street, died at his home Wednesday evening. Cancer of the liver was the cause of his death, he having been a sufferer from the disease for over 10 years. The attack which culminated in his death began last November.
Frank Louderback was born near Fulton, Fulton county, Indiana, July 24, 1852. He resided on a farm until 1880, when he moved to this city where he has lived ever since. He was united in marriage in 1876 to Martha EVANS of Cass county, who survives, and was the father of three sons, all of whom are living. They are William A. [LOUDERBACK], John H. [LOUDERBACK] and Glen M. [LOUDERBACK]. Mr. Louderback was long the custodian of the Methodist church of this city and held responsible positions with S. P. Bailey Lumber Co., and B. F. Noftsger elevator. He was a member of the Rochester Order of Red Men.
Complete funeral arrangements have not yet been made, awaiting the arrival of his son, William, from Oakland, Cal. The services will be held however in the Methodist church and the Red Men will have charge.

The body of David Mead KINGERY, who died in Logansport at midnight Tuesday at the age of 41 years, will be brought here Friday for burial. Bright's disease was the cause of his death. The final services will be held Friday afternoon at Hoover's chapel. Rev. S. A. STEWART will have charge.
Deceased was born in 1875 and had been a barber all his life, working in Rochester many years. Several years ago he went to Leiters where he conducted a shop for some time, later going to Logansport where the end came. He was married three times, his wives being Grace OLINGER of Mexico, Daisy MOON of Logansport and Mrs. Anna HORN of this city. He was divorced from the first two. There also survive his mother, Mrs. Anna KINGERY, and two sisters, Mrs. Robt. HOOVER of Weyerhauser, Wis., and Mrs. Minnie OSBORNE, of Hammond. Mrs. Percy HAWKINS of this city is a sister-in-law.

Friday, April 24, 1914

Joe MANS and wife went to Mexico Saturday where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Mans' mother. She was 89 years of age. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

Mrs. Metta HOOVER and Mrs. Minna OSBORNE arrived this morning to attend the funeral of Mead KINGERY.

The funeral of Mead KINGERY was held this afternoon at two o'clock at Hoover's chapel. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Peter THORSTENSON went to Illinois today where they will attend the funeral of Mrs. Thorstensen's sister. They will return Sunday.

Saturday, April 25, 1914

Mrs. J. N. TURNER, a resident of this township who lives west of Rochester, died Friday night. Death was due to complications following childbirth. The child was born last Wednesday and is living.
Mr. and Mrs. Turner moved to this county from Floyd Knobs, Indiana, recently, and located on the farm formerly owned by Masteller. The body will be taken there for burial Sunday.

Rufus BLAIR, an aged resident of Kewanna, died Friday at his home in Kewanna. He was the father of Mrs. George RALSTON of Kewanna and Noah BLAIR, operator at Delong. The funeral will be held Sunday, it is thought.

The funeral of Mrs. Henderson BALL, 89, who died at Akron Thursday was held there today, a large crowd attending. Senility was the cause of her death. She was the mother of 13 children, 10 of whom are living. She was the mother-in-law of A. A. GAST.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Freela BALL, July 1, 1824 - Apr 23, 1914; H. W. BALL, Nov 28, 1822 - Jan 3, 1911, both buried in the Gast Mausoleum]

Monday, April 27, 1914 to Tuesday, April 28, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, April 29, 1914

John SHILLING, of Chili, father of Abe SHILLING, for most of his lifetime a resident of Peru, died late Saturday afternoon of pneumonia and asthma. The funeral was held Monday afternoon at Chili.

Word was received today announcing the death of O. E. OXER of Greenfield, Ind., a brother-in-law to C. V. LEONARD of this city. Mr. Oxer has often visited in this city. Mrs. Leonard is in Greenfield at present and George DAWSON, Mr. and Mrs. John HOLMAN and Mr. Leonard expect to attend the funeral which will be held Friday.

Thursday, April 30, 1914

Delmar HUDKINS, a well known farmer living near Talma, died this (Thursday) morning at six o'clock, after a long illness. His death was caused by dropsy.
Born and raised in the vicinity of Talma, Mr. Hudkins had many friends and had the reputation of being a fair and square citizen. His untimely death at the age of 41 is the cause of much regret.
Mr. Hudkins leaves a wife and two children. Three brothers and three sisters, also survive. Lon HUDKINS of Tennessee, Jud HUDKINS of near Kewanna, one brother living in South Dakota, Ella HUDKINS of Kewanna, Mrs. Alice STUBBS of near Kewanna and Mrs. Cora RICHARDSON of the state of Washington. Mr. Hudkins was a member of the Odd Fellows lodge and of the Christian church. The funeral will be held Saturday.

Mrs. Christena HARTER, the mother of John [HARTER] and David HARTER, is dead at the home of her son, John Harter, near Akron. She was 86 years of age. Her death was due to paralysis. She has been an invalid for over four years. Mrs. Harter was born in Germany and came to this country when she was eight years old. Mr. Harter [John HARTER] died in 1904. Mrs. Harter was a member of the German Lutheran church. David Harter now lives in Canada and will not be home for the funeral.

Friday, May 1, 1914

Jackson WAGONER, 71, died at his home west of the fair grounds about 10 p.m. Thursday. Mr. Wagoner has been ill for some time with cancer of the liver, and failed rapidly in the past week.
Mr. Wagoner was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, his parents being Jacob and Rebecca WAGONER. The family moved to this county in 1849 and he had lived here ever since. He lived for a long time on his farm north of Leiters Ford and also for a short time south of Fulton. He then moved to his present home.
Mr. Wagoner was married in 1868 to Mary HOOD of Kosciusko county. He leaves besides his wife and 11 children, a sister and four brothers. The body will be buried at Leiters Ford, but further funeral arrangements have not yet been completed.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur BARNES left Saturday for their home in Michigan, after attending the funeral of their sister, Mrs. Elizabeth CARROTHERS. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. B. BUSSART and family, Mr. and Mrs. BIDWELL and Miss Ruth FOSTER of South Bend, came Saturday evening to attend the funeral of their uncle, Job DENY of this place. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

Saturday, May 2, 1914

Robert LOWRY, ex-county auditor, died in South Bend this morning where he has lived for the past five years.
Mr. Lowry was well known here. For several years after retiring from office he conducted a grocery store on north Main street. After leaving Rochester he and his daughter, Alice [LOWRY], settled in South Bend where he worked for the Birdsall Wagon company. On taking office here Mr. Lowry was the owner of a big farm and other property, but in the ten years that followed lost

everything. He was a good fellow and generous to the last degree.
Mrs. Lowry died in Rochester several years ago. There are three children, Miss Alice LOWRY, Mrs. Michael COURTAD and Robert LOWRY. The body will be brought here Monday for burial.

Mrs. Marie NELSON, widow of William NELSON, died this morning (Saturday) at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred SWICK, in Mentone. Death was caused by apoplexy. Mrs. Nelson was the mother of 13 children, all of whom are well known in Rochester and Fulton county. She was past 77 years of age.
Mrs. Nelson was a splendid type of the pioneer woman who helped to make this country what it is today. Her life was spent on the large Nelson farm which lies between Akron and Mentone. Here the family was raised, only one of them being dead, Mrs. Philip BRYANT, who lived near Athens. Mr. Nelson has been dead for 20 years. After the children left home Mrs. Nelsn moved to the home of her daughter, where she died.
Twelve children are living. They are, Allen NELSON, Frank NELSON, of Galveston, Texas; Samuel NELSON, Thomas NELSON, Riley NELSON, Ora NELSON, of Logansport; Mrs. Lilly HAGAN, Mrs. Mary SARBER, Mrs. Fred SWICK, Mrs. Corey FARRY, of Texas, and Mrs. John NELLANS.

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. V. DAWSON returned today from Dayton. Mr. and Mrs. Clem LEONARD returned with them. All had attended the funeral of O. E. OXER, who died recently at Greenfield, Ind. Mr. and Mrs. John HOLMAN returned last night.

Monday, May 4, 1914

Francis P. WAUGH, 88 years old, a former merchant in this county, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. J. HAIMBAUGH this (Monday) morning at 4:30 o'clock. Mr. Waugh had been failing for some time.
Mr. Waugh was well known over this and surrounding counties. For years he was in business, first at Talma and later conducted stores in Tiosa, Bourbon, Leiters Ford, Sidney and Ora. He was a good citizen in business and a Baptist in religion. Mr. Waugh moved to Indiana from Pennsylvania, where he was born, when he was about 44 years old. Previous to that time he lived on a farm. Mrs. Waugh died about 10 years ago. Two children are living, Mrs. A. J. HAIMBAUGH, who lives south of Rochester, and Mrs. Linnie MITCHELL, of Chicago.
The funeral will be held Wednesday at the home of A. J. HAIMBAUGH.

Mr. and Mrs. James COPLEN attended the funeral today of Maria NELSON, who died Friday night at Mentone.

Tuesday, May 5, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Henry MYERS, who died Monday, will be held at the home on west Fourth street, Wednesday afternoon.

Wednesday, May 6, 1914

John DEMSEY, son of Wm. and Mary DEMSEY, was born in Randolph county, Ind., Oct 20, 1848. He was one of a family of eight children, five sons and three daughters. He spent most of his life in the country where he was born. He was united in marriage to Alice JAMISON in the year 1870. To this union were born eight children, five sons and three daughters. The wife passed away to the spirit world in December, 1905, also two children while they were very young. Since the death of his wife, Mr. Demsey has made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Ottaway WHITTAKER, of Bicknell, Ind.
Mr. Demsey was a good neighbor and honest in all his dealings with his fellow men. Of the family of which he was a member, the father, mother and three brothers, George [DEMSEY], James [DEMSEY] and Daniel [DEMSEY], preceded him to the spirit world, leaving one brother, John W. DEMSEY of Wyoming, Mrs. Jane GRAY of Losantville, Ind., Mrs. Nancy STRAHAN of Muncie, Ind., and Mrs. Sarah FOSTER of Tiosa, Ind. Of his own family, he leaves three sons, David P. [DEMSEY] and Harry [DEMSEY], of Winchester, Ind., Charles [DEMSEY] of Danville, Ill, and John W. [DEMSEY] of San Francisco, Calif. Also two daughters, Mrs. Ottaway WHITTAKER and Miss Edith DEMSEY of Bicknell, Ind. He died at the home of his sister, Mrs. Sarah FOSTER in Tiosa, Ind, April 24, 1914, after a very short illness of pneumonia, aged 65 years, 6 months and 4 days. His acquaintance here was very limited, but the writer's understanding is that he leaves many friends near his home with his relatives to mourn his loss. Relatives and friends did all they could to relieve and help him, but to no avail. So we leave him in the hands of God. Funeral services were held at the Christian church Monday at one o'clock, conducted by Rev. McNEELY, burial in the Reichter cemetery.

Thursday, May 7, 1914

Sam ROKONIC, who had both legs cut off by an Erie freight in the local yards Wednesday, died at the Woodlawn hospital late Wednesday evening. He was buried at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Rokonic, who had been employed by the Douglas-Head company, had some money coming for his work which helped to pay the funeral expenses. His friends in the camp donated the balance. He had been in this country five years and is a native of Bulgaria. Rokonic is one of he unfotunate foreign laborers who are killed in this country every year while emloyed in construction work. Within the last year many have met death on the Erie while the double tracking was in progress.

L. C. SROUFE, a prominent and well to do farmer living north of Macy two miles, died at his home Wednesday morning.
He was a deacon in the Christian church at Macy. He leaves a wife, one daughter, Mrs. James SAVAGE, of Montana, one son, Scott SROUFE, 5 grandchildren, Ronald [SAVAGE] and Rena SAVAGE, Russell [SROUFE], Catharine [SROUFE] and Martha SROUFE, and a host of friends. Mr. Sroufe was 65 years old. This is the second bereavement in the family in the last 13 months. Mrs. Scott SROUFE died at Woodlawn hospital April, of last year.
Mrs. Savage and family of Montana cannot come on account of sickness.

Friday, May 8, 1914

I. W. KERN attended the funeral of his father last week at Warsaw. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Saturday, May 9, 1914

Mrs. Mary MYERS was born the 15th day of October, 1885, at Chillicotha, Ohio, and died at Rochester, Ind., May 4, 1914, age 48 years, 6 months and 20 days. She is survived by her husband, Henry M. MYERS, two sons, Frank [MYERS] and John K MYERS. Three sisters, Mrs. Jennie STIMNEL, of Decatur, Ill., Mrs. Bell PRETTYMAN of Marion, Ohio; four brothes, George MYERS of St. Louis, Mo., Wm. MYERS of Bloomington, Ill., Joseph MYERS of Decatur, Ill., and Samuel MYERS of Larne, Ohio. She was a member of the United Brethren church in Decatur, Ill., but had never had her membership transferred. The funeral service was held at Athens, Ind., May 6th, 1914. J. O. TODD in charge. Interment at Hoover cemetery.

Benjamin H. DILLON, son of Chas. and Eva DILLON, was born in Fulton county May 1st, 1891 and died at Longcliff May 2nd, 1914, his age being 23 years and one day. He leaves a mother and two sisters and many relatives to mourn their loss. His father died about eleven years ago and a sister, Eunice [DILLON], died about three years ago. The body was laid to rest in the Poplar Grove cemetery. The funeral was conducted by Rev. WHITAKER.

Jackson WAGONER, son of Jacob and Rebecca WAGONER, was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, Jan. 21, 1843, died April 30, 1914, age 71 years, 3 months and 9 days. Came with his parents to Fulton county, Indiana, 1849. He was married to Mary E. HOOD, March 5, 1868. To this union were born eleven children, three of whom have preceded him to the spirit world. Those now living are Arthur N. [WAGONER], of Gladwin, Mich.; Mrs. LANGHREN, John [WAGONER], of Argos; Mrs. Frank FREES, of Leiters; Frederick [WAGONER], near Germany; Mrs. Arthur MATTHEWS, Union City, Mich.; Marietta [WAGONER] and Mrs. John NUGENT, of Champaign, Ill.
He united with the Methodist Protestant church, near Leiters Ford, in 1888, of which he was a faithful member until 1898, when he moved near Fulton, Ind., and a year later united with the Fulton Baptist church of which he was a member at the time of his death.
He leaves a wife, eight children, a large number of grandchildren, one great-grandchild, an aged mother now 91 years old, four brothers and one sister and many friends to mourn his loss.
Mr. Wagoner has been in poor health for a number of years, but was able to attend to the duties of life until in December, but did not take to his bed until the last Saturday in January, from which he never arose. He suffered a great deal of pain, but bore it patiently.

Delmer HUDKINS, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. HUDKINS, was born Oct. 8, 1872, died at his home near Talma, Ind., April 30, 1914, aged 41 years, 6 months and 22 days. He was united in marriage with Letta ALSPACH February 30, 1901. He leaves to mourn a dear companion, one son, Merl [HUDKINS], by a former marriage and two daughters, Okal [HUDKINS] and Thelma [HUDKINS], three brothers, Jud [HUDKINS] of Kewanna, Ind.; Lon [HUDKINS], of Martin, Tenn.; W. D. [HUDKINS], of Rockham, South Dakota; three sisters, Mrs. Alice STUBBS of near Kewanna; Mrs. Cora RICHARDSON, of Washington and Mrs. Ella HUDKINS, of Kewanna, and

a host of friends and relatives. The father and mother, two sisters and four brothers preceding him in death. He has been a member of the Odd Fellows lodge for nine years. He was also a member of the Bloomingsburg Christian church of which faith he died triumphant in the Lord.

Daniel KIME, 83, died at Bruce Lake. He was the father of Emma WARSTLER, of Goshen. Surviving are five daughters and four sons. Burial was made in Elkhart Friday where services were held.

Monday, May 11, 1914

Four people, residents of Fulton county, were called by death Sunday. They were Miss Bernice COPLEN, daughter of Melvin COPLEN, who lives on south Main street, William E. RICHARDSON, grocer, who lived on east 13th street, Elijah BAIR, clerk in Harding's general store at Kewanna, and Mrs. Polly HALDERMAN, of Akron.

The death of Bernice COPLEN was caused by diphtheria which the child contracted 10 days ago. She became better last week and the physicians say that death was brought on by complications following the disease. Six children are living. Two passed away previous to this time.
The funeral will be held in the yard of the home on south Main street, Thursday morning at nine o'clock, Rev. F. Z. BURKETTE officiating. Burial in Athens cemetery.

William E. RICHARDSON died Sunday after a long illness. For years he has been in the grocery business on 13th street. He was past 70 years of age. Only one sister is living, Mrs. Gideon MILLER. His brother, C. C. RICHARDSON, died about two years ago.

Elijah BAIR died very suddenly Sunday evening at his home in Kewanna. He was at home and engaged in writing a letter when he fell over. Death was caused by heart trouble. He was nearly 50 years of age. For over 20 years he has been a clerk in HARDING'S store in Kewanna. He leaves a wife and six children.

Mrs. Polly HALDERMAN, a well known resident of Akron, also died suddenly Sunday. In the morning she prepared to attend the wedding of Walter HALDERMAN and went over to the home of Frank HALDERMAN. There she became ill and was placed in bed. Despite the aid of physicians she passed away in the night. Her death was caused by acute stomach trouble. Since the death of Mrs. LEININGER, Mrs. Halderman had been keeping house for her brother, Daniel LEININGER. She was past 70 years of age. Her husband, Samuel HALDERMAN, died several years ago. She was the mother of Frank and Charley HALDERMAN, residents of Akron.

Tuesday, May 12, 1914

Just 12 hours after Charles STIVER, a former partner, died in South Whitley, William L. CRABILL, of this city, passed away Monday evening at his home on south Madison street. Death was caused by a cancer of the stomach which postmortem examination revealed.
Mr. Crabill was last seen at his shop on February 26th. He became steadily worse and despite the aid of a number of physicians his recovery was given up several weeks ago. In the end he

fought death. While suffering a great deal he did not complain and firmly believed that he would get well. Possessing a strong constitution the final end was prolonged for weeks.
For 25 years William Crabill has been a barber in Rochester. He learned the trade under a Mr. LAGRO. Later he worked for Ray MYERS and John SHIRE. In 1897 he formed a partnership with Frank STETSON which has been in operation ever since. About 12 years ago they purchased the Arlington barber shop.
Seldom off duty, the first to arrive in the morning and the last to leave in the evening, "Bill" as he was known to everybody was a model of industry. Many young men learned the trade under him and they always left his employ with the warning to be a decent citizen. Though he was in the habit of telling people just what he thought, he had many friends.
William Crabill was born in Vaughnsville, Ohio, August 31, 1865, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Eli CRABILL, who are both dead. His father died when he was eight years old. His parents moved to near Millark when he was about three years old. On Sunday, August 30, 1891, he was married to Ida E. PONTIUS. Four children were born to them, Mrs. S. M. STUBBS, Ruth [CRABILL], Fern [CRABILL] and Zelma [CRABILL]. He has three half-brothers, John [CRABILL], Joseph [CRABILL] and Henry CRABILL, who live in Kansas.
William Crabill was a member of the K. of P. and Odd Fellows lodges. The funeral will be held at the Evangelical church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock.

Charles STIVER, 54, formerly a Rochester barber, died Monday morning at 2:30 o'clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. Lew WIMICK, in South Whitley.
Mr. Stiver's mother died when he was a lad. He was married, but parted from his wife some time ago. Two children were born to them, Miss Franchon STIVER dying from tuberculosis two years ago. The same disease caused his death after he had traveled to Arizona in search of health. One daughter, Mrs. Hazel DOUD, survives him at South Bend, and is the mother of two children. Two brothers also survive: George STIVER of Fort Wayne and M. O. STIVER, of Vincennes, Indiana, and the sister in South Whitley.
He was a member of the K. P. order and first started in the barber business at Rochester. He was later in Chicago and Indianapolis, until his health gave out, and he had to go West. It is expected that the remains will be driven through to Fort Wayne and the body incinerated at the crematory. The ashes will be turned over to his daughter to do as she wishes. This was the last request.

Wednesday, May 13, 1914

The funeral of William CRABILL was held this afternoon at the Evangelical church, Rev. BAUMGARTNER officiating. The Odd Fellows and K. of P. lodges attended in a body and Citizens band, of which Mr. Crabill was a member, led the funeral march. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Everett WILLIAMSON, a partner in the Fulton Garage, died Tuesday afternoon at his home near Fulton. He was only 21 years of age. His death was caused by tuberculosis.

Edna Bernice COPLEN, daughter of O. M. and Mary Belle COLEN, was born in Rochester, Indiana, December 15 1905, and departed this life May 11, 1914, aged eight years, four months and 26 days. Bernice, as she was familiarly known, was a pupil in the third grade of the public schools, a member of the primary department of the Christian Bible schools and a member of the primary duration, diphtheria causing her death. [sic] She was a sweet spirited child and had many

friends. Besides her parents, she leaves two sisters and five brothers, Mrs. May DICKERHOFF, Akron; Milo [COPLEN], Oscar [COPLEN], George [COPLEN], Grace [COPLEN], Ray [COPLEN] and Omer COPLEN. One foster brother, Foster [COPLEN], aged five and a sister, Hazel [COPLEN], aged 2, are dead.

William Egbert RICHARDSON was born June 18th, 1840, and died May 11th, 1914, aged 73 years, 10 months and 23 days. He was married to Agness L. ONSTOTT, September 15th, 1863, she having died Jan. 28, 1894. To the union were born eight children, seven of whom are living, one son having died April 2, 1892. Those surviving: Charles [RICHARDSON], of Macy; Jesse [RICHARDSON], of Jennings, Mont.; George [RICHARDSON], of Denver, Colo; Ralph [RICHARDSON], of Fort Jay, N.Y.; Mrs. John GRAY, at Union, Michigan; Hattie WILLARD and Grace MEREDITH of Rochester.

Thursday, May 14, 1914

Marion FINLEY, a veteran of the civil war, died this (Thursday) morning at his home on east 13th street, after a long illness caused by cancer.
For several years Mr. Finley has been unable to work. He suffered his affliction without complaint, knowing that there was no cure. In 1865 he enlisted in the army and was mustered out in the following August at Dover, Delaware. He was a member of Comany A, 155th Regiment, Indiana Infantry.
Mr. Finley was born in Wyandotte, Ohio, June 9th, 1849. On November 3rd, 1871, he was married to Mary SHOEMAKER. Three children were born, one of whom is living, Mrs. Maude ALSPACH of Peru, Ind. He leaves besides a wife, four sisters and two brothers. They are: Nathan FINLEY, of Huntington, and Alfred FINNEY, of Michigan; Mrs. Sarah LaRHUE of Plymouth; Mrs. Emma RALSTON, of this city; Mrs. Jane RANNELLS of Plymouth and Mrs. Belle TRAINER, of Peru.
The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at the Baptist church, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge. Burial will take place at the Citizens cemetery.

Leopold BRIDEGROOM, 83, died this (Thursday) morning at the home of his son, Thomas BRIDEGROOM, near Leiters Ford. Mr. Bridegroom has been in poor health for some time, having suffered three severe strokes of paralysis within the past year. He ran away from the Rochester home of his daughter, Mrs. Mary GREGORY, recently and went to the county farm. His son took him home last Wednesday. It is now thought that the over exertion caused his death. Mr. Bridegroom was born in Germany, coming to this country before he was 21 years old. He is the father of several children many of whom reside in Fulton county.

Mr. and Mrs. Abner McCAY and Mr. and Mrs. Young McCAY attended the funeral of an infant child of Mr. and Mrs. James WILSON at Kewanna Wednesday.

Friday, May 15, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. W. V. S. NORRIS of Fulton arrived this afternoon with the body of Mrs. Norris's brother, A. S. HEDGES, who has been ill in Chicago for some time. The body was taken to Fulton this afternoon where it will be buried.

Whitney Watson [CLIFF], infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. CLIFF, 117 E. 14th street, was buried this (Friday) afternoon, funeral services being conducted at the home by Rev. F. Z. BURKETTE. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Bert RUNNELLS received the sad news of the death of her cousin, Lena REINHOLD, on Saturday morning. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry REINHOLD of Monterey. Funeral was held there on Monday at 10 a.m. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Mrs. Charlotte McCROSKY passed away at her home in Tiosa, Sunday evening, after a short illness of pneumonia. She was an aged lady, of excellent qualities and since she had taken up her residence in this place, some years ago, had made many friends, who with the relatives mourn her loss. Funeral services were held at Center Wednesday, with burial in cemetery adjoining. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Richland Center I.O.O.F., Richland Twp.: Aaron McCROSKY, Jan 30, 1835 - May 13, 1907; Charlotte McCROSKY, his wife, Feb 3, 1833 - May 10, 1914]

Lewis BEEHLER autoed to Monterey Sunday to see his niece who died Saturday with lung fever. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.

Saturday, May 16, 1914

Several relatives of Leopold BRIDEGROOM residing in Peru arrived this morning to attend the funeral this afternoon at Leiters Ford.

Schuyler NORTON and Ben NORTON went to Kokomo this morning where they will attend the funeral of their uncle, Joseph NORTON, who died Friday.

Monday, May 18, 1914

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., May 18 -- Elmer BLILER, 45, of Elkhart, who came here last week to attend the funeral of his aunt, Mrs. Polly HALDERMAN, and sustained a paralytic stroke soon afterward, died at the residence of Frank HALDERMAN about six o'clock Saturday evening.
Mr. Bliler suffered a stroke last July, from which he had amost recovered. It is a sad condition to be suffered by the wife and three daughters who were hoping for his ultimate recovery. He lived near Akron when a boy and has many relatives and friends in this locality.
The funeral will be under the auspices of Elkhart lodge I.O.O.F. of which he was a member.
The interment will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery here.

Mrs. Freemont HART who lives west of Akron died Sunday. She had been in the best of health until Saturday when she was stricken with paralysis. She leaves her husband, and two daughters, one of whom is Mrs. John DAVIS who lives in the same neighborhood. Mrs. Hart was past 60 years of age. The funeral will be held at the home, Wednesday at 1 p.m. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery here.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester

I.O.O.F.: Freemont HART, Apr 10, 1857 - Dec 1, 1930; Martha A. HART, Apr 2, 1857 - May 18, 1914]

Jonas A. MYERS is dead. The well known veteran of the civil war and member of the McClung Post G.A.R., died Sunday evening at his home on Jefferson street at the age of 85. Mr. Myers held a gold headed cane as the oldest Odd Fellow in Rochester, having been a member for 63 years, was postmaster here for four years and was an ex-town marshal and member of the town board.
For years he was one of the progressive and leading citizens of Rochester. His death marks the passing of one of the staunchest supporters of the American flag that ever lived. He was intensely patriotic. He was a strong republican until the progressive party was launched, becoming one of its wheel-horses.
Mr. Myers died after a short illness. He took sick last Wednesday and went to his bed. Sunday night a few hours before he passed away he sat up on the edge of his bed and his relatives had hopes of his recovery. At 11:30 he died without a struggle. Mr. Myers was blessed with the best of health throughout his life. While in the army he never was wounded or even in the hospital. After the charge at Chattanooga, he was one of the four of his company who were left. On the 19th of July, 1875, he lost an arm at his planing mill in a buzz saw.
Though he was one of the most valiant soldiers in the war, he did not draw a pension until after the year 1890. He enlisted at Indianapolis, August 8th, 1862. He saw service at Perrysville, Peach Tree Creek, Chattanooga, and was with Sherman in all of his engagements on the march to the sea. He enlisted as a private and held every office in the company. When he was discharged at Washington in 1865, after the grand review, he held a commission as a lieutenant.
Returning after the war he purchased a half interest in the planing mill of Dave Martin in which he later assumed full control. For 40 years he was active in this business. Then he sold out about ten years ago to his son-in-law, Stilla BAILEY. In 1890 he was appointed postmaster here by President Harrison, holding the position for four years. Previous to that time he had served as a member of the town board and as town marshal.
Mr. Myers had the honor of being the oldest Odd Fellow in this county and one of the oldest in the state. He was also a charter member of the McClung Post, the meetings of which he never failed to attend. Mr. Myers was a firm believer in what he thought was right. Several years ago he made arrangements for his funeral and had the casket built. The services were also paid for. While in office he made a good public servant and would not follow the dictates of any one.
Jonas Myers was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, Feb. 20, 1829, the son of Jacob and Rosana MYERS. In 1839 he came to Miami county where he lived until 1843 when he moved to Rochester. In the years before the war he followed the trade of a carpenter. His first wife, Marian W. B. CLAYTON, died September 8, 1852. His second wife, Anna GRIMES, died November 1st, 1865. On March 17, 1867, he was married to Elizabeth CLAYTON, in Miami county, who survives him. Two children were born to the last union and are living. They are Mrs. Indianola E. BAILEY of this city and John MYERS, who recently moved to Miles City, Montana.
The funeral will not be set until Mrs. Myers hears from her son in Montana.

After a long and painful illness, William Earl MOWE died Sunday morning at nine-thirty o'clock at his home in west part of the city, age 25. His death was caused by tuberculosis of the bowls brought on by lead poisoning, which he contracted while following his trade as a painter. Several physicians who examined him maintain that death was caused by stomach trouble, and while in California, a prominent specialist promised a cure if he would go in a hospital and remain on diet. This order he refused to obey, which, his family say, caused his death.
Earl Mowe was the son of Mr. and Mrs. David MOWE who made their hom in Rochester for years. Within the last 20 years five children of the six have died. Bessie [MOWE] and Myrtle [MOWE] died the same year. It is the popular belief that their death was caused by tuberculosis, although the family and relatives believe that death was caused by other diseases. David Mowe, the father, died in California about five years ago. Iva MOWE died in 1902 and Carl [MOWE] passed away when very young.
Last January Earl MOWE returned to Rochester, after remaining in California for over three years. He was born in Rochester, June 26, 1889. In 1911, in California, he was married to Mary McMAHAN, who was with him when he died. He leaves his mother, Mrs. Viola MOWE, and one brother, Lee [MOWE].
Earl Mowe was a member of a California Moose lodge. He was a faithful member of the Christian church. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at two-thirty o'clock at the Christian church, Rev. BURKETTE officiating. The services will be in charge of the local ofder of Moose.

Tuesday, May 19, 1914

Delila [HORN], daughter of Hartman and Margaret HORN, was born in Knox county, Ohio, Nov. 16, 1842, died at the home of her niece, Mrs. John NORRIS, May 10, 1914, age 70 years, 5 months and 24 days. She came with her father to Fulton county, Ind., Oct. 17, at the age of ten years and has been a resident of said county since. Also united with the church of Christ at Sycamore Chapel, in June 1873. She continued her labor with the Disciples here until the Master called her home. She leaves one brother, William [HORN], two half-brothers, Columbus [HORN] and Noah [HORN] and two half-sisters, Mrs. - - - [not readable] - - -, and Mrs. Ella BARKMAN, and a host of relatives and friends to mourn her departure. Funeral at Norris home Wednesday p.m. Burial in Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, May 20, 1914

Mrs. Charlotte McCROSKEY was born in Champaign county, Ohio, Feb. 3, 1833, died at her home in Tiosa May 10, 1914, aged 81 years, 3 months and 7 days. She was united in marriage to Aaron McCROSKEY May 14, 1856. Mr. McCroskey died May 13, 1907. She united with the Christian church at Careysville, Ohio in early life and remained a member until moving to Indiana in 1865 when she put her membership into the M.E. church at Richland Center and remained a member until she left the church millitant for the church triumphant. Having no children of her own, she raised Inez OVERMYER, the wife of Frank OVERMYER. She leaves to mourn her departure her foster daughter, one brother, one sister, a number of nephews and nices and a host of friends.

Leopold BRIDEGROOM was born at Baden, Germany, Sept. 29, 1831, departed this life May 14, 1914. He came to New York with his parents at the age of seven years.
His companion preceded him to the spirit world 16 years ago. The children are William R. [BRIDEGROOM], of Argos, Thos. J. [BRIDEGROOM], of Leiters, Arthur F. [BRIDEGROOM], of Bennington, Mich., Claud L. [BRIDEGROOM], of Denver, Ind., Mrs. Henry LEWIS and Mrs. C. E. MARTIN of Peru, Mrs. Mary GREGORY, of Rochester. There are 26 grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren.
The funeral services were held at Leiters Saturday afternoon at the home of his son, Thomas, Rev. Samuel PLANTZ in charge, interment at the I.O.O.F. cemetery at Rochester.

Thursday, May 21, 1914

Miss Ella SHANKS of Macy attended the funeral of her brother Jonas MYERS today.

Friday, May 22, 1914

Ephriam WILSON, a well known resident of Ora, who for more than 40 years was a resident of Pulaski county, is dead.

The funeral of Mrs. Aaron McCROSKEY was held at the Richland Center church Wednesday. She had been a member for a good many years. Interment in Odd Fellows cemetery. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Saturday, May 23, 1914

The small child of Mr. and Mrs. Edward EASH, who died Thursday, was buried today.

Monday, May 25, 1914

Alsines HOFFMAN, a resident of Fulton county residing near Akron, died suddenly at his home Sunday. He has several relatives here.

Martha Ann HART, wife of Freemont HART, was born April 2, 1857, near Warsaw, Ind., died May 18, 1914 at her home near Akron, Ind., aged 57 years, 1 month and 17 days.
She leaves to mourn her departure a husband, one son, two daughters, Opal HART and Mrs. John DAVIS, four grandchildren, besides a number of friends and relatives.
She was a member of the U.B. church at Beaver Dam.
Funeral service was held at her home west of Akron, May 20, 1914. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery at Rochester.

Tuesday, May 26, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, May 27, 1914

Word was received Tuesday evening of the death of Milton BYBEE in Kansas City. John BYBEE of Kewanna left at once for that city and will take care of the body which will be taken to Mentone for burial Friday. He leaves near here the following: John L. BYBEE of Kewanna, Lawson BYBEE of near Talma, and Elmer BYBEE of Mentone.

Thursday, May 28, 1914

[no obits]

Friday, May 29, 1914

The funeral of Melvin BYBEE, who died at Kansas City, took place at Mentone today. He leaves a number of relatives in this county.

Saturday, May 30, 1914

The bodies of Rev. Bayliss DICKSON, well and favorably known to the older generation, and of his daughter, Adelaide [DICKSON], have been echumed from the old Argos cemetery and reinterred at Maple Grove where the family has secured a group of lots. The former died in 1874 and the latter in 1866.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Maple Grove Cemetery, Walnut Twp.: Bayless L. DICKSON, Eld., May 5, 1818 - Nov 3, 1874; Emma HOUGHTON DICKSON, Nov 6, 1822 - June 3, 1917; Adelaide R. DICKSON, June 1, 1844 - Sept 7, 1866]

Monday, June 1, 1914

[no obits]

Tuesday, June 2, 1914

James O. SHAW, for four years a resident of East Rochester, died Monday night after an illness of three weeks caused by heart trouble. He was nearly 64 years of age Mr. Shaw had not been well for over a year.
Mr. Shaw was a good citizen and a hard working man. He lived on a farm all of his life with the exception of the last four years. He was born in Tipton county, Ind., September 21, 1850. About 16 years ago he moved to this county. On February 12, 1883 he was married to Elizabeth HARTMAN, who survives him. Six children were born to them, three of whom are living, Mrs. Arza GANDSTAFF and Mrs. Elmer DOWNS of this city, and Mrs. Louise CRAWFORD of Manistee, Mich. He leaves one brother, J. F. SHAW of Tipton, Indiana.
The funeral will be held at the home Thursday afternoon at two o'clock.

Wednesday, June 3, 1914

Miss Grace CRAWFORD of Manistee, Mich., arrived this morning to attend the funeral of her father, Oliver SHAW.

Thursday, June 4, 1914

Louis HAROLD, one of the first settlers of this county, died Wednesday afternoon at five o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Sarah MOST of near Athens. Mr. Harold was born in 1828 and came to Fulton county from Ohio with his parents in 1840.
He was one of our best known an progressive citizens. Leading an active life and taking an interest in daily events, he retained all the faculties of youth to the last hour. Death was due to complications following old age. Mr. Harold was a close friend of "Uncle" Dell WARD, George PERSCHBACHER and Edward UTTER, old pioneers.
Mr. Harold was born in Pennsylvania, the son of Mr. and Mrs. John HAROLD, who passed away in this county about 50 years ago. A few years after his birth, the family moved to Ohio, and later to Indiana. They made the trip from Ohio in a covered wagon drawn by a yoke of oxen. They were compelled to cut their way through the woods and finally settled near Athens where John Harold purchased eighty acres of land from the government for $350.
This farm was later sold by Louis Harold when he purchased 120 acres near there which he owned until one year ago. In the ten years following their arrival here, Louis Harold often drove to Wabash and Logansport for mill feed and flour, the trip taking two days.
Louis Harold was married twice. When about twenty years of age he married Elenor BURNS who passed away about fifty years ago. Two children were born to them, Mrs. Elizabeth JONES and Mrs. Louisa GOOD of this county. He later married Rachel DORAN who died about forty years ago. Two children were born to this union who are living, Mrs. Sarah MOST and Milo HARROLD. He leaves seven grandchildren and one great-grandson.
He was a member of the Progressive Dunkard church. Throughout his life he was a strong supporter of the principles of the democratic party.
The funeral will be held Sunday morning at 10:30 o'clock, burial at the Nichols cemetery.

According to the will of Almon S. HEDGES, who died in Chicago last week, his entire estate consisting of $3,000 is left to his sister, Mrs. Cella NORRIS, wife of Victor NORRIS, who live north of Rochester on the Michigan road. Mr. Hedges was a batchelor and had no other relatives besides his sister living here. He passed away in a Chicago hospital and the body was buried in the cemetery at Green Oak.

The funeral of Oliver SHAW was held this afternoon at the Evangelical church. A quartette composed of Mrs. Sam HOFFMAN, Miss Faye BRADY, Jerome SWIHART and Rev. BAUMGARTNER, sang at the services. Many relatives from out of town attended the funeral.

Friday, June 5, 1914

After a long illness caused by an infected heart, Albert H. KING, died this morning (Friday) at the home of his sister, Mrs. C. J. IRWIN, on South Jefferson street. He had been very ill since the middle of January when he entered the Mayo hospital at Rochester, Minnesota. Here he was under expert treatment for several weeks when the physicians told his relatives that they could do nothing to relieve him. Mr. King was also afflicted with Bright's disease.
Death cut short the life of Albert King in the prime of his activity. He would have been 35 years of age next December. In the last ten years he had made a decided success of business and

during the last seven years had entire control of a large lumber company in Canada. Previous to this time he was in the grain business at Crawfordsville, Indiana.
Albert King was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John KING and was born in this city where he attended and graduated from the Rochester high school. He then completed a course in Wabash college, where he received a degree. He leaves two brothers and four sisters: Dr. M. O. KING of this city, Dr. L. A. KING of Williamsport, Indiana, Mrs. J. N. CLYMER of Peru, Mrs. C. J. IRWIN of this city, Mrs. H. H. CROSS of Chicago, and Mrs. M. J. HAMMEL of Indianapolis.
Mr. King was a member of the Presbyterian church and a 32nd degree Mason. He also belonged to a leading college fraternity. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home of Mrs. C. J. IRWIN.

The following people who have been here to attend the funeral of J. O. SHAW have returned home: William and Manford MAIN, Francis SHAW, Arley BAWLSAR, Elmer ADAMS and Jake WILBURN of Elwood, William HARTMAN of Hobbs, Ind., Mr. and Mrs. Harvey McCOY of Tipton, Ind., Mrs. Marsh CALDWELL, of Arcadia, Ind., Mrs. Olie THOMAS of Curlesville, Ind., and Mrs. Rhoda HARTMAN of Hobbs, Ind.

County Commissioner Henry E. CAMERER is dead. The well known citizen passed away Thursday afternoon at his home south of Rochester, after a very short illness. A week ago last Tuesday evening he took sick with stomach and bowel trouble. He became steadily worse despite the aid of several physicians and died amid great suffering, age 58 years.
Edward CAMERER, as he was known to every one, was well known over the county. A year ago last fall he was elected on the Democratic ticket for the second time as commissioner from the first district. His first term was highly satisfactory as he made a splendid showing as a public servant.
Henry E. Camerer was born in Rush county, Indiana, and moved to this county with his parents when he was three years old. Early in life he purchased a farm south of Rochester where he lived for thirty years. When about twenty-two years of age he was married to Miss Anne HOOVER. To this union four children were born. John [CAMERER] and Nellie CAMERER died about nine years ago, age 25 and 22. Two children survive, Mrs. Carrie GINTHER of Louisville, Kentucky, and Fred CAMERER.
Mr. Camerer leaves two sisters and one brother, Mrs. Hattie QUICK, Mrs. Minnie BLACKBURN and Omer G. CAMERER. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o['clock at the Methodist church in Rochester.

Saturday, June 6, 1914

The funeral of County Commissioner Henry E. CAMERER will be held Sunday at 2 o'clock at the Methodist chuch.

The funeral of Albert KING will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. IRWIN Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

Uncle Will CURTIS, of Rochester, spent Decoration here and attended the funeral of David FEECE Sunday.

David FEECE, an old resident of this vicinity, who died at his son's, Wm. [FEECE], near North Judson, was buried here last Sunday. A large crowd attended. Funeral was held in the Brouillette grove. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Monday, June 8, 1914

The funerals of Albert KING and County Commissioner Edward CAMERER were largely attended Sunday afternoon. The Masons attended the funeral of Albert King in a body. The last services over Mr. Camerer was held at the Methodist church.

Tuesday, June 9, 1914

The last will of Louis HAROLD who died last week at the home of his daughter near Athens was filed in court today (Tuesday).
Mr. Harold made special provision for his daughter, Mrs. Sarah MOST, with whom he lived for the last two years. Because of the extra work which she was compelled to do he allowed her $400. When this is paid including all debts, and $200 for a grave stone, the balance of the estate will be divided equally between Mrs. Sarah MOST, Mrs. Elizabeth JONES, Mrs. Louisa GOOD and Milo HAROLD. Fletcher STONER of Akron is named as the executor. The estate is probably worth, $20,000.

Miss Minnie BARR of Talma died Monday at her home from a cancer with which she had been suffering for some time. She was operated upon at Woodlawn hospital about seven months previous to her death.
Miss Barr was the sister of Charles BARR and S. BARR, all of whom live in this county. She has lived with her brother, Charles, and had kept house for him. She was born in Kosciusko county November 18, 1872.
The funeral will be held Wednesday at the Talma church. The cortege will leave the home of Charles Barr at ten o'clock. Burial will be made in the Reichter cemetery.

Wednesday, June 10, 1914

Mrs. Emma CLELAND of Kewanna died last evening at her home. Mrs. Cleland was 85 years old and has been ill for some time. Death was due to old age. She was one of the oldest and most respected women of Kewanna. She was the mother of two daughters who are both living. They are Mrs. John LEITER and Mrs. Henry HOWE. Her husband died twenty years ago.

Milo Ray [HUDKINS], the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin HUDKINS, who live southwest of Rochester, died Tuesday afternoon. The funeral will be held Thursday at Kewanna.

Thursday, June 11, 1914

The eight year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben EWER, who live at Fulton, died Tuesday evening. Death was caused by heart trouble.

A large crowd attended the funeral of Uncle Lewis HAROLD Sunday at Nichols cemetery, Rev. HOPKINS officiating.

Dr. SHAFER of Rochester attended the funeral of Lewis HAROLD Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. Philip BRYANT attended the funeral of Mr. HAROLD near Athens last Sunday. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Friday, June 12, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, June 13, 1914

John RUSSELL, who was recently arrested in Chicago, has confessed that he has killed eleven of his wives, whom he had married for their money and that one of these had been killed at the home of A. J. KRAMER, who resides near Silver Lake.
The sudden death of Mrs. RUSSELL occurred on Friday, July 29, 1913, while Mr. and Mrs. Russell were visiting at the Kramer home. Mrs. Russell was the first wife of Harry CAPLE, formerly of this city. According to the statement of Mr. Kramer, Mr. and Mrs. Russell had retired for the night when Mrs. Russell asked her husband to get her a drink. He got up and brought in the water. Shortly after drinking it Mrs. Russell became violently ill and Dr. LECKRONE of Silver Lake was summoned. This took place early Thursday morning and death followed the next day. It is thought arsenic was the poison used.
Before marrying, Mrs. Russell conducted a boarding house in Peru, and it was there that she met her future husband. She knew the man only about three weeks before their marriage.

E. T. HOCHESTEDLER died this afternoon at his home on West Seventh street. He had been sick for over a year.

Monday, June 15, 1914

Leiters Ford, Ind., June 15. -- Mrs. Aretta BRAUNELLER of this town suffered a violent death Saturday evening about seven o'clock, when the lamp she was filling exploded, covering her with burning oil. She suffered intense agony.
Mrs. Brauneller is a widow and lives alone in this town. No one heard the explosion or saw the accident. George POLLY, who lives near, found the partly conscious woman in the yard of her home with her clothes nearly burned from her body. She was discovered about ten minutes after the accident.
From the scene of broken glass and the oil can near, it is supposed that Mrs. Brauneller was in act of filling a lamp which was burning. And the blaze from the wick touched the gas from the can causing the exlosion. She was covered with burning oil which nearly consumed the clothes from the upper part of her body. The burns which she received around the head and chest were deep and severe. She was 67 years old.
Mrs. Brauneller leaves one son and one daughter, William FERNBAUGH, who lives near Leiters Ford, and Mrs. B. JOHNSON, of this town.
It was reported later that Mrs. Brauneller was in the act of filling the lamp with gasoline when the explosion occurred.

Mrs. Nancy J. HOOVER died in Longcliff asylum near Logansport Sunday after a short illness. Mrs. Hoover was taken to the asylum a short time ago.
Mrs. Hoover was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John HISONG and was born in Cass county May 5, 1851. She was married four times, recently to Chas. HOOVER. She leaves one son who lives in Indianapolis. The funeral will take place Tuesday at 1:30 at the Poplar Grove church.

Eli T. HOCHSTEDLER, son of Gabriel and Marie TROYER HOCHSTEDER, was born March 17, 1840, in Hudson county, Ohio, and died June 13, 1914, age 74 years, 2 months and 26 days. In 1854 she moved to Howard county, Indiana.
On August 9, 1863, he was married to Emaline LANTZ, who died September 9, 1878. To this union were born five children, one of whom, William Grant [HOCHSTEDLER], died in infancy. Mr. Hochstedler afterward married Mary A. FAVORITE at Winchester, Ind., who survives him. Besides the sorrowing wife, the following children remain to mourn with her the loss of their father: Mrs. Alford VAWTER, Rochester, Indiana; Mrs. Bert ARMSTRONG, Paradis, La.; Mrs. Phil MOSHER, Owen, Wis.; Salem E. HOCHSTEDLER, Spring Valley, Ill., Mrs. Ed VAWTER, Rochester, Ind.; Hermie E. HOCHSTEDLER, South Bend, Ind.; and two step-sons, Frank HOBBICK, Minatare, Neb., and William HOBBICK, South Bend, Ind. One brother, G. G HOCHSTEDLER, of Westfield, Ind., remains the last surviving member of his family.

Tuesday, June 16, 1914

The following people attended the funeral of E. T. HOCHSTEDLER today:
Rev. METZNER of Elkhart, Rev. SPANGLER of Peru, Rev. RILLER of Decatur, Rev. Jesse HOCHSTEDLER of Boston, Rev. McNARA and wife of Remington, Ind., S. E. HOCHSTEDLER of Spring Valley, Ill., William HOBBICK and son of South Bend, Hermie HOCHSTEDLER and wife of Westfield, John BOLTZ of Indianapolis, Z. HOCHSTEDLER of Michigan City, Benjamin BOLTZ of Winchester, Harold BOLTZ of Dunkirk, Lionel KEELY, of Paradis, La.

Wednesday, June 17, 1914

Joseph WALTERS, a resident of Richland township, died at Woodlawn hospital this morning. He has been ill for some time with cancer. He is a well known farmer and is the father of several children.

William HORN, of Marshall county, died at his home Wednesday morning, aged 90 years, 10 months and 16 days. Deceased was born in Knox county, Ohio, July 25, 1823. He settled in Fulton county, near Yellow Creek, in 1853, where he lived a year. He moved into Marshall county in 1854 and settled upon the homestead where he died.

Thursday, June 18, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. Ort FIELDS returned to their home in Fort Wayne after attending the funeral of William HORN of near Mentone. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Friday, June 19, 1914

Joseph C. WALTERS, was born in Knox county, Ohio, March 26, 1856, and departed this life June 17, 1914, aged 58 years, 2 months and 11 days.
He was the son of Edward and Hannah WALTERS, and came with them to Kosciusko county, Indiana, in 1874. During the year 1878 he was married to Catherine Anne SLIFE, and to this union eight children were born, five of whom survive as follows: Mrs. Anna E. AUBIL, of Michigan; John W. [WALTERS], Charles E. [WALTERS], Mrs. William BALDWIN, Mrs. Allie WYNN, of Rochester, Indiana. The deceased was also the grandfather of nine grandchildren, of whom seven are living. - - - - - -
Besides the sorrowing widow and children named above, there are five brothers living, as follows: William [WALTERS], of Missouri; Abraham [WALTERS], of Fulton county; Albert [WALTERS], Levi [WALTERS] and George [WALTERS] of Kosciusko county; one brother preceded Joseph to the other world. Together with a host of more distant relatives and friends they will mingle their tears of sorrow and sympathy. - - - -

Saturday, June 20, 1914

The first automobile funeral ever held in Fulton county was conducted Friday afternoon when the body of Joseph WALTERS, who died at Woodlawn hospital on Wednesday was taken to the Palestine cemetery in Kosciusko county. Mr. Walters lived in Richland township of this county in the Sand Hill community.
G. S. OVERMEYER'S truck carried the casket and the pall bearers the whole distance from the Walters' home to Palestine, a distance of eighteen miles. Six automobiles carrying relatives and friends followed the truck hearse. The preacher preceded the cortege in a roadster type automobile. The trip to the church was made in an hour and thirty minutes. Burial was made in Palestine cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Palestine Cemetery, Harrison Twp.: Joseph C. WALTERS, 1856-1914; Catharine A. WALTERS, 1854-1935]

Monday, June 22, 1914

Arna Merl TIPTON died Saturday evening at five o'clock after a long illness. Death was caused by tuberculosis. Mr.Tipton was a cigar maker but had not worked at his trade for over two years. During the last year he had great trouble with his eyes.
Mr.Tipton was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac TIPTON and was born in Rochester June 4, 1884. He learned the cigar maker's trade early in life and joined the local union when he was 19 years of age. On March 19, 1903, he was married to Bessie BELL. Two children were born to them, one of whom is living, Crystal TIPTON. Mr. Tipton was one of nine children, only one of whom is living, Raymond TIPTON. His father and mother are both living.
Mr. Tipton was a member of the Eagle lodge, which order conducted the funeral this afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. G. C. PULLMAN had charge of the services.

Mrs. Minnie BAIR, whose husband died suddenly a month ago, passed away Sunday evening as a result of a stroke of paralysis. The same disease was the cause of Mr. Bair's death. She leaves seven children. Mrs. Bair was about 48 years of age.

Mrs. William GRIMES and her mother Mrs. Mary HOWES, of Denver, were fatally injured in an explosion which occurred at the family home in Denver, Miami county, at 10 o'clock Saturday morning. Both were burned about the face and head and inhaled the flames. Mrs. Howes passed away soon after the accident and her daughter is not expected to live.
Mistaking gasoline for coal oil caused the terrible accident. The women poured the gasoline into some scaling hot water for the purpose of maing a dip for dipping chickens. An explosion followed and the women, their clothes in flames, ran about the yard screaming for help. Mr. Grimes was in the barn yard when he heard the screams and with the assistance of some farm hands succeeded in putting out the flames.
The whole population of Denver and vicinity is excited over the affair. The Grimes and Howes families are well known and prominent.

Tuesday, June 23, 1914

The double funeral services of Mrs. Mary HOWES and Mrs. William GRIMES, both of whom were fatally injured in a gasoline explosion at their home near Denver Saturday morning, took place at the Baptist church in Denver Monday afternoon at two o'clock. Burials in the Denver cemetery. A number of people here knew both victims.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Westlawn Cemetery, Jefferson Twp.: William GRIMES, 1859-1928; M. Louise GRIMES, 1864-1914 and Henry HOWES, d. Nov. 19, 1898, ae 82y-5m; Mary J. HOWES, 1840-1914]

Wednesday, June 24, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, June 25, 1914

Asa DEWEESE, whose name adorns both county jail and court house as one of the building commissioners, died at his home west of Fulton this (Thursday) morning, after an illness of short duration. He was approaching his eighty-eighth year. Senility and the extreme warm weather are believed the causes.
Mr. Deweese was one of the county's few remaining types of pioneers who made their homes by the work of their hands, having lived here over sixty years. He had an extensive acquaintance, being well known as a pedestrian of ability. Often he walked from his home to the city to attend a meeting of the commissioners' court in which he served two terms, being president in the second. Mr. Deweese was a progressive commissioner and many of the most important public improvements in the county are due to his idea of keeping county affairs apace with the advance of the general community.
Asa Deweese, of the 1st district, was born in Miami county, O., in 1826. Three years later his parents moved to Shelby county, Ohio, and he lived there until 1854, when he came to Fulton county and purchased the land in Liberty township, west of Fulton, which has ever since been his home. His baggage brought to the county consisted of a gripsack, in which he carried a change of clothing, two iron wedges and a grubbing hoe, while on his shoulder he freighted an ax and a rifle all necessary appurtenances for early day farming in the heavy timber of this county. After two years work on his new farm he returned to Ohio and married Emeline RUSSEL. She lived but two years leaving her husband alone. Several years later he married Mary A. BUTLER and two children blessed this union, Emily, wife of Charles MARTIN of Marion, and Charles

[DEWEESE], a son.
Funeral arrangements are not known.

Allen BYBEE, of Mentone, 77 years of age, Civil War veteran and prominent farmer, died at his home Wednesday morning. Death was due to a general breakdown, Mr. Bybee's health having failed him about 18 months ago. Besides the widow Mr. Bybee leaves two sons, Addison BYBEE and Hollis C. BYBEE, and one daughter, Mrs. L. D. MANWARING, all of Mentone. The funeral service will be held at the Methodist church in Mentone on Friday afternoon at 2 p.m.

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., June 24 -- Naomi RIGGLE, aged 13, daughter of Rev. RIGGLE, fatally burned Tuesday morning when her father threw a blazing gasoline can in the yard, died the same afternoon shortly after five o'clock. Her body with the exception of those parts covered by her shoes and belt, was a mass of burns and she had little or no chance to recover.
The accident happened about eight o'clock in the morning and although everything possible was done to aid her, the fight was in vain and hypodermics were used to alleviate her last hours of suffering. She leaves besides the frantic father, who cast out the burning can in an attempt to avert an explosion in the house, a mother, three sisters and two brothers.
The Riggles have lived here but two weeks, he coming to assume charge of the All Saints church. No funeral arrangements have been made but it is thought the body will be shipped back to Pennsylvania whence the family came.

Friday, June 26, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, June 27, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Aretha BRAUNELLER was held at her home here Tuesday at twelve o'clock and then taken to Kewanna where she was laid away. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Mrs. AIRGOOD and Henry RARRICK and wife motored to Mentone Friday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Rarrick's uncle. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Word was received in this community Wednesday that Mr. Joseph C. WALTERS died at Woodlawn hospital Wednesday morning at 8:00 o'clock. Mr. Walters was 59 years old; leaves a wife and five children, Mrs. Arlie WYNN, Mrs. William BALDWIN, Mrs. Elmer OBIEL, Charles [WALTERS] and John WALTERS to mourn their loss. Besides a world of friends Mr. Walters was known for miles around. - - - SAND HILL ITEMS.

L. K. BROWER returned today from Fox Lake, Wis., where he attended the funeral of his father, who died recently. He was past 90 years of age, and left besides Mr. Brower, another son and five daughters.

Mr. and Mrs. F. E. BRYANT, his mother, Mrs. Hannah BRYANT and Mr. and Mrs. Simon BYBEE of North Judson motored to Mentone Friday to attend the funeral of Allen BYBEE, who was well known here.

Monday, June 29, 1914

Val ZIMMERMAN, undertaker, went to Logansport this (Monday) morning to secure the body of Mrs. Nancy A. ZOLMAN, who committed suicide Sunday evening, but returned with two corpses, the second being that of Isaac BALL, who died during a fight with another patient.
Ball, who was taken to the asylum from here Saturday, became involved this moning in an argument with an insane doctor. A scuffle and a fist fight followed, during which Ball suddenly expired. The coroner's verdict says death was due to a rupture of the liver. The body was brought to the Zimmerman morgue.
Ball was a batchelor, 51 years old, and was well-to-do, owning a farm near Marshtown where he lived with a maiden sister, who is the only surviving close relative. This was his second trip to the asylum, having been taken there in 1889. He has been considered queer since that time. Last week he came to Rochester, and terminated a series of peculiar actions by stealing a pocketbook from a relative in southwest Rochester. His arrest followd a foot race with the officers.
An application to Longcliff was made today for Miss Miriam BALL, sister of Isaac Ball, who had been living with him at Marshtown.

Word was received here Sunday morning that Mrs. Adeline ZOLMAN, a former resident of this county, committed suicide at Longcliff asylum at Logansport, late the same evening.
The message was sent to Milo [ZOLMAN] and Harley ZOLMAN, two sons who live in this city. Mrs. Zolman was the wife of John ZOLMAN, who is now living in Whitley county. She has been confined to the asylum for about two years.
Mrs. Zolman is the daughter of Nathan ZOLMAN and the sister of S. P. ZOLMAN, of Newcastle township. When about twenty years of age she married her cousin. Only two children are living. Val Zimmerman brought the body to Rochester where the funeral will be held.
It was also learned at Longcliff today that Mrs. Zolman hung herself with her apron, tying one end to the steel which barred her cell window, and looping the other end about her neck.

Wesley FENIMORE, who carried mail between Rochester and Fulton for over fifteen years, died at his home in Royal Center Sunday, age 65.
Until four years ago Mr. Fenimore was a resident of Fulton where he took an active part in the life of the community. He was a very active member of the Odd Fellows lodge. When the rural routes were started out of Rochester Mr. Fenimore discontinued his services to the government.
Mr. Fenimore has three children living, a daughter in Ft. Wayne and Charles [FENIMORE] and Henry FENIMORE. J. T. FENIMORE of this city is a brother of the deceased.

Tuesday, June 30, 1914

The will of Allen BYBEE of Mentone was filed for probate on Saturday. Mr. Bybee, who leaves an estate estimated at about $13,000, leaves a lot in Mentone, household goods and $2,500 in cash to his wife and the remainder to his other heirs in proportion fixed by Indiana law.

The funeral of Nancy Adeline ZOLMAN, who committed suicide at Longcliff Sunday evening will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the church in Athens, Rev. F. Z. BURKETTE in charge. Nancy Adeline Zolman was born in Knox county Ohio, September 22, 1852. She was a member of the Baptist church. She leaves besides her husband and two sons, Milo [ZOLMAN] and Harley [ZOLMAN] of this city, a brother, Sanford ZOLMAN, of this county.

The funeral of Isaac BALL, who died at Longcliff Monday, will be held at Kewana Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Burial will be made at Kewanna cemetery.

The funeral of Asa DEWEESE was held at Fletcher's Lake Saturday. In accordance with one of his last requests, no funeral sermon was preached.

Wednesday, July 1, 1914

Albert L. GRAY, a resident of Indianapolis, Ind., died at the Woodlawn hospital this (Wednesday) morning at 3:00 o'clock. Death was caused by diabetes. He was 27 years old.
At his bedside were he wife, two sisters and his mother. Mr. Gray came to Rochester Sunday with the family and they were staying at Seldom Inn, on the east side of the lake. Tuesday he became very ill, caused by the change in the weather and was taken to the hospital. Rev. F. Z. BURKETTE was with him when he passed away.
Mr. Gray was employed in Indianapools as an inspector for the Burroughs Adding Machine company. He had been in ill health for several months. The body will be taken home this evening.

Special to the Sentinel
Delong, Ind., July 1 -- The body of Clarence HOBSON, a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. HOBSON of this town, is now being brought back to Indiana for burial, according to word received by them. Hobson died in Panama June 11, five days after he was operated upon for gall stones.
Deceased was a steam shovel engineer until recently he went into the dairying industry. He leaves a wife, two small sons, his parents, a brother, Stephen [HOBSON], and a sister, Mrs. Ellsworth EDGINGTON.
His wife, a former resident of Massachusetts, is bringing the body back to New London, Ind., where the funeral will be held July 5. Mrs. Hobson left Panama June 25 and will arrive at New York the 2nd or 3rd of July. Mr. Hobson was three years in the coast artillery stationed on the Atlantic Coast. He was a Mason.
The bereaved relatives wish to thank thir neighbors for their kindness.

Thursday, July 2, 1914

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., July 2 -- Hiram B. WHITTENBERGER died Wednesday morning at his home in Larwill, Ind., at the age of 79 years.
Deceased was the youngest son of the William WHITTENBERGER family, one of those that settled in Akron in 1836. The ten sons of this family helped to establish the town of Akron. Daniel [WHITTENBERGER], of Akron, is the remaining member of the family and is in his 90th year.

Hiram lived here until 1869, locating at Larwill in that year, where he was engaged in general merchandise until three years ago, failing health compelling him to retire. He enlised in the Civil War in November 1861, at the first call for volunteers, served his country until February 14, 1863, when he was honorably discharged.
He is survived by two sons and his aged wife. Mr. Whittenberger kept in close touch with friends of boyhood years, and outlived the greater number of them. His frequent visits to Akron were a great pleasure to relatives and friends. The funeral will occur at Larwill Friday afternoon.

Another version of the death of Isaac BALL in Longcliff last Monday was published Wednesday in the Logansport Pharos-Recorder. It is as follows:
"The body of Isaac Ball, who died Monday at Longcliff hospital from the effects of injuries received in an insane collision between Ball and another patient at the Cliff, was taken to Rochester in Fulton county, where the body will be cared for by relatives.
"According to the finding of the officers at the hospital, Ball entered the room of another patient Saturday, was ordered out by the other patient and refused to go. The patient attacked Ball, knocked him to the floor and jumped upon him with both feet. After the insane assailant was gotten under control it was found that Ball was suffering from internal hemorrhages, and that a splintered rib had punctured some of the vital organs. Death ensued a short time later."
According to the report reaching the Sentinel, Ball was not killed by the other patient but rather expired in a convulsion brought on by the scuffle.

J. J. STINSON died at his home in Ora Sunday morning and was buried in the Monterey cemetery Wednesday forenoon. His funeral was held from the Christian church at Ora. His age was 88 years, 3 months and 12 days.

Samuel CAPLE, a veteran of the Civil War, aged 77 years, is dead at his home near Gilead.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Gilead Cemetery, Perry Twp.: Samuel CAPLE, 1837-1914; Lois E. CAPLE, 1852-1930.

Friday, July 3, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, July 4, 1914

[no paper - holiday]

Monday, July 6, 1914 to Tuesday, July 7, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 8, 1914

Opal Louise HOLLOWAY, the three-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elvin HOLLOWAY, who live near the Pendleton bridge, northwest of the city, was found dead in bed this (Wednesday) morning by her parents.

The child had gone to bed the evening before apparently in the brest of health and mystery surrounds the sudden death. Mrs. Holloway is prostrated by the happening.
The funeral will be held Thursday at ten o'clock at the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Word was received Tuesday of the death of Mrs. George DOLAN in Bloomington, Ill., age 56. Mrs. Dolan was a former resident of this county and lived south of the city where George DOLAN now owns a farm. The funeral was held Tuesday.

Thursday, July 9, 1914

Lee WADE, of Lynn, Mass., an instructor in woodcraft at Culver Military Academy, who was taken to Chicago on a special train Monday suffering from poison, died Wednesday night at a hospital. It is said he mistook the poison tablets for a cathartic.

The report of Coroner F. D. LOUGH, who investigated the sudden death of the three months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elvin HOLLOWAY, who reside near the Pendleton bridge, west of town, was returned late Wednesday afternoon. The verdict stated that the child died of suffocation.
The little girl was sleeping in an upstairs apartment and was in an extremely warm room. There was little ventilation according to the coroner. It is not known whether the child died on account of being under the bedding or whether the close atmosphere of the room suddenly choked her. The child's head, however, was on the outside of the bedding when whe was found Wednesday morning by her parents.
The funeral was held this morning, burial being made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Mrs. Sarah HOOVER, 70, one of the oldest women in Rochester, died in her home at 882-1/2 [?] Main street this (Thursday) morning. Mrs. Hoover had not been well for some time. It is thought that her death was caused by advanced old age.
Mrs. Hoover was born in Urbana, Ohio, June 27, 1835. She moved to this county in the early sixties and has been a resident the remainder of her life. She united in marriage after moving here with Samuel HOOVER, who preceded her in death several years.
There are five children surviving -- Mrs. Flora SINGLETON of Lockport, Ill.; Miss Louise HOOVER, of this city; John HOOVER, of Chicago, Ill.; Mrs. Clara LOGAN, of Twelve Mile; and a foster-son, Claude STINSON, of Athens. Mrs. Hoover has resided with her daughter, Louise, over the Marsh grocery, for the past ten years.
The funeral arrangements have not been made, but will be announced upon the arrival of the remaining children.
The funeral service of Mrs. Sarah Hoover will be held at the Evangelical church at 2 p.m. Friday.

Friday, July 10, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, July 11, 1914

After lying unconscious for seven days, John WAGONER died Saturday morning at his farm home one mile north of the McKinley school house. Death was caused by dropsy with which Mr. Wagoner has suffered for over two years. He was about 65 years of age.
John Wagoner was a well known farmer of this county. He was the son of Sol WAGONER, who at one time was one of the richest men in the county. Forty-five years ago John Wagoner purchased the farm east of Rochester where he died. His wife passed away several years ago. He leaves one son, William WAGONER, who resides near him.
The funeral of John Wagoner will be held Monday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the Liberty church. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Mrs. Elsworth EDGINGTON and Mr. and Mrs. J. H. HOBSON are attending the funeral of Clarence HOBSON at North Attleboro, Mass. Mr. Hobson was to have been buried at New London, Ind., but his wife wanted him to be buried in North Attleboro, Mass., her former home. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Monday, July 13, 1914

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 14, 1914

Ezra BRYAN, 19 year old son of Thomas BRYAN, who lives east of Akron, died this afternoon at two o'clock as result of injuries received when he was run over by a wagon loaded with threshed wheat. The accident occurred this morning at nine o'clock when Bryan was driving out of a field on the farm of Oliver BURNS. He attempted to jump on the wagon when it was in motion and slipped and fell under the wheels. He suffered internal injuries.

Wednesday, July 15, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, July 16, 1914

The funeral of Ezra BRYAN, who was killed Tuesday under a wagon loaded with wheat, was held at the United Brethren church at Athens this morning. Friends and relatives from all over the county were present. It was one of the largest funerals ever held in that neighborhood.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas BRYAN, the parents of the young man, have been very unfortunate. Seven or eight years ago one of their children fell in a tub of hot water and died from the results of the burns. Several years later a son was killed while working on the railroad. Tuesday another son was killed. Of the five children born to them, three have met violent deaths.

Mr. and Mrs. John DIXON left Monday for Lima, Ohio, where they will attend the funeral services of his mother, Mrs. Joseph DIXON. Mrs. Dixon was well known in this neighborhood.

The funeral of John WAGONER was held at Liberty Church, Monday at 10 o'clock. Burial at the Hoover cemetery at Athens.

Friday, July 17, 1914

Word was received today by Mrs. Omer ROSS of the death of her aunt, Mrs. T. A. MILLER in Los Angeles, Cal. Mrs. Miller was a former resident of this city and moved to California about 10 years ago. She passed away July 11.

Archie STEVENS, nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Clark ENYART of this city and a former residen of Rochester, was killed in Bridgeport, Conn., Thursday afternoon. It is not known by what means Mr. Stevens met death but it is thought that he was killed by a live wire as he was engaged in the electrical business as a lineman.
Archie Stevens was well known here and at one time was an employee of the Sentinel. When very young he was taken with his sister, Iva STEVENS, to the home of Clark Enyart in this city where he lived until he was 21. When he left Rochester he traveled all over the world for four years. On last Thanksgiving day he was married in Bridgeport, Conn., where he was employed. His sister is married and is now living in Chicago. Austin STEVENS was the father of Archie STEVENS, and the brother of Mrs. Clark Enyart. Clark ENYART was a brother to Mrs. Austin STEVENS.

Saturday, July 18, 1914

Word was received Friday by Mrs. Mollie FINLEY of the death of her niece, Mrs. Bessie HOOVER, in Louisville, Kentucky. Mrs. Hoover was a former resident of this city.

Monday, July 20, 1914

After an illness estending over two years Mrs. Melvin TRUE died at the Woodlawn hospital Sunday morning. The necessity of an operation became apparent last week when she was removed to the hospital. Although she withstood the operation well, the attending physicians held but little hope for her recovery. Mrs. True was past 54 years of age. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at one-thirty at Mt. Zion. Rev. F. Z. BURKETTE will have charge of the services.
Tryphena STEFFY was born in Fulton county, Indiana, October 28th, 1859, and departed this life July 19, 1914, aged fifty-four years, six months and 21 days. During the year of 1877 she was united in marriage with Wm. H. KEEL, and to this union two sons were born: Guy [KEEL], whose home is in Aztec, New Mexico, and William H. KEEL, Jr., of Argos, Indiana. Having been left a widow she was married to Melvin TRUE February 8th, 1888. The result of this union was the birth of Raymond I. [TRUE], who died when only six years old; Rosa Pearl [TRUE], and Walter L. [TRUE], who survive the mother.
Mrs. True was converted sixteen years ago, and with her husband united with the Methodist church at Green Oak.
Being of a reserved disposition, she did not mingle much with those outside her own household, but her kindly greetings, neighborly charity, and warm welcome always held out to her friends and neighbors have won for her the loving confidence of all who knew her.
Following the death of a wife and mother, then the tragic deaths of two daughters-in-law, now comes the messenger again, claiming another wife and mother.

Mrs. True's health began to fail more than two years ago, but until within the last month her condition was not alarming. The best of medical skill obtainable, the loving administrations of husband and friends, and the best wishes of the entire community could not arrest the inevitable. Besides the relatives named above, there are one brother and one sister, the last of a family of eleven children, seven grandchildren, and others more distantly related.

Tuesday, July 21, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 22, 1914

Miss Mary FULTZ died this morning at Woodlawn hospital after a long fight with tuberculosis. Miss Fultz was a sister to Ed FULTZ, a prominent farmer residing near Rochester.
She had been at the hospital for some time and but little could be done for her, as she grew weaker every day. She died at about 10:00 o'clock and her body was taken to the home of her brother, south of the Valley church where the funeral will be held.
She has one other brother living and one sister, Mrs. Sadie HEIGHWAY, who also resides near here. She was about 35 years of age.

Ezra Paul BRYAN was born in Miami county, Ind., Oct 5, 1896, and departed this life July 14, 19014, age 17 years, 9 months and 9 days.
He leaves to mourn his departure a father, Thos. BRYAN, a mother, one brother, Sidney [BRYAN], and sister, Olive [BRYAN], and one half-sister, Bessie [BRYAN], besides a host of friends and relatives.
He became a member of the United Brethren church at Athens Ind., and has lived a consistent christian life ever since.
Funeral services were held at Athens, July 16, 1914. Funeral sermon was delivered by Rev. J. O. TODD. Interment at Hoover cemetery.

Thursday, July 23, 1914

Stricken by apoplexy while milking a cow Wednesday evening about eight o'clock, Mrs. Sarah OLDHAM died when she fell and her body was not found until three hours later when the husband returned from Fulton. The sudden death of his wife has nearly prostrated Mr. Oldham. Mrs. Oldham was past 51 years of age.
Wednesday evening the father and one son went to Fulton to do some shopping. The son returned home about ten o'clock and went directly to bed. He noticed a light in the kitchen and thought that his mother was near. Mr. Oldham returned at eleven o'clock and discovered that his wife was not in bed and with the aid of the two children they searched for an hour before the body of Mrs. Oldham was found in the barn lot. She had evidently passed away soon after the attack and was lying just beside the milk stool.
J. N. OLDHAM lives near Fletcher Lake. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon; burial at the Fletcher Lake cemetery.

Friday, July 24, 1914 Saturday, July 25, 1914

[no obits]

Monday, July 27, 1914

Mrs. Omar MONTGOMERY, daughter of S. Y. GROVE of Talma, and niece of O. K. GROVE of this city, died Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Mrs. Montgomery had been in ill health for some time but serious complications did not set in until Friday night. She was the wife of Omar MONTGOMERY, who conducts a restaurant and bakery in Talma, and was only 37 years of age.
Mrs. Montgomery [Nora GROVE] had many friends in this city, where she often visited. Her sister, Mrs. Ford BYRER of Ft. Benton, Montana, is expected to arrive this evening. Her father and mother are both living and she has the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Jack IMLER of Logansport and Lou [GROVE], Archie [GROVE] and Oliver GROVE and Miss Leila GROVE of Talma.
Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery were married about 12 years ago. They have a nine year old son whom they adopted several years ago. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the home in Talma.

Tuesday, July 28, 1914

William BROCKEY, age 58, a well known farmer living in Newcastle township, died Monday evening at nine o'clock. Death was caused by dropsy.
Mr. Brockey had been ill for the past year and the attending physician believes that he was also suffering with a cancer of the liver. Mr. Brockey was born in this county and for years lived on the farm where he died. He leaves a wife and a son, Ben BROCKEY, and two step-sons, Phillip HAMLETT and Washington HAMLETT, who live in this city. Mr. Brockey was a member of the Baptist church.
The funeral will be held at Athens Wednesday. The procession will leave the home at 11 o'clock. A Baptist minister from Peru will have charge of the services.

Wednesday, July 29, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, July 30, 1914

David RAILSBACK died at his home near Talma, Monday morning. Funeral services were held Wednesday forenoon at Talma, with interment in the Reichter cemetery.

Friday, July 31, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, August 1, 1914

Phillip JENKINS, the veteran hunter and trapper, who knew Lake Manitou and its surroundings like a book, passed over the great divide this morning at seven o'clock. Death was caused by a cancer of the liver.
Mr. Jenkins was past 70 years of age and until the last two years he was nearly as active as any man many years younger. Lake Manitou had been his home and his means of making a living for over 50 years. When the lake was little known outside of the county and when game was plentiful, Phil Jenkins trapped, fished and hunted. Every visitor at the lake who wanted to land the big ones or shoot the most ducks endeavored to win the favor of Mr. Jenkins. His opinion was always accepted as the last word.
Mr. Jenkins leaves a wife and three daughters, Mrs. A. NELLANS, Mrs. Charles ALSPACH and Miss Minnie JENKINS. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at two o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Philip J. JENKINS, father, 1845-1914; Eliza SANNS [JENKINS], mother, 1848-1933; Minnie M. JENKINS, dau., 1870-1942]

Monday, August 3, 1914

The funeral of Philip JENKINS was held this afternoon, and the burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Practically every conveyance in the cortege this afternoon with the exception of the hearse was a motor vehicle.

Cerus ANDERSON, an old soldier living in Akron, died at his home Saturday evening. He was 75 years old.

Tuesday, August 4, 1914

John BEECHER, for 38 years a resident of this city, and a member of the local post G.A.R., passed away this morning (Tuesday) at his home on Madison street after a long illness. He was past 71 years of age. Death was caused by heart trouble and dropsy.
Mr. Beecher was born in Franklin county, Ohio, February 3, 1843. At the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted in Co. K, 134th Indiana Infantry and was mustered out three years later as corporal in Co. C, 151st Indiana. After the war he moved to Indiana and on August 9th, 1869, he was married to Martha E. BALTIMORE who survives him. They have no children. Mr. Beecher leaves one brother and one sister who live in Kansas.
Mr. Beecher was a blacksmith by trade and after moving to Rochester workef for some time for Samuel HEFFLEY. Later He started a shop of his own and remained active until two years ago.

Wednesday, August 5, 1914

The funeral of the late John BEECHER will be conducted under the auspices of McClung Post G.A.R., at the residence Thursday morning at nine o'clock, Rev. A. S. WARRINER of the M.E. church in charge. Interment at Chili cemetery, four miles east of Denver.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Chili Cemetery, Richland Twp.: John BEECHER, 1843-1914; Martha E. BEECHER, 1837-1930; also

military marker, John BEECHER, Corpl Co C 151 Ind Inf.]

Russell Louis [WERNER], son of Martin and Anna WERNER, was born July 23rd, 1914 and departed this life July 31st, 1914, aged 8 days.
Besides the parents the following are left: Clarence [WERNER], Sylvia [WERNER], Lloyd [WERNER], Clara [WERNER], Gertrude [WERNER], Pearl [WERNER] and Charles [WERNER]. One brother, Claude [WERNER], died four years ago. The funeral was held Saturday morning, burial being made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Thursday, August 6, 1914

As the result of drinking carbolic acid while ill and despondent two weeks ago, Mrs. Verna DAY, 24, died on Thursday morning at 12:30 at the home of her sister, Mrs. Ezra JONES, south Monroe street.
According to physicians in charge of the case, death was caused by fatty degeneration of muscles of the heart, an indirect result of the acid taken some time ago.
Her death was very sudden, high hopes having been held for her ultimate recovery until Wednesday evening when she rapidly grew worse, became weaker and despite the aid of several physicians, passed away about midnight. Her husband, Bliss DAY, who is employed at the gas plant, thinking she would recover, started for Illinois Wednesday with his brother. No word can be conveyed to him until he reaches his destination.
Verna Esta ANDERSON was born March 12, 1890, the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John ANDERSON. She attended the public schools in this city and graduated in 1909 from the Rocheter high school. She then went in the employ of Beyer Bros. Co., resigning her position last winter. She was married on May 9 to Bliss DAY of this city. Mrs. Day's mother died when she was very young and her father died about one year ago. She leaves two sisters, Mrs. Ezra JONES of this city and Mrs. Bert SAUSAMAN, of Akron, and one brother, Chas. ANDERSON, of Plymouth.
The funeral arrangements have not been completed and will be announced at a later date.

Friday, August 7, 1914

A telegram was received here Friday announcing the death of Mrs. W. H. ROUGHTON in Urbana, Ill. Mrs. Roughton is the daughter of Mrs. Sarah HOWARD and the sister of Wm. HOWARD of this city.
Mrs. Roughton has been ill for some time. Mr. Howard left for Urbana Thursday when word was received that his sister was very ill. Mrs. Roughton leaves a husband and two children. Mr. Roughton is chief of the Urbana fire department.

The funeral of Mrs. Bliss DAY will be held Sunday afternoon at three o'clock at the home of Ezra JONES, on south Monroe street.
Rev. A. S. WARRINER of the M.E. church will have charge. All persons wishing to call may do so at any time. Bliss Day arrived in Rochester Thursday night. He did not receive the telegram announcing the death of his wife until Thursday morning at eleven o'clock.
Pall bearers are to be girl friends of the deceased: Miss Frankie CONDON, Edna CONDON, Fern WRIGHT, Lefa WRIGHT, Elizabeth JOHNSON and Hannahbelle PORTER.

Rev. and Mrs. H. E. BUTLER went to Grovertown, Ind., this morning to attend the funeral of Mrs. Butler's brother, G. W. UNCAPHER.

Saturday, August 8, 1914

Mrs. Isaac CREVISTON of Rochester and Levi HAYNER, superintendent of the Kentucky stock farm, both passed away Saturday morning, the former at Woodlawn hospital and the latter at the farm north of the river.
--Mrs. Creviston died at the age of 34, having five children, the youngest aged one and the oldest aged 12. Her death was caused by gall stones, an operation at the hospital failing to give relief. Mr. Creviston is an employe of the Erie railroad and the family has been living on north Jefferson street. The funeral will be held Monday.
--Levi HAYNER has been superintendent of the Kentucky Stock Farm for 13 years. The property belongs to Chicago people and Mr. Hayner came here from Kentucky to take charge of the farm. He was past 76 years of age and was never married. Death was due to heart trouble of one and one-half hours duration. It is thought that he has no living relatives. The funeral has not been arranged.

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas RHODES and Miss Josephine MIKESELL of near Peru attended the funeral of Mr. William BROCKEY Wednesday.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover Cemetery, Henry Twp.: William BROCKEY, July 4, 1854 - July 27, 1914, ae 60y-23d; Lovina BROCKEY, Apr 5, 1849 - Sep 23, 1921, ae 72y-2m-18d]

Monday, August 10, 1914

Since the death of John BEECHER, who was a member of Co. K, 134th Indiana Volunteers, there are now only four members left, two of whom live in Miami county: A. J. PARKS, of Peru, and Oliver ARMANTROUT of Jefferson township.

William H. GRAHAM, a prominent retired farmer living near Akron, is dead, age 70. His will was filed today (Monday), and Mrs. Margaret WALLACE of this city, a sister, will receive one-sixth of the estate, which is valued at $20,000.

Charley RAYMER, a farmer living near Macy and a brother of John RAYMER of this city, died Sunday. He was 42 years of age and leaves a wife and five children.

The funeral of Mrs. Isaac CREVISTON was held Monday afternoon at the Evangelical church at 2:00 o'clock. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Short services were held over the body of Levi HAYNER at the Kentucky Stock Farm Monday at 12:30. The body was then shipped to Wilson, N.Y. where Mr. Hayner formerly lived.

The funeral services for the late Mrs. Bliss DAY, took place Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m. at the home of Ezra JONES on south Madison street, Rev. SWITZER of Plymouth and Rev. WARRING being in charge. Six girl friends of the deceased acted as pall bearers. Interment was in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, August 11, 1914

William MORGAN, a feeble minded man, living with his father, Harrison MORGAN, south of Akron, has been missing from home for over six weeks and his parents believe that he has committed suicide.
The missing man is about 35 years of age and is a well know character in that neighborhood. When he left home six weeks ago he put on his old clothes and went out of the door with the remark to his father that Bowen lake was good enough for him. Thinking that he might have drowned himself in the lake which lies near his home, 25 neighbors dragged the small body of water Monday. Nothing was found or any evidence collected which lead the searchers to think that Morgan had been near the lake.
Morgan often leaves home for weeks at a time and always put on his best clothes and taken all the money in the house. The last time he reversed his performance and left his money with his best clothes at home.

Wednesday, August 12, 1914

Beecher SWEET went to Logansport this evening to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law, James VINEY. It will be held Thursday.

Thursday, August 13, 1914

Mrs. Floy DUNLAP MOONEY, wife of Arthur MOONEY of St. Louis, and sister of Heber DUNLAP of this city, died at his home, north Pontiac street late Wednesday. Mrs. Mooney took ill two weeks ago and suddenly became worse, dying late in the afternoon. The disease was hemorrhage of the throat.
Mrs. Mooney, a harpist, was known in the theatrical world under the stage name of Dagmar DUNLAP. She was born May 18, 1888. Both of her parents are dead, but the brother and a sister are living, Heber [DUNLAP] of this city and Hazel [DUNLAP], of Ft. Wayne.
She was married on May 30 of this year to Arthur MOONEY, having become acquainted with him on one of her engagements in a large eastern theater. The couple appeared on all of the large eastern vaudeville circuits and on those of the middle west, having played in New York, Chicago and Pittsburgh. They were to start on a long engagement in two weeks. They were both fine musicians, Mr. Mooney being prolific on many musical instruments.
The funeral will be held Friday at the Presbyterian church at 2 p.m.

Friday, August 14, 1914

The body of Mrs. Floy MOONEY was taken to South Whitley today. A short service was held at the home of Heber DUNLAP, before departing.

Saturday, August 15, 1914

Word was received by P. J. STINGLY this morning that his sister-in-law, Mrs. R. E. DOYLE, of Joliet, Ill., was dead. Mrs. Doyle had been ill for some time, and Mrs. Stingly had left this morning to visit her, before the telegram was received. She will be brought to Royal Center Monday for burial.

Monday, August 17, 1914

Dwelly J. BAILEY, a well known farmer living in Wayne township, died today at noon as a result of injuries he received when he was kicked and stamped by a young horse.
The incident took place about nine o'clock, when Mr. Bailey attempted to go in behind the animal which was tied in the barn. He was found unconscious by his daughters some time later. They do not know exactly how the accident happened. The injuries which caused death were inflicted on the head and chest. It is evident that the animal first kicked the aged man to the floor and then jumped upon him with his fore feet. Mr. Bailey did not regain consciousness.
Mr. Bailey is the father of Mrs. Rube HENDRICKSON, wife of the Fulton county recorder. Mr. and Mrs. Hendrickson heard of the accident about eleven o'clock but did not arrive before her father passed away. There are eleven children in the family. Mr. Bailey was the father of eleven daughters and one son, the latter having passed away some time ago.

H. Westfall CORBIN, an old respected farmer residing about one-half mile south of Green Oak, died at his home early Sunday morning. Mr. Corbin had lived in this county for many years. He had been ill for over two weeks. The funeral will be held at the Horton chapel, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Horton Chapel/Mud Lake Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: Henry W. CORBIN, Dec 23, 1838 - Aug 16, 1914; Ruth CORBIN, Aug 24, 1841 - May 9, 1920]

William RAYMER, who lived in the Coon school house, three miles south of Macy, died very suddenly. He was taken sick while feeding at the barn, was helped to the house by two friends and died from a stroke of apoplexy. Funeral services were held at Deedsville Tuesday.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Deedsville I.O.O.F., Union Twp.: William R. RAYMER, 1874-1914; Lydia E. RAYMER, 1874-1940]

Main DEAMER and family and A. O. FARRY and family attended the funeral of Mrs. Cynthia WILEY at Mentone last Sunday. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

The body of Paul BEATTIE was brought to Grass Creek Tuesday, the funeral was preached by Rev. SHEAK of the U.B. church. - - - GRASS CREEK ITEMS.

Elliott BERNARD, who was a contractor and builder of stone roads, died suddenly Thursday at the hotel in Bourbon. His home was in Delphi, Ind.

Tuesday, August 18, 1914

Word was received here today announcing the death of Colonel MATHIAS in St. Louis, Mo. Two brothers, residents in this city, Jacob [MATHIAS] and John MATHIAS, are now in St. Louis.
Colonel Mathias was born in this county the son of Mr. and Mrs. John MATHIAS. About ten years ago he moved to St. Louis, where he engaged in the hay business. Mr. Mathias leaves a wife and three children. He has the following brothers and sisters living: Mrs. Charles DOWNS of this

city, Mrs. Elmer APT of Fulton, Charles MATHIAS of Fulton; Jacob MATHIAS of Macy; and John MATHIAS, of Burton. Mr. Mathias was about 55 years of age.

Mary REEDER, widow of Rev. Wm. REEDER, is dead at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Martin MATHEWS near Kewanna. Mrs. Reeder was past 90 years of age and was one of the best known women in that community. She had a host of friends and was loved by all.
For years Mrs. Reeder lived in Kewanna with her husband. After his death in 1895 she moved to the home of her daughter. Mrs. Reeder was very active in church work. She leaves the following sons and daughters: Mrs. A. J. HARSH of near Grass Creek; Mrs. Sarah HILL of Logansport; Mrs. Martin MATHEWS, Rev. T. J. REEDER of Wolcott, Ind.; and John REEDER of Canada.
The funeral was held this afternoon at two-thirty o'clock.

Martin McINTIRE, a well known barber of this city, died at his home on North Jefferson street this morning at 12:30 o'clock. Death was due to a complication of diseases. He has been seriously ill since the middle of March. Several times he rallied and was able to be on the street, but he gradually grew worse.
Martin McIntire was born January 3, 1872 in this county, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Elliot McINTIRE. He was married to Ethel LEWIS and to this union two children were born, Deverle [McINTIRE] and Carmen [McINTIRE], both of whom are living. Mr. McIntire was in the barber business in this city for many years, being a partner in the Arlington Hotel barber shop at the time of his death. He also had been interested in the Manitou barber shop. He was a member of the Moose lodge and of the Barbers union. He has many relatives in this part of the country. The funeral arrangementds have not been completed, but will be announced Tuesday.

Wednesday, August 19, 1914 to Friday, August 21, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, August 22, 1914

A telegram was received Friday by Tim COAKLEY announcing the death of Con BARRETT in Long Island City, New York, where Mr. Barrett was train master on the Long Island Railroad. Con Barrett was born in Rochester and learned to be a telegraph operator under Clark CONDON at the Lake Erie depot.

Monday, August 24, 1914

Leon LEONAL, a young Italian laborer, who has been working on the Erie, died at the Woodlawn hospital Saturday evening as result of injuries sustained when he attempted to jump on a freight train at Akron.
The accident occurred about six o'clock. Leonal attempted to steal a ride on the train and slipped and fell under the wheels. The cars passed over his body badly crushing both legs and fracturing the skull. He was taken to Woodlawn hospital where Doctors LORING and FARRY amputated one leg and removed a piece of bone from the skull. He died three hours after the accident.

Leonal had only been in this country for a few months and leaves a wife and three children in Italy. He has a brother living in Akron, O., and he will take care of the body.

A small child of Mr. and Mrs. Joe MILLER of Plymouth was buried at [Moon] cemetery near Leiters Ford Tuesday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Tuesday, August 25, 1914

Isaac Washington BROWN, familiarly known as "Colonel," Rochester's well known bird and bee man, closed sixty-six years of activity Monday night at 10:35 o'clock, when he passed away suddenly in his home on west 16th street following an attack of acute bronchitis.
Colonel Brown was in Chicago last week, was taken ill with indigestion and returned home Wednesday. His condition was not considered serious until Monday afternoon when matters took a turn for the worse. Acute bronchitis suddenly developed and the Colonel died before Mrs. Brown could reach a telephone to summon Dr. Charles GOULD who had been in charge of the case.
Coloner Brown was known all over the middle west and parts of the east as the "Bird and Bee Man," specializing in lectures on these subjects. He never disdained to speak publicly, but confined most of his efforts to school buildings, it being no exaggeration to say that hundreds of thousands of pupils have heard him speak. It was while he was engaged in this work that he attracted the attention of Miss Helen GOULD in 1904. She sent him to Texas where he studied the boll weavil and the Hessian fly, and then lectured for three years under her, at a substantial salary, filled numerous Winona engagements and spoke in the large Eastern cities. At this time he assembled a tidy fortune, which has been more or less cut down since by unfortunate investments. He essayed to run a model meat market, bought considerable property, and visited the Chicago board of trade, where he was a well known figure for many years.
Isaac Washington BROWN, son of John D. and Rebecca BROWN, was born in Carroll County, Indiana, May 27, 1848. He ran away from home when 16 years of age joined the 135th Infantry and served during the war of the rebellion. He came to Rochester in 1870 and entered a law office, but practiced very little. He was united in marriage with Emma STRONG, December 25th, 1872. To this union two sons were born, DeWitt [BROWN], Raiford, Fla., and Ray [BROWN], Seymour, Indiana. There also survive besides the widow, two brothers, Will [BROWN] of Tipton, Ind., and James [BROWN] of Hoopston, Ill., and three sisters, Mrs. Lizzie CULLER, Indianapolis, Mrs. Nellie ROWLEY, Rochester, Mrs. Mell THURBER, New York City.
Col. Brown was a member of the I.O.O.F. and K. of P. lodges. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon in charge of Odd Fellows.
__________

Colonel Isaac W. BROWN was probably Rochester's most picturesque character, and a legion of friends will join his family in their grief. It is doubtful if there lives another man who had a similar life work and it is certain that the good done by the "bird and bee" man will live long after him. He was peculiar, yes and like most prophets, without great honor in his home community, but his efforts had results. While not a naturalist, he knew much of nature, especially of bird and insect life, and he made practical use of his knowledge. He was a genuine friend of winged creatures and they, as well as the people, will miss the "Colonel."

Wednesday, August 26, 1914

Mrs. Nina L. VALENTINE, wife of Grant A. VALENTINE, piano player at My Show, died at Woodlawn hospital Tuesday evening at 10 o'clock, after an illness of two weeks of tubercular trouble. Mr. and Mrs. Valentine have resided in Rochester for but three months, having come here from Chicago, living with Mrs. Jacob EILER at her home on North Jefferson St.
Nina Luella VALENTINE was born in Wisconsin, Jan. 16, 1889, and was united in marriage to Grant VALENTINE some years ago. They had one child, Richard VALENTINE. The Valentines have resided in many surrounding towns, he having talent as a piano player. The funeral arrangements have not been completed, but she will not be buried here. It is thought that her body will be taken to her former home in Wisconsin.

The services over the body of the late Isaac W. BROWN will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the house on west 16th street, Rev. W. F. SWITZER of Plymouth, officiating. Interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
__________

Isaac Washington BROWN, 1848-1914. Buried in Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery. His monument reads: "Erected & dedicated by the Indiana Audobon Society and friends in loving memory of Isaac Washington Brown, known over the United States as 'The Bird and Bee Man.' He traveled by various methods all over the country and spread the Gospel of bird protection which has been of untold sentimental & economic benefit to mankind. Erected 1931."
[Wendell C. and Jean C. Tombaugh, Fulton Co Ind Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.]

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben McINTIRE attended the funeral of his brother, Mart McINTIRE, Thursday in Rochester. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Mrs. John WAGONER, who has been ill for several months, died at her home south of Argos last week. She was 66 years and 10 months old. The funeral was held at Leiters Ford last Thursday. She leaves a husband and the following children: Mrs. Ines OVERMYER of Richland Center, Mrs. Dora PONTIUS of Culver, Mrs. Jesse HARTLE of Leiters, and Olin WAGONER of Talma. She leaves two sisters, Mary WAGONER who lives west of Rochester and Susan McGUIRE of Plymouth.

Thursday, August 27, 1914

The funeral of I. W. BROWN was held this afternoon at the house. Many friends and relatives from over the state paid their last respects to the well known citizen. Rev. W. S. SWITZER of Plymouth preached and the I.O.O.F. lodge had charge of the ceremony. The following people from out of the city were present: J. W. BROWN of Tipton, Ind., J. B. BROWN of Hoopeston, Ill., and Mr. and Mrs. George W. CUTLER and Mrs. Edward RHEES of Indianapolis. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, August 28, 1914

Mrs. Roy SHELTON, 26, who has been ill for three years with tuberculosis, died today at the home of her mother, Mrs. Mary TOBEY, who lives souteast of Rochester. Mr. and Mrs. Shelton returned to Fulton county last spring after traveling through Colorado and Arizona for the benefit of Mrs. Shelton's health. The end was hastened by an attack of pneumonia.
Before they went West Mr. and Mrs. Shelton resided in Logansport where he held a position as a blacksmith. They have been married for five years and have no children. Mrs. Shelton leaves the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Jesse COLLINS of Rochester, Victor TOBEY of Logansport, Mrs. Nettie HEETER of Elkhart, George TOBEY of near Rochester and she has three sisters and one brother who live at home.

Saturday, August 29, 1914

[no obits]

Monday, August 31, 1914

The one-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vern SMITH, who reside near Mentone, is dead as the result of drinking a quantity of kerosene. The child died within a short time after drinking the liquid.
The mother had gone to a huckster wagon to do some trading and had left her babe sitting on the floor in the kitchen. When she was away the little one crawled to the place where the oil can was sitting and sucked a quantity of the liquid through the spout. The mother returned a short time after and when she saw the child showed signs of illness she hurriedly summoned Dr. YOCUM. Before the physician could arrive the child was beyond medical aid and died soon after.

After an illness lasting over a year, Mrs. Armilda MANNING, wife of Lawrence V. MANNING, died Sunday at the home in North Fulton Avenue. She was past 76 years of age.
Mrs. Manning had been confined to her bed for the last three weeks. One year ago this time, when the family were preparing to take a trip to their old home in Illinois, the aged woman took sick, and never fully recovered. The physicians assert that death was caused by tuberculosis.
Mrs. Manning was the mother of 13 children, seven of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Manning have been married for 59 years. They moved here from Illinois about thirteen years ago. After living on a farm east of Rochester for several years, they moved to the city, where they have since resided.
Mrs. Manning leaves one brother and one sister, Lon SWISHER and Mrs. BLANCHETTE of Wisconsin. The children who are living are Mrs. William SANDERS, Mrs. Ella REESE, A. G. MANNING, Lily MANNING, Mrs. T. J. GAUMER, L. L. MANNING and J. O. MANNING. She was a member of the New Light church.
The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the house.

Tuesday, September 1, 1914

Mrs. Almyra RICHTER wife of Leonard RICHTER, landlord of the Cottage hotel, died at the Woodlawn hospital at 12:15 today, where she was taken Sunday evening for the purpose of an operation. Mrs. Richter went on the operating table this morning but her strength was such that she died without coming out from under the influence of the opiate. Mrs. Richter was afflicted with a tumor.
Mr. and Mrs. Richter moved to Rochester just a month ago when he purchased the Cottage hotel. For years they lived on the old home place nine miles east of Rochester. Soon after coming here Mrs. Richter suffered a complete breakdown in health. She was 60 years of age.
Miss Almyra BEERY was married to Leonard RICHTER 42 years ago and was the mother of 10 children, eight of whom are living, Mrs. Luella JOHNSON, C. E. RICHTER, Mrs. Leitha Lavina BLACKBURN, Homer D. RICHTER, Mrs. Emma HEETER, Vern RICHTER and Mrs. Sylvia May PFEIFFER. Mrs. Richter was a member of the Saints church.

Wednesday, September 2, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, September 3, 1914

The funeral of Mrs. Almyra RICHTER, who died Tuesday at the Woodlawn hospital, will be held Friday morning at the Nichols cemetery. The procession will leave the house in East Rochester at 10:30 o'clock. Rev. J. M. RIGGLE of Akron will have charge of the services. Miss Mable BLACKBURN, of Kokomo, and Mr. and Mrs. Fordie JOHNSON and Mr. and Mrs. Charles SHAW of Peru are here to attend the funeral.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County, Indiana Cemeteries, Nichols Cemetery, Franklin Twp.: Leonard R. RICHTER, 1842-1919; Almyra RICHTER, 1854-1914]

Friday September 4, 1914

A. J. HARSH, who for 40 years taught school in Wayne township and who was well known and loved by hundreds of men and women, died Thursday evening at his home in Grass Creek, after an illness lasting over four months. He underwent an operation for a cancer of the stomach about three months ago, but the knife failed to relieve him.
Mr. Harsh has taught school regularly for the last 40 years and during the last winter had charge of the Liberty school in Wayne township.
He was past 57 years of age. Mr. Harsh was a student and kept up to date on new methods of teaching. As he was well liked by everyone, he never had any trouble in securing a school.
He leaves a wife and three children. One child, Dessie [HARSH], died several years ago, and the three remaining are: Fred [HARSH], Carl [HARSH] and Fay HARSH. The funeral will be held at the home Saturday afternoon at two o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Grass Creek Cemetery, Wayne Twp.: Andrew J. HARSH, 1858-1914; Emma F. HARSH, 1867-1920; Odessa HARSH, dau of A. J. & Emma, Nov 8, 1886 - Feb 17, 1908]

Saturday, September 5, 1914

[no obits]

Monday, September 7, 1914

Rufus ALSPACH, age 78, died at his home near Talma Saturday evening from blood poisoning. The poisoning is the result of a cut received from an ax, while Mr. Alspach was chopping wood. Mr. Alspach was an old and respected farmer. His wife died two years ago and he leaves several children, who also reside near Talma to mourn him. The funeral was held Monday morning at the Talma U. B. church. Burial was made in the Hamlet cemetery.

Tuesday, September 8, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. John PHILLIPS have been informed of the death of their cousin, Clarence PHILLIPS, who visited here last summer and made many friends here. He died at Benzonia, Mich., last week.

Wednesday, September 9, 1914

Mrs. Pat KELLEY was called to Star City last week on account of the death of her brother's wife. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Thursday, September 10, 1914

A number of citizens of Argos and surrounding county have decided to conduct a thoro investigation as to the killing of Clyde JEFFERIES who came to his death from a shot by deputy game warden C. P. HOLLOWAY. A post mortem has been held and attorneys employed, Chas. KELLISON of Plymouth and Don BOSE of Argos.
Prominent among those interested is Dr. Chas. SARBER, of Argos. He with several others declared they would put up the money for a thoro investigation of the killing and a prosecution of Holloway. A considerable sum was subscribed, it is said, though none has yet been paid in. There is said to be considerable feeling over the matter, especially in the neighborhood of Rutland, where John GOODMAN, proprietor of the store at Rutland, is taking a prominent part in the matter.

Friday, September 11, 1914

Mrs. Anderson MOORE, wife of Anderson MOORE, a laborer, died Friday morning at 8:30 at her home in East Rochester. Mrs. Moore has been ill for some time and the end was hourly expected. She leaves one son Carl [MOORE] and her husband. The cause of her death was heart trouble, but it is thought that she also had tuberculosis. The funeral arrangements have not been completed but will be announced later.

Saturday, September 12, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H. GOOD are here from Marion to attend the ANDERSON funeral.

The funeral of Mrs. Anderson MOORE will take place at the United Brethren church, Sunday afternoon, Rev. H. E. BUTLER officiating. Burial in the Citizens cemetery.
Emmaline Isabel FLYNN was born in Cass county, Indiana, July 20, 1861, and died Sept. 11, 1914, aged 53 years, four months and 10 days. She was married to Anderson MOORE, June 25, 1888. They had two sons, Carl [ANDERSON] and Earl [ANDERSON], the latter dying in infancy. Besides the family she leaves a sister, Mrs. Wm. GOOD, of Marion, and three brothers, Frank [FLYNN], Wilson [FLYNN] and Lee [FLYNN], all of Rochester.

Monday, September 14, 1914

Mrs. Margaret L. AIKENS died at her home on East Eighth street Saturday evening after a long illness. Death was caused by tuberculosis.
Mrs. Aikens was born in Johnstown, Pa., Jan. 15, 1846 and moved to Indiana when she was very young. She was married to Sam AIKENS who still resides here, but they were divorced several years ago. She leaves one son, Archie AIKENS.
The funeral was held this afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the residence on Eighth street. Rev. David LEININGER had charge of the services. The burial was made in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

Tuesday, September 15, 1914 Wednesday, September 16, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, September 17, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. Frank PONTIOUS and family attended the funeral of Mrs. Pontious' brother, Mr. Clarence SMITH, which occurred at Mentone Sunday.

Mrs. M. WILE and son, Lee [WILE], are in Cincinnati to attend the funeral of a relative. They will visit for a short time in Hamilton, Ohio, before returning home.

Friday, September 18, 1914

William Edward SHELTON, aged 61, who has resided in Fulton for some time died this (Friday) afternoon at his home, after an illness of typhoid fever.
He leaves besides his wife no near relatives, having no brothers or sisters, nor any children. An adopted daughter is married to a man named PEFFER, who lives near Macy.
Mrs. George MILLER, E. Ninth street, this city, was his step-mother, being his father's second wife. John [SHELTON], William [SHELTON] and Horace SHELTON were cousins of the deceased, and there are a number of other relatives in this vicinity. Mr. Shelton was a prominent citizen in his community.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Shelton Cemetery, Rochester Twp.: William E. SHELTON, 1853-1914; Melissa SHELTON, 1852-1929]

Saturday, September 19, 1914

Mrs. Roy [Anna BUNN] GELBAUGH, sister of Mrs. Peter LOWMAN of this city, died Thursday evening at her home near Richland Center after an illness caused by tuberculosis.
The funeral will be held Sunday morning at ten-thirty o'clock, Rev. KUONEN, M. E. pastor, having charge. Mrs. Gelbaugh leaves three sons, Harold [GELBAUGH] age eight, Vernon [GELBAUGH] age six, and Gresham [GELBAUGH], age five. Mrs. Gelbaugh was also a sister of Mrs. Clyde LOUGH.

Monday, September 21, 1914

Fred FOBES, well known old time Lake Erie conductor, is dead. The body was buried at Peru Sunday.

Howard LENTZ, who is employed at the American Bakery, received word this morning from Mishawaka that his sister, Miss Fern LENTZ, was dead.
Miss Lentz was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles LENTZ, who formerly lived in this city, where they conducted a grocery in East Rochester. They moved away from here over a year ago. Miss Lentz had been ill for some time.

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob GRASS and Mrs. Dr. A. L. BOWMAN attended the funeral of Mrs. Emma CAMEL [sic] at Nichols last Monday. - - - TALMA ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Nichols Cemetery, Franklin Twp.: Emma JUDD CAMPBELL, wife of Alvin A. CAMPBELL, 1888-1914]

Tuesday, September 22, 1914

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Sherman REED of Fulton died Sunday night, aged about two years. Funeral was held Tuesday.

Wednesday, September 23, 1914

Martin N. KING received a telegram this morning announcing the death of his father, Martin Luther KING, at the home of his daughter in Covington, Ind. Mr. and Mrs. King left at once to attend the funeral. Martin L. King was past 88 years of age.

Thursday, September 24, 1914

Word was received this morning of the death of Mrs. Frank WALTERS in Palisade, Colo., where she went last spring with her husband for the benefit of her health.
Mrs. Walters has been ill for several years. They lived in this city for years and went West in the spring in the hope of helping Mrs. Walters. Mr. Walters will arrive in Rochester Sunday from Colorado with the body of his wife. Mrs. Walters is a sister of Mrs. Charley REED who lives in East Rochester.

Friday, September 25, 1914

The funeral of Cecil BECHTEL of Fulton, who died Tuesday, was held Thursday at the U. B. church in Fulton. His father, a brother and two sisters survive.

The funeral of Miss Fern LENTZ, sister of Howard LENTZ of this city, who died Sept. 20, was held Wednesday at Mishawaka.

Saturday, September 26, 1914

[no obits]

Monday, September 28, 1914

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Otto CARLSON died Saturday evening about eight o'clock. Funeral Sunday morning.

Searchers Sunday afternoon found the body of Isaac DORAN, Peru contactor, well known here, in the old stone quarry of the Wabash river bed just west of the city. He had left his home Friday afternoon evidently out of his mind, and had ended his life by jumping into the river. Bandages from a wound in his throat were found near the scene.
Doran, it will be remembered, was found in the rear of the Scott hotel at Peru some time ago suffering with a deep gash in his throat. The police scouted the story Doran told about being attacked by a large negro and several of the neighborhood hinted at an attempted suicide. However no weapon of any kind was found near Doran.
Mrs. Taylor JEFFERIES, of Talma, sister of the dead man, went to Peru Saturday, where she learned that he was missing.

The funeral of Mrs. Frank WALTERS, who died at Palisade, Colo., will be held at the home of Charles REED Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. F. C. MOON in charge. Interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. Belle GELBAUGH, which was held at this place on last Sunday forenoon, was largely attended. She was only 27 years, four months and some day, just at the prime of life. She leaves three little children which need a mother's care. She wished to live to rear her children with her companion but was submissive to the Lord's will and it was His will to take her to himself. We cannot understand but we know He does all things well. She was respected and loved by all who knew her and the host of sorrowing relatives have the sympathy of the entire community. Rev. E. M. KUONEN officiated and burial was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery of this place. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Mrs. Hannah BRYANT went to Mentone today to attend the funeral of her cousin, Isaac DORAN, who drowned himself at Peru.

Tuesday, September 29, 1914

Despondent because his wife had refused to live with him, Fred CARTER, age 22, a son of James CARTER and a well known young man of Kewanna, committed suicide Mnday afternoon by shooting himself through the heart.
The act took place at the home of his grandfather, J. J. CARTER, who lives in Kewanna. The young man left the family after the dinner hour and went to his room up stairs. After remaining there for a few minutes, he shot himself with a revolver. He was dead before a physician could be summoned.
Fred Carter has been married twice and was the father of one child. His first wife passed away several years ago. His second wife left him during the summer and refused to come back. A sister of the deceased committed suicide several years ago by drinking carbolic acid. It is said at the time that the act was caused by a love affair. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at the home of his father near Kewanna. He leaves a father, mother, wife and two sisters.

Dr. H. E. BENNETT, one of the leading physicians of Mentone and a very prominent citizen of that place, was found dead in his bed at 7:30 o'clock Sunday morning. Death was due to heart trouble, of which disease he had been a sufferer for a number of years.
Dr. Bennett apparently was as well as usual on Saturday and was busy answering calls throughout the day, concluding the day's work by visiting two patients late in the evening. He retired at about 10 o'clock, sleeping on a cot in a room adjoining his office in order to be near his telephone and answer calls, if necessary. At about 7:30 o'clock on Sunday morning, his wife entered the room and found him dead.
Dr. Bennett was about 50 years of age and besides his wife leaves two sons, Herbert BENNETT, who resides at Burket, and Roy BENNETT, who is unmarried and lives at home.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Mentone Cemetery, Franklin Twp.: H. E. BENNETT, M.D., 1855-1914; Ella BENNETT, 1858-1942]

Wednesday, September 30, 1914

Andrew HARRIGAN, who has been an inmate of the county farm for the past year, died Tuesday at the Long hospital in Indianapolis. He was sent there about two weeks ago to undergo an operation for a cancer of the lip. He leaves two relatives who live near Grass Creek, John McLAUGHIN and Mrs. Anna O'BRIEN.

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. George STINSON, who live on the SMITH farm in the Germany neighborhood, died Monday and was buried Tuesday, Rev. SPOHN of this city officiating.

Mrs. Carrie THORMEN WALTERS was born Nov. 6, 1871 at Fulton, Ind., and was married to Frank WALTERS Dec. 25, 1898. They resided west of Rochester until last March, when they sold their home, Mrs. Walters having been an invalid for six years. She and her husband went West to see if a change of climate would give any relief, finally located in Palisade, Colorado where she made many friends and where she passed away Sept. 23, 1914, aged 42 years, 11 months and 17 days. The body was brought from Colorado to the home of her sister, Mrs. Chas REED, where Tuesday the funeral was conducted by Rev. F. C. MOON. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, October 1, 1914

[no obits]

Friday, October 2, 1914

Mrs. Scott SPENCER of Dallas, Texas, formerly Miss Edna SWICK, who had a large circle of acquaintances here, died Sept. 22 of tuberculosis and was buried on the 23rd there. She leaves a husband, six months old daughter, father, mother and other relatives.

Francis ONSTOTT of Akron, who underwent an operation at the hospital Thursday, died Friday morning. He will be taken to his home where the funeral will be held.

Saturday, October 3, 1914

Francis FIELDS, the five months old child of Mr. and Mrs. William FIELDS who live on west Fifth street, died this morning after a short illness. The child took sick Friday at noon. The funeral will be held Sunday.

The funeral of Francis ONSTOTT, who died at Woodlawn hospital Friday, will be held at Akron Sunday at 10 o'clock.

Monday, October 5, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. John GINN and Mrs. David PUTMAN attended the funeral of their niece, Mrs. Jasper LYONS, at Marion Sunday.

Tuesday, October 6, 1914

Joseph FRITZ, a resident of Wabash three years, but who never divulged his previous home, was the man killed by an Erie freight train east of here while sleeping on the track. He carried a thousand dollar insurance policy, made payable to a sister who cannot be located.

Wednesday, October 7, 1914

William BIEDERMAN, a former resident of this city, died Tuesday at Thompsonville, Mich., where he has lived for the last ten years. For years Mr. Biederman was a drayman in this city. The body will be brought here Thursday for burial.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: William N. BIEDERMAN, father, 1849-1915 [sic]; Sarah Ellen BIEDERMAN, mother, 1859-1935]

Thursday, October 8, 1914

The will of Abraham PONTIOUS, who died at his home in Akron last week, was filed in the clerk's office Wednesday. He left all his property to his wife, same to be divided among the children at her death.

The body of William BIEDERMAN, who died in Michigan, was brought to Rochester today. A short funeral service was conducted at the I.O.O.F. cemetery by Rev. A. S. WARRINER.

Friday, October 9, 1914

A letter to the SENTINEL from Mrs. Con WELCH, of Long Beach, Calif., contains the announcement of the funeral services for Mrs. Theresa B. SLICK, 65, wife of the late Judge SLICK, of this city, which weere conducted Saturday, Oct. 3. Burial in Long Beach, Rosedale cemetery.

Saturday, October 10, 1914

Francis HEETER and daughter, Mrs. Fred ROWE, and Mr. and Mrs. Larrie NICHOLS attended the funeral of their niece, Mrs. Ethel FIELDS, in Rochester Sunday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Monday, October 12, 1914 to Friday, October 16, 1914

[no obits]

Saturday, October 17, 1914

After an illness extending over a year, Mrs. Margaret GREGSON, one of the oldest residents of this county, died Friday night at the home of her friend, Mrs. Wilson BOLES, on south Franklin Avenue. Mrs. Gregson was past 78 years of age.
Death was caused by Bright's disease and complications following the removal of a cancer. About eight months ago, while still living in her home on east Ninth street, Mrs. Gregson underwent an operation for the removal of a cancer on the breast. She never fully recovered and about two months ago was taken to the home of Wilson BOLES where she died. Mrs. Boles and Mrs. Gregson have been life long friends and before her marriage Mrs. Boles lived with Mrs. Gregson.
Mrs. Margaret Gregson was born in Michigan about 78 years ago. Her maiden name was [Margaret] MONTGOMERY. When very young she moved to this state. The deceased was first married to Samuel RUSSELL who died 11 years ago. About four years ago she was married to George GREGSON who passed away two years later. Mrs. Gregson leaves only one near relative, a sister, Mrs. Ella ROCKHILL of Tippecanoe, Ind.
As a reward for services during the past three years, Mrs. Gregson has willed a house and lot on Ninth street, her only property, to Mrs. Boles. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at the Boles home at one-thirty, Rev. A. S. WARRINER officiating. Burial at the Mt. Zion cemetery.

J. N. ALSPAUGH, 76, well known here, died Friday at North Judson after an illness with paralysis. He had been landlord of a hotel there for a number of years, and leaves a wife and several children. The funeral will be held at Athens Sunday at 11 o'clock, Rochester lodge I.O.O.F. and the G.A.R. being in charge.

Monday, October 19, 1914

Special to the Sentinel
Indianapolis, Ind., lOct 19 -- Lee N. SHIELDS, of Akron, Ind., was injured fatally early Saturday when he was struck by a fast Pennsylvania train near Plainfield, Ind. It was supposed that he fell asleep on the tracks and was not seen until it was too late for the engineer to stop his train. The victim was brought to the Deaconess Hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate both legs. Shields failed to survive the shock and died a few hours later.
__________
Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., Oct 19 -- Miss Fannie SHIELDS was notified early Saturday morning that her brother was in an Indianapolis hospital with both legs severed, the result of a railway accident. Miss Shields and Mrs. Dora BRIGHT left at once for the city and telegraphed back later that Mr. Shields was dead. It is supposed the body will be brought here for burial.
Lee N. Shields was a twin brother to Bessie SHIELDS, who died not long ago. He was also a nephew of Scott SHIELDS of this city, and for many years made his home here. For a long time he was missing, but was finally located in the West.

Tuesday, October 20, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, October 21, 1914

With Rev. Samuel McNEELY of Tiosa officiating, there was held at the Talma Christian church Tuesday the funeral of Rebecca BUSENBURG, 87, daughter of Peter and Nancy BUSENBURG, who died Sunday at the home of Mrs. Henry BATZ.
She was born in Knox county, O., Feb. 15, 1827, and was united in marriage Nov. 28, 1845 with John GROVES. To this union were born three children, two of which preceded her in death.
On July 31, 1889 her husband died and she later was married to Ephriam TIPTON. After a few years she was again left alone by the death of her husband and was married to Allen HENRY of Tipton, Ind. In a short time she was left again, since which time she has lived with her daughter, Mrs. Batz.
The early life of "Aunt Becca," as she was familiarly known, was spent in Coshocton county, Ohio, near her childhood home where she joined the church in which she was so faithful and loyal. Later with her husband and family she moved to Newcastle township, Fulton county, Indiana, and being one of the early settlers endured the hardships of a pioneer life, she and her husband being two of the founders of the Christian church at Talma.
She leaves a daughter, Mrs. Henry BATZ; two grandchildren, Mrs. M. R. KIZER and Isaac BATZ; four great-grandchildren, one great-great-grandchild and a host of other relatives and friends.

Levi LEITER received a message this morning telling of the death of Mrs. Lydia LATON in an Indianapolis hospital. Mrs. Laton was formerly Miss [Lydia] MEREDITH, and for several years taught Latin in the high school.

Special to the Sentinel
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct 21 -- Coroner DURHAM is conducting an investigation of the death of Nathan Lee SHIELDS, 37, who died at the Deaconess hospital Saturday, supposedly from injuries suffered when run down by an inbound Pennsylvania train near Plainfield that morning. Shields' legs were cut off and it was supposed this caused his death. When Coroner Durham began his investigation, however, he found three knife wounds on the body, one deep one near the heart.
It is thought that Shields, realizing after he was run down that he would be crippled for life, stabbed himself in an effort at suicice. A bloody knife was found in his coat pocket. According to his brother, Shields had brooded over the death of a sister, Miss Bessie [SHIELDS], who died last spring.
Another theory is advanced that Shields was stabbed and then thrown under the train. His brother, Fred [SHIELDS], who lives in Indianapolis, swears that he never saw the knife before, and that he gave his brother another knife not long ago.
Shields appears to have been something of a man of mystery. He lived in Indianapolis until about fifteen years ago. Then he disappeared, asserting that he was going to the West to seek his fortune. His brother, according to the statement made to the coroner, heard nothing from him until about two years ago. Then he got into communication with the wanderer, and prevailed on him to come home. He arrived here in June in response to the appeals of his brother. Three weeks later his sister died.
Miss Fannie SHIELDS, a sister, of Akron, Ind., is here and will take charge of the body after the investigation is finished. Trainmen were to be examined today.

Thursday, October 22, 1914

Blinded by a bonnet which she was wearing and furthjer handicapped by deafness, Mrs. Fred GRAEBER, Sr., 67, a life long resident of this city, was struck and instantly killed this morning at the target at eight o'clock by west bound Erie passenger train number 229.
For 27 years Mrs. Fred Graeber had lived within 30 feet of the two railroads, the Lake Erie and Erie, at the point where they cross in East Rochester. To her trains have ever been a familiar sight and though deaf, she was in the habit of crossing the tracks at least once a day, when every morning she walked to the farm home of William LIGHTFOOT for milk.
The accident was witnessed by Isaac CREVISTON, an Erie employe, who was walking toward the target at the time. He said that he was about 100 feet from the crossing when Mrs. Graeber came from her home and crossed the south track. When in the center of the north track the aged woman changed her course and started to walk directly in front of the oncoming train which was only a few feet away. The bonnet which she was wearing prevented a view of the train and although the whistle blew loudly for the crossing she did not hear.
A matter of four or five seconds would have saved her life. When in the center of the track, according to the only eye witness, Mr. Creviston, Mrs. Graeber saw the train and made every effort to get out of the way, but she was too late. The pilot beam of the engine struck her in the back as she stepped over the north rail, crushed her frail body and jammed her head first into a net work of wires and iron rods which at that point ran along the side of the track. She was instantly killed, the fatal wounds being on her head, which was partly crushed.
The train stopped and backed up to the crossing and with the help of M. C. JONES the towerman, the body was carried to the home, a few feet away. As the body was mangled the ambulance was called and it was taken to the morgue. The home which had suffered so sudden a blow was soon crowded with friends and relatives of the family.

Mrs. Fred GRAEBER was born in Germany and came to this country with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig MARSHALL, when she was but three years old. Mrs. Graeber was 67 years old on the 10th day of December, 1913. On the 10th day of December 1868, in Richland township, this county, Miss Margaret MARSHALL and Fred GRAEBER were married. They were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are living. They are: Floyd [GRAEBER], Max [GRAEBER] and Harry [GRAEBER] of this city, Fred [GRAEBER] of California, Mrs. Emma LONG of Texas, Mrs. Mary INGRAHAM of Pennsylvania, and Miss Etta GRAEBER of Ft. Wayne. Mrs. Graeber has two brothers and two sisters living, John [MARSHALL] and George MARSHALL of this county, and Mrs. Louise ZINK of South Bend and Mrs. Lydia KERLER who lives north of Rochester. Mrs. Charley KIME, a daughter and Ernest GRAEBER, a son, died several years ago.

Friday, October 23, 1914

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., Oct. 22 -- Mrs. Clara Luella MORRETT, 49, was found dead Thursday afternoon at five o'clock, when her husband, William MORRETT, returned to the home two miles east of here, from work on the roads. The mother had been alone since noon, as the two youngest daughters were in school.
According to Dr. FERRY, Mrs. Morrett had been dead for several hours. She was found by her husband lying on her bed where it was evident that she had gone to rest. County Coroner LOUGH returned a verdict of death due to heart trouble.
Mrs. Morrett was the mother of four daughters, three of whom are living: Mrs. Marie JERERD who lives near the family home, and Fay [MORRETT] and Elizabeth [MORRETT], who are in school. A daughter, Lura [MORRETT], died several years ago. Mrs. Morrett was the daughter of Philip RADER. She leaves two brothers, Schuyler [RADER] and Nelson RADER, and one sister, Mrs. Sarah NELSON. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at the home.

Saturday, October 24, 1914

Special to the Sentinel
Winamac, Ind., Oct. 24 -- Misses Myrtle [KELSO] and Olive KELSO, aged 20 and 22, respectively, daughters of O. S. KELSO, a prominent contractor, were struck and instantly killed here this morning by a west bound Pennsylvania express train. A third sister, Miss Gladys [KELSO], escaped injury.
The three girls were going to Chicago, and had learned that their train was three hours late. The agent told them that the second section would stop, but the girls mistook the first for their train, attempted to cross the double track and were caught. Their bodies were badly mangled.
__________

Miss Olive KELSO attended Rochester college a number of years ago. The Kelsos were very close friends of the family of Rev. A. S. WARRINER, who was notified here Saturday morning. The Kelso girls were very well known here.

After an illness of several years as the result of tuberculosis, Jacob ROBBINS died Friday evening at his home in East Rochester. He was past 60 years old and leaves a wife and a child three months old.
Mr. Robbins has been confined to his home for several months. He moved to East Rochester last spring. Previous to that time he had lived for several years in Michigan, where he was married. For years he lived near Green Oak where he was well known. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at the United Brethren church.

A few changes have been in the arrangements for the Graeber funeral. The services will be at the house on Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. PULLMAN of the Evangelical church officiating. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Jonathan BUSENBURG went to Tippecanoe this morning to attend the funeral of an uncle.

Monday, October 26, 1914

Otis DAVIS, age 29, died Monday morning at eight o'clock at the home of his mother, Mrs. Lydia DAVIS, who lives at Fulton Ave. and 5th streets. Death was caused by tuberculosis.
Mrs. Davis and her son returned several weeks ago from California where they went in the hopes of benefitting his health. The change did not do him any good. For years the family lived near Talma on a farm where Ira DAVIS, the father, was killed several years ago in a runaway. The only surviving son, Jack DAVIS, now lives on the home place near Talma. Otis Davis was born on the farm near Talma and received his education in the school there.

The funeral of Mrs. Fred GRAEBER, Sr., was held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock in the home in East Rochester, Rev. PULLMAN of the Evangelical church officiating. Interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Three daughters from out of the city were here, Mrs. Frank INGRAHAM and son of Franklin, Pa., Mrs. Charles LONG of Dallas, Texas, and Miss Etta GRAEBER of St. Joe, Mo. Fred GRAEBER of California was the only child not present.

A. P. COPELAND is in Marion, Ohio, to attend the funeral of his father-in-law, Luther BOLEN.

George MARTINDALE and daughter, Ada [MARTINDALE], went to Laketon this morning to attend the funeral of Mr. Martindale's sister.

Tuesday, October 27, 1914

The funeral of Otis DAVIS will be held Wednesday at one o'clock, at the M.E. church in Mentone, Rev. PULLMAN of the Evangelical church in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery at Mentone.

Wednesday, October 28, 1914

Special to the Sentinel
Argos, Ind., Oct 28 - - A short service was held Tuesday over the body of Prof. C. L. HOTTEL, 67, superintendent of schools here, who died Sunday of apoplexy.
Prof. Hottel, a noted educator of Marshall county and well known in the northern part of the state, died suddenly at his home here Sunday night. He had attended church services in the morning and taught his regular class in Sunday school. Upon returning home he was stricken down and remained conscious only a short time.
The body was taken to Hartsville, Bartholomew county, for burial. Serviving are his wife, a son and daughter, the latter being a teacher in the Argos schools.

Thursday, October 29, 1914

[no obits]

Friday, October 30, 1914

It became known today that John MILLER and Charles MILLER, who are connected with the Macklin murder mystery in South Bend, were former residents of Rochester, where they worked as brick masons.
Hazel MACKLIN, the 17-year-old girl who was found murdered in South Bend Monday, was the niece of Chas. Miller. John Miller, a brother, married Miss Carrie McKEE, a sister to Frank McKEE of this city. The Millers now live in South Bend. They moved away from Rochester about seven years ago.
The police of all cities in the northern part of the state and also of southern Michigan are interested in the Macklin case. Clews are developing everywhere, and a man by the name PATO is now being sought. The body of the girl was found in a vault two months after she had been killed.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. DECK attended the funeral of their brother-in-law at Thornhope last week. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

The funeral services of Mrs. Clara RADER MORRETT were conducted Sunday afternoon by Rev. John McCOLLEY at the family residence two miles east of Akron where she was born and always lived almost a half a century. Many friends and neighbors attended the service. The floral offerings were beautiful expressions of the esteem of friends of the departed. Interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Saturday, October 31, 1914 to Monday, November 2, 1914

[no obits]

Tuesday, November 3, 1914

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. Bert STREET, 23, who died at Pontiac, Ill., last week. Mrs. Street was formerly Miss Susie Mae FELTY and was born near Kewanna.

She spent most of her life near that place. A few years ago she was united in marriage to Bert STREET of Pontiac, Ill., and spent the remaninder of her life at that place. She was a member of the Evangelical church. Besides the husband she leaves three small children -- two daughters and a son, her mother, Mrs. Lenora HARDING of South Bend, two brothers, J. M. FELTY of this city and Harold HARDING and one sister, Miss Grace HARDING, besides other relatives.
The funeral services were held at the first M.E. church of Pontiac, conducted by Rev. T. H. RYAN of that city. Burial was made at the South Side cemetery.

Wednesday, November 4, 1914

The body of an Italian laborer was found Wednesday morning about one mile east of Germany Station by the section men. Val ZIMMERMAN was notified at once and he drove to Germany and brought the remains to Rochester.
The man had been killed by falling under a freight or passenger train upon which it is supposed he was stealing a ride. The body was completely severed and a number of deep cuts were found upon the head. From papers found it is thought that his name was Nick NOWICH and his home in Bassett, Wis. The police of that city were notified of the death. But 24 cents in money was in his clothes.

Thursday, November 5, 1914

Rev. McNEELY was called to Plymouth Sunday to conduct the funeral of George MECHLING who died suddenly Friday evening of apoplexy.
Mrs. McNEELY, Mrs. Emma HILL, Mrs. Viola DECK, Mrs. David PALMER, Miss Elizabeth COLE, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. STRAUDERMAN and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. PALMER attended the funeral of Geo. MECHLING at Plymouth Sunday.
Orville UMBAUGH took Obediah SMITH and family to Plymouth Sunday to attend the funeral of their son-in-law, Geo. MECHLING.
Guy SMITH of Illinois attended the funeral of his brother-in-law at Plymouth Sunday, and spent the night with his parents. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

Friday, November 6, 1914

[no paper]

Saturday, November 6, 1914

A telegram was received by the SENTINEL, Friday morning from San Diego, California, announcing the death of John M. FISH, 75, father of Carl FISH, at Chulavista, California.
John M. Fish was a pioneer resident of this county, but moved to California over one year ago after his son left Oklahoma and settled in San Diego.
He was an ex-county assessor of Fulton county. For years he lived on a farm in Newcastle township where he was well known. The funeral will take place in San Deigo Saturday. Burial in the Greenlawh cemetery at that place.

Monday, November 9, 1914

The body of the man found dead on the Erie east of Germany last week was buried in the Citizen's cemetery Sunday afternoon at four o'clock. Rev. A. S. WARRINER had charge of the services. Val ZIMMERMAN made every effort to discover the identity of the man, but all telegrams failed to bring an answer.
[NOTE: See Nov. 4: Nick NOWICH]

Tuesday, November 10, 1914

Michael SULLIVAN of northwest of Tiosa was stricken with paralysis Sunday morning and died this (Tuesday) morning. Mr. Sullivan is an uncle of Dr. Harley TAYLOR.

George NEFF, Rochester's well known mechanical genius, was killed Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, when he fell striking his head on the floor of the bath room at his home on east Eighth street. A broken blood vessel in the brain caused death.
Mr. Neff had been a cripple all of his life, never having had use of his lower limbs. He was found on the floor by his house keeper, Mrs. Rose MITCHELL, who called help at once. Mr. Neff was 60 years old and leaves but one relative, Lester WILSON, who lives east of Rochester. Deceased left no will. Mr. Neff has been ill since the middle of August when he closed his repair shop. Doctor George HILL, the physician in the case, says that Mr. Neff's illness contributed to his death.

Wednesday, November 11, 1914

The funeral of Michael SULLIVAN, who died Tuesday, will be held Thursday at the Lutheran church at Tiosa at 11 o'clock.

The funeral of George NEFF will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock at the house.

Thursday, November 12, 1914

Eleanor Virginia [MYERS], daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. MYERS, died Wednesday afternoon at the home in Macy. She was about one year old. The funeral will be held at the house on Friday afternoon at one o'clock. Burial will take place at the cemetery in Peru.

Friday, November 13, 1914

Mrs. Milton HENDERSON has returned home from Camden, Ind., where she attended the funeral of her mother, Mrs. ARMSTRONG. - - - MT. ZION ITEMS.

Michael SULLIVAN was stricken with paralysis Sunday morning. He died Tuesday morning. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

Saturday, November 14, 1914

According to word received here this (Saturday) morning, Miss Pearl RICHARDS, a member of the 1914 Rochester high school class, died Friday at the home of her parents in Kokomo, after an extended illness of typhoid fever.
Deceased went to high shcool here for some time, making her home with her brother, Prof. Oren RICHARDS, now in Columbia university. She was popular as a student. The funeral is Sunday afternoon at Kokomo and it is probable that a delegation from the high school here will attend.

Monday, November 16, 1914

Mrs. Maude LAWRENCE, who has been ill for the past summer, died suddenly Saturday afternoon at the home of her sisters, Misses Jennie [THOMSON], Bessie [THOMSON] and Susan THOMSON, in East Rochester. Death was caused by cerebral softening.
Mrs. Lawrence became afflicted with brain trouble last February, when she came to Rochester and was taken care of by her sisters. Recently she seemed to have been improving and was able to walk around the home. Saturday she died within two minutes after being stricken and before the family had time to call a physician. Doctor LORING and Coroner LOUGH were called at once and arrived soon after the death.
Mrs. Lawrence was born in Peru about 38 years ago, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard THOMSON, both now dead. In 1900, she was married to W. H. LAWRENCE, who is now living in Plymouth. They were the parents of one son, Thomas LAWRENCE, who is living. Mrs. Lawrence leaves, besides the three sisters, three brothers, Harry [THOMSON], Clyde [THOMSON] and Guy THOMSON. They are all here for the funeral which will be held Tuesday morning at nine o'clock. R. R. EASTERDAY of the First Christian Science church of Indianapolis will have charge of the services. Burial at Peru.

Tuesday, November 17, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, November 18, 1914

The funeral of Peter MEDARY, 62, first cousin of Peter STINGLY of this city, was held at the home in Peru Wednesday. Mr. Medary was a former resident of this county and his first wife was Miss Ida BURTON. He leaves a wife and a daughter.

Thursday, November 19, 1914

Mrs. J. J. EGER, who was taken to a hospital at South Bend Friday, was operated on Friday night for an absess on the brain. Her condition was such that she never rallied and died Sunday morning at 5 o'clock, the remains being brought to Kewanna on the evening train Sunday. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Friday, November 20, 1914

Mrs. Samantha STRUCKMAN, mother of William STRUCKMAN died at his home in Pleasant Valley today (Friday). She had recently moved on the farm from this city.

Boyd F. BLACK, 42, was born in Fulton county, Indiana, on August 25, 1872, and died at his home near Chase, Michigan, November 13, 1914. Funeral at Chase.

Saturday, November 21, 1914

D. A. BRADLEY, a pioneer resident of Culver and Fulton county, is dead at Culver.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Poplar Grove Cemetery, Union Twp.: Daniel A. BRADLEY, father, Feb 5, 1851 - Nov 15, 1914; Margaret J. BRADLEY, mother, Mar 15, 1846 - Aug 7, 1926]

Mrs. Samantha STRUCKMAN, 71, who died at the farm home east of Rochester Friday afternoon, was the wife of Daniel STRUCKMAN, who was killed in December, 1910, by a maddened bull.
Mr. and Mrs. Struckman were among the early settlers of this county and came here in 1864 after their marriage in 1861 in Lancaster county, Ohio. They purchased the farm northeast of Rochester soon after coming to this county and on it they lived until death. Mrs. Struckman was the mother of four children, two of whom are living: William STRUCKMAN, who is now on the home place, and Mrs. Florence CARR, of the state of Washington. Two sons died when they were very young.
Mrs. Struckman's death was caused by dropsy. She had been sick for over a year. Her maiden name was Miss Samantha FENSTEMAKER and she was born in Ohio in March, 1843. Mrs. Struckman was a member of the Evangelical church of this city. She leaves one brother and two sisters living in Ohio.
Mrs. Struckman had made all arrangements for her funeral and several months before she died Mrs. Struckman picked out the songs, the verse in the Bible to preach about and had visited Rochester and picked out a cement vault.
The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the Evangelical church in this city. Rev. George PULLMAN will have charge. Burial at the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Max SOLIDAY, of Thurston, Ohio, arrived this afternoon to attend the funeral of Mrs. Samantha STRUCKMAN.

Monday, November 23, 1914

Mrs. Matilda FUNK, 76, widow of John FUNK, died Saturday afternoon at the home of her son, John FUNK, who lives south of Athens. She had been ill for over a year. The funeral was held this (Monday) morning at the United Brethren church in Athens. Rev. E. N. BALLOU had charge of the services.
Mrs. Funk was born in Ohio in 1828, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William WARD. In 1867 she was married to John Funk, who died at the home near Athens in 1894. In 1885 Mr. and Mrs. Funk moved to Fulton county and purchased a farm near Athens. They were the parents of eight children, two of whom died when very young.
The following children are living: Mrs. Rose E. CLEMENS of Akron, George [FUNK] and

John FUNK, who live near Rochester, Mrs. Martha BLINN and Cary H. FUNK of this city. Mrs. Funk leaves one sister in Ohio who is 82 years old. She had three half-brothers, living in Ohio, Michael [STREEVEY], Thomas [STREEVEY] and Peter STREEVEY and one half-sister, Mrs. Tobitha SEILER. Early in life Mrs. Funk united with the Methodist church, but later joined the United Brethren.

Clarence Edward BROWER, eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry BROWER of this city, died this morning at the home after an illness of 20 weeks. Death was caused by acute Brights disease and leakage of the heart. He leaves one sister, Medrith [BROWER] and one brother, Donald [BROWER]. The funeral will probably be held Wednesday.

Tuesday, November 24, 1914

Samuel BRICKLE, one of the oldest men in the county and the inventor of Brickles Liniment, died at the county farm Monday evening on his 90th birthday.
The aged man had long been a well known figure in Rochester where he had lived since 1864. About 15 years ago he became crippled through disease and was compelled to walk in a stooping posture. For years he lived in East Rochester where he built the residence now occupied by Charles REED.
In 1870 Mr. Brickle began the manufacture of the well known liniment and traveled over this section of the state selling it. In late years he became so feeble that he was unable to work and the remedy was turned over to his son, J. F. BRICKLE, who lives in Syracuse, Ind. Through misfortune and sickness, Mr. Brickle was compelled to go to the county farm about a year ago. His son, Louis [BRICKLE], took care of his father while he lived.
Samuel Brickle was born in Pennsylvania and moved to South Bend in 1854. Ten years later he moved to Rochester. He was married to Myria SULLIVAN who died in 1901. They were the parents of four children, two of whom are living, Charley BRICKLE of Washington and J. F. BRICKLE of Syracuse, Ind.
The funeral will be held Wednesday at Hoover's chapel, burial at the Odd Fellows cemetery.
[Rochester Sentinel, Tuesday, November 24, 1914]

Wednesday, November 25, 1914

Mannasseh LEEDY, 67, one of the best known farmers in the county, died at his home five miles north of Rochester, Tuesday night at 10 o'clock, after an extended illness of what is believed to have been stomach trouble.
Mr. Leedy, who lived on the Michigan road north, for years, was a prominent and well-to-do farmer. He leaves besides his wife, three sons: Ezra [LEEDY], Charles [LEEDY] and Albert [LEEDY], all of whom live near their father. Partial arrangements for the funeral Friday afternoon at Richland Center have been made.
Mr. Leedy was a civil war veteran and served 17 months with the 11th Indiana. He was born in Miami county, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham LEEDY. He was married about 46 years ago and soon after he moved to Fulton county. He owned the farm where he died for over 20 years.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Richland Center I.O.O.F., Richland Twp.: Mannasseh LEEDY, father, Co H 11 Reg Ind Vol, Dec 17, 1847 - Nov 24, 1914; Margaret M. WYNN LEEDY, his wife, mother, Jan 28, 1846 - May 21, 1918]

Thursday, November 26, 1914

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, November 27, 1914

Peter DISHER, 65, died Thursday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. O. E. ACKER in Minneapolis, Minn., according to word received here by his son-in-law, Atty. Arthur METZLER.
Mr. Disher had been ill for some time with pneumonia, and Mrs. Metzler had been at his bedside for a week. Miss Blanche DISHER, the third daughter, who teaches here, went Monday. Mrs. Disher died in Minneapolis in February, 1913. There survive, besides the three daughters, one son, Charles L. [DISHER], of McClain, Ill.
The body will be brought to Plymouth, where the Dishers lived, after a short service in Minneapolis. Burial at Plymouth Saturday.

The funeral of Mrs. Will FUNK was held at Mt. Hope church Monday at 11 o'clock by Rev. BALLOU, burial in Mt. Hope cemetery. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: William M. FUNK, d. Jan 5, 1894, ae 56y-7m-5d; Matilda FUNK, 1837-1914]

Saturday, November 28, 1914

Two large peach seeds, which lodged in his stomach several months ago, are believed to have caused the death of Mannasseh LEEDY, 76, whose funeral took place today (Saturday) at Richland Center, Rev. Samuel McNEELY officiating.
For some time Mr. Leedy had been suffering from severe pains and although many physicians were called upon to investigate his case no cause for his illness could be ascertained. When he died a post mortem examination was held and the two large peach seeds were found in his stomach. Rochester doctors attributed his death to these seeds which it is believed were swallowed by Mr. Leedy during the early part of the past summer. He leaves a wife and three sons.

Monday, November 30, 1914

Otto BUCK, 14, victim of the accidental shooting at Deedsville, died this (Monday) morning, according to word received here. He was a son of a well known Lake Erie brakeman and was fatally wounded Friday.
There was not a physician in Deedsville, or in the nearby towns, when the news of the accident reached the boy's parents. A desperate effort was made to secure doctors, but unfortunately all were in Peru on business. Three hours had passed when the automobile of the first medical man rumbled up to the Buck residence.
However, in as much as the boy had one lung perforated, his bronchial tubes partly shot away, the main nerve trunk governing his left arm shattered, and was greatly weakened from the loss of blood, he had small chance to recover in any event. Funeral Tuesday afternoon.

Tuesday, December 1, 1914

Miss Myrtle HENDRICKSON went to Peru this morning to attend the funeral of Ora WILKINS.

Wednesday, December 2, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, December 3, 1914

The funeral of Mannasseh LEEDY, of this place, on last Friday afternoon, was largely attended. He was nearly 67 years of age. He suffered a long time with stomach trouble which was thought to be cancer, but a post mortem was held and two peach seeds were found lodged in his stomach and by their appearance had been there for a long time. It is thought that they caused most all of his trouble. He leaves to mourn their loss a host of relatives and friends, but he was ready to go and our loss is but his gain. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Mrs. George MEDBOURN died Saturday morning at 8 o'clock. Heart trouble was cause of death. - - - MAXINKUCKEE ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Culver Masonic Cemetery, Union Twp.: G. L. MEDBOURN, 1860-1922; Anna MEDBOURN, his wife, 1856-1914]

Friday, December 4, 1914

SAMUEL BRICKLE WAS FAMOUS
"Who has not heard of Brickle's Linement?" queries the Argos Reflector and then continues. "Few of us are unfamiliar with that name, but it is probable that a still smaller number of local readers knew of the identity or whereabouts of the 'inventor' of that erstwhile famous household remedy?
"Back in the 70's and the 80's, Samuel BRICKLE, with his humble medicine wagon, was as regular in his periodic visits through the rural districts of this community as our own "Doc" HOFFMAN is now. Samuel Brickle with his beard cut ala Horace Greeley, seemed quite an old and decrepit man during his later visits which became less frequent and finally ceased entirely.
"Children then unborn have grown to manhood and womanhood, a generation has passed and most of us had quite forgotten the old peddler. Now we hear that Samuel Brickle, the original and only patentee of the aforesaid household remedy, died at the county farm infirmary near Rochester, on Monday of last week, Nov. 29, his ninetieth birthday! He had been a citizen of Rochester for half a century."

Edward S. FULTZ, 53, ex-sheriff of Fulton county and a prominent democrat, died at 5:30 this morning at his farm home two miles northeast of Rochester. Mr. Fultz had been in failing health for five years as the result of paralysis, the last attack on Tuesday evening of this week, causing death.
Five years ago he suffered an attack of paralysis which left him in very poor health. Noted

physicians in many cities were consulted and for a while it was thought that he had fully recovered. From the last attack, Mr. Fultz never rallied, dying this morning. The members of the family and his close relatives were at the bedside.
Edward S. FULTZ was one of the best sheriffs that this county ever had. Elected November 3, 1898, he served for the next four years, being re-elected for his second term by a good majority. Mr. Fultz was tireless in the performance of his duties and secured a reputation as an efficient official. He attracted the attention of the state by capturing Roy JONES, the man charged with kidnapping Nellie BERGER. Sheriff Fultz followed Jones to Columbus, Ind., where tha arrest was made.
Mr. Fultz was born in this county in 1860, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel FULTZ. Twenty-seven years ago he was united in marriage with Miss Nora HOLMES, who survives him. They have one daughter, Miss Mildred FULTZ. Mr. Fultz lived on a farm all of his life with the exception of four years spent in office. A year ago he sold out and took a smaller place nearer Rochester. He was a member of the K. of P. lodge, the Macabbees, the Modern Woodmen and the Fulton County Horse Thief Detective Association. He leaves one brother and one sister, Mrs. Sadie HEIGHWAY of near Akron, and Benton FULTZ, who lives in the state of Washington. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

Adam K. DAINE, aged about 80, died Wednesday evening at his home near Gilead after an extended illness. He was the father of Peter [DAINE] and Charles DAINE, both of this city. Funeral Sunday afternoon at one o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Gilead Cemetery, Perry Twp.: Adam K. DAINE, 1835-1914; Margaret DAINE, 1854-1922]

Saturday, December 5, 1914

Mr. and Mrs. N. G. HUNTER of Wabash arrived today to attend the funeral of Edward FULTZ.

Monday, December 7, 1914

Mrs. Lavina WALTERS, mother of John WALTERS of this city, died Saturday night at her home near Whippoorwill, north of Rochester. Mrs. Walters was the widow of Michael WALTERS. She had been very ill for some time.
Mrs. Walters was born in Pennsylvania, September 17, 1831. She came to Fulton county when very young and was one of the first settlers in what is known as the Germany neighborhood. She leaves two sons, Charles WALTERS, of North Manchester, and John WALTERS, of this city. The funeral will be held Tuesday at 10 o'clock at the South Germany church.

Tuesday, December 8, 1914

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 9, 1914

Mrs. Henry [O.] BLACKBURN, 47, of near Green Oak, died Wednesday morning, a victim of tuberculosis. She had suffered with the disease for over ten years.
Mrs. Blackburn [Minnie L. CAMERER] was the daughter of Jacob CAMERER, and her brother Edward CAMERER died less than a year ago. Mrs. Blackburn leaves two sons, Lyman [BLACKBURN] and Carl BLACKBURN, the latter married and living near the home place. Mrs. Blackburn has one sister, Mrs. Addie QUICK, of near Athens, and one brother, Omar CAMERER, who lives south of Rochester. Mrs. Blackburn was a member of the Methodist church of Green Oak and of the Rebekah lodge of the same place.

A telegram was received from Hammond this morning saying that Harley CLEMANS, who was injured Tuesday, died early this morning. His wife, who left here Tuesday afternoon, arrived before he passed away. The body was brought to the home in Rochester this afternoon, arriving on the train due here at 1:40 p.m.
It was learned this morning that the injuries which caused his death was due to a broken jack which gave way when he was under a car.
It seems that Mr. Clemans was working on a freight car which needed repairing and which had been lifted off of the trucks. It was necessary to get under the car and a jack screw was used to raise the structure several feet above the ground. Mr. Clemans then crawled under and while in this position, the jack broke letting one end of the car fall across his stomach.
The tremendous weight mashed his body nearly flat and he was compelled to lay in this position for some time until his helper ran and secured several men who blocked up the car and pulled Mr. Clemans out. He was taken to the hospital, where the physicians found at once that he was fatally injured.
Harley Clemans was well known in this city where he had lived for several years. His parents live in the vicinity of Athens. He had worked for the Erie railroad for a number of years. He leaves a wife and two children.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Harley CLEMANS, Oct 7,1871 - Dec 9, 1914; Jennie COOPER CLEMANS, his wife, Mar 11, 1879 - Dec 22, 1922]

Thursday, December 10, 1914

[no obits]

Friday, December 11, 1914

Lee [MILLER] and W. C. MILLER received a telegram this morning from Gettysburg, Pa., announcing the death of their cousin, Rufus SHEADS, a railroad man, age 47. He has often visited in Rochester.

Saturday, December 12, 1914

A. J. CART, 72, a farmer, was instantly killed Friday night at 9:26 o'clock, and his wife was fatally injured, when their buggy was struck by Erie express train No. 13, at Servia, east of here. The rig was totally demolished and the horse was killed.
The aged couple had been attending services at the Brethren church southeast of Servia and

were driving home in their closed buggy when the accident occurred. No. 13, one of the fastest trains on the Erie, was traveling at a rate of 55 miles an hour when the locomotive struck the buggy. The engineer saw the rig drive upon the track, but too late.
Three children survive. One son, J. D. CART, is postmaster at Servia. Another son, Reuben [CART], lives in the West, and a daughter, Mrs. Nettie WOLF, lives in North Manchester.

Catherine STUDEBAKER died at the home of Joe HOUSE west of Fulton Tuesday morning at the age of 86. She lived nearly all her life in Liberty township, was married to George HOUSE. A son was born to this union and with other relatives is left to mourn. The funeral was held Thursday at the Baptist church in Fulton at 11 o'clock.

The funeral of Harley CLEMANS who was killed at Hammond, was held this afternoon at one o'clock at the Athens church.

The funeral of Mrs. Henry BLACKBURN was held Friday afternoon at the Methodist church at Green Oak.

Monday, December 14, 1914

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Loy PEOPLES who was born last week was buried Sunday afternoon in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Lavina WALTERS was born in Northumberland county, Pa., Sept. 17, 1831, and died Dec. 5, 1914, aged 83 years, two months and 18 days. Grandma WALTERS was a faithful member of the Zion church of the Evangelical association for the past 61 years and a member of this class during all these years. Her husband, two sons and two daughters preceded her in death. Grandma leaves three sons, three daughters, 22 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren, one sister, four brothers and a host of friends to mourn their loss.

Tuesday, December 15, 1914

According to word which has been received here by Mrs. Abe BEREBITSKY, wife of the well known junk man, her brother, whose name translated into English was something like Willie TUROTZSKY, has been killed while serving in the Russian army in Poland.
Turotzsky, who was 39 years old, leaves a wife and three children who are in dire need, and the Berebitskys are aiding them as much as possible. They live in the town of Schek (pronounced Schastz), in Minsky-Governy. Turetzsky had an orchard which he had rented from the government, paying 500 rubles for its use. He was called away before he was able to handle the yield, his family could get no help, there was little market for apples, and they lost all.
As a result, came the appeal from the Czar's land and it will be answered by Abe and his wife, who never do things by halves. Just where Mrs. Berebitsky's brother was killed, was not learned, but he doubtless fell in Poland, where Russian troops have done most of their fighting. Turetzsky was a Russian Jew.

The funeral of Mrs. Sarah FEECE of near Culver was held Monday at the Athens U. B. church at 1 o'clock. Rev. BALLOU of this city had charge. Mrs. Feece was 88 years old and was the widow of Jacob FEECE.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Sarah FEECE, 1827-1916 [sic]]

Wednesday, December 16, 1914

[no obits]

Thursday, December 17, 1914

John H. ORR, who died Sunday at the Bourbon home of his son, Joseph ORR, at the advancred age of 90 years and one day, was buried at Pierceton today (Thursday).

William LISEY, for a number of years assessor of Union township, died Wednesday noon at his home, two miles northeast of Kewanna, after an extended illness of tuberculosis.
Lisey had been confined to his home for some time, not having been out since election day. He was past 60 years of age and the end had been expected for some time. He leaves a wife and five children - Mrs. Orville WHARTON, Mrs. Guy IRVIN, Miss Minnie [LISEY], John [LISEY] and Harry [LISEY], the last named being married. Lisey had served two terms as assessor of Union township and was recently elected on the republican ticket for a third term.
The funeral arrangements are not known.

Clay SHEETS went to Decatur, Ind. this morning to attend the funeral of a cousin.

Friday, December 18, 1914

Mrs. E. A. RANNELLS went to Athens Monday where she attended the funeral of a near relative. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Several from here attended the funeral of Grandma WALTERS Tuesday of last week. The Walters girls are staying at the home of Alvia KALE and Chas. BEEHLER. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.

The funeral of Harley CLEMANS was held at Mt. Hope U. B. church Saturday afternoon at 1:30 and burial was made in Mt. Hope cemetery. A large crowd of relatives and friends attended. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

A. E. BABCOCK and Henry ZELLARS attended the funeral of William LISEY at Kewanna today.

Saturday, December 19, 1914

John J. CARTER, well past 80, for years a resident of Wayne township, died this (Saturday) morning at his home in Kewanna of dropsy and old age. Besides his wife, he leaves two sons and four daughters, all married.

[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Barnett Cemetery, Union Twp.: John J. CARTER, Sargt Co E 87 Ind Vol Inf, 1834-1914; Sarah E. CARTER, his wife, 1839-1925]

Monday, December 21, 1914

Benjamin B. SHARP, who has lived for the last 12 years on a farm northeast of Rochester, died this morning (Monday) after a long illness. Four years ago he was afflicted with paralysis which left him helpless. He was past 60 years of age and leaves a wife and five children.
The children living are: John SHARP, Mrs. Daisy HAMLET of this city, Mrs. Addie SCOTT of this city, Mrs. Mabel BROSE who is living at home, and Russell SHARP, who is living at home. Mr. Sharp was a member of the Gleaner Lodge at Leiters. He was a member of the United Brethren church of this city. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the U.B. church in this city.

A telegram was received by Mrs. Julia HOOVER Saturday announcing the death of B. M. ELLIOTT in Washington, D.C. He was 75 years of age and leaves one daughter, Mrs. B. L. CORBY of Maryland. Mr. Elliott was an uncle of Mrs. Hoover.

John TROUTMAN received word this morning that his aunt, Mrs. Jesse BALDIN of Watseka, Ill., was dead. Jesse BALDIN was a former resident of this city and was a step-son of Isaac TRUE. He lived here during the war.

Friends in Rochester received word Saturday of the death of Peter ARMANTROUT of Peru.

Tuesday, December 22, 1914

Mrs. G. W. HAYWARD received a telegram from South Bend this morning stating that her brother-in-law, Henry ROBBINS, was dead. He is well known here.

Wednesday, December 23, 1914

J. D. BONINE has gone to Cassopolis, Mich., to attend the funeral of his brother.

Thursday, December 24, 1914

Augustine HISEY, 69, ex-county commissioner, died at his farm home one-half mile south of Tiosa at 12:30 today (Thursday) after a long illness of diabetes. He had been seriously ill for four weeks.
Mr. Hisey was one of the best known farmers of the county, having lived on his place for 33 years. The farm he owned was his father's before him, and he worked hard, acquiring a comfortable fortune. In 1898 he was persuaded to make the race for commissioner on the democratic ticket, was elected but not re-elected. He was a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church near Tiosa. His disease came upon him four years ago, and gradually grew worse, compelling him to take his bed about a month ago. The family expected the end.

Augustine HISEY was born in Columbiana county, O., in 1845, the son of Jacob and Hannah HISEY, who moved with their family to this county about 1875. In 1881, Mr. Hisey was married to Mrs. Mary E. STRAWBRIDGE, at Macy, Ind., and at once took up a residence on his father's farm. To them was born one child, Mrs. Emma EASH, who has been dead eight years. Her husband, Frank [EASH] died several years ago, leaving two children, Mildred [EASH] and Edward [EASH]. Mrs. Hisey had two daughters by her first husband, Mrs. Miles PERSCHBACHER and Mrs. Edgar ROBBINS, both of whom reside near Tiosa. Mr. Hisey's parents have long been dead, and he leaves besides his wife, but two brothers, John [HISEY] of this city and Daniel [HISEY] of Bellefontaine, Ohio. Two brothers, Henry [HISEY] and Charles [HISEY], and a sister, Mrs. Thomas PARTRIDGE, are dead.
No funeral arrangements have as yet been made.

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph KEEVER and Mrs. H. E. McDOWELL went to Roann last Sunday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Keever's mother, Mrs. J. JOHN. Mrs. John's condition for a long time was serious and death came as relief to one who had nobly fulfilled many years beyond that allotted to the average individual. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Friday, December 25, 1914

[no paper - holiday]

Saturday, December 26, 1914

The funeral of Augustine HISEY will be held at the Lutheran church at Tiosa Sunday morning. The procession will leave the house at ten o'clock.

Monday, December 28, 1914

Walter CLIFTON, eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert CLIFTON of Chicago and grandson of Mrs. Angeline BURTON of this city, died at his home Saturday afternoon.
The body was brought to Rochester this afternoon where the funeral was held. The child's death was caused by heart leakage with which he had suffered for several years. He is one of four children. He was well known in this city and had often visited at the home of his grandmother on west 13th street.

Tuesday, December 29, 1914

Dr. C. J. LORING today (Tuesday) received a telegram stating that his brother, Dr. D. J. LORING of Valparaiso, passed away early this morning.
Dr. Loring was 66 years old, had practiced medicine for 40 years and was well known in this city. He leaves, besides a wife, three brothers and three sisters, Dr. C. J. LORING of this city, Dr. S. C. LORING of Plymouth and Judge H. H. LORING of Valparaiso, Mrs. Jane ABBOTT of Chanute, Kans., Mrs. Huldah MARTIN of Fulton and Mrs. Mary CRONLEY of Burr Oak.
The funeral will be held at Valparaiso Thursday morning at 11 o'clock.

The funeral of Walter CLIFTON was held Monday afternoon at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Angeline BURTON on 13th street. Rev. G. C. CHANDLER of the Baptist church had charge. Burial at the Odd Fellows cemetery. Only the near relatives of the family were present.

Wednesday, December 30, 1914

Levi LEEDY, 69, a lifelong resident of Denver, was found Monday afternoon lying unconscious in a wood box near a kitchen range. The discovery was mady by P. F. THARPE, a painter and paper hanger. The aged man expired six hours later. Death is said to have been due to apoplexy.
According to Tharpe, the dead man fell into the box but a few minutes prior to Tharpe's visit to the Leedy home, where he resided alone. Leedy never rallied, despite the efforts of his physician.

Eli ZARTMAN, age 50, one of the leading business men of Kewanna and well known over Fulton county, died at the Baldwin hospital Tuesday evening in Peru as the result of a stroke of apoplexy.
Mr. Zartman has been ill for over a year and about two weeks ago he was taken to a hospital in Peru. During the last few days it was thought he would recover and his death Tuesday evening was totally unexpected.
Eli Zartman had a varied business experience in this county and during his 30 years of active life made a comfortable fortune. He was born near Macy, the son of Jackson ZARTMAN, who died about 22 years ago, also a victim of apoplexy. When about 22 years of age, Mr. Zartman entered the threshing business, in which he stayed for several years. He then started a store at Leiters Ford and sold harness and implements for two years, then moved to Macy and entered the meat business with Lee MILLER, now of this city.
Selling out a year later, Mr. Zartman again entered the implement business at Macy with Harry RUNKLE with whom he remained for over a year, then moved to Akron and with Wm. C. MILLER started another implement and hardware store. Mr. Miller and Mr. Zartman remained together for 13 years, after which the latter sold his interest to his partner.
Mr. Zartman then started a hardware store at Kewanna where he has been for the last eight years.
Through all of his business transactions Mr. Zartman made many friends and always had the reutation of being on the square. He was a diligent man and because of his ceasless activity, became afflicted about a year ago with nervous trouble, which later caused his death.
Mr. Zartman leaves a wife and adopted daughter, Imogene ZARTMAN, and three brothers, Charles [ZARTMAN], Irvin [ZARTMAN] and Samuel ZARTMAN who live east of Fulton. Mr. Zartman was a member of the Methodist church.
The funeral will be held at Macy Friday morning at 10:30, the body being taken direct to that town.

According to word received here by his aunt, Mrs. Sol ALLMAN, Theodore GREENEWALD, a Philadelphia box manufacturer, and husband of Miss Bertha LAUER, formerly of Rochester, died suddenly at his home today (Thursday [sic]). Greenewald had been ill for some time, but not seriously so, and his sudden end was a shock to Mrs. Allman, his wife's mother's sister. He was for years a clothing salesman who visited Rochester regularly, and was popular because of his musical talent. Besides his wife, he leaves a daughter, age six.

Thursday, December 31, 1914

[no obits]