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FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1917

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1998

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 

 


Rochester Sentinel

1917

Monday, January 1, 1917

The body of the late Rev. James WALES, who died Saturday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Lydia SHIVELY, in South Bend, was brought to Rochester at 10:30 Monday morning for burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The funeral was held at the U. B. church at 11 o'clock. Rev. Wales was formerly a member of the Evangelical conference of this district and was well known in Rochester.

Tuesday, January 2, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, January 3, 1917

John TONER went Tuesday to Chicago to attend the coroner's inquest on the death of his daughter, Mrs. Roy DUNKIN.

Miss Esther BURKETT was called to play the organ for the funeral of Rev. James WALES at the U.B. church at Rochester on Monday a.m. of this week. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Thursday, January 4, 1917

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. SHIVELY of South Bend, who have been visiting relatives here this week, following the funeral of her father, Rev. WALES, will return home Friday.

Henry PAULSON, 66, of Leiters Ford, who died Sunday, was buried Thursday morning, after funeral services in the Methodist church in the above town. Mr. Paulson was born in Germany, Dec 31, 1850. In 1882 he came to Kosciusko county, moving in 1883 to Fulton county, where he spent the rest of his life. In 1876, he married Celia ANTONISEN, who is living. They were the parents of four children, Hans PAULSON, only surviving. He also leaves three brothers, among whom are William PAULSON of Rochester. He was a member of the Lutheran church.

Friday, January 5, 1917

[no obits]

Saturday, January 6, 1917

Miss Anne HENDRICKSON, 64, a sister of Ed HENDRICKSON of this city, died Friday night at her home south of Kewanna, after a brief illness. Miss Hendrickson was a mute and had for years made her home on the old Hendrickson place with her sister, Sarah [HENDRICKSON] and brother Isaac [HENDRICKSON]. Mrs. Kate MURRAY of Wayne twp., is also a sister. Funeral Sunday afternoon at home, with interment in Bowman cemetery near Grass Creek.

Mrs. Nellie LUNSFORD, 28, died Wednesday, Jan 3 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lincoln OVERMEYER, near Lake Bruce, from paralysis. She was born Dec. 30, 1834. Funeral Friday at one p.m. from Sharon church, with burial in the Moon cemetery.

Mrs. Fannie JONES, mother of Lesley CARPENTER, died Wednesday evening at her home near Santa Ann, funeral services at Santa Ann on Friday afternoon. - - - MAXINKUUCKEE ITEMS.

The infant child of Mrs. Laura RUSH BENNER was buried at Richland Center last Saturday. - - - MAXINKUCKEE ITEMS.

Monday, January 8, 1917

[no obits]

Tuesday, January 9, 1917

Annabelle KNIGHT, 10, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tid KNIGHT, of Gas City, died Sunday at the home of her aunt, Mrs. Lily LITTLE of Indianapolis, a victim of diphtheria. Funeral took place in Indianapolis Sunday afternoon.

Wednesday, January 10, 1917

[no obits]

Thursday, January 11, 1917

Ann HENDRICKSON, daughter of Jacob and Catherine HENDRICKSON, was born in Fulton county, Indiana, January 6th, 1856, and after living in the same house where she was born for 60 years, 11 months and 28 days, died on the evening of January 4th, 1917, after an illness extending over several months.
Ann was the youngest child of a family of 12 children, five of whom are living, Isaac [HENDRICKSON], Sarah [HENDRICKSON and Catherine [HENDRICKSON]. Isaac, Sarah and Ann never married, but all lived happily together, making it especially fortunate for Ann, who was never able to speak or hear. The deceased never united with any religious organization. The funeral services were conducted from the family residence at one o'clock Sunday, by E. B. DeVAULT, with burial in the Bowman cemetery.

Grant MANNING has returned from Chrisman, Ill., where he attended the funeral of his daughter, Melva MANNING.

Friday, January 12, 1917

Attempting to cross the tracks at Ora, west of here, ahead of a fast Erie freight, Mrs. Lizzie ROSE, 64 years old, was struck and killed instantly.

The two weeks old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ike THOMPSON died Thursday evening a victim of pneumonia. Funeral Sunday at 2:30 in home on North Jefferson St.

County Assessor J. W. BYRER received word this morning of the death of his sister, Mrs. Ella SCHNITZ of Ft. Wayne. He will go to Ft. Wayne Sunday.

Saturday, January 13, 1917

The funeral of the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ike THOMPSON which the SENTINEL stated would occur Sunday afternoon, took place Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

Dr. Samuel R. FISH was born in Randolphia, Ind., Aug 24th, 1844, and died at his home in Talma, Ind., Dec 18, 1916, aged 72 years. Very early in life he moved to Marshall Co., Ind. He also lived for a while in the West but by far the greater part of his life was spent in this state.
In 1865, he was united in marriage to Susanna MEYERS. To this union were born seven children, two sons and five daughters, all of whom survive. In 1880, the companion of this husband and mother of these children was taken away.
In the year 1882, he was united in marriage to Mary KESLER to which union were born six children, four of whom died in infancy.
Being again bereft of his companion, he was united in marriage to Sidney STRAWDERMAN in 1898.
About four years ago death again invaded his home and in 1913 he was again united in marriage to Agnes JEFFERIES, who survives.
Besides the widow and children, he leaves one brother, W. L. FISH, of Oklahoma, and one sister, Calista EMMONS, of Wisconsin, 15 grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and a large circle of friends and relatives. He was a graduate of a St. Louis medical college and practiced medicine for a period covering about 45 years. During this time he practiced at Millark, Argos and Talma, the greater part of the time being at Talma, where he had an extended practice, practically up to the time of his demise. His was a life spent in ameliorating the sufferings of his fellows than which no greater service can be rendered. His name is a household word in the community where he passed his last years.

Monday, January 15, 1917

Elijah OLDFATHER, 79, died Monday morning at 10:10 at his home on South Elm Street, after a short illness, caused by complications due to old age. Altho he had been in feeble health for months he did not take to his bed until last Friday. Mrs. Oldfather, who survives, said that his death was hastened by trouble and worry.

Mr. Oldfather was born in Ohio, August 8th, 1837. After his marriage, he moved to near Bunker Hill, later moving to Fulton county, locating on a farm east of Rochester, where he lived for 38 years, recently moving to the city. Mr. and Mrs. Oldfather were the parents of eight children, six of whom are living: Mrs. Lucy HARP of Ohio; Mrs. Alfred FOORE of near Athens; Mrs. Emma STIVER of Ohio; Mrs. Bessie SHAFER of Argos and David OLDFATHER and Mrs. Lottie GREGORY of Rochester.
Mr. Oldfather was a member of the Presbyterian church. He leaves a foster son, Edgar PULSE, who has made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Oldfather since he was a baby. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Eliza STUTZ of Farmersville, Ohio.

The funeral of A. N. HOOVER, of Akron, who died last week, took place Sunday.

Verda Josephine THOMPSON was born Dec 29, 1916 and died Jan 11, 1917, age 13 days. She leaves to mourn her loss her father, mother, ltwo sisters, a brother and many friends.
[NOTE: Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Births 1882-1920, Verda J. THOMPSON born to Isaac A. THOMPSON and Maude MOW THOMPSON, Dec 29, 1916]

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. [MEREDITH] and Mr. and Mrs. A. L. MEREDITH and Mr. and Mrs. J. N. BALL of Akron went today to Argos to attend the funeral of the late Joseph BRYAN.

Tuesday, January 16, 1917

The funeral of Elijah OLDFATHER will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 at the house.

The funeral of Mrs. George HUTCHINSON of near Argos was held here Friday. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Mrs. Eliza SHANES, an old resident here, passed away Friday evening. She was a devoted member of the Poplar Grove M.E. church, where her funeral was conducted Sunday at 1:30. She leaves two sons, William [SHANES], who lived with her, and John [SHANES], who lived near by, besides other relatives and numerous friends and neighbors who will greatly miss her. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd MOGLE, Mrs. Arthur MARTIN, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. FRAIN and Mr. and Mrs. Geo. COOK attended the funeral of a relative at Rochester Sunday. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Wednesday, January 17, 1917

Lewis McCLURE, an old resident of Argos, died at his home Sunday morning, aged about 70 years. The funeral was held Tuesday.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Maple Grove Cemetery, Walnut Twp.: Lewellyn W. McCLURE, Co I 151 Ind Inf, 1839-1917; Catharine McCLURE, wife of L. W., 1841-1930]

Thursday, January 18, 1917

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., Jan 18 -- Bernard Hughes SMITH, 19 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert SMITH of Akron, died at their home Wednesday night. He had suffered with pneumonia since Sunday. Funeral Friday afternoon at the Methodist church.

Mrs. Jane KROFT, 82, died at her home in Akron, Wednesday night, death being caused by complications incident to old age. She had been a resident of Henry Township a number of years. Six sons and two daughters survive, three of whom live near Akron: U. S. KROFT, Fletcher KROFT and Mrs. Sherman SIPPY. Funeral services at the Mt. Pleasant church, Friday morning, Rev. G. E. HUGHES officiating.

Friday, January 19, 1917

Word was received late Thursday of the death at 4:30 p.m. of Mrs. David COOPER, 90, at her home with her son, Voris COOPER, in Englewood. Death was caused by old age. William [COOPER] and Coryletus [COOPER], two sons who reside here, left early Friday morning for Chicago to arrange the funeral. Another daughter, Mrs. Martha SHOUP, of Chicago, and several grandchildren survive. Funeral here at Baptist church Saturday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. G. C. CHANDLER officiating. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: David COOPER, father, July 7, 1825 - June 5, 1902, ae 76y-10m-28d; Amy A. COOPER, mother, Nov 21, 1826 - Jan 18, 1917, ae 90y-1m-27d]

Alexander Noah HOOVER, son of Daniel C. and Frances HOOVER, was born Dec 4, 1846 near his present home a few miles northwest of Macy. He passed from this life Jan 12, 1917, aged 70 years, one month and 12 days after an illness of ten days duration. Mr. Hoover had just returned from a visit at the home of his son in Chicago when he suffered an attack of appendicitis. A specialist came to perform an operation but it was too late.
Mr. Hoover, while but a youth, enlisted in the 153rd Indiana Infantry and was honorably discharged in 1865.
On March 28, 1879 he was united in marriage with Emma Alice COOK and to this union one child was born, Charles Guy [HOOVER], who with his wife and three children now reside in Chicago.
He was converted in early manhood and remained until the time of his death a devoted Christian. Mr. Hoover was a member of the Pleasant Hill M.D. church and it was at that place that the funeral services were conducted by his pastor, Rev. H. R. CARSON of Gilead. A large audience was present despite the inclemency of the weather to offer their sympathy and pay their respects. Interment was made at the Akron I.O.O.F. cemetery.
He leaves a wife, a son, Charles Guy of Chicago, with his wife and three children, a sister, Mrs. Lydia MURPHY of the Pleasant Hill neighborhood, two brothers, Joseph [HOOVER] and Freemont [HOOVER] of Akron and many other relatives and friends to mourn his departure.

Saturday, January 20, 1917

Mrs. Eliza (Grandma) SHRIVER, 79, died at her home with her daughter, Mrs. Allen Ballinger at Athens, Friday evening, a victim of dropsy, heart failure and old age. Funeral at the Athens U.B. church Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery. One brother, Jonas HIZER of Canton, Ohio and four children, Mrs. Allen BALLENGER of Athens, Mrs. Chas. McMAHAN of near Akron, Mrs. N. B. HOFFMAN of east of Rochester and Allen SHRIVER of Mentone survive.

The BURKETT brothers in this neighborhood received the sad news of the death of their cousin, Mrs. Vine DUDDLESON of near Culver. Her funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon of this week at 2 o'clock at the Reform church at Culver. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

The infant sons of Elmer IRVIN and wife and Rufus JONES and wife were buried in the Citizens cemetery at this place last week. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Mrs. Omar SOUTHALL has been assisting this week in the care of her mother, Mrs. ROADS, who passed away Monday morning. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mrs. G. V. NICODEMUS received word Monday that her aunt, Mrs. Rachel BABER, passed away at her home in Mexico that morning. The funeral was held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at the Dunkard church in Mexico. Mrs. Nicodemus attended the funeral. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Monday, January 22, 1917

After a long illness due to complications, William CONRAD, 63, died Sunday morning at 10 o'clock at his home on College Ave. He had been in feeble health for years. Funeral Tuesday morning at the houet at nine o'clock with burial at the Springcreek cemetery in Cass county.
William Conrad was born in Cass county, July 8, 1853. In 1884 he moved to Rochester. Mr. and Mrs. Conrad were the parents of five children, Edward J. [CONRAD] and Arthur E. [CONRAD] of Logansport, A. C. [CONRAD] of near Rochester, Mrs. Flora B. COLWELL of Rochester and Mrs. Pearl ELKINS of Fulton. Mrs. Conrad is living. When he moved to Rochester, Mr. Conrad engaged in the will driving business but in later years led a retired life.

Mrs. Hannah B. MOWE, 59, wife of Deputy Sheriff Henry MOWE, died Suddenly Monday morning at the home on N. Jefferson St., after an illness of a few hours.
When Mr. Mowe left home in the morning, his wife was feeling well. A few minutes later she took sick at the home of a neighbor and had to be assisted to her home. Death was caused by apoplexy. Mrs. Mowe had long been a sufferer with heart trouble. She leaves besides her husband, four children, Robert [MOWE], Ray [MOWE], Mrs. Omer STEFFEY and Mrs. Lillian STURKEN.
Funeral arrangements later.

The funeral of Solomon FLORA, 73, a well known farmer, living west of Richland Center, who died Saturday afternoon at 2:30,will take place Tuesday morning at the Richland Center M.E. church. The cortege will leave the home at 10:30. Interment in R. C. cemetery.
Mr. Flora was born Aug 31, 1843. For the past two years, he had been in poor health, culminating in a fatal stroke of paralysis two weeks ago. Brights disease also was one of his afflictions. Besides his wife, there survive five children, three daughters, Mrs. A. B. FLORENCE, Mrs. Dan McLAREN and Mrs. J. C. CALHOUN, all of the same neighborhood and two sons, J. William [FLORA] of Logansport and Ira [FLORA] of near home.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Amy COOPER of Englewood, was held at the Baptist church here Saturday afternoon, with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Chester GANTZ, agent for the Nickle Plate, died Saturday evening at his home in Argos, a victim of pneumonia.

Amy Ann LOWE, born November 21, 1826, died January 18, 1917, was born on a farm about 60 miles from New York City, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, and was the eighth child of a family of nine children of which there were four boys and five girls born to Cornelius and Elizabeth BAKER LOWE. Home was made at this point until deceased was about eight years of age, when the family moved to the state of Ohio, on a farm site about five miles south of Wooster. Here the family lived until the deceased was united in marriage to David COOPER, December 1, 1853, when her new home was made about one mile from the bride's former home.
Amy COOPER and husband lived at this place until the year 1864, and then moved to Gilead, Indiana; in the year 1873 the husband, wife and family of five children moved to Rochester, Indiana, where the home was made until the death of her husband, David COOPER, June 5, 1902. Mrs. Cooper and son, Carrol Lotus [COOPER], kept house until the year 1905. At that time the home was broken up and Mrs. Cooper moved to Chicago, where she and her younger child, Voras [COOPER], kept house until the last.
Mrs. Cooper united with the Baptist church years ago and remained a steadfast Christian. In spite of the advanced age Mrs. Cooper attained, she was nevertheless active most of the time and able to be about her home, doing in fact a great portion of the lighter of the household duties.
On the morning of January 18, she had her son place her in a comfortable position on the couch so that she might have a peaceful sleep, and from this sleep she never aroused, dying at about 4:30 in the afternoon.
To David and Amy Cooper were born six children in order named: William Henry [COOPER], Mary Elizabeth [COOPER], Carrol Lotus [COOPER], Martha Elizabeth [COOPER], David Freemont [COOPER] and Voras L. [COOPER]. Of the children, Mary Elizabeth and David Freemont preceded her parents in death, while the remaining four children survive to mourn their loss. There are also five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren and in addition many near relatives and dear friends.

Tuesday, January 23, 1917

The funeral services of Mrs. Hannah MOWE will be held at 1:30 Wednesday afternoon in the U.B. church, Rev. NORRIS of Culver officiating. Interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Friends wishing to view the body may do so at the home on Jefferson St., near 7th, between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Wednesday.

Mrs. Mary FINLEY of this city received word late Monday of the death of her aunt, Mrs. Nacy [sic] KEIM, 95, of Roann. The funeral was held Tuesday. Mrs. Finley's brother, R. C. SHOEMAKER and wife of Danville, Ill., spent Monday night here with her enroute to attend the funeral.

Miss Georgia DEAN of Decatur, Ill., arrived in the city today to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. Henry MOWE.

Wednesday, January 24, 1917

Among those here to attend the MOWE funeral Wednesday were A. R. MOWE and daughter of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Tobias HELSEL and Fred HELSEL of Argos, Ollie PORTER of Plymouth, Mr. and Mrs. Omar SWOVERLAND of Argos, Mrs. Esther DICKEY and son, Chas. [DICKEY], of Warsaw, Mr. and Mrs. David SMITH of Culver and Mr. and Mrs. Schuyler MOWE of Wabash.

The body of Mrs. RHODES was taken to Kokomo for burial. The party was taken by Mel [MAHLER] and Lester MAHLER in autos. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

J. E. BECK attended the funeral of Mr. JOHNSON at Monterey, Saturday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, January 25, 1917

Danville, Ill., Jan 25 -- George STUNKARD, 60, formerly of Rochester, Ind., and known throughout the central states as a trainer of harness horses for the Grand and the Western Circuits, died suddenly Wednesday at Sidell while laughing hearily over a funny story. Stunkard had been employed in stables at Sidell for more than 50 years. He was a bachelor.
__________

So far as could be learned here, Stunkard has never been a Rochester resident, altho he had visited Mrs. Ollie BAUM, of this city, a sister. She is in Sidell to attend the funeral.

Solomon FLORA died on last Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Funeral was held at this church on Tuesday a.m. of this week. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery here. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Hannah Wilmouth BARNETT, daughter of Henry and Nancy BARNETT, was born in Cass County near Logansport, April 20th, 1857 and died very suddenly at her home January 22nd, 1917, aged 59 years, nine months and two days.
She was the youngest of 13 children all of whom, with the father and mother, have preceded her. When but a child of seven, she, with her parents and family, moved to Fulton county, which had been her home since. The past four years she had lived in the city.
At the age of 18 she was united with the M. E. church, and thru her entire life, she was an earnest worker. March 15th, 1887 she married Henry F. MOWE. To this union were born four children: Mrs. Chas. STURKIN, Mrs. Omer STEFFEY, Robert D. [MOWE] and Ray B. MOWE, who with the husband, two stepsons, Finley E. MOWE of West Lebanon and Aquilla R. MOWE of Chicago, and the grandchildren are left to mourn their loss. Not only is the home circle broken, but among the many relatives and friends in the church and the Woman's Relief Corps, of which she was a member, will she be missed. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at U.B. church. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Schuyler MOWE of Wabash and Mr. and Mrs. Findley MOWE of West Lebanon returned home today after attending the funeral of the late Mrs. Hannah MOWE.

Friday, January 26, 1917

Miss Georgia DEAN has returned home to Decatur, Ill., after attending the funeral of the late Mrs. Hannah MOWE.

Saturday, January 27, 1917

William CONRAD, son of Rebecca and John CONRAD, was born near Logansport July 8, 1853, and died Sunday, Jan 21, 1917. He was united in marriage with Miss Martha Ann CARNWELL on Nov 27, 1873 and lived most of their lives in Rochester. There were five children born to them, three sons and two daughters, all living: Edward [CONRAD] and Arthur [CONRAD] of Logansport and Albert [CONRAD] West of this city and Mrs. Alva COLWELL of this city and Mrs. Alba ELKINS of Fulton. There are 10 grandchildren. He also leaves a devoted wife who faithfully nursed him thru years of suffering.

Monday, January 29, 1917

Dr. Emanuel SHANKS, veteran of the Civil war and a one time well-to-do physician of this county, died suddenly Sunday evening at nine o'clock in the tramps' hangout near the water works station, a victim of apoplexy.
Seldom is a community given a more shining example of the evil effects of over indulgence in liquor. Dr. Shanks once commanded the respect of everyone, was a factor in his community and had the love of a wife and family. His later years saw him gradually sink to a saloon "bum," his only support being that of a parental government which remembered, when others forgot.
The officers Monday made every effort to secure some trace of relatives, who might be interested enough to attend the funeral, but no one was found who knew anything about his family. Only two papers were found upon the body, a receipt from a lawyer for two dollars, a retaining fee to file suit for a divorce and a Christmas card, mailed the aged man last December by his grandchild. Her address was not on the card. The body will be held for several days and if no relative calls, Shanks will be buried here at the expense of the county which provides $50 to defray the expense of burying a soldier.
Shanks died without medical attention, but several tramps who were present tried to give him relief. They notified the officers, who had the body removed to a local morgue. Dr. Shanks lived for a number of years near Talma and Tiosa, practicing medicine, but he never set up an office. It is thought by several local people that his wife and children now live in Chicago.

Mrs. Florence CHAMBERLAIN, 46, wife of William CHAMBERLAIN, died Friday evening at the home in Tampa, Florida, after a long illness from cancer. Rochester relatives were informed of the death thru a message sent by Jesse CHAMBERLAIN, who had already started South. Mrs. Chamberlain was a former resident of Rochester, moving to Tampa with her family a number of years ago. She leaves a husband and six children. Funeral and burial there.

Anderson YOST, an aged man, who resided on the Michigan road, just a mile south of Argos, dropped dead Friday evening just after having eaten a hearty meal.

Tuesday, January 30, 1917

Coroner Dr. A. E. STINSON, held an inquest over the body of Dr. E. SHANKS Monday afternoon, but has not yet returned a verdict. The officers here failed to find any trace of relatives and later talking to the soldiers home at Marion, learned that Shanks had entered that place as a single man. His body will be held here for several days.

Corwin HUNTER, 49, a farmer living four miles west of Germany Station, died Tuesday morning at 5:30, a victim of apoplexy. Mr. Hunter took sick very suddenly Monday evening while at his barn. Despite the aid of a physician, he succumbed 12 hours later.
Mr. Hunter leaves a wife and two children, Mabel [HUNTER] and Cassius [HUNTER]. His father, Jefferson HUNTER, lives near Argos. He also leaves three brothers and one sister, who live in Marshall county. Funeral Thursday afternoon at one o'clock at the Burton church. The cortege leaves the house at 12 o'clock.

Daniel FRAIN has returned from Winamac where he attended the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Rebecca FRAIN, 96. She was the mother of nine children, six of whom are living: Daniel [FRAIN] of Rochester, Edwin [FRAIN] and Felix [FRAIN] of Winamac, George [FRAIN] of Kokomo, Mrs. Emma GRAFFIS of Kewanna and Mrs. Sarah WOOD of Terre Haute.

William BEEHLER, 60, a farmer living near Grandview church in Richland township, died Tuesday noon after a long illness caused by diabetes. He leaves a wife and seven children.

J. W. KERN attended the funeral of his uncle at Warsaw Tuesday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Mrs. Miles NORMAN and her daughter, Mrs. William ZIMMERMAN, went to Peru this morning to attend the funeral of a relative.

Wednesday, January 31, 1917

Orlando COLLINS, 71, a veteran of the Civil war, died Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 at the county farm, where he was taken a week ago to await a vacancy at the soldiers' home at Marion. Death was caused by complications following an attack of grip.
He leaves a wife and son, Delbert [COLLINS], who is now at Terre Haute. Mrs. Collins was taken to the home of a relative at Silver Lake several weeks ago and she is too ill to return and attend the funeral. After serving in the War, Mr. Collins returned to Rochester where he married Miss Margaret MOWE. He had since lived in Rochester.
Funeral Thursday at 1:30 p.m. from the Hoover chapel, Rev. G. R. CRANE in charge. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Ray COOPER, 23, died at his home in Akron late Tuesday evening of tuberculosis. He leaves a wife and two children. Funeral at the home Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. Burial at Peru.

Dr. CASE, Edd CASE and Miss Glen HULING went to Roann Sunday to attend the funeral of Mrs. John SCHULER, mother of Mrs. Edd CASE. Mrs. Schuler was near 80 years old and had resided in and near Roann nearly all her life. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

The funeral of Mr. SUNGART [SWIGART ?] was held at the Reform church Saturday at 10 a.m. Interment at Leiters Ford cemetery. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

According to the verdict returned Wednesday morning by Dr. A. E. STINSON, of Athens, Fulton county coroner, the death of the late Dr. Emanuel SHANKS was due to apoplexy.

Thursday, February 1, 1917

Special to the Sentinal
Kewanna, Ind., Feb. 1 -- George A. GRUBE, 84, aged resident who suffered long exposure several weeks ago when he lay all night upon the floor, freezing his feet, died at his home Wednesday evening. He never fully rgained consciousness as the result of his terrible experience.
Mr. Grube was born in Germany, April 14, 1832. He had been married twice, was a retired farmer and amassed considerable property. He leaves four children, seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Funeral Friday afternoon at two o'clock at the German Lutheran church near Bruce Lake.

Special to the Sentinel
Macy Ind., Feb 1 -- John BILLS, 67, a long time resident of Macy, dropped off a chair dead in his home here about one o'clock this morning. His only brother, Elias [BILLS], with whom he is said to have been drinking, covered up the body and went back to sleep awaking about 11 o'clock. He notified a business man and the corpse was found, lying by the chair, and was held awaiting an afternoon visit by the coroner. The two men were bachelors and lived alone, doing threshing and well work. A sister survives and a niece, Miss Jeanette EVANS, formerly lived in Rochester.

Just about 36 hours after his son, Corwin [HUNTER], of near Germany, had died of apoplexy, Jefferson HUNTER, 86, of near Argos, succumbed Wednesday afternoon, shortly after three o'clock. The funeral of the son was held this afternoon at Burton, with burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery here. Funeral of the father at Poplar Grove, Friday afternoon and interment in the cemetery nearby.
Jefferson Hunter was born in Ohio and came to this part of the state many years ago. His wife died four years ago and there are no surviving brothers or sisters. Three sons and a daughter are living, all residents of Marshall county, except Cassius [HUNTER], who lives west of this city. Mr. Hunter made his home with his son, Otis [HUNTER], near Argos, and the third son, Willis [HUNTER], lived with them also. The daughter, Mrs. Mae NORRIS, also resides near Argos.

Friday, February 2, 1917

Special to the Sentinel
Macy, Ind., Feb. 2 -- Joseph C. SAMPSEL, aged nearly 78 years, a well known farmer, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Minoah TRACY, west of town, Friday morning at 4:00 o'clock, after a two weeks illness of pneumonia.
He was the son of Henry and Sarah SAMPSEL and was born near Trenton, N.J., May 26, 1839. In 1865 he came with his family to Indiana and located on a farm north of Macy. In 1863 he married Miss Minerva HART, and to them seven children were born. Those living are J. C. SAMPSEL, Mrs. Ella McCARTER and Mrs. Minerva BOWERS, Kokomo and Mrs. Rozilla TRACY, Macy. His wife died a year ago, and he also lost a brother, Henry [SAMPSEL], and a sister, Mrs. Charity FELLERS, a year ago.
For years he had been a member of the Macy Christian church and a member of the I.O.O.F.
__________

County coroner NEWELL, of Peru, held an inquest on the body of John BILLS, Thursday afternoon, and decided that death was due to alcoholism. The sister, Mrs. Phoebe GROAT and daughter of Hammond, his niece, Mrs. Jeanette CAMPBELL and husband and a nephew, Charles EVANS and wife, of Kewanna, have arrived for the funeral, at 10:30 o'clock Saturday morning at the Christian church. Interment in Plainview cemetery.
Years ago a physician told John Bills that he would have to quit drinking or he would die. For fourteen years he abstained from drink, but 14 months ago he commenced drinking again, and his death is the result.

Mrs. Cassius HUNTER went today to Argos to attend the funeral of her late father-in-law, Jefferson HUNTER.

Saturday, February 3, 1917

Mrs. Mary ANDERSON went today to Payne, Ohio to attend the funeral of her mother, the late Mrs. Margaret OVERMYER.

Monday, February 5, 1917

J. W. FERREE, 61, died Sunday morning at 3:30 at his home on West 4th Street, a victim of cancer. He had been ill since July, 1916. Mr. Ferree was well known in this county, over which he traveled for 41 years as agent of the Watkins Remedy Co. He came here from Stevens Point, Wis., but was born in Pennsylvania.
Mr. Ferree was married twice, his first wife dying shortly after he came to Rochester. Seven years ago he married Mrs. Fred BOSENBERG, who is living. He also leaves five brothers and one sister. Funeral Wednesday at two o'clock at the Presbyterian church, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge.
The body may be viewed Wednesday from 10 a.m. until two p.m.

William Haron McNITT, 46, of South Bend, died suddenly Sunday afternoon at his residence. McNitt has been the ticket agent for the Vandalia in South Bend for the past 12 years, and only last week resigned the position to enter into business with the Russ Blueing Co. Mrs. McNITT was formerly Flo Marie LEITER of Kewanna.

Abraham RIMES, 85, a well known resident of the county farm, died Sunday, after a short illness. He was born in England. The body was taken Sunday to Kewanna by Henry HOWE to be buried there Monday at the expense of the A. D. TONER estate, according to a promise mae by Mr. Toner some time before his death. Rimes, before his commitment to the county farm, had been an inmate of the Longcliff asylum. He was first brought to this township in 1904. Of his relatives little could be learned, except that two sons and a daughter survive. Rimes, it seems, had been married nine times. One woman he married on three separate occasions.

William BEEHLER was born Feb. 19, 1856 in Seneca county, Ohio, and died Jan 30, 1917, aged 60 years, 11 mo. and 11 days. His parents moved to the farm where Henry MEHLING now resides when he was quite young. To John and Esther BEEHLER were born Lydia [BEEHLER], Mary [BEEHLER], William [BEEHLER], Edwin [BEEHLER], Henry [BEEHLER] and David [BEEHLER], Edwin, Henry and David having died before.
Wm. Beehler married on March 25, 1888, Christian COPLEN, who then resided east of Rochester. They at once moved to the present home which he had bought and where they always lived. To this union were born Edna [BEEHLER], Glenie [BEEHLER], Mary [BEEHLER], Clyde [BEEHLER], Ruth [BEEHLER], Alta [BEEHLER], Lee [BEEHLER] and Rethal [BEEHLER]. Glenie died at the age of two.
Deceased leaves to mourn his companionship, the wife, five daughters, two sons, three grandchildren, a brother and two sisters, besides a number of relatives and a host of friends.
He was baptized in the German Lutheran faith when young. Later he and his wife united with the Evangelical church at Grand View, in which he retained faith to theend. He was a kind father devoted to the welfare of his family and a patient sufferer, having been in failing health for more than a year, and confined to his bed for the past four weeks.

Tuesday, February 6, 1917

Abram DILLMAN, 81, justice of the peace for many years, is dead at Silver Lake.

Word has been received here of the death of Frederick [GRUBBS], small son of Mrs. Harry GRUBBS, formerly of Rochester and now of Rockford, Ohio.

The funeral of Gerald [MEYER], the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur MEYER, was held Saturday at the U. B. church. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

The body of Mrs. Mary MEREDITH, widow of the late Hanson MEREDITH, formerly of this county, was brought Tuesday from Indianapolis, where death occurred, and taken by motor hearse to Leiters Ford for burial.

Wednesday, February 7, 1917

Word reached here Sunday evening of the sudden death of Wm. McNITT of South Bend. Mrs. McNITT was formerly Miss Floe LEITER of Kewanna. Mr. and Mrs. John LEITER and Mrs. Ida HOWELL left Sunday evening for South Bend, other relatives followed later. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

William BEEHLER'S funeral was held at this place on last Friday forenoon, Rev. DeWITT having charge of the service. Burial was made in the Citizen's cemetery. Quite a number attended the funeral, considering the extremely cold day. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Mrs. Mary Ann THORNBURG, of Walnut, was buried in the Citizen's cemetery at this place on Monday of this week. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Robert WALTERS received word Sunday that the body of the late Mrs. R. MEREDITH of Indianapolis would be brought to Leiters Tuesday for burial. - - - BETHEL ITEMS.

Thursday, February 8, 1917

Macy, Ind., Feb 8 -- Miss Laura COLLINS, daughter of Mrs. BACON of near this town, died Wednesday in Danville, Ill., where she had been visiting her brother, Edward COLLINS. Death was caused by pneumonia. The body was brought to Macy Thursday where the funeral will be held. Miss Collins was well known here and in Rochester where she often visited her brother, Edward COLLINS, who formerly lived there. She was an only daughter.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Laura R. COLLINS, 1870-1917; James BACON, 1837-1912; Nancy E. BACON, 1843-1927]

Local relatives received word Wednesday afternoon of the death of W. A. LANE in Hammond, Ind., where he moved from Rochester, 20 years ago. He was a half-brother of Mrs. Marshall HILL and Mrs. Samuel WENGER of Rochester and of Mrs. Marion CARTER of Detroit, Mich. When Mr. Lane lived in Rochester, he conducted a restaurant. His wife died several years ago. He leaves four children.

Mr. and Mrs. George SHONTZ and daughters, Mrs. E. E. HENDERSON and Miss Lena SHONTZ and T. J. BRYAN went today to Argos to attend the funeral of Frank BRYAN.

Mrs. Jessie COLLINS was called today to Macy by the death of her sister, Miss Laura COLLINS.

Friday, February 9, 1917

Miss Laura COLLINS died at the home of her brother, Ed COLLINS, in Danville, Ill., Wednesday night, Feb 7th, of double pneumonia. She and her mother, Mrs. Nancy BACON, went to Danville several days before Christmas to make their annual visit during January and February. Miss Collins was a resident of the Green Oak neighborhood for years. About five years ago she moved to Macy. She was employed in the T. J. EWER music store, and was also a dressmaker. She was a member of the M. E. church and of the Rebekah lodge. She leaves three brothers, Edward [COLLINS] and Azro COLLINS, one half-brother, Arthur BACON, several step-brothers and sisters and a number of nieces and nephews. Her body was brought to Macy Thursday evening.

Saturday, February 10, 1917

Mrs. Mary ROTH received word Saturday of the death of her sister, Mrs. G. E. SMITH, at her home in Crawfordsville, Friday evening. Mrs. Roth is ill with the grip but Miss Lena ROTH left in the afternoon to attend the funeral.

Monday, February 12, 1917

WE ARE SCOOPED
Chicago Herald
Lilliam GROFF, who was graduated from a Chicago high school last year, is an heiress. The information that she has inherited the estate of her grandfrahter, Dr. Emil SCHINCKE, who died recently in Rochester, Ind., was received by the police yesterday in a telegram from Bruce LOVE, police chief of the Indiana town.

Chicago, Ill., Feb. 12 -- Lillian GROFF, 16, with her mother, Mrs. Lillian ROHNBERG, left today for Rochester, Ind., where Miss Groff will claim the estate of her grandfather, Dr. Emil SCHINKE, who had long been believed dead.
Miss Groff was located by the police here at the request of Rochester authorities. "I don't know whether I am heiress to a dollar or a million," the girl said. "I never saw my grandfather but once, and then I was quite little."
__________

The body of Dr. SCHINKS (SHANKS) is being held here at the Hoover morgue. It will be remembered that he died at the waterworks plant, and so far as can be learned, had no earthly possessions, save a few personal belongings. The girl was expected Monday afternoon.

Mrs. May MATHIAS, 35, wife of Charles MATHIAS, who lives west of Rochester about eight miles, died Sunday afternoon at 1:10 a victim of peritonitis. She leaves a husband and two children, a son, aged 15 and a daughter, aged 12. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at the Burton church. Mr. and Mrs. Mathias were married 16 years ago. She is the daughter of Jacob LISEY of Kewanna, who is living. She also leaves one brother, John LISEY.

Mrs. V. P. CALVIN of Kewanna, who died Wednesday evening, was buried Friday at Crooked Creek cemetery.

Tuesday, February 13, 1917

Word received by local police officials, from Miss Lillian GROFF, of chicago, who has been corresponding with them in regard to the estate of her grandfather, the late Dr. Emil SCHINCKE (SHANKS), is to the effect that she will not reach this city for several days, or at least, that she will not leave Chicago until she received details.

Thomas B. MARTIN, 73, who conducted a jewelry store in Rochester about 35 years ago, died Tuesday mornng at five o'clock at the home of his son, O. D. MARTIN on Fulton Ave., as the result of a stroke of paralysis which he suffered recently.
Mr. Martin leaves four children, two of whom live here, Mrs. Francis SPOHN and O. D. MARTIN. He came to Rochester about a month ago from Wilders, where he had been living with another son. Mrs. Martin died a number of years ago. For the last few years Mr. Martin has been living here and in Pulaski county. He was a jeweler by trade.

Wednesday, February 14, 1917

[no obits]

Thursday, February 15, 1917

Rev. J. N. MARTIN, of Peru, former pastor of the U. B. church of this city, arrived Thursday morning to preach the funeral services of the late T. B. MARTIN, which were held at the house on Fulton Ave., at two o'clock p.m. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Isaac IRVINE, 77, a pioneer resident of Fulton county, died Thursday morning at Longcliff, where he was taken last week. The body was brought at once to Rochester, where the funeral will be held at the home of Martin A. Irvine. Death was caused by asthma and other complications.
Isaac Irvine was born in Newcastle township, June 22, 1839, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Marshall IRVINE who died when he was nine years old. He is the last of a family of three children. He married Miss Sarah KILMER, who died 12 years ago. They were the parents of three children, two of whom are living, Martin A. IRVINE of Rochester and Mrs. Wm. SANDS of Akron.
Mr. Irvine spent nearly all of his life on the farm, moving to Rochester eight years ago after the death of his wife. He was a member of the Progressive Brethren church.
Funeral Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the Tiosa Brethren church. Burial at Reichter's cemetery.

Mary Kathleen [KUHN], daughter of Arthur J. and Clara KUHN, was born Dec 5, 1916 and died Feb 12, 1917, age two months and seven days. She leaves a father, mother and one sister. A brother is dead. Funeral Wednesday, Feb. 14, at the home, burial at Akron.

Friday, February 16, 1917

Mrs. William ROHNBERG of Chicago, daughter of Dr. Emanuel SCHINKE (SHANKS), who died here three weeks ago, arrived in Rochester Thursday afternoon and after viewing the body at Hoover's morgue and securing some pension papers which will enable her mother to secure an allowance from the government, she left for home on the next train. She did not make any arrangements for the funeral or seemed to be affected in the least by the fact that her father was dead. According to her story thereis a reason.
She said that he deserted her mother, who is now living with her in Chicago, when she was three months old and never made any arrangements for their support. Mrs. Rohnberg knew that her father died penniless, in fact her mother told her, when she left for Rochester, that she would be lucky to find the old man with a shirt on his back. She said that they thought that a soldiers' home was located here, as the last letter written to them by Mr. Shanks came from a soldiers' home.
Mrs. Rohnberg took back with her a book of receipts written by her father which are supposed to be valuable. When she found a paper from an attorney, given when her father filed suit to get a divorce, she said: "I will certainly show that to mother." It seems that Shanks tried to get a divorce to keep from paying his wife one-half of his pension, which the government turned over to her. The body will be buried soon, the county allowing $50 toward that expense. His daughter and wife refused to bear any of the burden.
So ends the last chapter of a life devoted to the worship of John Barleycorn.

The funeral of Isaac IRVINE will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the Tiosa Brethren church.

Saturday, February 17, 1917

Earl "Speck" KING, a jockey and a brother of Mrs. Ort PERSCHBACHER of this city, was fatally shot near Royal Center Friday.
King, who is said to have been drinking, took a bicycle from a boy and later was compelled to give it back by a farmer, Wm. KNADING. King ran into the home where he was staying, got a shot gun and fired at the farmer twice. Knading then secured a .25 rifle and shot King twice in the body.
King was rushed to the St. Joe hospital at Logansport where he died Saturday morning. He was well known here as he often drove horses at the fair. Knading has been arrested.

Mrs. Venie MONESMITH, wife of Thomas MONESMITH of near Germany, died Friday evening in a hospital in Detroit, Mich., following an operation for a cancer.
Mrs. Monesmith went to the Detroit home of her son, Roy KING, three weeks ago. She had been in ill health for some time. The body will be brought home Sunday morning. Funeral Sunday afternoon at the Sharon church near Leiters.
Mrs. Monesmith leaves a husband and a son, a sister, Mrs. Dora LINKENHELT of Rochester, and two brothers, Al HUNTER of near Germany and Nell HUNTER of near Oak Grove. Her mother, Mrs. Sarah HUNTER, is living near Germany.

Effie Mae MATHIAS, daughter of Jacob and Jane LISEY, was born in Fulton county, near Kewanna, April 18, 1881, and died Feb 11, 1917, age 35 years, nine months and 24 days. She was converted Dec 1899. On March 2, 1901, she married Charles M. MATHIAS and was the mother of two children, Lloyd Earl [MATHIAS] and Marjorie Pearl [MATHIAS]. She leaves a husband, a son, age 15, a daughter age 12, a father and one brother. The funeral was held at the Burton church, Rev. Z. DIXON, in charge.

Hanna M. FULLER was born in Virginia September 3rd, 1823. At the age of 21, she was married to Dr. S. JULIEN of Logansport. Her husband passed away 16 years after their wedding. She remained a widow for a period of 40 years. At the age of 76, she was united in marriage to Percy CALVIN of Kewanna, June 10th, 1910. She died at her home in Kewanna Feb 7, 1917, age 84 years and five months. Those who survive are the husband, one brother, John A. FULLER of Logansport, and two daughters, Mrs. Rose J. RANDALL of Cleveland, Ohio, and Mrs. Anne McCOMBS, of Peoria, Ill. She was a Presbyterian in faith from the age of 16.

Monday, February 19, 1917

Elder James F. WAGONER, 83, well known in this county as a preacher and author of religious tracts, died Monday morning at 3:45 at the home of his sister, Mrs. Mark R. RICHTER, South Elm Street. He had been in feeble health for some time, but a week ago became ill with hypo-static pneumonia, which, coupled with his advanced age, caused his death.
James Francis WAGONER was born in Miami County, Ohio, Jan 30, 1834. When a small boy he moved with his parents to Fulton county, where he lived the rest of his life. Early in life he became an Adventist preacher and until within a few months of his death, was very active in the work. Until the death two years ago of his wife, whose maiden name was Rebecca SAMPLE, he lived on a farm near the city. He leaves one son, Frank WAGONER, of Rochester. A daughter is dead.
Funeral arrangements announced later. Friends are requested not to send flowers.

Some mystery seems to surround the death of Earl "Speck" KING, who was shot near Royal Center, Friday. William NADING is now in jail at Logansport, charged with first degree murder.
A farmer whose name is unknown, witnessed the tragedy and the officers of Logansport are looking for this man. Nading swears that he only fired twice, while people living near, are unable to account for another shot which they said was fired before King shot at Nading. When told of King's death, Nading said that he was sorry.
Small boys started the trouble which led to the shooting, when they teased King about being drunk as he passed along a road. He lost his temper and took a bicycle away from one of the lads who called Nading. King's body has been taken to North Manchester, his old home, for burial.

Tuesday, February 20, 1917

The funeral of Elder James F. WAGONER will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the home of Mark RICHTER, Rev. VanVACTOR of Argos in charge. Burial at the Odd Fellows cemetery.

The funeral of the little infant daughter of Arthur KUHN and wife was held last Wednesday at the house, burial at Akron. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Wednesday, February 21, 1917

Word reached here Tuesday of the death of Mondy BURKE at Winamac. Mrs. Burke was a sister of Mrs. BARKER of this place. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

The five months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto COOPER died at their home on South Logan Street Friday night at 11 o'clock of pneumonia. Funeral was held Sunday at the Baptist church with interment in the Shaffer cemetery. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

The infant baby of Mr. and Mrs. Earl HICKS of Bunker Hill died Sunday morning. The child weighed 3-1/2 pounds and had been put into a baby incubator but the struggle for life was too great. - - - MACY ITEMS.

The funeral of Geo. D. WILSON, a former resident here, was held here Thursday, Rev. A. C. NORTHROP of Plymouth officiating. He passed away suddenly at his home in Towner, N.D. The body was brought to Plymouth by his son, Frank [WILSON], who lives in the same town. It was taken to the home of his daughter, Mrs. LORING, where on Thursday morning a short service was held before the funeral at Poplar. He was 69 years old. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Rev. VanVACTOR of Argos arrived in the city Wednesday morning to conduct the funeral services of the late Elder J. F. WAGONER which took place at the Mark RICHTER home on East Twelfth St., at 2:30 o'clock. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, February 22, 1917

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. SANNS and son, Joe [SANNS], were Saturday and Sunday guests of John SANNS and Geo. DECK and families, after attending the funeral of Mrs. SANNS' father held at this place Saturday. - - - TIOSA ITEMS]

Friday, February 23, 1917

After an illness lasting two years, caused by organic heart trouble, Henry Lewis WHITTENBERGER, 67, died Friday morning at 8:50 at his home in this city, 1224 S. Jefferson St. Mr. Whittenberger had been ill for two years and for the last six months has been confined to his bed. He moved to Rochester from his farm southeast of the city about 18 months ago.
Mr. Whittenberger was born in this county, near Mt. Zion, the son of Joseph and Sarah WHITTENBERGER, who are dead. He leaves one brother, John WHITTENBERGER, of Warsaw, and five sixters, Mrs. Alice LEININGER of Angola, Mrs. Elsie E. SHAW of Chicago, Mrs. Clara EDWARDS of Ithaca, New York, Mrs. Henry FOGLESONG of Rochester and Mrs. Ida DITMIRE of Fulton. Mrs. Whittenberger is living. He leaves two sons, Milton WHITTENBERGER of near Mt. Zion and John F. WHITTENBERGER of Santa Barbara, California, and five grandchildren. Mr. Whittenberger was a member of the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church.

As the result of blood poisonng contracted from a small cut on his hand, inflicted while cutting corn last fall, John A. DIXON, 66, died Thursday evening at 5:45 at his farm home near Mt. Zion. The wound which caused his death healed once, but later opened when Mr. Dixon was working on a barbed wire fence. The attending physician advised amputation several months ago, but he refused to submit, saying, "I will go with the arm."
He was born in Ohio and lived for 30 years on the farm where he died. He leaves a wife, five sons, Charles [DIXON], Joseph [DIXON], Thomas [DIXON], Henry [DIXON], John [DIXON] and a daughter, Josephine SWIHART. He also leaves several brothers who live in Ohio. Mr. Dixon was a former member of the Odd Fellows lodge. Funeral Sunday morning at the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church, of which he was a member.

Saturday, February 24, 1917

Mrs. McNEELY of Tiosa, widow of Rev. Samuel McNEELY, Saturday morning received a telegram from Newcastle, Pa., saying that her son, Alva McNEELY, 40, had dropped dead about two hours previous. Mr. McNeely was a telegraph operator and had been living in Pennsylvania for several years. He was well known around Tiosa where he was born. He leaves two brothers, Arthur "Buck" McNEELY of Rochester and Jess McNEELY of Plymouth.

John FRY, 70, of near Fulton died Friday night in Peru at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ora HORTON. Death was caused by Bright's disease. He had been ill for about a month and went to the home of his daughter several weeks ago. Mrs. Fry and three daughters are dead. Funeral Monday afternoon at two o'clock at Fulton.

The funeral of Lewis WHITTENBERGER will be held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the residence on South Jefferson St., Rev. Geo. PULLMAN in charge of the services. Burial will be made at Mt. Zion.

Monday, February 26, 1917 to Tuesday, February 27, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 28, 1917

David PAINTER, 59, died early Tuesday evening on the Barrett road, near the home of Pierce WILSON, where the body was found about midnight by John MASTERS. Night officer CLAYTON was notified, and with Sanford PAINTER, removed the body to Hoover's morgue. Death was due to exposure, following several weeks of hard drinking.
David Painter was known to nearly every Rochester citizen. For the past 30 years he was a partner with his brother in a shoe repairing shop, now located in the rear of the Hub Shoe store. He was an expert workman and while in condition, always had all of the work he could do. He was born in Howard county, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Epperson PAINTER. He came to Rochester in 1868. Mr. Painter leaves two sisters and one brother, Mrs. Elizabeth CRAWFORD of Pittsburgh, Pa., Mrs. Sarah WARD of Plymouth and Sanford PAINTER of Rochester.
Funeral arrangements will not be made until after the coroner's inquest.

Miss Ida CLAY, 48, died at the county farm,Tuesday evening at eight o'clock, as the result of burns sustained Monday afternoon when her clothes caught fire from an oil stove.
Superintendent Henry McMILLEN asserts that he placed an oil stove in the jail at the farm where the mentally afflicted are housed, Monday morning, and that someone during the day moved the stove to within a few inches of Miss Clay's chair. She could not get out of a chair without assistance. After dinner, H. D. SWOTE, an employee, detected smoke and running to the jail with a bucket of water, found Miss Clay's skirts ablaze, the fire leaping about her knees, while she sat in the chair without making a cry. The fire was quickly extinguished but she was so badly burned that she died Tuesday evening.
The body was removed at once by relatives to Hoover's morgue where funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, burial at the Odd Fellows cemetery. Miss Clay leaves two brothers and one sister, William [CLAY] and Finley CLAY of this county, and Mrs. Dora BUTLER of Roswell, New Mexico. Miss Clay had been an inmate of the county farm for eight years.

Mrs. Alice NEWCOMB went to Peru last week to attend the funeral of Fermur FISHER and she is now spending a few days wth relatives in that city. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. MADDUX died last Tuesday evening at 5:30 o'clock. The funeral services were held at the U.B. church Thursday afternoon by Rev. DIXON. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. MADDUX of Markle attended the funeral of their little granddaughter Thursday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Rex SWIHART are here from Elkhart to attend the funeral of her father, Mr. DIXON of Mt. Zion. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Thursday, March 1, 1917

The funeral of David PAINTER was held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 at the home of Sanford PAINTER on Pontiac St., Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge, burial at Odd Fellows cemetery.

Opal Geneva [MADDUX], daughter of R. D. and Edith MADDUX, was born near Athens March 16, 1916 and died Feb 20, 1917, aged 11 months and four days. Funeral at Mt. Hope Thursday 2 p.m. by Rev. Z. DIXON.

Friday, March 2, 1917

Cyrus H. ROBBINS, 88, a pioneer resident of this county, died Thursday afternoon at three o'clock at his home on West 11th St., as the result of a stroke of paralysis which he suffered two weeks ago. Prior to that time, he had been in good health.
Becoming a resident of this county in 1836, Mr. Robbins for years actively assisted in the early development of the city and county. He occupied several positions of trust and honor in the community, being elected trustee and county commissioner on the democratic ticket. He was a promoter of the present agricultural society and served four years as its first president.

While in business here, he served one term as postmaster, receiving his commission from President Franklin Pierce.
Cyrus H. Robbins was born in Adams County, Ohio, June 29th, 1828. He was brought by his parents to Indiana when he was but one year old. His father, Joseph ROBBINS, settled on a farm in Henry county, Indiana where they resided for seven years, and from there came to Fulton county. Joseph Robbins settled on what is known as the MANNING farm one mile East of Rochester. This farm the elder Robbins secured from the government in 1836, one year before Fulton county was organized.
Joseph Robbins was a native of Ohio, born in 1794. He was of Scotch English descent, his parents being natives of Connecticut. Mary ROBBINS, his wife, was a native of Ohio of German Irish descent, born in 1799. Cyrus Robbins was the fifth of eight children. He spent his younger years on the farm. In 1849 he engaged in the general mercantile business with his brother at Rochester, and successfully carried on the business for a period of ten years.
Mr. Robbins was married to Miss Sarah C. SMALL, who is living, January 4th, 1857. To this union nine children were born, Alfred D. [ROBBINS] and Charles E. [ROBBINS] of this city, William B. [ROBBINS] and Alvin LeRoy [ROBBINS] of Mishawaka, Indiana, Mrs. Marion MOORE of near Akron, Mrs. Albert MARTINDALE of Peru, and Mrs. Stephen PYLE and Mrs. Bert COLE who both reside near this city. The other daughter, Mrs. Marion FULTZ died one year ago.
After selling out the mercantile business he moved on a farm 2-1/2 miles southwest of this city where he lived for 45 years. Retiring from the farm, he moved to this city a little over 10 years ago to spend the rest of his life. He was a member of the Methodist church. Funeral at the home, Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge.

Marshall NEW, a younger brother of Isom NEW of this city, died Thursday evening at his home in Peru. He was born and raised in the neighborhood of Green Oak. For a number of years, he has been working in the railroad shops at Peru. Funeral Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the home in Peru.

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Mar 2 -- Mrs. Sarah STRONG, 81, died this afternoon at two o'clock after an illness lasting a few days. She took sick last Friday with the grip.
Mrs. Strong was well known in this community, having lived here all her life. Her husband, Andrew STRONG, died here in 1898. Mrs. Strong leaves the following children: F. O. STRONG, a traveling salesman, Prof. W. F. STRONG of Dixon, Ill., Sidney STRONG, Everett O. STRONG, Miss Deborah STRONG, Mrs. A. A. KISTLER, and Mrs. Fredrick W. BRUBAKER all of Akron.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Sarah WARD has returned to her home in Plymouth after attending the funeral of the late David PAINTER.

Saturday, March 3, 1917

[no obits]

Monday, March 5, 1917

Mrs. Martha BRAMAN, 85, died at the county farm Monday morning after a long illness. She had been unable to walk for 30 years, as the result of a stroke of paralysis.
The body has been removed to the home of her niece, Mrs. Alice KELLEY where the funeral will be held. Mrs. Braman was the sole witness of the shooting affray 10 years ago, when Gilly BURNS shot Mrs. BURNS and Joseph CRIPE. Mrs. Braman was sitting in the room with Mrs. Burns and several stray shots struck her in the face. Mrs. Braman went to the county farm six years ago. She left enough money to pay her funeral expenses.
Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Baptist church. Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge.

Mrs. Ralph QUERRY returned to her home in Decatur, Ill., after attending the funeral of her uncle, the late David PAINTER.

Tuesday, March 6, 1917

Funeral services for Mrs. Elizabeth TUTTLE, who died Sunday at the home of her daughter in Marion, were held Tuesday afternoon at Hoover's chapel, burial at the Citizens cemetery. Her husband, Carey TUTTLE, died here six years ago.

Wednesday, March 7, 1917

Ex-county Treasurer Layman Ellis DOWNEY, 41, died Tuesday evening at 11 o'clock at his home on South Monroe St., after an illness lasting three months, caused by anemia. Mr. Downey was compelled last fall to quit work on account of declining health and despite the aid of several physicians, he passed away.
Layman E. Downey was born near Fulton, Jan 28, 1876, the son of William G. and Alice DOWNEY. The latter is living. About 30 years ago, the family moved to Fulton where Mr. Downey was later employed in a grocery store. After a few years, he moved to Akron where he was in the grocery business for several years. He then bought a grocery in Rochester where he was in business for 12 years. During that time he served one term as city treasurer. When Frank McCARTER was elected county treasurer, Mr. Downey was appointed deputy, in which position he served four years. At the expiration of that time he was elected to the office, where he remained two years.
On December 4th, 1898, Mr. and Mrs. Downey were married. They had two children, Thelma [DOWNEY] and Zora [DOWNEY], who are living. Mr. Downey, who was one of three children, is the last of the family. He was a member of the Christian church, where he served many years as Sunday school superintendent. He was a member of the Maccabee and K. of P. lodges. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock at the Christian church.

Lucius MACKEY came from Grand Rapids today to attend the funeral of Layman DOWNEY.

Thursday, March 8, 1917

Abe RIMES, who died recently at the county farm, wrote his own epitaph which now adorns a monument over his grave at Kewanna. It says: "Born in England, a creature of circumstances and a believer in a hereafter, if there be one, if not, still a creature of circumstances."
Rimes was a very peculiar character which is proven by the fact that he married nine times. Friends in Kewanna paid all of the funeral expenses. A. D. TONER took care of the funeral. M. J. HILAND furnished a monument and John A. PARKER did the gold leaf work for the monument, as they had promised Rimes several years before he died. Rimes many years ago owned 40 acres near Kewanna and according to report deeded it to his brother to avoid paying one of his wives alimony. The brother, it is said then neglecvted to deed the property back to the original owner.

Homer "Dell" RICHTER, 39, shot himself with a revolver early Thursday morning at his farm home four miles north of Akron, dying instantly. The body was found a few minutes later by Mr. Richter's seven year old son.
Mr. Richter was the son of Lem RICHTER of near Akron and a nephew of Mart RICHTER of Rochester. No reason is known for the suicide. He left the house in the usual manner about six o'clock while his wife was preparing breakfast. a few minutes later the boy went to the barn, where he found the body laying prone upon the floor. Mr. Richter leaves a wife and three children, the oldest of whom is 18.
Mrs. Vida BLACKBURN of this city, a sister of Mr. Richter, said that she knew no reason for his rash act. She asserted that he owned a farm and had money in the bank. He always made it a business practice, said his sister, to not owe anyone a cent. On hearing of the death, she left at once for the home.

Among those who were here to attend the funeral of the late Layman DOWNEY, held at the house Thursday afternoon, were, Mr. and Mrs. Walter DOWNEY, of Wabash, Mr. and Mrs. Frank HATHAWAY, of Peru, Joseph GEYER and Miss Clara PHILABAUM, of Marion, E. E. DOWNEY of Tipton and Arthur [GEYER], Joseph [GEYER] and Miss Dora GEYER of Denver.

Mr. and Mrs. Harry KISSENGER have returned from Liberty Mills, where they attended the funeral of Lafayette HALL, father of Edward HALL, who formerly ran the American dry goods store in this city, but who is now located in Kokomo.

Friday, March 9, 1917

Albert G. PUGH, 77, one of the oldest newspaper men in the state and former editor of the SENTINEL, died Thursday evening at 11 o'clock at his home in Fulton Ave., after an illness lasting four years.
Mr. Pugh had been in declining health as the result of several strokes of paralysis and an attack of the disease caused his death. He was seldom able to come up town after leaving the SENTINEL four years ago.
During his declining years, Mrs. Pugh has been in constant attendance at the side of her husband. A year ago they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, when friends from everywhere called to pay their respects.

Albert G. PUGH was born in Troy, Ohio, July 1, 1839. Several years later, he moved to Logansport where he was reared. In 1861 he came to Rochester, entering the employ of the Sentinel and during that year enlisted in the war, remaining nearly four years. After the war he came back to Rochester, again coming to the Sentinel, where he worked for the next 50 years in the capacity of compositor, foreman, publisher and editor. He was editor of the Sentinel from 1864 to 1872.
On March 27,1866, Mr. Pugh married Miss Lida KITT. They were the parents of one daughter, Grace PUGH, who died a number of years ago. He was a member of the local post, G.A.R., and a member of the Methodist church. Funeral Saturday afternoon at 2:30 at the home on Fulton Ave., Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge.

Mrs. Lucinda LITTLE, 69, died Thursday night at her home in Akron, a victim of apoplexy. Her husband died four years ago. She leaves two sons, Joseph LITTLE of near Silver Lake and John LITTLE. Funeral Sunday afternoon at the Nichols church.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Nichols Cemetery, Franklin Twp.: David LITTLE, May 26, 1839 - Dec 26, 1912; Lucinda LITTLE, Oct 20, 1849 - March 8, 1917]

Andrew CARRICK, 75, a resident of Fulton county for the past 10 years, died Wednesday evening at his farm home in Newcastle township, a victim of heart trouble. The body was sent Thursday to his old home in Clinton county, where the funeral will be held at the home of a brother. Mrs. Carrick died in 1887. Mr. Carrick moved to this county, buying a 66 acre farm. Because Mrs. Carrick asked him to remain single, the aged man lived a lonely life for nearly 30 years. They hever had any children. Charles DALTON, a neighbor, took care of Mr. Carrick in his last illness.

"If I thought that I would soon have to go to war and get shot, I would kill myself right away," said Homer RICHTER, Monday to his wife, carrying out the threat Thursday morning at the farm home near Akron.
Mrs. Richter said that her husband was deeply interested in the European war and in the prospects of war with Germany. "He would talk of nothing else," said Mrs. Richter, and read numbeous papers all of the time, telling people many times that it must be terrible to die on the battlefield. His father, Lem RICHTER, of near Akron, is nearly prostrated by the act of his son. The latter's brother was killed in the Civil war. Funeral Saturday afternoon at one o'clock at the Nichols church.

Saturday, March 10, 1917

The funeral of the late Mrs. Lucinda LITTLE will take place at the Nichols church Sunday at 10:30 a.m. instead of Sunday afternoon as stated in Friday's SENTINEL.

Monday, March 12, 1917

A telegram was received here Saturday announcing the death of John AWALT in Joplin, Mo. He was the brother of Mrs. C. C. WOLF. Mrs. C. C. WOLF, Mrs. Charlotte RIDENHOUR and Miss Katheryn AWALT.

John McCLUNG received a telegram Sunday evening announcing the death of his mother, Mrs. Sarah McCLUNG, 70, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ernest BROWN in Indianapolis. Mrs. McClung had been ill for more than a year, caused by heart trouble and other complications. She had been living in Rochester on Pontiac St., spending her time here and at Indianapolis. The body will be brought to Rochester for the funeral at the home of her son near Mt.Zion.
Mrs. McClung was the widow of Jesse McCLUNG, who died April 22, 1898. She was the daughter of Stephen and Katherine DAVIDSON, and leaves three sisters and one brother, Mrs. Almeda STINSON, Mrs. Arch STINSON, Mrs. J. A. McCLUNG and John DAVIDSON of Elmsburg, Washington. The Davidson family were pioneer settlers in this county and 40 years ago were prominent. Mrs. McClung's father, Stephen Davidson, was state senator from this district for several terms.

Four weeks after the death of his wife, William CHAMBERLAIN, 49, brother of A. B. [CHAMBERLAIN], Harry [CHAMBERLAIN] and Jesse CHAMBERLAIN of Rochester, died Sunday evening in Tampa, Florida. Death was caused by typhoid fever. Mr. Chamberlain became ill four days ago.
He leaves five daughters and two sons, the oldest of whom is 19.
Jesse Chamberlain left at once for Tampa to attend the funeral and bring the children back to Rochester.
William Chester CHAMBERLAIN was born in Rochester, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Chester CHAMBERLAIN. He went to Tampa a number of yearrs ago and was employed by the city.

Word was received by Henry FOGLESONG of the death Monday morning of his grandson, John Phillip KARN, five months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl KARN, who died at the home of his parents in Grand Rapids, Mich., a victim of exzena. Mr. and Mrs. Karn and Mrs. Henry FOGLESONG will arrive Tuesday evening with the body for funeral services, conducted by Rev. A. S. WARRINER at the Foglesong home on So. Monroe St., Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. Elias VanDUYNE was held Monday morning at ten o'clock at the Green Oak church, Rev. E. H. KENNEDY of Macy in charge, burial at the Mt. Zion cemetery.
Mrs. Van Duyne died Friday night as the result of an attack of grip. She leaves a husband and seven children. Her first husband died a number of years ago. The children are, Charles [FROUTE] and Edward FROUTE and Frank VanDUYNE of near Wagoners, Otto VanDUYNE of Washington, D.C., Mrs. Lulu BURKETT of near Wagoners, Mrs. Roy WOLPERT of near Tiosa and Mrs. David KROWTHWELL of near Athens.

Tuesday, March 13, 1917

Word was received by friends in this city Monday of the death at Lafayette of Rev. L. C. BUCKLES, former pastor of the Rochester Methodist church. He was 84 years old and had been in the ministry for 60 years.

Wednesday, March 14, 1917

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest BROWN, of Indianapolis, Wednesday accompanied the body of her mother, Mrs. Sarah McCLUNG, to Rochester. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at the home of John McCLUNG, near Mt. Zion, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. Interment at Mt. Zion cemetery.

G. B. M. SEWELL, aged about 50, who married Margaret DARR, daughter of Reuben DARR a number of years ago, committed suicide Wednesday morning at Huntington by drinking carbolic acid. He was a conductor on the Erie railroad, and it is said that he took his life as the result of losing his job. Mr. Sewell and his first wife, Miss Darr, were divorced.

Wendell COOK, four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. William COOK, East 11th St., died Wednesday at noon after a short illness caused by croup. Funeral arrangements later.

Martha Jane LOWMAN, daughter of George and Sarah LOWMAN, was born in Cass county, Ind., June 10, 1840, died March 10, 1917, aged 75 years, nine months. She with a twin sister, were the youngest of a family of nine children.
In 1864 she was united in marriage with Abraham FAUROTE. To this marriage three children were born, Malissa [FAUROTE], who died in infancy, C. E. FAUROTE, of Wagoners, and J. E. FAUROTE, of Macy. Her husband died in October, 1868.
She was again united in marriage, her second husband being Elias VanDUYNE, with whom she was joined in wedlock Jan 7, 1870. To this union nine children were born four of whom preceded her to the spirit world. Lillie KROTHWOHL, of Rochester, Frank VanDUYNE, of Rochester, Mrs. Lulu BURKETT, of Wagoners, Mrs. Fannie WOOLPERT, of Tiosa and Otto VanDUYNE of Washington, D.C. are the surviving children.
She also leaves to mourn her death her husband, one brother and one sister, seven children, fifteen grandchildren, besides many friends and neighbors.

The funeral of Mrs. Lucinda LITTLE was conducted by Rev. H. M. RIGGLE. Interment at Nichols cemetery. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Theodore McFARLIN passed away Monday, March 5, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Alvin JONES, after a few days illness of paralysis. Besides his daughter he leaves a step-son, Joseph FLAGG of Kentland, several grandchildren, also two brothers, R. C. [McFARLIN] of Culver and John [McFARLIN] of Bantry, N.D. The funeral was held at the old home Wednesday conducted by Rev. S. C. NORRIS. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Thursday, March 15, 1917

Ozias Marcellus KEWNEY, 68, died Wednesday evening at 5:30 at the home of his sister, Mrs. Ernst von EHRENSTEIN, after a long illness caused by dropsy. He was bedfast for six months. Mr. Kewney was one of eight children of John and Harriet KEWNEY. He was born in Logansport and came to Rochester in 1858 with his parents. For years he worked in the Kewney Foundry on North Main St. He was married to Mrs. Sarah OLDS and later separated by divorce. They had one child, who is dead. Mr. Kewney leaves the following brothers and sisters, J. F. KEWNEY of Michigan City, Mrs. E. von EHRENSTEIN of Rochester, Horace [KEWNEY] and Leon KEWNEY of Chicago.

Funeral Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at Hoover's morgue.

Mr. and Mrs. Carl McCLUNG, of Greenville, Ohio, arrived in the city today to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. Sarah McCLUNG.

Friday, March 16, 1917

Mrs. Harry EMMONS of Argos, sister-in-law of Daniel EMMONS of Rochester, died Thursday night. Funeral Sunday at 10 o'clock at the Tiosa church.

Saturday, March 17, 1917

Mrs. W. J. DOLPH received a message Saturday, saying that her nephew, Alvin CLARK, son of Mrs. Madge FREEMAN of Ft. Wayne, had been fatally shot in New Mexico in a scrimmage between American soldiers and Mexican bandits. Young Clark was a member of an Indiana company of the regular army. The mother cannot go to her son, because of the threatening railroad strike.

Monday, March 19, 1917

Mrs. Mary STAHL, 70, widow of Levi Stahl, who died last August, succumbed Sunday morning at 11:30 at her home on West 4th St., a victim of organic heart trouble. Mrs. Stahl had been in ill health for several years but became worse in the last three weeks.
Mrs. Stahl was born in Fulton county, December 21, 1846, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John DRUDGE. She was one of six children and is survived by a brother, Francis DRUDGE of near Akron. On Jan 1, 1865, Mary DRUDGE married Levi STAHL. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living: Mrs. K. P. RICHARDSON of Rochester, Mrs. Samuel NELSON of Akron, Mrs. M. L. BARKMAN of Rochester, Charles STAHL of near Rochester, Mrs. G. K. WILSON of Chicago and Clinton STAHL of San Francisco, Calif. All of the children are here to attend the funeral with the exception of the youngest son.
Mrs. Stahl leaves 19 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. She was a member of the Christian church. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the home, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge.

Jesse CHAMBERLAIN was expected home today from Tampa, Fla., where he attended the funeral of his brother, the late Wm. CHAMBERLAIN. The six orphan children of the late Mr. Chamberlain will return with him to make their home in this city. There are four girls and two boys.

Tuesday, March 20, 1917

The funeral of Mrs. Mary STAHL was held from the home at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. Among those from out of the city here were Mrs. Robert MORROW, of South Bend, Mr. and Mrs. G. K. WILSON of Chicago and Frank RICHARDSON of Kewanna.

Wednesday, March 21, 1917

The body of a son born to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph FENIMORE of Gas City was taken Sunday to Macy, where the funeral was held. Mrs. Fenimore was formerly Miss Florence ARNOLD of Rochester. Mrs. Margaret ARNOLD of Macy is caring for Mrs. Florence [FENIMORE].

Ezra HATFIELD, a farmer living near Mentone, came to Rochester Tuesday to take his wife home from the Woodlawn hospital, where she had been taking treatment for the past four weeks.
Mrs. Hatfield was feeling fine and told her husband that she would be ready to leave after noon. He went up town to lunch, returning about one o'clock to find her dead. She succumbed suddenly, while alone in her room eating dinner, fully dressed and ready to leave. Death was caused by a blood clot on the brain.
The body was taken to Mentone Tuesday evening for the funeral. Mrs. Hatfield was 59 years aold.

Thursday, March 22, 1917

Archie DAWSON, 21, son of Mrs. Martha DAWSON of near Athens, was instantly killed Wednesday evening at LaPorte, when crushed between two freight cars on the Lake Shore R.R. where he was employed as brakeman. The body was brought home Thursday evening.
Young Dawson had been working on the Lake Shore for the past three months. He met death in the LaPorte yards. He leaves the following sisters and brothers: Mrs. Lillian HELTZEL, Mrs. Ruth CARR and Miss Gladys DAWSON, and John [DAWSON], Dee [DAWSON] and Paul [DAWSON].

The three weeks old infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lawson LELAND was buried Saturday. Another daughter, Opal [LELAND], is seriously ill of pneumonia. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse PeGAN and son, James [PeGAN), went to Roann Monday at attend the funeral of Mrs. STORY. Mr. PeGan had made his home with Mrs. Story after his mother died. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Word was received here by relatives of the death Monday of James ARMSTRONG, a former resident of this community. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.

Atty. Harry BERNETHA, Mr. and Mrs. Clera LEONARD, Mrs. Julian MEYER and Miss Ruth BRINKMAN, motored Thursday to Kewanna to attend the funeral of Mrs. Fred GILLESPIE, who died at her home in Kewanna, Tuesday night, a victim of a cancer. She was a daughter of the aged Perry CALVIN.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F., Union Twp.: Fredrick GILLESPIE, 1861-1948; Catharine J. GILLESPIE, 1865-1917]

Friday, March 23, 1917

While in Warsaw Thursday to attend the funeral of her sister-in-law, Mrs. William McCAUGHEY, Miss Martha McCAUGHEY received word from the home in Rochester, saying that her brother, David Wiley McCAUGHEY, 52, was not expected to live.
She arrived home one hour after he had passed away, at 6:00 p.m. Thursday, in the home of his sisters, Martha [McCAUGHEY] and Hannah McCAUGHEY, Jefferson St., a victim of bronchial pneumonia. He had been sick for only a few days. Mr. McCaughey came to Rochester about three years ago from Chicago, where he practiced law.
David Wiley McCaughey, the son of David E. and Lavina McCAUGHEY, was born in Wayne township, May 23, 1864. He attained a finished education, graduating from the classical department at Wabash college and from the Chicago Law School. He then took up his residence in Chicago and at the time of his death was a member of the Chicago bar. He leaves the following brothers and sisters: Miss Hannah McCAUGHEY, Miss Martha McCAUGHEY and Mrs. Margaret ELLIOT, of Rochester, Mrs. C. E. SMITH of Clark, S.D., John McCAUGHEY of Wayne township, Rev. William McCAUGHEY of Warsaw and Milton McCAUGHEY of Luther, Mich. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and of the Masonic lodge.
Mr. McCaughey never married. Altho of a retiring disposition, he had many friends, men of like profession of broad education. Funeral Tuesday morning at 11:30 at the home on Jefferson St., Rev. S. A. STEWART of LaPorte in charge. Burial at Fletcher's Lake.

The funeral of Mrs. William McCAUGHEY of Warsaw was held Friday afternoon at the home. She died Wednesday morning after a very short illness caused by asthma.

The funeral services for the late Archibald DAWSON will be held in the home east of the city, Saturday afternoon, Rev. George R. CRANE of this city officiating. Burial in Athens cemetery.
Dawson, who was a Lake Shore brakeman, was instantly killed at Pinola, near LaPorte, Wednesday evening, in a peculiar manner. Dawson's train had gone onto a siding to permit a fast passenger train to pass, and he went to a nearby restaurant to get a lunch. Returning to the caboose of his train, he was seen by Conductor BENNER, of the freight, to step directly onto the path of the oncoming passenger train. It is believed that he was under the impression that the passenger had gone. His body was terribly mutilated, his limbs torn off, head crushed and practically every large bone in his body broken. Milton FLEMMING of Elkhart, engineer of the train which struck Dawson, did not know of the accident until his train reached Elkhart when pieces of flesh were discovered on the engine. The body was brought here Thursday evening.

Patrick FLANNERY, 74, of Liberty township, died suddenly Tuesday night as the result of an attack of heart trouble. Missing him from the bed, Mrs. Flannery got up and found her husband prone upon the floor. The physician, who was quickly summoned, said that he had been dead for more than an hour. He was a veteran of the Civil war and leaves a wife and four children.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: Pat'k FLANNERY, Co D 11 Ohio Inf (no other info on stone)]

Susan Elizabeth WYCOFF was born at Louisville, Kentucky, Jan. 1, 1838, and died at her home near Kewanna, Ind., Feb. 24, 1917, aged 79 years, 1 month and 23 days. She was the only daughter of Daniel and Margaret WYCOFF. She was united in marriage to Mr. ANDERSON; to this union was born one daughter. Later her first husband died, and she was again married to Mr. James F. SINGER, May 10, 1866 with whom she lived until his death on Feb. 21, 1896. To this union was born one daughter, and three sons, all of whom survive their mother. She also leaves 12 grandchildren to mourn her death.
Sister Singer united with the Edinburg Christian church of Bartholomew County at the age of 15 and was a member until Jan. 30, 1899. She then united with the Bruce Lake U.B. church of which she was an ever faithful member. The funeral service was conducted from the Bruce Lake U.B. church Monday, Feb. 26, 1917, at two o'clock with interment at Shaffer cemetery. Services were in charge of Rev. Samuel RHODES.

Martha BRAMAN, ldaughter of James and Elizabeth BRAMAN, was born in Marion Co., Indiana, Sept 19, 1830. When six years old, lshe moved with her parents to Fulton Co., Ind., and lived here all her life, except two years in Missouri. When quite young she united with the Baptist church at Ebenezer and remained a faithful member. In 1885, she fell and broke her hip and never was able to walk after that. She never was married. Died March 5, 1917, aged 86 years, five months and 23 days.

Because of the critical illness of her brother, the late David W. McCAUGHEY, Mrs. Marguerite ELLIOT did not go to Winona Thursday as planned. Miss Martha McCAUGHEY returned home Thursday night shortly after her brother died.

Saturday, March 24, 1917 to Monday, March 26, 1917

[no obits]

Tuesday, March 27, 1917

Louis M. HOOVER, 25, deputy county surveyor and only son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob HOOVER, died Monday night at 11:25 at the home on West 5th St., a victim of pneumonia. He had been sick but a short time, altho several weeks previous to becoming seriously ill, he had been complaining with the grip. His parents are prostrated.
Louis Hoover was born in Huntington, September 10, 1891, the second son of Jacob and Ella HOOVER. When he was one year old, they moved to Rochester where they have since resided. In 1910, he graduated from the Rochester high school, going then to Purdue university and later attending the State School of Mines at Rollo, Missouri.
When Alvin OLIVER was elected county surveyor, Mr. Hoover was appointed deputy, which position he held until his death. He had an older brother, William [HOOVER], who died in infancy. He was a member of the Elks club at Peru, of the Cleofan fraternity at Purdue and of the Rochester Golf club.
Mr. Hoover took an active part in the social life of Rochester. He was always congenial and many times insisted on participating in affairs, when his health demanded better treatment.
Funeral Thursday at two o'clock at the home.

Isaac BERLIEN, a veteran of the Civil war, died Monday at the Marion Soldiers home. He was a brother of Mrs. E. R. HENDRICKSON of Rochester and Mrs. Frank WEAVER of Akron. Mr. Berlien had never married. Funeral at Akron, Wednesday with burial in Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochdster I.O.O.F. cemetery: Isaac BERLIEN, Co A 26 Ind Inf (no dates on stone)]

Oliver JENKINS, 70, a mason, died at his home in Macy, early Tuesday morning. A widow and a son survive.

The funeral services of David McCAUGHEY were held from the home on Jefferson St., Tuesday at 11:30 a.m., Rev. S. A. STEWART, of LaPorte, in charge. Burial at Fletcher's Lake.

Wednesday, March 28, 1917

Rev. Geo. PULLMAN will officiate at the funeral of Deputy Surveyor Louis M. HOOVER, which will be held from the home on W. Fifth St., Thursday at 2:00 p.m. Interment in the mausoleum. The following will act as pall bearers: Lyman BRACKETT, Julian MEYER, Tom HOOVER, Charles BABCOCK, Percy SMITH and Arthur COPELAND.
Mrs. Hoover's condition Wednesday was not improved, fears that she will remain bedfast for some time being exressed by the family. Besides the natural collapse due to her days of sleepless worry and the prostration following the demise of her son, she is suffering with erysipelas, with which she has been stricken before.

Mrs. Benton ESSIG returned to her home last Saturday morning at Lawrence, Mich. She came on account of the critical condition of Isaac BERLIEN, her brother, who was at the National Military House at Marion, Indiana. She was accompanied to Marion by F. M. WEAVER, as her sister, Mrs. WEAVER, was not able to go. They found Mr. Berlien in a serious condition and he passed away on Saturday evening.
The body was brought to Akron on Monday, a short funeral service at 10 a.m. on Wednesday at the Weaver residence and interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester.
Mr. Berlien was a Civil war veteran, and for several years has been at the Soldiers Home as his health has been frail. Three sisters, Mrs. F. M. WEAVER, Mrs. ESSIG and Mrs. Ed. R. HENDRICKSON of Rochester, survive. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Thursday, March 29, 1917

The Louis M. HOOVER funeral took place at the home on W. Fifth St., at two o'clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. Geo. PULLMAN in charge. Interment at mausoleum. Among those who were here to attend the funeral were a delegation from the Elk's Club at Peru, of which deceased was a member, David MARKS and family of Huntington, Mrs. George FIRESTONE of Plymouth, A. C. HOOVER of Kokomo, John BOND of Warsaw and many others.

Among those from out of the city who were in Rochester Tuesday to attend the David McCAUGHEY funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Wm. D. McCAUGHEY of Findlay, Ohio, Bruce McCAUGHEY of Frankfort, Mr. and Mrs. Harry WYNN and Wilbur ELLIOTT of Lucerne, Dr.

PATTON of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Walter McCAUGHEY of Crosswell, Mich, Sherman HIZER and family and Mr. and Mrs. John McCAUGHEY of Grass Creek, Mrs. C. E. SMITH and daughter of Clark, South Dakota, Wm. H. McCAUGHEY of Warsaw, Miss Jane McCAUGHEY of Luther, Mich., George ULRICH and Mr. and Mrs. Ed. THOMAS of Logansport and Earl SMITH of Walkerton.

Louis MARX of Huntington was here today to attend the HOOVER funeral.

Friday, March 30, 1917

Mrs. Mattie WARE went to South Bend Saturday evening to attend the funeral of her brother-in-law Geo. RUSH which will be held at that place Sunday. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Oliver JENKINS died at his home in Macy at 2:10 o'clock Tuesday morning after several months illness caused by a cancer of the stomach. He was French by birth. He has lived in this community many years and was a mason by trade. He was a charter member of the I.O.O.F. order in Macy and also its oldest member. He leaves a wife and one son, Darius [JENKINS], who is now in Montana. One son died a number of years ago. Funeral arrangements will not be made until they hear from the son, Darius. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Saturday, March 31, 1917

Mrs. Rebecca STAHL died Friday afternoon in her home at Segreganset, Colo., after an illness of four months with dropsy. Word was received here Saturday morning by her son-in-law, Omer BRICKLE. The body is being brought here and the party should arrive Sunday or Monday morning.
The Stahls went to Colorado about four years ago, taking up a claim.
Mrs. Stahl was the widow of the late Jacob STAHL of this city and leaves three children: Alva STAHL, Miss Alice STAHL and Mrs. Omer BRICKLE. All three were with their mother when she died, but it is not known who will return for the funeral.

Monday, April 2, 1917

The body of Mrs. Rebecca STAHL was brought to this city Sunday afternoon at two o'clock and was buried at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The funeral services were held at the house in Segreganset, Colo. A daughter, Mrs. Omar BRICKLE, accompanied the body.

Tuesday, April 3, 1917

D. W. McCAUGHEY, who died recently at the home of his sisters, had the distinction of selecting scarlet as the color for his school, Wabash college at Crawfordsville. The incident occurred in 1887 when a committee of four was named to select a college color. After a long wrangle, one of the men suggested heliotrope. That was the last straw. Mounting a stump, McCaughey then offered the words which made him famous in Wabash history, the words which gave the Little Giants their color of scarlet. They were: "Heliotrope -- We want blood."

Wednesday, April 4, 1917

Mr. and Mrs. Virl BRUGH attended the funeral of Mrs. Rebecca STAHL last Tuesday at Rochester. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. WHITACRE were in Huntington Tuesday attending the funeral of a relative. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. WALLEY of Culver and Mrs. Israel GELBAUGH of this city went to Akron Tuesday to attend the funeral of their uncle, John AUKERMAN.

Mr. and Mrs. O. W. STENGLE returned this afternoon from Peru where they attended the funeral services of Oscar BUCKLEY.

Thursday, April 5, 1917

Mrs. T. J. WORTHINGTON was called to Argos Saturday on account of the death of her brother, John JORDON, who was 81 years of age. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Mrs. William BIDDINGER has received word of the death of her uncle, A. D. STUBBS, in Kansas City. He was well known here.

Granville TATMAN, 69, who had been at the county farm but 10 days, died of bronchitis at two o'clock Thursday afternoon. He has a brother living near Fletcher's lake, whence he came. Funeral Friday at county farm, the brother having refused to take the body, according to the superintendent.

Friday, April 6, 1917

The funeral of Granville TATMAN, who died Thursday, was held at the county farm Friday afternoon, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge.

Saturday, April 7, 1917

[no obits]

Monday, April 9, 1917

Anderson BOGGESS, 74, was found dead in his rooms south of the court house, late Saturday afternoon. Martin SLUSHER discovered the body after breaking in the door which was barricaded with a chair. The corpse lay where it had fallen over on the bed, evidently while Boggess had been in the act of undressing. Miss Minnie BELT, upon finding the door locked and fearing the old man was ill, called Slusher, an Electric Shop employee, and had him break in.
Following a post mortem, Dr. Archie STINSON, county coroner, pronounced death due to heart failure and a dropsical condition. This explained the theory that death came to the old man as the result of violence. He was seen Friday noon, according to William WILLIAMSON, who lives in an apartment just across the hall and was then in bad condition.

Others think he had been dead several days. A private funeral was held from the Hoover chapel at 1:30 p.m. Monday, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Alexander BOGGESS was born March 18, 1843 and died Friday April 6, 1917, age 74. He leaves besides a son, William [BOGGESS], who lives near the lake, two brothers, Charles [BOGGESS], of Mentone, and Hiram [BOGGESS], of Avola, Ark., and two sisters, Mrs. Emaline SMITH, of Whitman, Mo., and Mrs. Wash. EHLINGER, of Argos. His wife and two sons, Fred [BOGGESS] and Hudson [BOGGESS], are dead.

Mr. and Mrs. Julius ROWLEY went to Peru today to attend the funeral of a friend.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter SAYGER, who died Wednesday at Athens, was buried Friday at the Mt. Hope cemetery.

Tuesday, April 10, 1917

Melvin SULLIVAN, seven year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter SULLIVAN, northeast of Tiosa, died Monday evening at six o'clock in Woodlawn hospital. He had been ill for the past month and despite the attendance of several physicians, he was unable to survive. He leaves one brother, three years old. Funeral Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at the Lutheran church at Tiosa.

Wednesday, April 11, 1917

[no obits]

Thursday, April 12, 1917

Suddenly suffering an epileptic attack, Mrs. John DENNY of Fulton, Monday fell on her seven months old son, it is said, smothering him to death. The child was buried Wednesday at Fulton. Mr. and Mrs. Denny moved to Fulton from Delong recently and he is employed on the section. The family is in very poor circumstances and their condition this winter has been pitiful. Fulton people have [been] doing all in their power to relieve the parents and two remaining children since they moved there.

Melvin L. SULLIVAN was born in Fulton County, Nov 12, 1909 and died April 9, 1917, age seven years, four months and 27 days. He was baptized Jan 19, 1911. He leaves a father, mother, one brother, grandfather and grandmother.

Friday, April 13, 1917

John AUKERMAN died Sunday morning at his home in Akron. He had been ill for some time, due to complications incident to old age.
He was born in Cumberland county, Pa., in 1831, and had lived in this county since 1850. He married Hannah DILLMAN in 1853.
He enlisted for the Civil war in November 1861 and served four years.
Funeral was conducted at he M. E. church by Elder H. M. RIGGLE.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron

Cemetery, Henry Twp.: John AUKERMAN, 1831-1917; Hannah AUKERMAN, his wife, 1834-1926]

Mrs. W. H. BEECRAFT and Mrs. F. G. KEESEY went today to Tipton to attend the funeral of Mrs. Beecraft's brother, Ed GRAY.

Saturday, April 14, 1917

Heartbroken by the death of her only son, Louis [HOOVER], Monday March 26th, Mrs. Ella HOOVER, wife of Jacob HOOVER, died Saturday at 12 o'clock at the home on West 5th St.
Attacked by grip, erysipelas and other complications, medicine seemed to have little effect upon the woman who could think of nothing but her loss. She refused to be comforted and gradually became worse.
Miss Ella BLUMFIELD and Jacob HOOVER were married 39 years ago Saturday, in Rochester. She was 59 years old last September. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the house, Rev. George PULLMAN in charge.

Monday, April 16, 1917

[no obits]

Tuesday, April 17, 1917

Mrs. Sarah ARVEN CLEVENGER, 66, died Monday at her home two miles east of Fulton. She was the wife of Wm. CLEVENGER and the mother of Alex [CLEVENGER] and Orval CLEVENGER. She leaves one sister, Mrs. Henry S. VanBLARICOM of this city. Mrs. Clevenger was born Feb 1, 1851.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo AULT, 1127 So. Bancroft Ave., died Tuesday morning and was buried in the Citizens' cemetery.

The funeral services of Mrs. Ella HOOVER were held from the late home at 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, Rev. George PULLMAN in charge. Interment at Mausoleum. Among those from out of the city who were here to attend the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. - - - - CANADY, of Indianapolis and A. C. HOOVER and daughter, Miss Louise [HOOVER], of Kokomo.

Wednesday, April 18, 1917

After suffering several weeks with appendicitis, Schuyler KEEL, of near Green Oak, died Wednesday morning at Woodlawn hospital. He had been in a precarious condition for several days and was removed to the hospital after it was too late.
Mr. Keel leaves three children, Homer [KEEL] of Minnesota, Otis [KEEL], who lives at home, Mrs. Edward HUNTER of Plymouth and two brothers, John T. KEEL of Rochester and James KEEL of New Mexico. Mrs Keel died several years ago.

Mrs. Leah HOWER, 77, wife of Henry HOWER of near Mt. Olive, died Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock as the result of a stroke of paralysis, suffered three weeks ago.

Mrs. Hower leaves eight children: Sarah A. WILLIAMS, Emma ENYART, Charles HOWER, J. A. HOWER, of Pound, Wis., Ida DOWNS, John HOWER, Liddie KNIGHT and Daniel HOWER. Mrs. Hower leaves two sisters in Stark Co., Ohio, where she was born. Her maiden name was Leah WEAVER. She leaves 33 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.
Funeral Thursday afternoon at 1:30 at the United Brethren church in Fulton, of which she was a member.

Mr. and Mrs. John McGRIFF and Mr. and Mrs. Ben McGRIFF and daughter, Lois [McGRIFF], attended the funeral of Joe REDMAN at Argos on Monday afternoon of this week. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

The eight months old son of Mr. and Mrs. John DENNY, who was smothered to death Tuesday night, was buried here Wednesday morning. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Ray DINSMORE and son Robert [DINSMORE] of Lawrenceville, Ill., are visiting relatives here, having been called last week on account of the death of the former's father, Adam DINSMORE. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

The body of Mrs. John McFEELY of Culver was brought here for burial Friday afternoon. Mrs. McFeely was about 30 years old and leaves her husband and a little daughter about eight years old. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Poplar Grove Cemetery, Union Twp.: John G. McFEELY, 1878-1956; Hattie C. McFEELY, 1887-1917]

Thursday, April 19, 1917

Oliver SHRIVER, 76, died Friday morning at 2:30 at his home in the College addition after a short illness caused by complications following old age. He leaves a wife and two daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Shriver moved to Rochester about three years ago from a farm near Akron. Funeral arrangements will be made after the arrival of the children.

The funeral of Schuyler KEEL will be held at the Green Oak church Friday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. Burial in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

Friday, April 20, 1917

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. A. E. SINGLETON of Lockport, Ill., Thursday. Funeral services Sunday at that place. Mrs. Singleton was formerly Miss Flo HOOVER of near Athens and is a sister of Miss Lou HOOVER of this city. Besides the husband, she leaves two daughters, Lois [SINGLETON] and Claudia [SINGLETON] and one son, Kenneth [SINGLETON]. Miss Hoover is in Lockport.

Word was received here Friday morning by Will RANNELLS, that his cousin, James R. RANNELLS, aged about 46, had died in Indianapolis at 2:30 a.m., after an illness of some duration. Mr. Rannells was a shoemaker and formerly resided here, being a son of John RANNELLS, long a well known local blacksmith.

He was a brother of the late Dr. J. N. RANNELLS of this city, of D. A. RANNELLS, of Plymouth and Mrs. Milo CHESNUT of Chicago. He leaves a wife and one daughter.

Saturday, April 21, 1917

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., April 21 -- Mrs. Elizabeth SPAUGY, 62, died Friday evening at the home of Virgil SHAFER, near Akron, after an illness of more than four months. Until the past few years she has always lived in or near Akron. Peter SPAUGY, the husband, died about 12 years ago. She leaves one brother, James [RAYMER]. Funeral services at the Methodist church, Monday, Rev. John McCOLLEY in charge.
[NOTE: Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Obits/Biogs, 1901-1904: Wednesday, March 30, 1904: After an illness of three weeks, from complications of diseases, Peter SPAUGY died at his home in Akron Tuesday afternoon.
Deceased was born in Germany in 1842, his parents emigrated to America when he was but a few months old, he is the last one of a family of seven children to pass away. He was a veteran of the civil war, a member of the 26th Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, and served under Capt. David RADER, he went out at the first call, and was honorably discharged in 1866.
He (Peter Spaugy) was united in marriage with Sarah E. RAYMER in 1871, who without children, survives him. They resided in Wabash county twenty-two years, and for nearly three years has been a resident of Akron.]

There were 43 autos at the Schuyler KEEL funeral, west of Green Oak, Fri. near Winona. He died in Warsaw. [sic]

Monday, April 23, 1917

While driving his car, in which were riding his wife, Leslie STEFFEY and Mrs. Frank STEFFEY, Wilson Shannon BOLLES, 77, was suddenly stricken with an attack of apoplexy, Sunday afternoon on the Barrett road east of Rochester, spent his last efforts in stopping the machine and died without saying a word or giving evidence that he suffered any pain.
Mr. and Mrs. Bolles and their friends were returning from Sugar Grove, where they had spent the day. When near the Frank MOORE farm, Mr. Bolles was compelled to turn into some gravel to avoid another car. His machine stopped and later starting again, the car ran but a few feet and the driver collapsed.
Wilson Shannon Bolles was born in Cleveland, Ohio, Dec. 22, 1839. When 15 years old he moved to Miami county with his parents. At the beginning of the Civil war, he enlisted at Peru in Company G, 51st Indiana, serving over four years. He was discharged as sergeant. In 1868 near Mt. Zion, Mr. Bolles married Susan STEFFEY, who survives. They were the parents of one son, who is dead. In the eighties, Mr. and Mrs. Bolles moved to Kansas, four years later returning to this county. For a number of years, they lived on a farm south of the city, moving to Rochester, South Franklin Ave., three years ago.
Besides his wife, Mr. Bolles leaves a brother, William BOLLES of Wabash and a sister, Mrs. Laura DOUGLAS of Marion. He was a member of the Pleasant Valley Evangelical church. For a number of years Mr. Bolles was a faithful member of the McClung Post G.A.R., serving in many capacities and at the last annual election was chosen commander.
Mrs. Bolles paid a remarkable tribute to her husband Monday saying that in their 48 years of

married life he had never given her a cross word.
Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the home, Rev. George PULLMAN in charge.

Mrs. Margaret J. IZZARD, 92, one of the oldest and probably the longest continuous resident of Fulton county, died Saturday aftrernoon at 1:30 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Olive HARDING of Fulton. The aged woman had been in good health until last Wednesday when she suddenly became ill.
Mrs. Izzard was born in Decatur county March 5, 1825, the daughter of Charles and Ella CALOWAY. When 10 years old, she moved to this county where she had since resided. Shortly after her 16th birthday, she married Jabes IZZARD, who died in 1900. They were the parents of 12 children, six of whom are living: Elizabeth REED of Fulton, Mrs. Olive HARDING of Fulton, Mrs. Vida MYERS of Montana, Mrs. Sarah NIXON of Logansport and Newton [IZZARD] and Charles IZZARD of Rochester. Mrs. Izzard was a member of the United Brethren church.
Funeral Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at the Fulton U.B. church. Burial in the Citizen's cemetery at Rochester.

Nathan HINESLEY, 64, father of Merton and Emanuel Hinesley, of this county, died Sunday morning at 10:30 at his home near Sheridan, Ind. Death was caused by paralysis. He had been in ill health all winter, and had been unconscious for 30 days. Mr. Hinesley was well known here, where he spent the summer of 1916. He was born in Tippecanoe county, and leaves a wife and three sons, Merton [HINSELEY] Emanuel [HINSLEY] and Burton [HINSELEY]. He was one of seven children, but one of whom survives, James [HINESLEY], of Idaho. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the home in Sheridan.

Luther J. MILLISER, six months old child of Mr. and Mrs. John H. MILLISER of No. Pontiac St., died Saturday evening. Funeral at the house Sunday afternoon, burial in the Moon cemetery.

Denver, Ind., April 23 -- Charles BELL, 34 years old and married, manager of the Greer Wilkinson Lumber Company here, because of despondency due to ill health, committed suicide Sunday by discharging a revolver into the roof of his mouth.

Mrs. Ed HUNTER returned today to her home in Plymouth after attending the funeral of her father, Schuyler KEEL.

Tuesday, April 24, 1917

Frank BELT, 60, died Tuesday morning at two o'clock in his farm home, six miles south of Rochester on the Peru road, where he lived many years with his sister, Mrs. Mary Caruthers. Death was caused by a nervous complaint, altho he had been ill for only three days. Mr. Belt never married.
He leaves two brothers and two sisters, Cyrus [BELT] and Raymond BELT, Mrs. Mary CARUTHERS and Mrs. Malissa EVERETT. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the home; burial at the Shelton cemetery.

Jesse Oliver SHRIVER was born in Loganville, Logan Co., Ohio, Feb. 3, 1841, moved to Indiana in 1849 and from that time until his death April 19th, 1917, has been a resident of Fulton County.
Jesse and Ruth SHRIVER, parents of deceased, were among the oldest settlers to the county and were the parents of nine children of whom Oliver was the oldest. The deceased was married Jan. 12, 1884 and to that union were born two children, Maude Kathryn DILLON of Marion, Ind., and Everett M. SHRIVER, of Lexington, Mo. He was converted when a young man and associated with the U.B. church. Besides a widow, Alice SHRIVER, and six children he leaves three brothers, Elias [SHRIVER], David [SHRIVER] and Frank SHRIVER.
Funeral services were conducted at the U.B. church Saturday, April 21, Rev. G. R. CRANE in charge. Interment was made in the Mount Hope cemetry.

Schuyler [KEEL], son of William and Elizabeth KEEL, was born on the farm one-fourth mile west of Green Oak, Oct 4, 1858, and died April 18 1917, aged 58 years, six months and 14 days, the farm always being his home, with the exception of one year in Rochester.
He was united in marriage with Miss Ida May RICHARDSON, Dec. 25, 1879. To this union were born three children: Lary L. [KEEL] of Blue Earth, Minnesota, Mrs. Daisy HUNTER, Plymouth, Ind., and Otis [KEEL], living on the farm with his father. His wife preceded him in death eight years ago. He was initiated into the I.O.O.F. lodge at Green Oak, April 14, 1888.

Wednesday, April 25, 1917

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph GORDON, of Richland township, died early Wednesday morning.

With Fred REED, Fred PERSCHBACHER, John HOOVER, William DOLPH, Ira HOLSTER and Tom HOOVER acting as pall bearers, the body of Dr. Emil (SHANKS) SCHENKS, who died following apoplexy Sunday evening, Jan 28th, was Tuesday held in its final resting place at the Citizen's cemetery.
The corpse, embalmed by John Hoover, had lain at the Hoover morgue for practically three months, a perfect state of preservation being maintained. Mr. Hoover was of the opinion that it could have been kept indefinnitely.

Mrs. J. METZGER, John BYRN of Wabash, Mrs. J. V. ROLFE and son, Chas. [ROLFE], of Mishawaka, attended the funeral obsequies of Mrs. Elizabeth SPAUGY at the M.E. church last Monday, conducted by Rev. Isaac MARKLEY. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth SPAUGY was conducted Monday afternoon at the M.E. church by Rev. Isaac MARKLEY of Columbia City. Mrs. Spaugy had been at the home of Virgil SHAFER for four months and was tenderly cared for by Mr. and Mrs. Shafer. Death came as a messenger of mercy to relieve the patient from the terrible suffering of cancer. A brother, James RAYMER, is the only surviving relative. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Grandma IZZARD, 92, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William HARDING, Saturday afternoon. Funeral was held at the U.B. church Wednesday morning. Burial was made at Rochester. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Mrs. Marshall SMITH and Miss Myrtle MICKLE, of Marion, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson STEFFEY and Melvin STEFFEY, of Peru, and Ernest STEFFEY, of Elkhart, returned to their resepective homes today after attending the funeral of William BOLLES Tuesday afternoon.

Thursday, April 26, 1917

[no obits]

Friday, April 27, 1917

R. P. TRUE has received a letter from Maryville, Tenn., telling of the death of the mother of R. H. HANNA, who is well known here. She was also the mother of Mrs. Belle GREGORY.

Saturday, April 28, 1917

Attorney E. E. MURPHY received word Friday evening of the death of his half-brother, Harry CAPP, 48, which occurred at Hamilton, Ohio. The cause of his death is not known and Mr. Murphy left Saturday to bring the body to Rochester for burial.
Mr. Capp was well known in Rochester, where he engaged in the restaurant business for years. He was last connected wth the Lake Erie restaurant, which is now being managed by Mrs. CAPP. He left Rochester last December going to Hamilton to work in a paper mill, where he had been employed for six years previous to 1913, when he and his wife lost everything in the flood of that year. Besides his former wife, he leaves a son, Edward CAPP, and his mother, Mrs. Samantha MURPHY.

Mrs. Sidney WILSON Friday received word that her mother, Mrs. Anna LAVERING was dead in South Bend.

The funeral of Mrs. A. E. SINGLETON was held from the home in North State street yesterday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. The Rev. G. F. COURRIER, pastor of the Marion Street Methodist church, Aurora and the Rev. Mr. BURR of Lockport, officiated. Mrs. G. F. COURRIER gave a vocal solo and William GOODALE and Mrs. Harry VAUGHN sang a duet. Burial was in Lockport cemetery.
Mrs. Singleton died in Silver Cross hospital Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock. She was born in De Graff, Ohio, Feb. 21, 1864, and was married December 24, 1891. She was formerly Miss Flora Maye HOOVER. She was survived by her husband, two daughters and a son. They are Mrs. Charles GOODALE, Lois [SINGLETON] and Kenneth SINGLETON, two sisters and two brothers, Mrs. S. LOWMAN, Akron, Miss Louise HOOVER, Rochester, Ind., John HOOVER and Scott STINSON, both of Chicago. - - - Joliet News.

Mrs. G. C. CHANDLER Saturday received word from her mother at So. Bend that Lieut. Stewart BOLTER, a second cousin of Mrs. Chandler, was killed April 4th while fighting with the Canadian army in France. He is thought to have perished in the attack upon Vimy ridge. Mr. Bolter enlisted at his home city of Toronto and has a younger brother in the aviation corps. Mrs. Chandler was born in Toronto.

Monday, April 30, 1917

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, May 1, 1917

The funeral of Harry CAPP was held at Hamilton, Ohio, Monday. E. E. MURPHY returned Tuesday afternoon.

David SHONK, 78, died at his farm home, nine miles southwest of Rochester, Monday at 10:40 a.m., a victim of senility. While he had been ill, or failing, for practically a year, Mr. Shonk was able Sunday to be out of doors. Funeral Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. from the Rochester U.B. church, Rev. G. B. CRANE in charge. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Mr. Shonk leaves besides a widow one son, William SHONK, northeast of the city, and 12 grandchildren. A daughter, Mrs. Frank MULLENCOPF, preceded him. One granddaughter, Miss Ollie MULLENCOPF, made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Shonk. Mr. Shonk was one of Rochester township's pioneer farmers, moving to the farm where he died about 40 years ago.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: David SHONK, father, Co H 46 IVI, 1839-1917; Lydia A. SHONK, mother, 1842-1923]

John WHITE, 25, died Monday afternoon at the home of his father, Chas. WHITE, in Fulton, a victim of tuberculosis. Two sisters, Carmen [WHITE] and Lovie [WHITE], died of the same disease during the past year. Mr. White leaves a father, a brother, Theodore [WHITE], and a sister, Mrs. Frank CARITHERS. He had been in failing health for over a year. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at Fulton.

Mrs. John PHILLIPS received a message Monday telling of the death of her brother, Leander PORTER, at Mt. Vernon, Ohio. He was 70 years old.

Wednesday, May 2, 1917

[no obits]

Thursday, May 3, 1917

Mrs. Arthur SHIREMAN went today to Denver to attend the funeral of Miss Ellen McHENRY.

Friday, May 4, 1917

James SUTHERTON, 71, is dead at his home near Five Corners, after an extended illness with dropsy. He leaves a wife, five sons and several daughters. Funeral at Macy Sunday at two p.m. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery there.

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar ALLEN and Mrs. John SHONK of Flora were here for the funeral of David SHONK.
Wilson HULLINGER and Mrs. Ella WARREN left today for their home in Kokomo after attending the funeral of David SHONK.

Mr. and Mrs. William ROSE returned to their home in Kokomo today after attending the funeral of David SHONK and spending a short time with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. SHONK, northwest of the city.

Word was received that Mrs. Isaac DAWSON died at her home in Rollo, North Dakota, March 23, at the age of 60 years leaving a husband and seven children. Mr. and Mrs. Dawson formerly lived south of Fulton.

Saturday, May 5, 1917

Vincent P. CALVIN, 87, died Friday afternoon at the home of his daughter, northeast of Kewanna. He has been ill for six weeks. Mr. Calvin was the last of his generation, but leaves six children.Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2:30 at the Christian church in Kewanna.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F. Cemetery: V. P. CALVIN, March 13, 1830 - May 4, 1917; Catharine BURTON CALVIN, wife of V.P., June 1, 1835 - Nov 6, 1908]

Monday, May 7, 1917

While working among the flowers in her yard on South Monroe St., Saturday afternoon at 4:30, Mrs. Mary Ann HERRING, 72, wife of Jacob HERRING, suffered a stroke of paralysis, which caused her death several hours later. She was found, unable to move by a neighbor, Mrs. Bessie HURST. With the help of another woman, Mrs. Herring was taken into the house. Altho conscious, she never spoke after the attack and died at eight o'clock.
Mrs. Herring was born in Ohio, April 23, 1845, the daughter of Daniel and Sarah SLUSSER. On October 2, 1863, she married Jacob Herring in Ohio and they moved to a Fulton county farm in 1865. They were the parents of five children, four daughters and a son, two of whom are living: Mrs. Eliza Jane CZASPANSKY of Lamont, Oklahoma, who is coming to attend the funeral, and Charles HERRING, at home. Mrs. Herring leaves three sisters and two brothers: Mrs. Katherine GANDER of Vaugnsville, Ohio; Mrs. Margaret GRAINDER of Columbus Grove, Ohio; Mrs. Mel GARNER of Columbus Grove, Ohio; Daniel SLUSSER of Columbus Grove, Ohio and Nathaniel SLUSSER of Barrister, Mich. Several brothers and sisters are dead.
Mrs. Herring was a member of the Christian church, Knights and Ladies of Honor and of the Rebekahs.

The seven-days old son of Mr. and Mrs. George WILSON, who live south of Rochester, died Sunday. Funeral Monday afternoon.

Tuesday, May 8, 1917

Ollie MOORE, aged about 61, a resident of Athens, was instantly killed on the crossing in that town Tuesday afternoon about 2:30 o'clock, when the Ford which he was driving, was hit by the east bound Erie passenger which passes thru Rochester at 2:02. When the train stopped, the mangled body was found lodged upon the pilot of the engine. The head was completely severed.
No reason is known for the accident. Mr. Moore drove a car frequently, taking traveling men to nearby towns, and was preparing to drive a salesman, when he crossed the track. It is thot that he forgot to look for the train, the side curtains preventing a full view of the tracks. The machine was completely wrecked. It is estimated that the train was going 40 miles an hour, when the accident occurred, but it stopped within 600 feet, and backed to the station.
Mr. Moore leaves a wife, who lives at Athens, and a mother, Mrs. Emma MOORE, who lives in Rochester on East 8th St. Three children, Oscar MOORE of Athens, Mrs. Justin MASTELLER of Mt. Zion and Mrs. Robert RILEY of Illinois, also survive.

The funeral services for Mrs. Jacob HERRING are to be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, at the home on South Monroe St., Rev. G. C. CHANDLER officiating. Burial in Citizens cemetery. The daughter, Mrs. Eliza J. CZASPANSKY of Lamont, Okla., was expected to arrive Tuesday afternoon.

Wednesday, May 9, 1917

Witnesses of the accident at Athens Tuesday afternoon, when Ollie MOORE was struck and killed by an Erie passenger train, are still puzzled as to the reason the victim attempted to cross the track. They assert that the engineer blew his whistle frantically when he saw Moore approaching the crossing, and the victim had a plain view of the track. Funeral services will be held Thursday p.m. at Mt. Hope U.B. church. Burial at Mt. Hope. The verdict of the coroner, Dr. A. E. STINSON, near whose home the accident occurred, was expected Wednesday.

Mrs. Sarah SHADLE KALEY died at her home near Delong Tuesday morning after an illness of several months. The funeral was held at the Meethodist church Friday at 2 p.m. Interment at Leiters Ford cemetery. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, May 10, 1917

Rev. Lee FISHER, formerly of this city but for two years pastor of the Oakdale Baptist mission at Peru, died rather suddenly Tuesday morning at his home, 463 East Main street. He had been suffering from Bright's disease and was seriously ill for the past four months. Mrs. Fisher was alone with her husband at the time he expired.
Rev. Fisher was 69 years of age and a native of Miami county. He had resided in Peru for three years. Besides the widow there survive two brothers, Rev. Peter FISHER, the German Baptist minister residing east of Mexico, and Henry FISHER, residing northwest of Mexico. He was a cousin of Congressman H. A. BARNHART, of this city, and while residing here was pastor at the Bethlehem church near the city. He had also held several other nearby charges.
Funeral Thursday afternoon at the late home, with burial in the Dunkard cemetery at Mexico.

Opal Maxine [LELAND], fifth child of Lawson and Nettie (IRWIN) LELAND, was born April 27, 1915 and after an illness of seven weeks passed away at the family home, aged 2 years and four days. A little brother, Kermit [LELAND] and little sister, Ellen May [LELAND] preceded her in death. She leaves besides her parents, three sisters, Marjory [LELAND], Marietta

[LELAND] and Louise [LELAND], also her grandparents, Mrs. LELAND of Argos and Mr. and Mrs. T. W. IRWIN and many othr relatives. Funeral services were conducted in Poplar Grove M.E. church Thursday afternoon by Rev. J. F. KENRICH. Burial was made in the cemetery near by. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Mrs. Albert WILEY of Aurora, Ill., came today to attend the funeral of her father, Ollie MOORE.

Friday, May 11, 1917

William PALMER, 71, a well known farmer living east of Tiosa, died Thursday afternoon at five o'clock after a long illness. Death was caused by heart trouble and general disability. He leaves a wife and two daughters, Mrs. Dan BUSSERT of this city and the other living in Kokomo. Funeral Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at the house.

Proping himself up in bed with a chair, after taking down from the wall his old double-barrel shot gun with which he had killed many a cotton-tail, Richard "Tippy" STARNER, 66, shot himself thru the heart Friday afternoon at 12:30, dying instantly at his cabin home on the banks of the Tippecanoe river, in Talma.
The old trapper did not take a chance on the death shot. He sent both loads from the gun into his left side under the arm, pushing both triggers down with a board. No one heard the reports and he was found about 2 minutes later by Paul HULTS, who happened to step into the cabin. Charles FORE, who had been taking care of "Tippy," left the house at noon. It is thot that he killed himself because he knew death was not far away. He was afflicted with several cancers, which were causing him great pain and he had been in the care of the county since the holidays, when he was compelled to remain in doors.
The death of "Tippy" Starner marks the passing of one of the last of the well known trappers, fisherman and hunters, who made the Tippecanoe river their "Stamping ground" for the last 50 years. He knew every crook and turn of the river for 20 miles and he was well known in the county, and even the state. He married once and his wife left him a number of years ago. They had one child who is dead. He leaves but one relative, a brother, Polk STARNER.
In recent years, he has had considerable trouble with his eyes, and not long ago attracted considerable attention in an Indianapolis hospital where he went to get relief thru an operation. "John Barleycorn" brought him considerable grief, but he numbered his friends by the score.

Louis BERNERO, who works for F. DOVICHI, Wednesday received a letter from Italy announcing the death of his cousin, Joseph BERNERO, an officer in the Italian army. The letter said that the relative met death a half mile back of the firing line. He leaves a wife and three children. There are now three widows living in the Bernero home in Italy, a mother and two sisters. Men 50 years old are being called to the colors in Italy, according to the letter.

Mrs. M. FINLEY returned today from Peru whjere she attended the funeral of her niece, Mrs. Hary FINLEY.

Saturday, May 12, 1917

A large number of friends attended the funeral of Wm. PALMER, which was held Saturday morning at 11 o'clock at the home near Tiosa.

The body of Richard "Tippy" STARNER, who killed himself Friday, will be buried Sunday morning at Reichter cemetery.

Mrs. Omer ROSS received word Saturday morning from her sister, Mrs. Daniel COLGAN of White Tail, Montana, that the latter's three year old son was dead. Mrs. Colgan was formerly Miss Ora TRUSLOW of Rochester.

Monday, May 14, 1917

Archibald STINSON, 69, died Sunday evening at his home in Athens after an illness lasting two years, due to an organic heart trouble and other complications. Mr. and Mrs. Stinson had returned recently from Biloxi, Miss., where they spent the winter. He leaves a wife, a son, Dr. A. E. STINSON of Athens, two brothers, George STINSON of Colorado, John STINSON of Washington and one sister, Mrs. Helen HUFF of Ohio.
Mr. Stinson was one of the best known farmers in the county. He was born in Ross county, Ohio, August 21 [or 31?], 1847, the youngest of 12 children. After his marriage to Josephine DAVIDSON, he located on a farm in Newcastle township in 1882, where he lived until five years ago, when he moved to a home in Athens. He always took an active interest in politics as a member of the republican party and served several years as a director of the Fulton County Fair Association.
Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the house.

Tuesday, May 15, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, May 16, 1917

Rev. Samuel ESSICK and son, Luther [ESSICK], and Rev. and Mrs. Isaiah IMLER, all of Young America, were here today to attend the [Archibald] STINSON funeral. The Essicks will remain for a few days visit.

Among those here to attend the [Archibald] STINSON funeral today were: Mr. and Mrs. Ernest BROWN, Tom STINSON and Miss Edna STINSON of Indianapolis, Palmer STINSON of Deniston, Texas, and Mrs. M. B. RITCHIE and Mrs. RAE and Miss Nannie MOORE of Lafayette.

Funeral services for Arch STINSON were held at the home in Athens at two o'clock Wednesday afternoon, Rev. A. S. WARRINER officiating. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery, Masons in charge.

Mrs. John HERBIC went today to Deedsville to attend the funeral of a cousin, Mrs. Clint BELL.

Thursday, May 17, 1917

Mrs. M. RAE, Mrs. E. RITCHEY and Miss Kitty McCOY returned today to Lafayette after attending the funeral of Arch STINSON.

Mr. and Mrs. Lee MILLER went to Kewanna Thursday afternoon to attend the funeral of Mark MOORE, 65, of Bruce Lake, who died Tuesday. Mr. Moore was a retired farmer and was well known here.

Friday, May 18, 1917

Mrs. Stilla BAILEY received word Thursday evening of the death at Logansport of Joseph CALVERT, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert CALVERT, formerly Miss Hattie STURGEON. She was a daughter of Enoch STURGEON and after marrying resided for a number of years on North Jefferson St. Tuberculosis caused the death of the son. Funeral Friday afternoon at 4:00 o'clock.

Mrs. Frank [Mary ESTIL] DILLON, 66, long a Rochester resident, died Wednesday evening at her home in Warsaw. Her death was due to hemorrhage of the brain. Mrs. Dillon had been in failing health for several months, following an operation a year ago at Battle Creek, Mich. With Mr. Dillon she spent the winter in California, and they returned to Warsaw early in April.
Mr. and Mrs. Dillon, who was Mary ESTIL, were married in 1872 at Akron, and later moved to Rochester. They went to Warsaw from Rochester five years ago. Mrs. Dillon was a member of the Methodist church, the Pythian Sisters and the Rebekah lodges, and the Woman's Relief Corps. Besides the bereaved husband, she is survived by a step-daughter, Mrs. Adam WEICK, of Columbia City, a sister and niece, Mrs. Ida MALOTT and Mrs. Ida SHIREY, both of Los Angeles, California.
The funeral service was held from the home, 603 East Center street Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, with Rev. Leslie NAFTZGER, pastor of the Methodist church, officiating. Interment at Warsaw.

Mrs. William BIDDINGER received word Thursday evening that Jerry HARMON, 66, died at six o'clock at the home of his brother, John [HARMON], near Bruce Lake. His wife died several years ago and but one brother survives. Mr. Harmon left all of his property, a 100 acre farm in Aubbeenaubbee township, to his wife's nephew, Leslie STUBBS. Mrs. Biddinger was a cousin to Mrs. Harmon.

Mayor and Mrs. William BRINKMAN went to Warsaw today to attend the funeral of Mrs. Frank DILLON.

Saturday, May 19, 1917

[no obits]

Monday, May 21, 1917

Raymond MURPHY, 20, a graduate of the Rochester high school, class 16, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alpheus MURPHY who live three miles northeast of Rochester, died at the army hospital at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas, Monday morning. He had enlisted in the army here April 5th.
The parents are prostrated. They had barely finished reading a letter from Raymond Monday morning in which he said that he was getting along fine when they received the following telegram: "Raymond Murphy died here this morning. Shall we ship the body home or have it buried in the National cemetery?"
The body will be shipped to Rochester at once. Arrangements are being made by local citizens for a public funeral service in Rochester when the Citizens band will be asked to march as well as the members of the G.A.R. The lad is Rochester's first contribution to the great war. The local recruting officer said that he might have been killed in a fall from an aeroplane as he enlisted in the aviation corps.
While in school here young Murphy was active on the track team and in basket ball. He leaves a father and mother, four brothers and four sisters.

Tuesday, May 22, 1917

Val ZIMMERMAN, who had been taking care of her for the last 10 years, received a message Tuesday morning from Logansport, announcing the death of Mrs. Ellen PETERS, 84, in the St. Joseph hospital in that city. She had been in the hospital there for the past three years. Mrs. Peters was the wife of Henry PETERS. They moved to Rochester in 1868 and lived for years on North Pontiac St. She was born in Dorum,Germany, March 21, 1833. Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. George SMITH, corner of Elm and 12th sts., died suddenly late Tuesddy afternoon.

Raymond MURPHY, young Rochester soldier who died at Ft. Sam Houston Texas, Monday, will be given a semi-military funeral here, under the direction of the city and county officials.
The family Tuesday morning left all arrangements to Mayor BRINKMAN who has appointed the following men to look after details: Superintendent A. L. WHITMER, school children; Rev. A. S. WARRINER, Boy Scouts and Recruiting Officer RICHARDSON and Bernard CLAYTON, order of procession. Persons who can furnish automobiles are requested to notify Mayor Brinkman or Bernard Clayton. Contributions of flowers are also sought.
The funeral will be held at the Evangelical church, probably Sunday afternoon, but if the body arrives Wednesday, the services may be conducted Friday. No further details concerning the cause of death have been learned but a detail of soldiers will probably accompany the body. A number of Rochester members of the national guard will march as well as city and county officials and Boy Scouts will act as pall bearers.
As Raymond Murphy is the first Rochester lad to die with the colors, Mayor Brinkman has issued a proclamation asking all stores to close during the funeral if held Friday, and requesting all flags half masted.
McClung Post, G.A.R. Tuesday agreed to attend the funeral in a body.

Word was received Monday evening by Mr. and Mrs. John W. SMITH that their grandson, Smith CASEBEER, son of Dr. and Mrs. CASEBEER, of Newport, Ind., was accidently killed Monday. No details were given. Mr. and Mrs. Smith went Tuesday morning to Newport to attend the funeral.

PROCLAMATION
Whereas Raymond MURPHY is the FIRST SOLDIER of this county to lay down his life in the service of his Country during the PRESENT WAR, and has offered and given his all for "your flag and my flag."
Now, therefore, I William BRINKMAN, Mayor of the City of Rochester, Indiana, do order and request that the flags in the city be lowered to half mast, and that all business in the City be suspended during the hours of the funeral services.
Given under my hand this 22nd day of May, 1917.
W. Brinkman
Mayor

Wednesday, May 23, 1917

Mrs. Gertrude SMITH, 37, wife of George SMITH of South Elm St., died suddenly at 3:30 Tuesday afternoon a victim of apoplexy. She became ill about two o'clock while her aunt, Mrs. Malissa BURNS, who lives near, was calling at the house. Mrs. Burns summoned a physician, but after he arrived, Mrs. Smith went into convulsions from which she never rallied. Her mother, Mrs. Mark BURNS, died several years ago in the same manner. Mrs. Smith leaves a husband, two children, Mildred [SMITH] and Wilma [SMITH], a brother, Earl [BURNS] and the father.
Funeral services at the Christian church at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. WRENTMORE officiating and Rebekahs in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral services for the late Eliza PETERS will be held from St. Paul's Episcopal church Friday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. Geo. E. SCHERER in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Maggie BIBLER died at Longcliff Friday morning. The body was brought to the home of her sister, Mrs. Jane LISEY, Friday, the funeral was conducted from the home Saturday afternoon, burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, May 24, 1917

Cecil COOK, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. E. COOK, died Wednesday afternoon after an illness of only a few days, at his home near Kewanna. Death was caused by brain fever. Besides his parents he leaves three brothers, Hugh [COOK], Elmer [COOK] and Chas. [COOK] and two sisters, Mrs. Ed COSTELLO and Mrs. A. I. GILBERT, all of whom live near or in Kewanna. The funeral will be held at two o'clock Friday afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles BRYANT went today to Chicago to accompany home to Rochester the body of her brother, the late Raymond MURPHY.

Friday, May 25, 1917

According to a letter received by W. P. ROSS from John W. SMITH, his brother-in-law, who is now in Newport, Ind., called there by the death of his grandson, Smith CASEBEER, 14, the boy died as a result of a bullet wound in his head, mysteriously inflicted.
Young Casebeer, a son of Dr. and Mrs. Max CASEBEER, had been camping in a woods near the town with a number of other boys by whom his body was found Monday evening, a revolver upside down in his left hand. Many shots had been fired in the woods by the boys, complaint having been made of it in town, but as no one was with the youth at the time of the mishap, the real manner of death will probably never be known.
Relatives scoff at the suicide report, because of the position of the pistol in his hand, making it seem impossible that the boy could have shot himself, accidently or on purpose. There were no marks of burned powder on the face or clothing. He lived but a half hour after being found, but was unconscious all of the time. The funeral was held at Newport, Wednesday afternoon.

Mrs. Frank FOOTE, a resident of Rochester when her husband was in business here, died recently in Chicago. They moved from Rochester to Warsaw.

Saturday, May 26, 1917

The funeral of Raymond MURPHY will be held at the Evangelical church Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge.
The funeral procession will leave the house about 1:30 and will be met on North Main St., by delegations on foot, including the Citizens band. After the services, the procession will form on Main St. for the march to the cemetery. Automobiles for the use of the members of the G.A.R. and W.R.C. are to be lined up in front of the court house by two o'clock.
Flowers should be left at Val Zimmerman's store before Sunday noon.

Jeremiah HARMON was born in Davis Co., Missouri Jan 20, 1856 and died at his home near Delong, Ind., May 17, 1917, aged 61 years, three months and 27 days after an illness of many weeks.
He was left an orphan at the age of 14 years. He married Genevie HILAND Jan 29th, 1880 in Davis Co., Missouri. In January of 1883 they moved to their present home in Indiana. He was a member of Zion church, joining church in the winter of 1893 remaining a loyal member. His father, mother, two brothers and one sister preceded him to the spirit world.
He leaves two brothers, William HARMON of Rocky Ford, Colorado and John HARMON who was staying with him at the time of his death. Also a foster son, Leslie STUBBS and family of Monterey, besides other relatives.
Funeral services were held at the Zion M. P. church Sunday morning at 10 o'clock with Rev. MYERS officiating. Burial in Moon cemetery.

Monday, May 28, 1917

THOUSANDS PAY A FINAL TRIBUTE TO DEAD SOLDIER
More than 5,000 people were in Rochester Sunday afternoon to honor the memory of Raymond MURPHY, Rochester soldier boy, who died at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas, Monday May 21st. Rev. A. S. WARRINER preached the funeral sermon at the Evangelical church to at least 800, while more than a thousand waited outside.
A procession of marchers formed at 1:30 to march down North Main St. and meet the funeral cortege. They consisted of the Citizens band, followed by the Boy Scouts, the Moose lodge, high school boys and city and county officials. In the march to the cemetery, the same order was observed, except that cars filled with the members of the G.A.R and W.R.C. followed the marchers. A detail of local soldiers escorted the colors in front of the hearse. There must have been nearly 100 autos in the procession to the cemetery. A member of the band sounded taps at the grave. Due to the efforts of Cy DAVIS, marshal of the day, and others, the day's program was carried out nicely.
After the services at the church, the casket was opened at the door, and for an hour people passed into the church and around the casket. The crowd was so dense for a while, that a girl fainted.
Taking for his central theme, the fact that civilization has only advanced thru the sacrifice of life, Rev. Warriner paid a deep tribute to the men who died in our past wars. "Today, we are fighting the battle for democracy," said the speaker. He pictured the curcifixion of Christ as the supreme sacrifice for mankind.

Jacob KARN went to Gilead today to attend the funeral of Mrs. Karn's father, Samuel ZIMMERMAN.

Tuesday, May 29, 1917

Quite a number of Athens people attended the MURPHY funeral at Rochester Sunday afternoon. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Many from here attended the funeral of Raymond MURPHY Sunday. - - - SAND HILL ITEMS.

Wednesday, May 30, 1917

Mr. and Mrs. Alpheus MURPHY Tuesday received a letter from Ft. Sam Houston telling about the death of their son, Raymond MURPHY. The letter said that the lad went on police duty in the kitchen Saturday, where he worked all day and became overheated. He took sick Sunday morning at eight o'clock and was at once removed to the hospital at San Antonio, where despite the aid of the best physicians, he died 24 hours later.

Several from here attended the MURPHY funeral at Rochester Sunday. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Chas. R. CULVER died at his home in Akron last Wednesday night at the age of 71 years. He had been a resident of this community since 1869. He was born in Richland county, O., and enlisted in the I.O.V. cavalry in 1862 serving until the close of the war. In September 1869 he was married to Mrs. Hannah CUTSHALL SECREST who survives him. The funeral service was conducted on Friday afternoon at the Christian church by Rev. COMER of the M.P. church of which deceased was a member. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Thursday, May 31, 1917

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, June 1, 1917 to Monday, June 4, 1917

[no obits]

Tuesday, June 5, 1917

The body of the adopted infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jake CRABILL, who recently moved to Michigan from near Rochester, was brought here Monday for burial.

Thomas SEASE, 46, a Lafayette taxi driver, believed murdered and robbed, early Monday, was a great-uncle of J. R. BOWEN of this city. Mr. Bowen, who is attached to the faculty of the Winona agricultural school, is here to spend the summer getting actual experience in the Winona creamery. With his wife and daughter, he is occupying the JEWELL property on east 10th St.
__________

Lafayette, June 5. -- Thomas SEASE, owner of a taxi line here, died from injuries inflicted by hold-up men who brutally attacked him on a lonely road. Sease was found unconscious in a road four miles west of the city. He regained consciousness long enough to tell of being beaten over the head with a blunt instrument, being robbed and thrown into the road. A sheriff's posse are searchng for the assailants today.

Wednesday, June 6, 1917 to Saturday, June 9, 1917

[no obits]

Monday, June 11, 1917

Mrs. Manson YIKE, 31, died Saturday afternoon at 3:30 in her home on South Elm St., a victim of diphtheria. She had been ill for four or five days with tonsilitis and as a result of her weakened condition, she was an easy victim of the disease. Mrs. Yike became a mother three months ago and despite illness of several weeks, worked every day in a large garden. She also had the care of four children. The funeral services were held at the home Sunday afternoon.
Ida Idella MUSSELMAN was born in Miami county, July 9, 1885, the daughter of Marion and Harriett MUSSELMAN. On July 16, 1906, she married Manson L. YIKE. They were the

parents of five children, one dying in infancy. She leaves besides her husband and four children, a mother, three brothers, Charles MUSSELMAN, who is now in the army, Francis MUSSELMAN of Ashton, Ill., Jesse MUSSELMAN of Elburn, Ill.; one half-brother, William WINES, of Peru, and one sister, Mrs. Orpha YIKE of Rochester.
The Yike home was quarantined Saturday afternoon shortly before Mrs. Yike died. The infant child is now ill with diphtheria.

After tuberculosis lasting several years, Ralph BURNS, 24, died Sunday evening at 9:30 at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James M. BURNS, of near Delong. The family moved from Rochester last December. The young man had been married and was the father of a child, who is dead. He leaves a father, mother, two brothers, and five sisters. Mrs. Burdette VanDIEN of E. 14th St., is a sister. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Christian church in Rochester.

Mrs. Sarah ANDERSON, 54, wife of the late Robert ANDERSON of Leiters Ford, died at her home there Saturday evening of hardening of the artries. Funeral services from the home at two p.m. Tuesday. She leaves a daughter, Mrs. Otis BISHOP, of Calif., a son William ANDERSON of Leiters, two granddaughters, Ida ANDERSON of this city and Mrs. Art WELLINGTON of Culver and a grandson, Chas. ANDERSON of South Bend.

J. N. MUTCHLER, of Bruce Lake, who died Friday evening, was buried in the Citizens cemetery here Sunday. He was the father of Sam [MUTCHLER], Charles [MUTCHLER] and Peter MUTCHLER of this city.

Tuesday, June 12, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 13, 1917

Funeral services for Mrs. Martha ZIMMERMAN Thursday afternoon at 2:30 at the home on West 4th St., Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. Burial at the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Thursday, June 14, 1917

Jacob MUTCHLER, son of Valentine and Kathren MUTCHLER, was born in Seneca Co., Ohio, Aug 21, 1831 and died June 8, 1917, aged 85 years, nine months and 18 days. His parents came from Pennsylvania dnd settled in Ohio, living for some time among the Indians, from whom they bought a farm.
On Sept 30, 1852, Jacob Mutchler was married to Matilda Ann WILMUTH in Marion Co., Ohio, near Little Sandusky. To this union there were born eight children. Three of these, with their mother passed on before. Peter K. [MUTCHLER], Samuel S. [MUTCHLER], Mollie Alice [MUTCHLER], Margaret E. [MUTCHLER], Charles E. [MUTCHLER] and two half-brothers, with eighteen grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren survive.
Mr. Mutchler with his wife and family came to Indiana in 1878, settling in the Bearss neighborhood 3-1/2 miles from Rochester. His wife, Matilda, died in Fulton Co., Aug 9, 1890.

In early life he united with the U.B. church and was for some time S.S. Supt. Of late years, however, the infirmities of old age prevented him from service that would tax his strength. Funeral services were held at his late home, Bruce Lake, Sunday afternoon, June 10, conducted by Rev. G. C. CHANDLER. Burial in the Citizen's cemetery at Rochester, Ind.

Sarah Ann ANDERSON was born Nov 29th, 1833 and died June 9th, 1917 aged 83 years six months and 10 days. She married Robert ANDERSON March 18, 1855. To this union were born four children, two sons and two daughters, Florence Melissa [ANDERSON] and Eyrus Melville [ANDERSON] having died in infancy. The other daughter, Mrs. Mae Belle BISHOP died about a year ago in Bakersfield, California. John William [ANDERSON] of Leiters Ford is the only survving one of the family.
Deceased was born in Wayne Co., Ohio. In 1866 they moved to Indiana and purchased a farm near Leiters, where they resided until the death of her husband about nine years ago. She then moved to Leiters where she resided until her death.
She with her husband united with the Bethel M.E. church shortly after coming to Indiana and remained a faithful member until her death. She was always a kind and charitable neighbor and will be mourned by a large number of friends.
She leaves besides her son, four grandchildren, Charlie ANDERSON of South Bend, Ida ANDERSON of Rochester, Mrs. Maggie WOOLINGTON of Culver and Max ANDERSON at home. Also five great-grandchildren. The relatives have the sympathy of all their neighbors and friends.

Idella YIKE, daughter of Marion and Harriet MUSSELMAN, was born in Miami county, Indiana, July 9, 1885 and departed this life June 9, 1917, aged thirty-one years and eleven months.
While quite young she united with the Church of God at Disko, Indiana.
She was united in marriage to Manson L. YIKE July 16, 1906. To this union were born five children, one child died in infancy. She leaves to mourn her loss, her husband, mother, four children, three brothers, one half-brother and one sister besides a host of friends and neighbors. She was a kind hearted wife and mother and will be greatly missed.
Funeral services were held at the home on South Bancroft street, conducted by Rev. G. C. CHANDLER, Sunday afternoon June 16. Interment in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Friday, June 15, 1917

[no obits]

Saturday, June 16, 1917

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. SHIREMAN of Rochester and Mrs. Samuel BRINEY of Richland Center were called to Rockford, Ill., Friday by the death of J. C. BUDGE.

Monday, June 18, 1917

After an illness lasting several years, Jacob Charles GOHN, 63, died Monday morning at 1:30 at his farm home west of Rochester. He leaves a wife and four children: Floyd [GOHN], of Mansfield, Ill., Eva J. [GOHN], Charles Ernest [GOHN] and Raymond D. [GOHN], all at home. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the house.

Mr. Gohn suffered his first stroke of paralysis nine years ago. The fifth and last attack came a week ago last Sunday.
He was born in Ohio, March 21, 1864. When a child he came with his parents to Indiana, locating later in Fulton county, 19 years ago. Twenty-nine years ago he married Miss Driscol KIZZIE. They were the parents of five children, one of whom is dead. Mr. Gohn leaves two brothers and one sister: W. J. GOHN of East St. Louis, Mrs. Della McTAVISH of Pine River, Minn., and Warren GOHN, a half-brother of ths county.
He was a member of the Rochester Methodist church and of the Odd Fellows and Woodman lodges.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John LEWIS died Saturday evening. The funeral was held Sunday morning. Mrs. Lewis remains in a serious condition.

Tuesday, June 19, 1917

Special to the Sentinel
Marion, Ind., June 19 -- Fred DRAKE, 43, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. DRAKE of Rochester, was found dead upon the floor of the kitchen in his home here at 7:30 this morning. No cause is known.
Drake had arisen about 6:30. His body was found by members of the family, the head resting on a pillow taken from a chair. There were no indications of violence. The coroner was to return a verdict this afternoon.
__________
By International News Service
Indianapolis, Ind., June 19 -- Fred DRAKE, found dead today at Marion, was under indictment at Winchester, charged with arson in connecton with the burning of a Ridgeville general merchandise store, in which he held a partnership. He was arrested with four others a week ago and was to have had a hearing soon.
__________
Fred DRAKE was born in Rochester and educated in the city schools. Quitting high school here, he entered the University of Michigan where he remained for several years. He conducted a drug store in Van Buren, Ind., for a number of years and recently moved to Marion where he embarked in the same business. He leaves a wife and two daughters, aged 12 and three. Two brothers, Ben [DRAKE] of Great Falls, Mont., and Charles [DRAKE] of Texas, also survive.
Mrs. H. S. Drake, mother of the dead man, left for Marion Tuesday morning, having received word of the death.

After a year of intense suffering caused by cancers of the stomach, Mrs. Olive Ellen BRIGHT, 37, wife of Charles BRIGHT of East Rochester, died Monday evening at nine o'clock. An operation some time ago revealed the cause of pain and for six months she suffered in silence. The home has been the scene of great trouble as the husband is a victim of muscular rheumatism and for days, is hardly able to move. The burden of taking care of the home has fallen upon the only daughter, age 15.
Olive Ellen THOMPSON was born in this county, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel THOMPSON, who survive. She also leaves four brothers and one sister, James THOMPSON of Churubusco, Elza [THOMPSON] and Frank [THOMPSON] of Talma, and Edward [THOMPSON] and Mrs. Cora BATTS of this county.

Mr. and Mrs. Bright were married November 7, 1900.
Mrs. Bright was a member of the Christian church. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at the church, Rev. A. E. WRENTMORE in charge.

Mrs. Arthur SHIREMAN and Mrs. Alvira BRINEY have returned from Rockford, Ill., where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Briney's father, J. C. MUDGE.

Wednesday, June 20, 1917

According to information given the SENTINEL, Wednesday by a Marion Chronicle representative, who was on the scene, Fred DRAKE'S death was a case of suicide, altho the coroner's verdict has not yet been returned.
__________
By International News Service
Marion, June 30 -- Fred DRAKE, former city clerk, who committed suicide by swallowing patasium cyanide at his home here yesterday morning, in a letter to his wife, accuses two prominent Van Buren citizens, Dr. DERBYSHIRE and John HESS, of hounding him to death. Drake alleges that the men framed charges of arson on him. He stated that as an innocent man, he would rather die than go thru with the "nasty mess" of a court trial.

H. S. DRAKE went to Marion to attend his son's, Fred DRAKE, funeral.

Mr. and Mrs. James THOMPSON of Churubusco motored here today to attend the funeral of his sister, Mrs. C. F. BRIGHT, held this afternoon.

Thursday, June 21, 1917

By International News Service
Marion, Ind., June 21 -- The coroner's verdict in the death of Fred DRAKE, of this city, was "suicide by potasium cyanide." The funeral services will be held at Van Buren Friday at 2:00 p.m.
__________
Dr. G. E. HOFFMAN, A. P. COPELAND, A. D. ROBBINS and Atty C. C. CAMPBELL, of this city, will act as pall bearers at the funeral.

Mrs. Louise Ely HOLMAN, 67, wife of George W. HOLMAN, died Wednesday evening at 9:20 at Battle Creek, Michigan, where she had been in a sanitarium for three weeks. Her husband, daughter, Mrs. Lucile Leonard, and John HOLMAN were with her when she passed away. The son, Capt. Hugh Holman, who has been located at Charleston, S.D., and daughter, Mrs. Grace Beach of New York City were unable to arrive before the end.
Mrs. Holman had been in poor health for several months and recently it was said that she was suffering with jaundice. After spending some time in Martinsville, she was taken to Battle Creek. Rochester friends did not realize that she was so near the end. The body will arrive in Rochester Thursday evening at 6:06, over the Lake Erie R.R.
Mrs. Holman [Louise Ely BRACKETT] was born on a farm north of Rochester, Jan 28, 1850, the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Charles BRACKETT. She was the oldest child. On Christmas eve of 1874, she married George W. Holman. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are living: Mrs. Lucile LEONARD and Capt. Hugh HOLMAN, of Rochester, and Mrs. Grace

BEACH of New York. The youngest child, Georgia Ann [HOLMAN], died in 1903. Mrs. Holman leaves two brothers and two sisters, Lyman [BRACKETT] and Charles BRACKETT, Mrs. Charles PLANK and Mrs. Frank BRYANT of Rochester. The other sister, Mrs. Rose WILLIAMS, is dead.
Mrs. Holman will be missed by the women who have worked to improve the civic and moral tone of Rochester. She took an active interest in club work and for two years was regent of the Manitou chapter, D.A.R. She was a member of the Baptist church in which organization she was very active for years.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Ernest T. BROWN, 36, of Indianapolis sister of John McCLUNG of near this city, died Wednesday morning, a victim of acute diabetes. She had been ill only for several days. Miss Ruth McCLUNG was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse McCLUNG of this county. She leaves a husband and four children. Her mother died last March. Funeral Saturday morning in Indianapolis. Burial at Crown Hill cemetery.

Friday, June 22, 1917

The funeral services for Mrs. George HOLMAN will be held at the home on South Main St., Saturday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. Geo. C. CHANDLER officiating. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
An autopsy held at Battle Creek developed the fact that Mrs. Holman died of a milignant affliction of the gall duct. She appeared to be much better on Tuesday, but grew worse toward evening, a fainting spell coming Wednesday.
Mrs. Lucile LEONARD and John HOLMAN arrived at five o'clock, but Mrs. George BEACH did not arrive from New York until Thursday morning. Mrs. Holman was conscious until a few minutes before she died.
The body was brought here from Battle Creek, Thursday evening, and taken at once to the home.

R. C. STEPHENSON of South Bend and Mrs. Ella SPOHN of St. Louis, arrived in the city this morning to attend the HOLMAN funeral.

Capt. Hugh HOLMAN, of Quartermasters corps, now stationed at Columbia, S.C., where a cantonment is to be located, arrived home today, called by the death of his mother.

Saturday, June 23, 1917

Joseph P. GOODNER, 69, died Friday night at 12:30 o'clock at his home west of Mt. Olive, a victim of cancer. He had been ill for over a year. He leaves a wife and six children. Mrs. Goodner is a sister of E. GLICK of this city. Funeral Monday at 2:00 p.m. at the house, Rev. O. B. WELLS of Fulton in charge.

After an illness lasting five weeks, David WALTZ, 80, died Friday afternoon at the home of his son, George WALTZ in Newcastle township. Death was caused by Bright's disease. Mrs. Waltz died two years ago. He leaves five children. Funeral Sunday morning at 11 o'clock at the Dunkard church, west of Tippecanoe.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Walnut

Cemetery, Walnut Twp.: David WALTZ, father, Apr 3, 1837 - June 22, 1917; Sarah A. WALTZ, mother, his wife, Sep 29,1842 - Apr 21, 1915]

The funeral services for Mrs. Geo HOLMAN, held at the home on South Main St., Saturday morning, were largely attended. Rev. G. C. CHANDLER officiated, and two solos, "Crossing the Bar," and "There's a Land that is Fairer than this," were sung by Miss Louise GIBBONS. The pall bearers were R. C. STEPHENSON of South Bend, Harry BERNETHA, M. A. BAKER, Arthur METZLER, Isaac ONSTOTT and A. E. BABCOCK. Interment was made in I.O.O.F. cemetery. Aside from those already mentioned who arrived for the services, many were present from Kewanna. The floral tribute was especially beautiful.

Atty Harley LOGAN, of Plymouth, was in the city today to attend the HOLMAN funeral.

Monday, June 25, 1917

Hubert BRYANT, 63, died at the county farm, a victim of paralysis.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton County Poor Farm cemetery, Rochester Twp.: Hugh BRYANT, (Akron, Henry twp), b. IN, ae 61, adm May 19, 1915, no home - went to Akron. Father, John [BRYANT]; mother, Emily [BRYANT], d. June 24, 1917 of Cerebral Apoplexy.

Tuesday, June 26, 1917

Rev. F. Z. BURKETTE, former Christian minister here, now at Greensburg, has received word of the drowning of his brother, Charles C. BURKETTE, in the Miami River at Dayton, Ohio.

Mrs. Almira COPLEN, 81, wife of Isaac COPLEN, died Monday afternoon at four o'clock at the farm home in Newcastle township after an illness of a week, due to complications.
Mrs. Coplen was born in Ohio and came to this county when a young woman. She leaves three children, O. M. COPLEN, Charles COPLEN and Mrs. Charles MILLER. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at Athens.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. William MARTINDALE of Richland Center died Tuesday morning. Burial at Richland Center cemetery.

Wednesday, June 27, 1917

Mel TRUE received a telegram Wednesday afternoon from Chicago announcing that Newton TRUE died there at 11 o'clock. Fred TRUE will be home from Chicago this evening. Mr. True had been sick for several months. The funeral will probably be held here.

Mrs. Regina GROSS of Logansport came Monday to attend the funeral of her niece, Mrs. Kate ZIMPLEMAN. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Aaron WALTZ and wife auoed to Argos Sunday to attend the funeral of a relative. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Dr. STINSON and wife went to Indianapolis to attend the funeral of Mrs. Ruth (McCLUNG) BROWN the latter part of the week. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Thursday, June 28, 1917

Funeral services for the late Newton TRUE, 66, were held Thursday morning at nine o'clock in the Chicago home of the deceased, Rev. J. P. BURSHINGHAM, of South Park M.E. church officiating. The body will be brought here for services at three o'clock Friday at the home of Edward MURPHY, conducted by Rev. A. S. WARRINER. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Newton True, son of Isaac and Louisa TRUE, was born at Rochester, Indiana, July 29, 1849, died at his home, No. 3243 South Park Ave., Chicago, Ill., June 27th, 1917, age 66 years and 11 months; was married to Hannah S. BURDGE, of Wabash county, Indiana, in the year 1873; to this union was born one son, Arthur C. TRUE, who with the wife survive, together with a brother, William [TRUE] and sister, Samantha MURPHY, of this city.

A little son arrived at the home of William MARTINDALE and wife on last Thursday but became ill with convulsions on Monday of this week and died on Tuesday morning. The parents have our sympathy. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Abner WAITE of Peru attended the funeral of David CLEMANS Sunday. Mr. Waite and Mr. Clemans were both in the same regiment in the Civil war.
David Clemans was brought home from Dukes Hospital Thursday, having been in too precarious condition to have an operation. He passed away Friday at his home, northwest of town. He was past 72 years of age, and was a veteran of the Civil war, and was a prisoner in Libbey prison once during the war. He leaves a wife, two sons, Newton [CLEMANS] and Solomon [CLEMANS], four daughters, Mrs. Sarah FENIMORE, Mrs. Delilah FOUTS, Mrs. Ethel SMITH, and Mrs. Gladys COFFING. The funeral was held in the Christian church Sunday afternoon and preached by Rev. C. E. SCIFRES. Burial was in Plainview cemetery west of town. - - - MACY ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainfiew Cemetery, Allen Twp.: David CLEMANS, Co A 26th Reg, 1844-1917; Mariah A. NICHOLS CLEMANS, his wife, 1850-1923]

Friday, June 29, 1917

Glen O. SHERLAND, brother of Arthur SHERLAND of Argos, died at El Paso, Texas, June 20, while in the service of the United States army. His death was caused by a secondary hemorrhage, the result of an accidental rifle shot from a comrade's gun.

The body of Newton TRUE arrived in the city Friday afternoon from Chicago accompanied by the widow and son, Arthur [TRUE]. The funeral was held at once.

After an illness lasting several years, Nelson B. WAYMIRE, 73, died Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at his farm home north of Rochester on the Michigan road.

He leaves a wife and one son, Harvey WAYMIRE, who has charge of the local office of the Western Union Telegraph Co. Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, June 30, 1917

[no obits]

Monday, July 2, 1917

Omer Isaac ALEXANDER, 38, South Monroe St., died suddenly Saturday evening at eight o'clock a victim of apoplexy. He returned home at noon from his work at the bridge factory feeling well. Several hours later he began to complain of a headache and at supper time, fell unconscious, dying two hours later. Funeral Monday afternoon at 2:30 at the house, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge.
Omer Alexander was born in Rochester December 16, 1879. He was adopted when two years old by Mr. and Mrs. Isaac ALEXANDER. In 1892 he married Miss Ellie HUDTWALCKER. They were the parents of one son, Clarence [ALEXANDER], who is living. Mr. Alexander was a member of the Baptist church and of the Moose lodge. The order had charge of the funeral.
The Citizen's band Monday afternoon played for the funeral.

Tuesday, July 3, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 4, 1917

[no paper - holiday]

Thursday, July 5, 1917

Mrs. Peter DIETRICH, 50, of Bremen, died suddenly at the Woodlawn hospital Wednesday, as the result of a blood clot on the brain. She underwent an operation 10 days ago.

Miss Hetty SCOTT and Mrs. WALKER and daughter, Naomi [WALKER], drove to Bourbon Thursday to attend the funeral of Mrs. M. BECKS. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Friday, July 6, 1917

Mrs. Isabella DAWSON, 80, widow of the late Jonathan DAWSON, died at her home, cor. Pontiac and 9th Sts., lat noon Friday, after a long illness, due largely to the complications of old age. For several years, she had been in ill health, but only became bedfast Wednesday.
Isabella Victoria KING, daughter of William and Ann LINE KING, was born near Roundhead, Hardin Co., Ohio, June 5, 1837, moved with her parents to New Haven, Allen Co., Ind. about 1844 and then to Mexico, Miami Co., Ind., about 1847, where her father died in 1852. She, with her mother, soon afterward moved to Rochester.

Jonathan Dawson and Isabella King were married in this city Sept. 18, 1856, by Rev. W. P. WATKINS, pastor of the M.E. church, and had continuously resided here, having in 60 years occupied only three residences. Mr. Dawson died Nov 11, 1916 at the age of 84.
To their union were born four children: Dr. Byron Francis DAWSON, of Corning, Calif., temporarily residing at Akron; Mary [DAWSON], died in 1860, aged one year; Mrs. Estella Edith SHELTON and George Vernon DAWSON, of Rochester. There are six grandchildren and one great-grandchild.
Funeral services at the home on W. Ninth St. Sunday at 3:00 p.m., Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

C. C. CAMPBELL and family were called to Hammond on account of the death of a relative. Mr. Campbell returned Sunday night, Mrs. Campbell following later. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Saturday, July 7, 1917

Mrs. Emma CUNNINGHAM, 74, wife of Joseph B. CUNNINGHAM, died Friday evening at eight o'clock at the home on Monroe St., after a long illness caused by arterial sclerosis and paralysis. The aged woman was sitting in a chair when death came. She had been helpless since suffering a broken hip two years ago.
Mrs. Cunningham was born in Miami county, May 13, 1843. June 8, 1876, she married Joseph CUNNINGHAM and in 1897 they moved to Rochester from a farm south of Rochester, where they had lived for two years. They were the parents of three sons, two of whom are living: Ray [CUNNINGHAM], of Rochester, and James [CUNNINGHAM], who is working for the Inter-State Commerce Commission. He is now in Burlington, N.C. Mrs.Cunningham leaves a half-sister, Mrs. Cora DOUGLASS, of Hammond. She was a member of the Christian church.
Funeral arrangements later.

George M. BAKER, 68, who was struck by an Erie local Friday morning, died Friday evening at the Woodlawn hospital at seven o'clock. Shock due to his injury proved too much for the aged man. After arriving at the hospital, the right leg was emputated above the knee.
George M. Baker was born in Dayton, Ohio, July 6, 1849. When a young man he moved to this county and had lived for years on a small farm three miles east of Leiters Ford. He had been working on the section for some time. Mr. Baker leaves a wife and seven children.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the Sharon church. Burial in Moon cemetery.

Akron, Ind., July 7 -- A. C. EMAHISER, 70, a veteran of the Civil war, died Saturday morning at 4:30 at his home in Akron, where he had lived for the past 21 years. Death followd a year of illness caused by a fistula. The body will be sent Monday to the old home in Morrow county, O., where Mr. Emahiser was born. After moving to Akron 21 years ago, he conducted a grocery for several years. He leaves a wife, four sons and two daughters. He was a member of the G.A.R. and of the Odd Fellows lodge.

Monday, July 9, 1917

Conrad MEEHLING, 95, Fulton county's oldest citizen, died Monday morning at 11 o'clock at his farm home north of the Tippecanoe river, near Whippoorwill. He had been very feeble for the past year, but previous to that time, came to Rochester frequently. Death was caused by complications due to old age.
Mr. Mehling was born in Willingsheim, Germany, May 28, 1822. He learned the stone mason's trade in his native country and came to America in 1852, locating a year later in Fulton county. He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Catherine MILLER, 75, and a son, Henry MEEHLING.
Funeral arrangements later.

Funeral services for Mrs. Joseph CUNNINGHAM at the Christian church Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. A. E. WRENTMORE in charge. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, July 10, 1917

The funeral of Conrad MEEHLING, who died Monday, will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the South Germany church, which was plastered by Mr. Mehling in 1861. He was married in Germany to Miss Katherine KUNTZ, who died April 15., 1903. Mr. Mehling, who was past 95 when he died, is a descendant of a line of long lived ancestors.

Wednesday, July 11, 1917

The funeral of Nathan THOMPSON, an old resident, was held here Friday afternoon. For several years he made his home with his daughter, Martha [THOMPSON], in Aurora. Recently he fell and was taken to a hospital where he died from his injuries and his body was brought here Friday noon. Besides the daughter, he leaves three sons, Schuyler [THOMPSON], Fred [THOMPSON] and Isaac [THOMPSON], and a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Poplar Grove cemetery, Union Twp.: Nathan THOMPSON, father, Co H 155 Regt Ind Vol, Feb 23, 1835 - July 4, 1917; Nancy J. ALEXANDER THOMPSON, mother, his wife, March 14, 1833 - July 22, 1905]

Mrs. William FARRAR and Mrs. Margaret CARVEY of Macy attended the funeral of Mrs. Joseph CUNNINGHAM here Tuesday afternoon.

Thursday, July 12, 1917

Irvin C. SMITH and family were called to Chili last Saturday on account of the death of his mother, Mrs. Lovina SMITH. Mrs. Smith was in her 90th year, and had suffered with paralysis. Mrs. Smith lived in Akron forty years ago, when her husband, Rev. R. J. SMITH, was the pastor of the M.E. church. - - - AKRON ITEMS.


Friday, July 13, 1917

Miss Sarah DECKER, for years the Pulaski and Starke county circuit court reporter, and well known to many Rochester attorneys, died at the home of her sister in Star City last Sunday.

Saturday, July 14, 1917 to Monday, July 16, 1917

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 17, 1917

Miss Esther BEEHLER of South Bend was here Wednesday to attend the funeral of her grandfather, the late Conrad MEHLING. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.

Wednesday, July 18, 1917

The funeral of Mrs. Nelson SCOTT of Indianapolis, daughter of Mrs. Etta SINGER of Kewanna, was held at Kewanna Wednesday afternoon. Mrs. W. H. HARDIN and Mrs. Gene COPLEN, of this city attended the service.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank SMITH received word today of the death of Miss Edith CLAWSON, of Lafayette, which occurred at her home Tuesday evening. Miss Clawson was a sister of Mrs. Cora ENYART, formerly of this city.

David WALTZ, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick WALTZ, was born April 3, 1837 in Wayne Co., Ind., where he grew to manhood.
After the death of his parents, which occurred while he was a young man he lived with his brother until his marriage to Amanda REAM on June 15, 1862. They moved to Stockdale, Wabash Co., Ind., where they lived about two years. Later, they resided in Miami Co., for one year coming to Marshall county in Sept. 1865, living here but a short time but returning in the spring of 1869 where he lived continuously until the death of his beloved wife which occurred April 21, 1915. He then resided with his children until his death, which occurred at the home of his son, George R. WALTZ, of Talma, Ind., June 22, 1917, at the age of 80 years, 2 months and 19 days.
To him were born six children, namely: Wm. H. [WALTZ], of Chicago, Ill.; George R. [WALTZ] of Talma, Ind; Elias Franklin [WALTZ] and Harrison M. [WALTZ] of Indianapolis, Ind.; Priscilla Jane HUMBERGER and Mary Caroline DAWSON of Tippecanoe, Ind.
He was a member of a family of seven children.
Owing to his marked kindness, sociability and honesty he was hailed as uncle David by neighbors and friends, always greeting all with a smile. On January 1st last he was compelled to take to his bed which he kept continually until the end, suffering a great deal which he bore with ideal patience. He leaves to mourn their loss one brother, one sister, three sons, two daughters, eight grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and a host of friends. One son, Elias Franklin, preceded the father in death in infancy.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank V. ROHRABAUGH of Argos and daughters, Miss Pearl [ROHRABAUGH], Mrs. Roy MAXWELL and Mrs. Silas MEREDITH of Mentone autoed to Delphi Sunday to attend the funeral of the former's brother-in-law, Reed TITLOW.

Thursday, July 19, 1917

[no obits]

Friday, July 20, 1917

Quite a number from this place attended the funeral of Mrs. Luella DYKES at Gilead church on last Sunday afternoon and several attended preaching service at Sand Hill church on Sunday evening. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Saturday, July 21, 1917

[no obits]

Monday, July 23, 1917

Lee THACKER, colored, of Beaver Falls, Va., was instantly killed at five o'clock Sunday afternoon when he attempted to board a moving west bound freight train at Fulton.
Thacker was warned, but he persisted with the result that he was thrown under the wheels and his body badly mangled. The remains were taken to the Ditmire morgue. Ditmire wired the man's home city and receiving no answer, buried him in the Fulton cemetery Monday afternoon.
Thacker was thot to be one of a gang of section hands employed near Merrillville and was identified by a registration card.

After a long and painful illness, Mrs. Roanna SINKS, 58, widow of A. G. SINKS, died Sunday morning at 3:30 at the home of her brother, Dr. J. L. Babcock, on South Main St. Death was caused by pernicious anemia. She was confined to her bed for 11 months. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Baptist church, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge.
Mrs. Sinks leaves three sons: Alva SINKS of Bellingham, Wash., James SINKS of Rialto, Calif.; and Dr. O. F. SINKS of Tulsa, Okla. Mr. Sinks died June 14, 1916. She also leaves five brothers and one sister, Cyrus BABCOCK of Converse, George [BABCOCK], Andrew [BABCOCK], Joseph [BABCOCK], and Dr. J. L. BABCOCK of Rochester and Mrs. William PENSE of North Manchester.

Tuesday, July 24, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 25, 1917

Three Rochester people and their guest were instantly killed Tuesday evening at 5:30 o'clock when the Ford driven by Rev. George R. SCHERER, West 3rd St., was struck by an interurban freight car on a crossing at Martisville, Ind.
The Dead
Rev. George E. SCHERER, 37
Loren SCHERER, 13, son
Mahlon SCHERER, 10, son
Mrs. T. H. SUTTON, 35, Michigan, sister of Mrs. SCHERER.
The Injured
Mrs. George SCHERER, hurt about head, condition not serious
Beulah SCHERER, eight, leg fractured in three places; will recover
The party enroute from Rochester to Olney, Ill., to visit Mr. Scherer's parents, had left here early on Tuesday. Mr. Scherer drove on the track, evidently not hearing or seeing the car.
For some distance away from the crossing the view is unobstructed, but witnesses stated that buildings hide the view of the track directly at the crossing. A. W. GANT, a farmer living near, said the automobile was not going more than 15 or 20 miles an hour.
The heavy freight car struck the machine broadside, crushing it and tossing it to one side. Rev. Scherer was dead when farmers arrived on the scene. Mrs. Sutton, who had been visiting the family here, was found dying near the side of the track. The two boys, both of whom had been held tight in the wreckage, died shortly after they had been removed.
Mrs. Scherer and daughter were dazed and Mrs. Scherer was unconscious for a time. They were taken to Indianapolis on a car, for medical treatment. Attendants at St. Vincent's hospital said their conditions were not serious and that both would recover.
The bodies were taken to Martinsville and prepared for burial, but it is not known whether they will be returned to Rochester or sent to the home of Rev. Scherer's parents in Olney.
The crossing where the accident occuure was the scene of a similar accident two years ago when two persons were killed.
Rev. Seherer had been a resident of Rochester for over a year. He was pastor of the Lutheran churches at Tiosa and Bruce Lake, having been recently installed at Tiosa.

Thursday, July 26, 1917

William [CHAPMAN], 30 months old son of Mrs. Mabel CHAPMAN, of Detroit, Mich., and Earl CHAPMAN, of Kokomo, was drowned late Wednesday in the creek on the Hollis HEETER farm, east of Athens, where the child made his home.
The Heeters had been caring for the child since the separation of the parents some time ago, and each was of the opinion, at the time of the accident, that the boy was with the other. Learning of their mistake, they followed the infant's footsteps to a log bridge across a dredged ditch, which it had evidently attempted to cross. Realizing at once what had happened, they raised an alarm and the body was later found a half mile from where the accident took place.
Mrs. Heeter is the child's great-aunt, a sister of Mrs. Chapman's mother, Mrs. Lavina BLACKBURN, of E 5th St., this city. The parents were notified of the tragedy Wednesday evening and were expected here Thursday.
Funeral Friday afternoon at two o'clock at Mt. Hope church. Burial at cemetery there.

Mrs. Elizabeth GAMBY, 75, a well known resident of Leiters Ford, died Thursday morning at 3:00 at the home of her daughter Mrs. George POLLEY, where she had been living. She had been in ill health for more than a year. Besides the daughter, she leaves one brother, Henry SHADEL, of Delong and two sisters.

Friday, July 27, 1917

The bodies of the Rev. George E. SCHERER, his two sons and his sister-in-law, Mrs. T. F. SUTTON, who were killed when their automobile was struck by an interurban express car north of Martinsville late Tuesday, have been sent to Olney, Ill., for burial.

Saturday, July 28, 1917

Maxwell TALLEY, 20, son of Mrs. Rube SQUIRES of Rochester, died Friday at the county farm, a victim of tuberculosis. He had been ill for 12 years and an inmate at the county farm for three years. He leaves a number of brothers and sisters. Funeral Saturday morning at 9:30 at the county farm.

Fred McKEY, East 9th, was called to Kokomo Friday by the death of his father, William McKEY, 75, who passed away after a week's illness. He leaves four children.

John STANLEY received a telegram from his sister, Mrs. Grover JACKSON, of East Para, Mo., Saturday morning, saying that her three years old daughter was dead.

Monday, July 30, 1917

Mrs. Emma BRADY, 66, wife of Thomas J. BRADY, died Sunday morning at 9:30 at the home on North Pontiac St., after a long illness caused by heart and liver trouble. Funeral Tuesday morning at 9:30 at the house, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge, burial at Syracuse, Ind., the old home.
Mrs. Brady was born in Elkhart county, Jan 20, 1851, the daughter of John and Mary GORDY. She was one of a family of seven children. On Jan 26, 1868, she married Thomas BRADY and moved to Fulton county in 1887. They were the parents of eight children.
Mrs. Brady leaves six children: Norman [BRADY] of Waukegan, Ill., John [BRADY] of Mishawaka, Mrs. Paul EMRICK of Lafayette and Mrs. Frank KUMLER, Mrs. Earle MILLER and Miss Fay BRADY of Rochester. She leaves a brother and sister, Cassius GORDY and Mrs. Ella FAGAN of Elkhart.
Mrs. Brady was a member of the Evangelical church and of the W.R.C. The latter will have charge of the services at the home.

W. E. MOHLER, East 9th St., received a message Monday morning announcing the death of his father, William H. MOHLER, 82, at the soldiers' home near Lafayette. Death was caused by cancer.
Mr. Mohler was a veteran of the Civil war, a member of the 87th Indiana regiment.
He leaves one son, W. E. [MOHLER], a step-son and step-daughter, R. B. MINTON of Star City and Mrs. Mary HENDRICKSON of Fulton.
Funeral Tuesday afternoon at Lafayette, burial at the home. Mr. Mohler was a former resident of Kewanna.

John FLOYD, 50, a farmer living east of Macy, dropped dead Sunday about one o'clock while working in his garden. He was found by his wife. Mr. Floyd was a well known character and often visited Rochester. He leaves a wife and four children. Heart trouble and the results of a dabauch were said to be the cause of his death.

Tuesday, July 31, 1917

Lester Owen [GREER], 17 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Clay GREER, died Monday afternoon at their home southwest of the city, of anaemia. The funeral will be held at the home Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 and burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetry.

The funeral of John FLOYD, who died Sunday while mowing weeds in his patch, was held at Five Corners church Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. He leaves a wife, several children and one brother. Rev. George E. GARRISON of the Macy M.E. church preached. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Clifford [MUSSELMAN], the 7-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse MUSSELMAN, of near Twelve Mile, died Friday of spinal meningitis, and the buneral was held at the Mud Lake chapel, Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Musselman was Miss Mina EWER. They have the deep sympathy of many friends. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Wednesday, August 1, 1917

Norman BRADY and family of Waukegan, Wis., [sic] and Joseph BRADY and family of Mishawaka, were in the city Tuesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. T. J. BRADY.

Thursday, August 2, 1917

Miss Marcia ADAMS, 87, a former resident of Fulton county, died Wednesday evening at the home of John WHITTENBERGER in Warsaw. The funeral will be held in Rochester at 2:00 p.m. Friday at the home of Miss Adams' niece, Mrs. Henry FOGLESONG, South Monroe St. Burial at Mt. Zion.

George NEECE, 45, died at the county farm Wednesday night as the result of eating a peck of green apples during the day. He was a noted eater and had been ill, as the results of a paralytic stroke, brought on several weeks ago by over-eating green beans. He was a son of John and Louisa NEECE, both dead. He leaves a half-brother, Dallas NEECE, who lives in Rochester.Funeral at the county farm, Thursday afternoon.

Mrs. Roanna I. SINKS, daughter of James and Catherine BABCOCK, died of pernicious anaemia July 22, 1917. She was married to A. G. SINKS, March 9, 1877. Two boys blessed this union, Omer [SINKS] and James [SINKS], who with the step-son, Alva SINKS, five brothers and one sister survive. She was united with the Ebenezer Baptist church at the early age of 12 years, remaining a member until she moved to Rochester, when she united with the Rochester Baptist church, being a beloved member until the end. Three generations of Baptist ministers had left their impression on her character and disposition. Mrs. Sinks believed in experimental religion, and when two years ago, after 38 years of happy married life, her partner was taken home, her heart was broken, but she never complained and she never lost her cheerful trust in God. Funeral services at Baptist church,Tuesday July 24, G. C. CHANDLER officiating. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Conrad MEEHLING was born in Willingsheim, Germany, May 25, 1822, and departed this life at his home near Grand View, July 9, 1917, aged 95 years, one month and 13 days. He was married in 1840 to Catherine E. KURTZ, who preceded him to the Spirit world in 1903. In 1849, lwith his wife and daughter, Catherine [MEEHLING], he came to America and located in Ohio. Afterward they came to Indiana. There were also born to them John [MEEHLING], Henry [MEEHLING], August [MEEHLING] and Elizabeth [MEEHLING], Catherine [MEEHLING] MILLER and Henry [MEEHLING] survive, also eight grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren.
His trade was stone mason and plastering, which he worked at until late years when he devoted his time to farming. Before leaving Germany he served over six years in the standing army and participated in two battles.
For several years he had been a faithful member of the Grand View Evangelical church. The funeral was held at the Zion Evangelical church. Rev. W. WILDERMUTH preached the sermon from First John 3-2. Rev. L. A. DeWITT assisted.
The pall bearers weere: Theo STICKLER, J. C. CLARK, Clinton TRIMBLE, Edward McGRIFF, Chas. JACKSON, Howard REED.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, South Germany Cemetery, Richland Twp.: Conrad MEEHLING, May 25, 1822 - no d.d.; Catherine E. CONRAD MEEHLING, Apr 10, 1817 - Apr 15, 1903, ae 86y-5d]

Friday, August 3, 1917

Edwin R. HENDRICKSON, 79, ex-county treasurer and a pioneer resident of the county, died Thursday evening at 10 o'clock in his home on South Monroe St., after suffering intense agony for five weeks due to a cancer of the liver. He had been in declining health for some time.
Mr. Hendrickson was born in Butler county, Ohio, Feb. 8, 1838, the son of Jacob and Katherine HENDRICKSON. He was on of 13 children. When he was three years old, the parents moved to Wayne township, where they lived until death. On October 6, 1870, Mr. Hendrickson married Miss Caroline ESTABROOK, who died in 1884. They were the parents of five children, four of whom are living: William H. [HENDRICKSON], who lives on the old home place near Kewanna; Mrs. John SWARTWOOD, of Rochester; Oren M. [HENDRICKSON] of Rochester and Mrs. J. B. BARNETT, of near Rochester. The youngest child died 10 years ago, the mother having passed away three weeks after she was born. In March 1907, Mr. Hendrickson married Mrs. Susan SMITH, who survives. He also leaves two brothers and two sisters: Isaac HENDRICKSON, of Kewanna, who is now very ill, Mathias [HENDRICKSON], of Kewanna and Miss Sarah HENDRICKSON and Mrs. Katherine MURRAY of Kewanna.
Mr. Hendrickson, when active, took a deep interest in community life and in politics. He was a supporter of the democratic party and about 36 years ago, served two terms as trustee of Wayne township. In 1899 he was elected county treasurer, serving two terms. He then moved to Rochester, where he resided the rest of his life. He was a member of the Masonic lodge.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at 1:30 at the house, Rev. S. A. STEWART in charge. Burial at the Blue Grass cemetery, near Grass Creek, the procession to leave the house at 2:30.

The funeral of Charles RICHTER, 86, who died Wednesday on his farm near Akron, was held Friday afternoon at the Athens church. Death was caused by heart trouble. He leaves three children: Mrs. Frank DRUDGE and Mrs. Nat ROSS of near Akron and W. N. RICHTER of Monon, Ind. For some years Mr. Richter had made his home with his son, coming to Fulton county occasionally to look after his farm.

Grant MOW, 53, died at noon Friday at his home, north of Whippoorwill after an illness of long duration. Mr. Mow was a bachelor and leaves three brothers, Marion [MOW], David [MOW] and Samuel [MOW] and two sisters, Mrs. George WOLF and Mrs. Eliza LAWSON. Funeral arrangements later.

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Omar MOW, who died at the home of its parents in South Bend Thursday, was brot to Richland Center Friday for burial Saturday.

Saturday, August 4, 1917

Mrs. Charles GLAUB, 31, died suddenly at her home in Plymouth Friday afternoon, a week after giving birth to a son. Mrs. Glaub was formerly Miss May SPENCER, the daughter of Mrs. Roman GINTHER of East Rochester. Funeral Sunday afternoon at three p.m.

Monday, August 6, 1917

The two year old child of Isa BRIDEGROOM, of near Winamac, was bitten by a rattlesnake last week and soon died. The cries of the child attracted the family and the snake was killed.

Robert Francis SPOHN, son of Francis and Grace SPOHN was born July 2nd, 1916 and after a brief illness died July 31, 1917, aged one year and 29 days. After a brief service at the home Thursday the body was laid away in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

George W. CLAYTON and family and Mrs. Bernard CLAYTON attended the funeral of Mrs. Charles GLAUB, held in Plymouth Sunday afternoon.

Tuesday, August 7, 1917

After a long illness caused by complications due to old age, Isaac HENDRICKSON, 82, a pioneer resident of Wayne township, died Monday evening at six o'clock on his farm home near Kewanna. A brother, Edwin H. HENDRICKSON, 79, died four days ago at his home in Rochester.
Isaac Hendrickson was born in Ohio and came here with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob HENDRICKSON, in 1841, Mr. Hendrickson never married. He leaves one brother, Mathias [HENDRICKSON], of near Kewanna and two sisters, Miss Sarah HENDRICKSON and Mrs. Katherine MURRAY. He was a member of the Masonic lodge.
Funeral Thursday afternoon at one o'clock at the home; burial in the Bowman cemetery.

The funeral of Kathleen [MOW], the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Omer MOW of South Bend, was held at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. David MOW, last Saturday morning, burial at Richland Center. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.

Wednesday, August 8, 1917

The funeral of Grant MOW was held at this church on last Saturday afternoon, Rev. DeWITT having charge of the service. Burial in the Odd Fellows cemetery here. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Herman WEIR and wife of Peru attended the funeral of their uncle, Grant MOW, and spent Saturday night and Sunday with relatives here. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Thursday, August 9, 1917

Mrs. George RENTSCHLER, Jr., 26, died Thursday morning at the farm home two miles east of Fulton, as the result, the doctors said, of uraemic poisoning. Friends think worry over the fact that her husband was called for examination to enter the National army played a part in her death.
Mr. Rentschler had been ordered to report to Rochester, Friday for examination and as he was physically qualified, Mrs. Rentschler could picture nothing else for him but death on a European battle field. They had no children but one was expected.
Mrs. Rentschler was formerly Miss Ruth GOSS, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed GOSS, who reside west of Mr. Olive. The parents, two sisters and a brother survive. Funeral Saturday afternoon, 2:30 o'clock, at U.B. church in Fulton, Rev. O. B. WELLS in charge. Burial in Fulton cemetery.

The funeral of Ora THRUSH, 42, who died Tuesday evening at his home on So. Elm St., after six month's struggle with Bright's disease, took place at the residence Thursday afternoon, with burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Ora Thrush, son of the late Rufus THRUSH and Ellen THRUSH, was born in Logansport, Ind., Oct 7, 1872. In 1906 he married Miss Metta HESS of LaPorte and to them were born three sons and one daughter. He is survived by wife, children, mother, four brothers and three sisters.

Friday, August 10, 1917 to Saturday, August 11, 1917

[no obits]

Monday, August 13, 1917

The two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles HEIGHWAY, former residents of Rochester and now of Plymouth, died Sunday. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at the home.

John EMMONS, a farmer of near Mentone, committed suicide Sunday by hanging himself in the barn. Ill health is supposed to have been the cause. Mr. Emmons is well known in this county and he formerly lived near Talma.

Tuesday, August 14, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, August 15, 1917

Joe SIEGFRIED, owner of the North Main St. bakery and restaurant was instantly killed early Wednesday morning when struck by a west bound Erie train near the Shelton crossing in East Rochester. Death came instantly.
Mr. Siegfried, who is troubled with asthma, got up early to take a walk and it is supposed that he did not year the train. According to the crew, he was walking on the tracks about 100 yards east of the crossing, when struck. The body was badly mangled and for several hours, no one could identify it. After being taken to Zimmerman's morgue, the son, Atwell SIEGFRIED, heard of the accident and went to the morgue, where he instantly recognized his father.
It was reported later in the day that the body was so badly mangled that even relatives did not recognize it. They identified him by a bank book which was found in his coat. The family claims that Mr. Siegfried suffered so from asthma that at times he became confused. They believe that as the train came on, he suddenly suffered one of these attacks. Mrs. Siegfried says that he left the house about four o'clock. She did not learn of his death until nearly eight.
Joseph Siegfried was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Jan 4, 1858, the son of Wendal and Holdebirt SIEGFRIED. When a young man he moved to Peru and later to Rochester in 1876 where he lived the rest of his life. On July 13, 1882, he married Mary Belle SHAFFER, who survives. They were the parents of one son, Atwell SIEGFRIED, who is living. He also leaves two brothers, Charles [SIEGFRIED] of Peru and William [SIEGFRIED] of Gilead and one sister, Mrs. Mary MULCAHY of Logansport.
Mr. Siegfried was a baker by trade and for several years worked for R. P. TRUE. Several years ago he started his own bakery on North Main street of which he made a success. It is said that he was just contemplating the purchase of a car, having after years of struggle saved enough money for a home.
He was a charter member of the K. of P. lodge. He was a member of the Maccabees. Funeral services Friday afternoon at two o'clock at the house, Rev. W. F. SWITZER, former pastor of the Methodist church, in charge. Services will be conducted by the K. of P. lodge.

Thursday, August 16, 1917

As it is impossible for Rev. W. F. SWITZER to be here, the hour for the funeral services for Joseph SIEGFRIED has been changed to four o'clock Friday afternoon, when Rev. Scott HERSHEY will have charge. The hour had to be postponed as Dr. Hershey could not arrive here until 3:30.

Among those who ;will attend the SIEGFRIED funeral services Friday afternoon are Mrs. George MULCAHY, of Logansport, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. SIEGFRIED of Peru, John BROWN, of Pontiac, Mich., land Mrs. Mary NICHOLSON, of Omaha, Neb.

Word was received here Sunday of the death of Clifton KARNS, who has been at the Woodman's Sanitarium in Colorado. Mr. Karns had been at the sanitarium for the past month for treatment for tuberculosis and word was received here last week that his condition was some

better, but his condition became decidedly worse and he died Saturday night, a victim of the Great White Plague. The body is expected here some time Wednesday. Arrangements for the funeral have not been made. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Friday, August 17, 1917

John BROWN of Pontiac, Mich., came today to attend the funeral of Joseph SIEGFRIED.

Grant CHINN of Nebraska, came Thursday evening to attend the funeral of Joseph SIEGFRIED.

Saturday, August 18, 1917 to Monday, August 20, 1917

[no obits]

Tuesday, August 21, 1917

Ulysses Grant MOW, son of Adam and Harriet MOW, was born Aug 14, 1864 near Grand View church and lived there until his death, Aug 3, 1917. He was one of nine children, three of whom preceded him in death. He was baptized in infancy and always lived an upright life, making many friends who considered him a trustworthy friend and neighbor. He was a member of the Odd Fellows lodge of Richland Center. The funeral services were conducted at the Richland Center church, Sunday, August 3, L. A. DeWITT in charge.

Wednesday, August 22, 1917

[no obits]

Thursday, August 23, 1917

William SANDERS, South Madison St., received a message Wednesday evening announcing the death of his father, John SANDERS, 85, at the home of a son, Frank SANDERS, in Mason City, Iowa. Mr. Sanders was born in Indiana and moved West in 1849. He had often visited her. He leaves several sons and daughters living in Western states. The funeral will be held in Mason City.

Friday, August 24, 1917

Judge COOPER and wife and Geo. COOPER and family autoed to Peru Friday to attend the funeral of the former's daughter. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Mrs. Washington ALSPACH suffered a stroke of paralysis Saturday evening and passed away at one o'clock the next morning. She leaves one sister, Miss Martha KINDER, one brother, two sons, William [ALSPACH] and Neil ALSPACH, one daughter, Mrs. Laura BERRY, a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren besides a host of friends. Funeral services were held in the Christian church Monday afternoon, by Rev. SCIFRES. - - - MACY ITEMS.

[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: George W. ALSPACH, 1833-1914; Armilda ALSPACH, 1837-1917]

Saturday, August 25, 1917

[no obits]

Monday, August 27, 1917

Rev. George H. BABCOCK, 68, died Sunday evening at 8:20 at his home on College Avenue, after a long illness caused by dropsy and asthma. He had been an invalid for several years.
Mr. Babcock moved to Rochester from Elwood about four years ago. He was born near Winamac, May 7, 1849. At Converse, in 1868, he married Nannie SMITH, who survives. They did not have any children, but reared a girl from the age of seven, Mrs. Minnie MOONEY, who now lives in Elwood. Mr. Babcock was a carpenter by trade and worked at it until about 40 years old, when he was ordained a minister in the Methodist Protestant church. He last occupied a pulpit at Sweetzer, Ind.
He leaves two brothers, Andy [BABCOCK] of Rochester and Cyrus [BABCOCK] of Converse, two half-brothers, Dr. J. L. BABCOCK of Rochester and Joseph BABCOCK of near Wagoners and one half-sister, Mrs. Clara PENSE of North Manchester. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at the home, Rev. Eugene HUNTER in charge.

Mrs. Miller WHITTENBERGER, 53, died Sunday morning at her farm home, two miles southwest of Akron, after a six months illness of heart trouble and dropsy. Funeral at two p.m. Tuesday afternoon, in the Pleasant View church, Rev. SPANGLER officiating. Burial in Akron I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Emma COLE WHITTENBERGER was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christian COLE. Mrs. Cole survives, living in Pasadena, Calif. There also survive the husband, two sons, Reuben [WHITTENBERGER] of Rochester and Orville [WHITTENBERGER] of Peru, two daughters, Mrs. Allen SHRIVER of Mentone and Miss Marie [WHITTENBERGER] at home, a sister Mrs. Frank CLEMANS of Pasadena, Calif., and a brother, Frank COLE, of Hammond. Mrs. Whittenberger came of a well known family and had many friends who will regret her demise.

Tuesday, August 28, 1917

The body of Mrs. Frank DILLON, who died at her home in Warsaw last March, was Monday brot to this city and interred in the mausoleum.

Wednesday, August 29, 1917

James CONNERY, 50, a bachelor, was burned to death Tuesday night near Kewanna, when a one room shack, on the Ike HENDRICKSON farm, burned to the ground. Connery's body was found Wednesday morning in the midst of a pile of burned bed clothing, blackened beyond recognition.
For years, Connery had lived alone on the farm, seven miles south of Kewanna. Tuesday he

visited Logansport and returned in the evening, getting off the train at Grass Creek, much under the influence of liquor, according to witnesses. A neighbor, living near, visited Connery at his home until 10 o'clock. It is his opinion that Connery lay down on the bed with a lighted pipe in his mouth.
The flames from the dwelling were seen at midnight by neighbors and by th time help arrived the walls of the house had begun to fall in. Everything was a total loss. It is not known whether Connery ever awoke. Several believe that he might have died from heart trouble, before the fire started. The body was taken to Kewanna. He had no relatives in that neighborhood.

E. J. WILE, New York suit and coat manufacturer, cousin of the local Wile family and well known here, has recently learned accidently of the death of his mother, in Alsace-Lorraine. Information came indirectly thru friends in Switzerland and the U.S., according to a letter from Mr. Wile received here this week.

Thursday, August 30, 1917

The funeral of James CONNERY, 62, who burned to death in a shack south of Kewanna, Tuesday night, is planned for Friday morning from the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Maggie McDONOUGHY, near Grass Creek. Relatives in the West sent word they could come for the services. Burial in St. Ann's cemetery at Grass Creek.
Connery, it develops, was not a bachelor, his wife having died some time ago. He leaves five children, Ted [CONNERY], residing at Logansport, and Grace [CONNERY], a daughter, making her home with Mrs. McDonoughy. Connery was brought from Logansport in an auto Tuesday evening, and was last seen alive, about nine o'clock, by the men with whom he made the trip. He promised them to go to bed, "after a while," and is supposed to have accidently caused the fire which brought his death. The body was frightfully burned, when neighbors reached the ruins about midnight.

Miss Mae CUMMINS received word Wednesday that her father, Walter CUMMINS, is dead in Grand View, Tenn. The body will be taken to Middletown, Ind., for burial. He leaves one other daughter, Mrs. Byron KILLEN, of Winona Lake.

Harry FELTS and family went to Illinois Saturday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Frank BABCOCK. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Albert BURKETT, Mrs. Mary BURKETT, Mr. and Mrs. William BURKETT and son Walter [BURKETT], Austin BURKETT and family, Jerry OVERMYER and family and Milo MEHLING and family attended the funeral of Roy DUDDLESON of Culver Sunday afternon. Mr. Duddleson was killed by lightning last week. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Friday, August 29, 1917

[no paper - holiday]

Saturday, September 1, 1917

John B. WRIGHT, 75, a veteran of the Civil war and a resident of this county for 70 years, died Friday evening at 5:30 at his home on North Fulton Ave., a victim of complications due to old age. He was bedfast for the past five weeks.
Mr. Wright enlised for the war in Indianapolis, 55 years ago Friday, serving three years with the 87th Indiana. He was born in Ohio and came here with his parents when he was five years old. He lived upon a farm north of the city for years, before moving to Rochester three years ago. Mrs. Wright died 17 years ago. He leaves three children, J. M. WRIGHT of Kankakee, Ill., Mrs. W. B. McALEXANDER of South Bend, and Miss Nora WRIGHT of this city. He leaves one brother, Jacob WRIGHT of Rochester.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at two at the house.

The funeral of Mrs. Jake METZGER, 60, who died Friday at her home northeast of Kewanna, will be held Sunday afternoon. She leaves a husband and three daughters.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Shaffer Cemetery, Union Twp.: Jacob METZGER, 1859-1938; Elizabeth J. METZGER, 1861-1917]

Rochester friends received word Friday of the death of B. F WEBSTER in Elgin, Ill. Mr. Webster was a former resident of Rochester, where he worked for Beyer Bros. He leaves a wife and two daughters, Mrs. Ralph MILLIGAN of Pineville, Ind., and Mrs. Byrl KIRKLIN of Muncie, Ind.

Monday, September 3, 1917 to Tuesday, September 4, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, September 5, 1917

The body of Miss Crete PROUTY, 15, daughter of the late Charles PROUTY, of this city, who died Sunday at her home in Three Rivers, Mich., was brot to Rochester Wednesday for burial. Miss Prouty, who was an orphan, had been making her home with Jake CRABILL when she died, a victim of tuberculosis. Funeral Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. at the U.B. church, Rev. E. DIXSON in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: Creety PROUTY, June 10, 1902 - Sep 1, 1917]

Thursday, September 6, 1917 to Friday, September 7, 1917

[no obits]

Saturday, September 8, 1917

Lafayette, Ind., Sept. 8 -- William ASHBY has confessed the murder of Thomas SEASE, a taxicab driver, near here, June 4. Ashby was arrested Thursday. Sease was slain with a hammer and then robbed.

Sease was an uncle of J. H. BOWEN, of Winona college, who spent the summer in the Beyer Bros. creamery here.

Monday, September 10, 1917

A. A. TATMAN received word Monday that his sister, Mrs. Belle BATES, 53, died at 4:00 a.m. Monday at the Wabash hospital, following an operation Sunday evening for adhesions of the bowels. Mrs. Bates, who is the first of a family of eight boys and three girls to die, was born in Miami county and spent a number of years in this county. Her home, at the time of death, was in Claire, Mich., where the body will be taken for burial.

Jacob HOFFMAN, 86, died Sunday evening at his home in Royal Center, according to word received here. Mr. Hoffman was a brother of Samuel HOFFMAN and Mrs. Jonas GOSS, of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Goss, Samuel Hoffman and son William [HOFFMAN] will attend the funeral thereTuesday afternoon.

Tuesday, September 11, 1917

Levi GELBAUGH, 70, a well known Fulton county pioneer, died at the farm home four miles north of Rochester at 3:00 p.m. Monday, after an eight weeks illness, due to dropsy and heart failure.
The widow, Mary [GELBAUGH], two sons, Leslie [GELBAUGH] and Frank [GELBAUGH] of this city, four brothers, Andrew [GELBAUGH] and Isreal [GELBAUGH] of Rochester, Phillip [GELBAUGH] of Bucyrus, O., and George [GELBAUGH] of Crestline, O., and a sister, Mrs. E. M. STOCKWELL of Pontiac, Mich., survive. Funeral at the home, Thursday at 10:00 a.m. Burial at Richland Center cemetery, Rev. Geo. PULLMAN officiating.

Mrs. John PARKER received word Tuesday afternoon of the death of her father, Henry REAM, at his home at Blackwell, Okla. Mr. Ream was once a resident of Rochester, having been brought up by the late Phillip and Mrs. COOK, and served some years as an Erie engineer. His first wife is dead, but three other children by her, aside from Mrs. Parker, a second wife and two sons survive. Mrs. Parker was prostrated by the news.

Elmore Yocum SHELT was born in Medina Co., Ohio, January 19, 1844, the eldest child of Wm. and Mary McCLOUD SHELT. Emigrated with his parents to the vicinity of Newark, now Akron, in 1848. His father died in 1853 leaving the wife and four children to encounter the hardships of pioneer days.
In 1861 when the dark clouds of secession enveloped the nation, and volunteers were called by Lincoln, Elmore and his step-brother, Bruce WHITTENBERGER became members of Co. K, 46 Reg Ind Vol., and entered service at the beginning of the war. He served until the close of the war and was mustered out September 4th, 1865. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, '64 and was held for eight months at Tyler, Texas. He returned at the close of service a wreck in health, from which he never fully recovered.
In 1866 Mr. Shelt was married to Miss Melissa MODLIN. Two children were born, Chas. [SHELT], who died in infancy, and Wm. O. [SHELT], a resident of Detroit, Mich. For several years Elmore had been afflicted with cancer of the face; on account of the affliction he had lived at the National Military Home at Marion, Ind., where he was given the strict attention the malady

required. He was enabled to assist in the business direction of the Home until about a year ago. He answered the last call on Tuesday morning, August 28, 1917; the remains were interred in the National cemetery at Marion.
One brother, Eldridge N. [SHELT] of Indianapolis, two sisters, Mrs. Emma BROWN of Rochester, Mrs. Virgil SHAFER of Akron, and two half-sisters, Mrs. Ella NOYER and Mrs. B. F. DAWSON of Akron, survive.

Wednesday, September 12, 1917

[no obits]

Thursday, September 13, 1917

Stephen SAFFORD died Tuesday morning at the home of his son, Chas., near Tiosa, where he has been ai invalid for some time. The body was taken to the former home in Pennsylvania for burial. The widow, three sons, Charles [SAFFORD] and Fred [SAFFORD] and George [SAFFORD], of Pennsylvania and two daughters, Angeline [SAFFORD], of Pennsylvania, and Mary [SAFFORD], of Michigan, survive.

Friday, September 14, 1917

Mrs. E. M. STOCKWELL returned today to her home in Pontiac, Mich., after attending the funeral of her brother, the late Levi GELBAUGH.

Peter JOY received word today of the death of his brother, William JOY, at the soldiers home in Lafayette, which occurred Thursday. Mr. Joy formerly resided on a farm near Green Oak.

Saturday, Septemberr 15, 1917 to Tuesday, September 18, 1917

[no obits]

Wednesday, September 19, 1917

Mrs. Rachel WARD, 53, widow of the late Henry H. WARD of this city, died late Tuesday afternoon at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harry KAHN in Indianapolis, according to word received here by her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Blanche WARD.
Mrs. Ward was taken ill some time ago while visiting relatives in Texas and since returning to Indianapolis, where she made her home with the Kahns, had grown gradually worse until death came. A son, Delbert [WARD], of Frankfort, survives. Interment will be made at the Jewish cemetery in Peru.
There also survive three brothers, Joseph [SAMUELS] and Abe SAMUELS, of Dallas, Texas, and Ike SAMUELS, of Houston, Texas and two sisters, Mrs. Grant HALDERMAN, of Longmont, Colo., and Mrs. Joseph BENDLE, of Greenville, Texas. Mrs. Harry Kahn, with whom Mrs. Ward made her home, was a niece.

John H. WHEATLEY, 80, one of Rochester's oldest residents and a veteran of the Civil war, died Tuesday at 3:45 p.m. at the home on East 14th St., a victim of heart trouble.
Mr. Wheatley had been ill since the first of the year, but not until recently was his trouble serious. He was for three years a member of the 87th Indiana Volunteers and was also a member of McClung Post, G.A.R. The widow, Mrs. Matilda WHEATLEY, survives. There are no children.
Funeral at the house Thursday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. A. E. WRENTMORE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, September 20, 1917

The funeral services for Mrs. Rachel WARD, lwho died Tuesday evening in Indianapolis, will be held Friday morning at 11:30 in the undertaking parlors of Crawford and Costin at Peru. Interment in the Jewish cemetery. Among those who will attend from here are Mrs. Blanche WARD and daughter, Henriyetta [WARD], Mrs. Belle THALMANN, Mrs. Harry NORRIS, Miss Rose WILE, Mr. and Mrs. T. A. MURPHY, Mrs. Margaret ----iller, Mr. and Mrs. K. W. SHORE, and Mrs. M. LEVI, Mr. and Mrs. Joe LEVI and others.

Friday, September 21, 1917 to Thursday, September 27, 1917

[no obits]

Friday, September 28, 1917

S. H. HOFFMAN was Friday called to Dayton, Ohio, by the death of his brother, John [HOFFMAN], who died there Thursday morning, aged 80 years and six days, leaving the local man the last of a family of five boys.
John Hoffman was formerly a Fulton county resident and had traveled as an itinerant preacher for more than 33 years. He leaves a widow and four children. Funeral Saturday afternoon at Dayton.

The funeral of Louis COPLEN, five months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene COPLEN, who died Friday evening, will be held Saturday morning at 11 o'clock at the home. Friends may call from nine to ten o'clock. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Death was caused by cholera infantum and complications.

Saturday, September 29, 1917

After an illness lasting several years, Nelson B. WAYMIRE, 73, died Saturday afternoon, at two o'clock at his farm home north of Rochester on the Michigan road. He leaves a wife and one son, Harvey WAYMIRE, who has charge of the local office of the Western Union Telegraph Co. Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, October 1, 1917 to Wednesday, October 3

[no paper available]

Thursday, October 4, 1917
Weekly Edition

The funeral of Nelson B. WAYMIRE, 71, a Civil war veteran and a resident of this county for the past 35 years, was held Monday morning at 10:30 at the farm home north of Rochester, Rev. H. E. BUTLER in charge. Burial was made at the Citizens cemetery. Mr. Waymire died Saturday afternoon at two o'clock after a long illness. For the past year, he had been practically helpless.
He was born in Miami county, in 1845. When the Civil war broke out, he enlisted, remaining in the service for nearly four years. After returning home, he married Mary E. STIBBS, who died in 1878. Charles WAYMIRE, who lives in North Manchester, was born to this union. In 1856 Mr. Waymire married Mary E. BURNS, who survives. They were the parents of one son, Harvey WAYMIRE, of this city.

Lonnie Mercel [MERRELL], 20 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin MERRELL, died Saturday evening a victim of cholera nfantum.

Friday, October 5, 1917 to Wednesday, October 10, 1917

[no papers available]

Thursday, October 11, 1917
Weekly Edition

After a long illness caused by complications due to old age, Edward BALL, 82, died Saturday at his home near Tiosa. The funeral services were held Monday afternoon at two o'clock at the Brethren church, Rev. D. A. HOPKINS in charge.
Mr. Ball was born in Columbiana Co., Ohio, January 25, 1834, the son of John and Aretta BALL. They moved to Fulton county in August, 1855, locating on a farm on the Tippecanoe river. In 1872, Mr. Ball married Maggie RITENOUR. They were the parents of two sons, Frank [BALL] and Clyde BALL, who live near Tiosa. He also leaves a wife, one brother and three grandchildren.

Mr. and Mrs. D. P. MUTCHEL returned Saturday noon from Peru where they were called by the death of the latter's mother. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Thursday, October 18, 1917
Weekly Edition

Mrs. Emma EBER, 31, wife of L. F. EBER, who lives south of Wagoners, died Saturday evening after a long illness due to tuberculosis.The funeral was held Monday afternoon at two o'clock at the Methodist church in Macy, Rev. FISHER in charge.
Mrs. Eber, who leaves a husband and five children, was the daughter of Zeni and Amanda EBER. She was a sister-in-law of Mrs. Otis HAGAN, Mrs. Archie MILLER and Mrs. Louis FELDER, of Rochester, and of Charles EBER, of near this city. She had been ill for several years.

Mrs. George CRANE Monday received a letter from a sister living in England saying that she had lost another son on the battlefields of France.
Christian HOOVER, 87, who conducted a furniture store in this city for more than 60 years, died Wednesday morning at 10:30 at the home on West 6th St. He had been confined to the house or only two weeks, but in the last year had been declining, altho his remarkable clearness of mind remained with him until the last. Three weeks ago he had perfected plans to spend the winter in Florida. Death was caused by euramia.
Mr. Hoover was Rochester's oldest business man. Coming here in 1852, he went into the furniture business in 1854. He was born in Franklin county, Pa., September 15, 1830. In 1852, he left home for the West to secure work at his trade, which was cabinet making. After visiting Detroit, he went to South Bend where he was unable to find anything. He then started to walk to Logansport, but stopped in Rochester where he secured work of P. A. MANN, who was then in the furniture business here. Mr. Hoover also worked at that time for Jacob WHITTENBERGER at Akron, walking from Rochester and back daily, for less than $1 a day.
In 1854, Mr. Hoover and Jesse YOST went into the furniture business and when Mr. Yost died a year later, the surviving partner purchased the business. He remained active in his chosen vocation until within two weeks of his death, coming daily to the store. He always maintained that activity was the secret of long life and until this year, went annually to the Wisconsin lake region to rough it. He often said that he was not going to rust out. Mr. Hoover was a man with few habits. He quit using tobacco 50 years ago.
Mr. Hoover represented a type of business men who are not numerous. It is said that his desk was jammed with thousands of dollars worth of notes, given in the purchase of furniture, which are outlawed, but despite the fact that he was a poor collector, he left a comfortable fortune. He never turned away from the store a poor man, who needed help, and donated much money to Rochester enterprises which cost him heavily. It is said that the Rochester Lock Co. lost him $14,000. Mr. Hoover's first store was located on the site of the present Palm Parlor. Several years later he moved north to the present location. When his son, Charles, was living he started a shoe store, which was managed by the former.
Altho he never aspired to office, Mr. Hoover was an ardent supporter of the republican party. He was probably the oldest member of that organization in the county and was one of the first men to back the party when organized by the followers of Abraham Lincoln. He was also the oldest member of the local Masonic lodge and was an Odd Fellow for years.
In 1855, Mr. Hoover married Julien BARKDOLL. They were the parents of four children: George [HOOVER], Charles [HOOVER], Mrs. M. O. REES and another daughter, of whom Mrs. M. O. Rees alone survives. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Hoover married his wife's sister, Margaret BARKDOLL, who is living. They were the parents of one son, John HOOVER, who is living. Several years ago, Mr. Hoover adopted Miss Trudie HOOVER, a daughter of Samuel BARKDOLL. Miss Hoover was taken to raise by Mr. and Mrs. Hoover when an infant, at the death of her mother. Thomas HOOVER, (son of Mr. and Mrs. John HOOVER), has been a member of the Hoover household since he was several months old. He leaves one sister, who lives in Pennsylvania.
Funeral Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at the house, Rev. Scott HERSHEY in charge.
A number of business houses closed Saturday afternoon during the hour of the Christian Hoover funeral. The offices of the United Public Service Comany were closed all the afternoon out of respect for Mr. Hoover, who was one of the founders and a former director of the institution. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Scott P. HERSHEY and special musical numbers were given by Miss Ruth BRINKMAN and C. J. IRWIN. The Masons were in charge of the burial at the mausoleum.

After an illness lastng 10 months, Mrs. John LEWIS, 34, died Thursday evening at 6:45 at the home on East 14th St., a victim of Bright's disease. She had suffered for weeks and for several months, had been blind.
Mrs. Lewis was the daughter of Robert NEWELL, of near Athens, who is living. About 10 years ago, she married John LEWIS, who survives, with three children, Robert [LEWIS], Harriet Leona [LEWIS] and Russell [LEWIS] She also leaves a half-sister, Mrs. William KIME, and two brothers, Ray NEWELL, of Athens, and Manford NEWELL, who is now at Camp Taylor, Ky.
Funeral of Mrs. John Lewis, Sunday afternoon, two o'clock, at the home on E. 14th St., Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: John LEWIS, 1884-1944; Ruth LEWIS, 1883-1917]

Mr. and Mrs. Albert McKEE and son, Brant [McKEE], left Friday morning for Hoopeston, Ill., where Mr. McKee's uncle, Nelson McCOY, 62, dropped dead Thursday evening. The McKees had planned to visit their relative this week end; instead, they will attend his funeral.

Oren KARN received a message Monday morning telling of the death in Ottawa, Ill., of Mrs. Karn's mother, Mrs. O'KANE. Mrs. Karn was called home last Friday.

The funeral of Mrs. Frank EBER was held in the M.E. church here Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock, preached by Rev. FISHER, Dunkard minister of Mexico, assisted by Rev. GARRISON. Mrs. Eber was Miss Emma BALDWIN before her marriage. She has been a sufferer of tuberculosis for nearly two years, and in the spring underwent an operation at Duke's hospital, hoping to benefit her health. Besides her husband she leaves four small children, a sister, living near Peru, a brother, James BALDWIN, of near Deedsville. Mrs. Eber was past 31 years of age. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Several from this community attended the funeral of John ALDERFER at Bethel last Wednesday. - - - COUNTY LINE ITEMS.

Thursday, October 25, 1917
Weekly Edition

Mrs. Elizabeth A. SOWERS, 49, well known in Rochester where her father, Rev. A. V. HOUSE, once occupied the pulpit of the German Lutheran church, died last Thursday at Germantown, Ind., as the result of injuries sustained when struck by a motorcycle.
Mrs. Sowers was born in Rochester in 1868 and leaves three children. Her father died in 1910 at Germantown, where he held a church. Mr. Sowers is dead. Henry DITMIRE and other friends received news of Mrs. Sowers' death this week.

Mrs. Maude SHOUP, 55, sister of Enoch [MOW] and Henry MOW, of this city, died in Alhambra, Calif., Oct 9th, according to word received here by Rochester relatives Thursday. Mrs. Shoup was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David MOW and is the first one of 10 children to pass away.

Mrs. Robert NEWELL, 70, wife of the ex-surveyor, dropped dead Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock at the home in Athens and her body was found a few minutes later by Mr. Newell. She had been in good health and for several days had been cleaning house. Death was caused by heart trouble.
Mrs. Newell leaves three children: C. L. CLEMANS, Mrs. Henry BECKER and Mrs. Emma KROUSE. She was married three times.
Funeral arrangements later.

Charles FORD, a son-in-law of Isom NEW, died Monday at his home in Chicago after a long illness. Mrs. Agnes FORD, daughter of Mr. New, died a year ago last winter and was buried here.

Catherine Elizabeth BURDGE was born in Wabash county near Laketon, Ind., April 1, 1843, one of a family of 13 children, born to James and Mary BURDGE. She died at her residence in Akron October 16, 1917.
She was married to Wm. HULING Jan 1, 1863. They lived upon the Huling farm two miles west of Akron until the death of Mr. Huling in 1880. To them was born one son, Kelsey P. HULING, who died in October, 1909.
A few years after the death of Mr. Huling she moved to Akron where she resided until her death. On March 29, 1887, she married Arnold CUTSHALL, who passed away in January 1910. Miss Glen HULING has been her devoted companion in declining years. Mrs. Cutshall sustained a severe stroke on September 14, from which she did not rally, but survived 33 days without any natural nourishment. She was a member of the M.E. church many years and a charter member of Akron Chapter O.E.S. No. 410. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Thursday, November 1, 1917
Weekly Edition

Manford NEWELL arrived Wednesday afternoon from Camp Taylor to attend the funeral of Mrs. Robert NEWELL. A few days ago he was called home to attend the funeral of his sister, Mrs. John LEWIS.

Mrs. Anna TALLEY, 69, widow of the late Tobias TALLEY, died at six o'clock Wednesday morning at the county farm where she has been in inmate for several years. A sister in Ohio and two sons and a daughter survive. Funeral arrangements later.

Isom NEW went today to Kokomo to attend the funeral of his son-in-law, the late Charles FORD.

Private Manford NEWELL, who was in Rochester to attend the funeral of his step-mother, the late Mrs. Robert NEWELL, returned today to Camp Taylor, Ky., where he is stationed with the new draft army.

Cyrus QUICK, a resident of Liberty township, near Green Oak, for the past 50 years, died Friday evening at his farm home after an illness lasting several months. Funeral Sunday afternoon at one o'clock at a Macy church. Mr. Quick leaves a wife and three children: Mrs. William BAKER who lives east of Rochester, and P. A. [QUICK] and Ollie QUICK, who live at home.

[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Cyrus QUICK, father, 1838-1917; Emily E. QUICK, his wife, mother, 1843-1920]

The funeral services of Mrs. Robert NEWELL were held at the United Brethren church at Athens, Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge. Burial was made in the Mt. Hope cemetery.

After a long illness caused by complications due to old age, Mrs. Eliza J. BOZARTH, 83, died Sunday evening at 7:30 at her home west of Rochester. A son, Francis BOZARTH, lives at the farm home.
Funeral services for Mrs. Elizabeth BOZARTH at Antioch church, Thursday, at 2:30 p.m. Burial at Antioch.

Francis PROVERT of near Tiosa has filed suit against the estate of Sadie E. ANDERSON for $2,400, while Grossman Bros., of Argos have also presented a claim of $415.80 against the same estate.
Francis Provert bases his claim upon money loaned and services rendered. Mrs. Anderson, who died recently, owned a farm near Tiosa. In March 1907, Mr. Provert went to work for Mrs. Anderson and he asserts that during 10 years of service he never received a cent. He also claims that during that time, he spent in improvements upon the farm, $1,400 of his pension money. He claims $1,000 for services rendered.
Mrs. Anderson left a farm and some personal property.

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph BALL, Mr. and Mrs. Eli BALL and Mr. and Mrs. Jesse BALL and family attended the funeral of Mrs. Margaret COOK of Logansport. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Thursday, November 8, 1917
Weekly Edition

Akron, Ind., Nov. 6 -- Matthew Clair BURNS, 20, son of Robert BURNS of near Akron, died Monday in Sharon, Pa., as the result of injuries sustained when he fell under a freight car. The accident occurred last Thursday, when both legs were cut off above the knees. He was a brakeman and for some time had been employed in the yards at Sharon. The body was brought home Tuesday morning. The young man leaves a father and two brothers. He was a graduate of the local high school.

Mrs. Nora WARNER, 20, wife of Irvin WARNER of Macy, died Sunday morning at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin ZARTMAN of near Fulton, a victim of tuberculosis. She leaves a husband and three children. Funeral Tuesday morning at 10:30 at a church in Macy.

Norma L. [SCOTT], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William SCOTT, died Sunday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Perry HILL, where Mrs. Scott makes her home. Burial Monday at Athens cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. Katherine GRABLE, 75, was held Wednesday at Skinner's church, near Twelve Mile. She leaves two sons and a daughter.

Mrs. Sarah McINTIRE, 58, wife of Reuben McINTIRE, of Athens, died Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock after a long illness caused by arterial sclerosis. She leaves a husband and two sons, Walter McINTIRE of Huntington and Wilbur [McINTIRE], who lives at home. Funeral, Friday afternoon at two o'clock at the Mt. Hope church.

Cyrus QUICK was born in Holmes county, Ohio, Feb 17, 1838, and departed this life Oct 26, 1917 aged 79 years, eight months and nine days. He was the son of David and Margaret QUICK, and was united in marriage to Emily E. PACKER March 30, 1862. To this union were born three children, two sons and one daughter. He leaves to mourn his departure a wife, two sons and one daughter, P. H. [QUICK] and I. M. QUICK at home and Mrs. Wm. BAKER east of Rochester, and one brother, Philo W. QUICK. Three brothers and one sister are dead. One grandson and one great-grandson are living. Elder Irvin FISHER of Mexico was in charge of the funeral.

Mrs. Walter WARNER died at the home of her father, Irvin ZARTMAN, Sunday morning at one o'clock, of tuberculosis of the throat, at the age of 29 years. She leaves a father, several brothers, a husband, one son and two little daughters. The funeral was preached in the M.E. church here Tuesday morning by Rev. E. H. KENNEDY of Amboy. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Walter McINTIRE and family returned to their home in Huntington Saturday evening after attending the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Reuben McINTIRE. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Thursday, November 15, 1917
Weekly Edition

Misses Edna [ROTH] and Lena ROTH received word Sunday that their grandmother, Mrs. Nancy ORR, of Crawfordsville, was dead. She had been ill for some time. Their mother, Mrs. Mary ROTH, has been in Crawfordsville for several days. Miss Lena will go Monday evening.

The funeral of Mrs. Lulah SIBERT of Kewanna was held Tuesday afternoon at the house. Mrs. Sibert died Sunday after a long illness. She leaves one daughter. She was the divorced wife of D. S. SIBERT, head of a Kewanna bank.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F. cemetery, Union Twp.: Lulah TONER SIBERT, wife of D. W. SIBERT, dau of J. H. & H. A. TONER, Feb 10, 1861 - Nov 4, 1917]

Mr. and Mrs. Garl HUDDLESON Tuesday attended the funeral of Willis BRYAN who lived near Roann. He was 97 years old. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, November 22, 1917
Weekly Edition

Ralph SHEETS, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank SHEETS of near Germany, died Monday night at 11 o'clock at the Woodlawn hospital, where he was taken two weeks ago Saturday, suffering with a carbuncle on the back of his head. Infection developed, spread to the face and to the brain, causing death.
The young man made up his mind two weeks ago that he was going to die and insisted upon making the funeral arrangements despite the advice of physicians. He was a graduate of the Leiters high school and last April entered the bank at Leiters where he was employed when he took sick. He leaves a father and mother, two sisters, Marie [SHEETS] and Maude [SHEETS], and one brother, Donald [SHEETS]. He was the oldest child. Ralph Sheets was born July 30, 1896 at the home near Germany. He was well known in Rochester where he attended high school for several years.
Funeral services for the late Ralph Sheets at Leiters Ford M.E. church, Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial in Leiters cemetery.

Albert MILLER, son of the late August MILLER, died at his home in Macy Tuesday morning at 1:30 o'clock of tumor on the brain. He had been blind the past ten years and has been a familiar figure here. He was a member of the M.E. church here and also a member of the I.O.O.F. order in Peru. His brothers, Amos [MILLER] and Robert [MILLER], of Logansport and Louis [MILLER] conductor on the L. E. & W. R.R., were with him when he passed away. Funeral services will be held in the M.E. church Thursday afternoon by Rev. G. E. GARRISON. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, November 29, 1917
Weekly Edition

John [ZIMMERMAN], four months old son of Mr. and Mrs. William ZIMMERMAN, died Friday at 9:00 a.m. at the home of his parents, a victim of spinal meningitis.

The body of Mrs. James A. GILMORE was taken to Plymouth from Chicago for burial. She was the widow of James A. GILMORE, for 40 years cashier of the First National Bank of Plymouth, who died less than two years ago.

Mrs. Chas. SCHOLDER went today to South Bend to attend the funeral of Mrs. Samuel ROSS. - - - FRIDAY ITEMS.

Within a few hours after arriving in Flinwood, Maryland, where they had gone to visit relatives, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. RIDDLE, of near Tiosa, received the shocking news that their son, Harold [RIDDLE], six, had died suddenly of acute indigestion. The boy took sick last Wednesday, a.m. at school and the physician, who was called, then asserted that he was in no danger. However, he became suddenly worse at midnight and passed away before the doctor could arrrive. No one was at home aside from other children, the oldest of whom is 20. Nine children remain.

According to word received here Wednesday morning at nine o'clock, Grant (Cotton) BETZ, 52, son of Mrs. Rachael BETZ, of this city, was found dead in bed in Hammond, where he was employed at his trade of cigar-maker.
The brief message gave no particulars, Mr. Betz evidently passing away some time Tuesday night. Henry MEYER went to Hammond Wednesday afternoon to bring the body to Rochester for burial.
Grant Betz was born in Tippecanoe, Ind., Sept 10th, 1865. There remain besides the mother, a sister, Mrs. Henry MEYER, of this city and a brother, Eugene [BETZ], of South Bend. Mr. Betz was a widower, his wife having died several years ago.
The funeral services over the body of Grant Betz, who was found dead in bed in his rooming house in Hammond Wednesday morning, will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. Henry Meyer. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body was brot to Rochester Wednesday evening by Henry Meyer.

Mr. and Mrs. Otho WARNER of Culver passed thru here Sunday going to Tiosa to attend the funeral of the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack RIDDLE, who died suddenly last week. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Thursday, December 6, 1917
Weekly Edition

Martin Luther KESSLER, 67, dropped dead Monday morning at his home in Newcastle township, north of Athens. His end was very unexpected altho he had been in declining health for several months. Mrs. Kessler found the body on the back porch of th home.
Mr. Kessler leaves a wife and two children, Mrs. Margaret KING, of Chicago, and Mrs. J. D. HEIGHWAY, of Akron. Two children are dead. He was a member of the Bethlehem Baptist church, where he served as deacon for several years.
Funeral services for the late Martin L. Kessler at Bethlehem church, 10 a.m. Wednesday morning, Rev. SMITH of Gary in charge. Burial in Hamlett cemetery, on the Tippecanoe.

Mr. and Mrs. Julius ROWLEY went to Chili today to attend the funeral of Abe SHILLING. - - - FRIDAY ITEMS.

Abe SHILLING, a former resident of Rochester and an ex-sheriff of Miami county, committed suicide early Wednesday morning in the barn at his home in Peru. Ill healh is said to have caused the act. Funeral at Chili, Friday afternoon.

Thursday, December 13, 1917
Weekly Edition

Fred KADER, 25, brother of Ernest KADER of Rochester, died Monday afternoon at the home of his parents in Peru after a long illness caused by kidney trouble. He had recently been discharged from the army after several months in the quartermaster's corps as a baker. He leaves a father and mother and four brothers, one of whom, William [KADER], formerly lived here.

Mrs. Anna WOLF, wife of Isaac WOLF, died Thursday at 10:00 a.m. after a two weeks illness. The funeral was held at the Reform church Saturday, interment at the Leiters Ford cemetery. Those who attended from a distance were, Mrs. DIPERT of South Bend and Mr. and Mrs. DIPERT of LaPorte, Mrs. Emma PERCELL of Logansport and Mrs. GRAY of Rochester. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, December 20, 1917
Weekly Edition

Mr. and Mrs. Robert WILEY and Mrs. Laura E. BABCOCK went to Culver Monday to attend the funeral of Private Everett KROUSE, who died of pneumonia following measles, at the Hiattiesburg cantonment. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Bradford KROUSE.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Poplar Grove Cemetery, Union Twp.: Everett E. KROUSE, 113 Amm Tr 2 Mtr Sec, son of B. D. & N. M., 1898-1917]

Isaac ARNOLD, 75, father of Mrs. Christian McCLURE, who resides in Zion City, died Monday afternoon in his Macy home and was buried Wednesday afternoon. Mrs. McClure attended the funeral.

Among those who attended the funeral of Fred KADER at Peru Thursday were Joseph EWING, Mr. and Mrs. Charles CHESNUT, Mrs. William KADER and Miss Ruth PONTIUS.

Mrs. William SHONK and daughter Alice [SHONK] and Mrs. David SHONK were called today to Kokomo on account of the death of a relative. - - - TUESDAY ITEMS.

The 13 months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. GUYNN of Peru was buried at Athens cemetery Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Guynn is a sister of Mrs. Otis KEESEY, southeast of Athens. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Robert Lloyd GUYNN, Nov. 19, 1916 - Dec 14, 1917]

Miss Jeanette CAMPBELL returned to Chicago Friday after attending the funeral of her niece, little Ruth SALES. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Thursday, December 27, 1917
Weekly Edition

The body of Henry GARDNER, 75, who died at his home in Akron Thursday night, was shipped for burial Saturday to the old home near Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Frank NORRIS and family of Kankakee, Ill., and Mr. and Mrs. GIBSON of Logansport came Saturday to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. Mabel CARTER. Mrs. Norris and children will remain for an indefinite visit among relatives. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Superintendent A. L. WHITMER received a telegram Sunday announcing the death of Mrs. Rezin REAGAN, wife of the former principal of the high school here. Mrs. Reagan died in Sioux Falls, S.D., after a short illness. Funeral, Wednesday at Sheridan, Ind. Mrs. Reagan leaves three children.

Mrs. George MARTINDALE, 70, died Sunday at the home near Mount Olive, a victim of pneumonia. She leaves a husband and several children.