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FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1918

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1998

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

   

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 

 


Rochester Sentinel

1918

Tuesday, January 1, 1918

Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah WERNER, at the late home southwest of the city Wednesday at 11:00 a.m., Rev. A. S. WARRINER officiating. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, January 2, 1918

Mrs. John GREEN died Sunday at her home at Leiters Ford. - - - GERMANY ITEMS.

Thursday, January 3, 1918

John KANNADA, 46, a well-to-do farmer residing three and one-half miles south of Leiters Ford, was asphyxiated Wednesday evening, his body being found by Mrs. Kannada in the garage where he had gone to charge the batteries in his automobile. A physician was called, but nothing could be done to restore life.
According to the story told by Mrs. Martha ZOLMAN, of Rochester, who was visiting at the home, Mr. Kannada told his wife about eight o'clock that he was going to the garage to look after his car, saying, "don't stay up for me." When he did not come back to the house, the wife got up and went to the garage, where she found her husband lying face downward on the floor beside the machine. The engine of the car (an Overland) was still running. The windows and doors of the garage were tightly closed.
Mr. Kannada was killed, just as several men have met death over the country, according to newspaper reports. Nat Willis, the well known actor, died in his garage several weeks ago as the result of running his machine in a closed building. Physicians assert that the victim does not realize the presence of so much gas until it is too late.
Mr. Kannada leaves a wife and several brothers and sisters. His mother lives with a daughter, Mrs. Ora TRACY, of near Macy. A brother, William [KANNADA], lives in Peru. Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, January 4, 1918

George G. GAMBLE of near Macy died recently in Miami, Fla., where he had gone to spend the winter. The body was taken to Sidney, O., for burial.

Miss Anna NELLANS returned today to her home in Indianapolis after attending the funeral of Mrs. John GREEN.

Saturday, January 5, 1918

Clarence I. RANNELLS was born at Rochester, Indiana, Feb. 10th, 1876, the only son of William W. and Ellen J. RANNELLS. He graduated from the country schools at the age of 12, and entered the high school at Rochester, Indiana, under Professor SCULL, graduating in the class of 1894. He then entered Rochester college under Professor BANTA, and received his diploma in two years. Having taught mathematics the second year, he entered Purdue university 1897, with credits of one year for the four year course. In 1899 he made application to enter Michigan with a three year credit from Purdue. Michigan requires students from other colleges to take two years course before giving a diploma, but after examination he received his diploma in one year. He was married to Mabel BANTA, January 4, 1900, and immediately went to Johnstown, Pa., entering the Cambria steel works as computist, where he continued for two years. In 1903 he entered the government service as civil engineer, where he continued until sickness compelled him to retire Nov. 3rd, 1914. He had charge of several of the principal dams on the Ohio river and was stationed at Parkersburg, W. Va., where his son, William [RANNELLS], was born, a daughter, Rhoda [RANNELLS], having been born at Johnstown, Pa. At Parkersburg, he was stricken with typhoid fever, which left him with the nervous condition which ultimately led to his death. He took membership with the Presbyterian church at Parkserburg 12 years ago and was a faithful member till death. He leaves his wife and two children and his father, William W. RANNELLS, besides many devoted friends who knew him to be perfect type of manhood. Funeral Monday, Dec. 31, at Evangelical church. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, January 7, 1918

[no obits]

Tuesday, January 8, 1918

Logansport, Ind., Jan 8 -- Dr. J. Z. POWELL, pioneer physician of this city, author of a history of Cass county and presidential elector in 1896, died at a hospital here.
__________

Dr. Powell was a brother-in-law of Congressman H. A. BARNHART, the men having married sisters. He was called here in consultation at the time of Mrs. Barnhart's fatal illness, July 1916.

Mrs. R. F. SPOHN received a telegram Tuesday morning announcing the death in Minneapolis, Minn., of her brother, Andrew FELTS, 73. He leaves a wife and four children.

Wednesday, January 9, 1918

Mrs. William BECRAFT, 74, died Wednesday morning at one o'clock at the farm home north of Rochester. She had been ill for some time. Mrs. Becraft leaves a husband and four daughters: Mrs. Lyman BRACKETT, who is now in Colorado Springs, Colo., Mrs. John FULTZ, Mrs.

William BRUBAKER and Mrs. George NORRIS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: William H. BECRAFT, 1840-1923; Mary A. BECRAFT, 1842-1918]

Mrs. E. D. GAMBLE and two children remained in Florida, after the death of her father-in-law, George GAMBLE, Sr., who had gone with them. Mr. Gamble's daughter and son, Miss Alma GAMBLE, of Chicago, and Judge Geo. GAMBLE of Logansport hurried to Florida upon receiving the message of death, and accompanied the body to Sydney, Ohio, the family burial place. Mrs. E. D. GAMBLE writes that she expects to be home before long. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, January 10, 1918

James WILSON, father of Clyde [WILSON] and Sidney WILSON, owners of the Paramount theater, died Wednesday noon at his home in Ober, Ind. Mr. Wilson had been ill for some time with a cancer, having recently undergone an operation for the disease.

Mrs. John MYERS, 35, died Wednesday evening at eight o'clock at the home on South Madison street, a victim of tuberculosis. Funeral Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at Christian church, Rev. A. E. WRENTMORE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Mrs. Myers, who with her husband and children, a boy aged six and a girl aged 10, moved to Rochester three months ago from Noblesville, was a daughter of the late George GREGSON, of this city. She leaves besides the husband and children, a brother, Harvey GREGSON, and three sisters, Mrs. Frank McCARTER, Mrs. George COPLEN and Mrs. Samuel ARNOLD.

Funeral of Mrs. William BECRAFT Friday afternoon at 1:30 at the Sand Hill church, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge.

Friday, January 11, 1918 to Saturday, January 12, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, January 14, 1918

Word was received from Creighton Mines, Ontario, Canada, of the death of Chas. WARE, son of Mrs. Elizabeth WARE of this city. Besides his mother he leaves a wife and daughter, and brother, Alonzo WARE of this city. The body was taken to Denver, Colo., for burial.

The funeral of Mrs. John MYERS which was to have been held Saturday was postponed because of the weather. An announcement of the time will be made later.

Tuesday, January 15, 1918

Mrs. Louisa MARTINDALE, aged widow of Jesse MARTINDALE, died early Tuesday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mart JACKSON, near Richland Center. She had been

ill for some time and death was caused by complications.
Mrs. Martindale leaves three daughters, Mrs. Mollie PENDLETON MOORE, Mrs. Thomas TRIMBLE and Mrs. JACKSON and one son, William [MARTINDALE]. Her husband died about eight years ago.
Funeral services Thursday afternoon at Richland Center, with burial at that place.

Funeral services of Mrs. John MYERS at the home on South Madison St., Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. A. E. WRENTMORE in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, January 16, 1918

George KOCHENDERFER arrived in Rochester Tuesday afternoon with the body of his wife, Mrs. Lucy KOCKENDERFER, 36, who died in Cornell, Wis., last Saturday, a victim of pneumonia.
Mrs. Kochenderfer leaves five children, three brothers, John [GOOD], Charles [GOOD] and Harvey GOOD, who lives in Wisconsin and a sister, Mrs. Verl BRYANT, of near Rochester. Her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Willard GOOD also live near this city.
The Kochenderfers went to Wisconsin last August, where they intended to make their home. Mrs. Kochenderfer took sick with a severe cold two weeks ago which soon developed into pneumonia.
Funeral services Friday afternoon at one o'clock in the United Brethren church.Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Sarah Elizabeth [ANDREWS], infant daughter of George and Minnie ANDREWS, died Sunday morning at the home near Maxinkuckee. - - - MAXINKUCKEE ITEMS.

Mrs. Taylor JEFFERIES went today to Peru to attend the funeral of her sister, Mrs. Isaac DORAN, who died at her home there Sunday. Mrs. Jefferies did not receive word of her sister's demise until Wednesday.

Noah FISHER, 79, uncle of Congressman BARNHART, died suddenly of paralysis Monday evening at the Mexico Dunkard home where he and Mrs. Fisher had been living for some time. Funeral Friday afternoon at 2:00 in Dunkard church at Mexico, Elder J. H. WRIGHT in charge, burial in nearby cemetery. Mr. Fisher was the youngest brother of Mr. Barnhart's mother and lived longest, none of the family now being alive.

Thursday, January 17, 1918

Funeral of Mrs. Geo. KOCHENDERFER will be held Friday afternoon at one o'clock in the Evangelical church instead of the U.B. church as announced Wednesday. Rev. J. H. RIGGLE, in charge.

Mrs. Eliza J. BERNETHA, 83, mother of Harry [BERNETHA] and Miss Belle BERNETHA, died Thursday morning at five o'clock at her home on South Main street after a four days' illness caused by a severe cold, followed by pneumonia. Considering her age, Mrs. Bernetha had been very active and was rarely ill.
Mrs. Bernetha was born near Royal Center, April 16, 1834, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.

George WASHBURN. In 1854, she married James A. BERNETHA, who died in 1887. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are living, Ex-judge Harry BERNETHA and Miss Belle BERNETHA of Rochester and Lon BERNETHA of North Judson. Two sons, George [BERNETHA] and Edward [BERNETHA] are dead. After the death of Mr. Bernetha in 1889, Mrs. Bernetha and two children moved to Rochester. She was a life long member of the Baptist church.
Funeral at the home, Saturday afternoon at 2:30, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER, of Franklin, in charge. Interment at the mausoleum.

Miss Maudie Ellen FRY, 31, died Wednesday evening at seven o'clock at the home of her sister, Mrs. Frank STETSON, South Pontiac St. Miss Fry had been an invalid all her life, due to leakage of the heart. She had made her home, since the death of her mother, with Mr. and Mrs. Frank STETSON. She leaves the following sisters and brothers: Mrs. Frank STETSON, of Rochester, and Mrs. Noble GOODNER, Mrs. Edward WAGONER and Mrs. Orval ARVEN and Charles L. FRY of near Rochester, and James M. FRY, of Peru.

Mary Ann GREY, daughter of Joseph and Adaline GRAY, was born near Osgood, Ripley Co., Ind., Feb 19th, 1842. She was the sixth child of a family of eight and departed this life at her home, north of Rochester, Jan. 9th, 1918. She united with the Methodist church when a child and had lived a devoted Christian life. She was united in marriage to Wm. H. BECRAFT near Osgood, Ind., Nov. 9th, 1865.
To this union four daughters were born. She has been a resident of Fulton Co. for forty-four years. She leaves a husband and four children: Mrs. Geo. NORRIS, Mrs. L. M. BRACKETT, Mrs. W. H. BRUBAKER and Mrs. J. F. FULTZ of this county, one sister, Mrs. Ed RUTLEDGE of Elwood, Ind., nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Funeral at Sand Hill church Friday.

Friday, January 18, 1918

Charles TALBERT left Friday for Canton, Ohio, because of the death of his father, Daniel TALBERT, 80. He was the father of 14 children, eight of whom are living.

Because of weather conditions, the funeral services of Miss Maudie FRY have been postponed for several months. The body will be placed in the mausoleum in the meanwhile.

Saturday, January 19, 1918

James M. FRY, who was called here by the death of his sister, [Maudie Ellen FRY] has returned home to Peru.

The funeral of Mrs. Eliza BERNETHA was held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 at the home, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER in charge.

Monday, January 21, 1918

Mrs. Martha Jane McCALIPP, 69, died at the home of her son, Arthur SHIREMAN, 120 W. 3rd St., at 8:00 a.m. Sunday, following a stroke of paralysis Thursday morning. It was the second attack of the disease. Funeral Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. in Evangelical church, Rev. Geo. CRANE

officiating. Burial in Citizens cemetery.
Martha Jane BOCKOVER, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. BOCKOVER, was born at Twelve Mile, Ind., Dec. 23, 1848. She was married early to Jacob SHIREMAN, who died 42 years ago at Argos. Afterward, she married Frank McCALIPP, who died in 1891 at Logansport. Since that time she has made her home with relatives, coming here two years ago. She was for 40 years a Christian, being associated first with the Christian and later with the U.B. churches.
There survive three children, Arthur [SHIREMAN], of this city, Ed. SHIREMAN of Logansport and Mrs. Frank FURGES, of LaCrosse, Wis., a daughter by the second marriage. There are also two brothers, Ike B. BOCKOVER of Logansport and John [BOCKOVER], of Peru, and two sisters, Mrs. Charles WEAVER of Muncie and Mrs. Sarah McHENRY, of Chili.
The funeral of S. D. HORN, of Chicago, will be held at the local Evangelical church Tuesday p.m., just after train, due here at 2:02, arrives from Chicago. Mr. Horn was formerly of this city and is the father of Sam T. HORN of Rochester.

Tuesday, January 22, 1918

Funeral of Miss Alinda B. HARTUNG, 39, who died Sunday morning at 8:30 at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. F. HARTUNG on North Jefferson St., Wednesday afternoon, at two o'clock, at the home, Rev. BOSSE in charge. Miss Hartung died after an illness of two weeks caused by typhoid fever. She was born July 28, 1878 in Ft. Wayne. She leaves a father and mother and three brothers, George [HARTUNG], Herman [HARTUNG] and Carl [HARTUNG].

Wednesday, January 23, 1918

Word has been received here of the death at his home in South Minneapolis on January 7th, of A. W. FELTS, an uncle of Charles [FELTS], Milton [FELTS] and John FELTS of this city.

Thursday, January 24, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, January 25, 1918

Miss Martha Jane McCALIPP, 69, died at the home of her son, Arthur SHIREMAN, 120 W. 3rd St., at 8:00 a.m. Sunday, following a stroke of paralysis Thursday morning.
Martha Jane BOCKOVER, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. BOCKOVER, was born at Twelve Mile, Ind., Dec. 23, 1848. She was united in marriage to Jacob SHIREMAN, whose death occurred 12 years ago. To this union three sons were born, the youngest son dying about nine years ago. She later married Frank McCALIPP. To this union two children were born, one of whom died in infancy.
She was a member of the U.B. church for 40 years.
There survive three children, Arthur SHIREMAN of this city, Edgar SHIREMAN of Logansport and Mrs. Frank FERGUS, of La Crosse, Wis. Nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren are living. There are also two brothers, Ike B. BOCKOVER, of Logansport, and

John [BOCKOVER] of Peru and two sisters, Mrs. Charles WEAVER of Muncie and Mrs. Sarah M. HENRY of Chili.
Funeral at the Evangelical church, Jan 22, 1918, Rev. Geo. CRANE officiating; burial in Citizens cemetery.

Mrs. Louisa MARTINDALE died on last Tuesday morning. Funeral was held at this church on Thursday at 10:30 a.m., Rev. Harley DAVIS, our pastor, having charge of the service. Burial in the Odd Fellows cemetery here. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Saturday, January 26, 1918

Min SNODGRASS, as she was familiarly known, died at her home Thursday evening, with heart trouble. Just before supper she sat down on a chair and was telling her sister about just having sent a washing home when she fell over dead. The shock was great for the family as she had seemed no worse than usual, having suffered some with rheumatism.
A number of years ago she was married to John CARPENTER to which union a daughter, Esther [CARPENTER], was born. Besides the daughter, she leaves a sister, Mag [SNODGRASS], two brothers, John [SNODGRASS] and Dwella [SNODGRASS].
Funeral was held at the house, Saturday afternoon, preached by Rev. C. E. SCIFRES, of the Christian church, of which she was a member. Interment in Plainview cemetery. - - - MACY ITEMS.

John BRADEN, south of Macy, left Sunday evening for Ashland, Ohio, to attend the funeral of his only brother, Dan BRADEN, who died Saturday afternoon. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Monday, January 28, 1918

Aaron Willis BYERLY, four, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward BYERLY, East 7th St., died Sunday morning at 3:00 o'clock, a victim of pneumonia. The child was only ill for 24 hours. Because of the deep snow, the funeral will not be held for several days. The body is now at L. Zimmerman's morgue.

Tuesday, January 29, 1918

Mrs. Harriet FREAR, 83, died Monday afternoon at 2:30 at the home of her nephew, William WAGONER, west of Rochester as the result of a long illness due to complications following old age. About six months ago, she fell and broke her hip, from which injury she never recovered.
Mrs. Frear was married twice. William FREAR, her last husband is dead. She does not leave any children. Mrs. Frear was a daughter of Sol WAGONER. Funeral Wednesday at 2:00 o'clock at the Baptist church, Rev. A. E. WRENTMORE in charge.

Funeral of the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward BYERLY at the house Sunday morning at 10:00 o'clock; burial in the Citizens' cemetery.

Wednesday, January 30, 1918

The funeral of the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward BYERLY will be held at the house Saturday morning at 10 o'clock, instead of Sunday morning as was announced.

Relatives in this community received the sad news that Mart WISER, who formerly lived near here, died and was buried last week. His home was near Fremont, Ind. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

George RARRICK, 83, died at his home Monday. Death was due to old age. Funeral at the house, at one o'clock Wednesday. - - - GERMANY ITEMS.

Thursday, January 31, 1918

Mrs. L. O'BLENIS and Mrs. Eliza WAGONER went to Claypool, Ind., today to attend the funeral of their sister-in-law.

Friday, February 1, 1918

Louis Haldon HOUSTON, 28, who has been ill for the past six months with tuberculosis, died Friday afternoon at 1:05 at the home of his mother, Mrs. Charles HOOVER, on Race St. Funeral arrangements later.

The funeral of Joe CANNON, aged Kewanna citizen, took place Friday afternoon. Mr. Cannon was a relative of the members of the late Mrs. Vernon GOULD.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F. cemetery, Union Twp.: Joseph C. CANNON, Co E 87 Ind Vol, 1837-1918; Mary Ann CANNON, 1842-1921]

Saturday, February 2, 1918

Mrs. Cora KROUSE, 47, died at her farm home northwest of Rochester Saturday at 7:00 a.m., a victim of paralysis, after an illness of a year's duration. Funeral Monday morning at the Sand Hill church. Burial at the Maple Grove cemetery at Argos.
Mrs. Krouse leaves a daughter, Hazel [KROUSE], who lived with her mother, three sons, Harry [KROUSE], Henry [KROUSE] and Archie [KROUSE], who live at home and Earl KROUSE, manager of the Kentucky Stock farm. Three sisters, Mrs. Henry BECKER, of Rochester, Mrs. L. L. ANDERSON, of Argos, and Mrs. Frank FISHER, of Germany, and a brother C. I. CLEMANS, of Gary, also survive. Mrs. Krouse was a widow.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Maple Grove Cemetery, Walnut Twp.: Frank KROUSE, 1863-1906; Cora A. KROUSE, 1870-1918]

Monday, February 4, 1918

Mark MATCHETT, 58, a well known resident of near Tiosa, died Monday morning at the Woodlawn hospital, where he was taken about a week ago.
He underwent a successful operation, but complications followed which caused death. He

leaves a wife and two sons, who are at home. Funeral Thursday morning at 11 o'clock at the Christian church in Tiosa; burial in the Reichter cemetery.

Mrs. Mary E. WAGONER, 73, died Sunday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John W. BEALL of near Kewanna, after a short illness. Funeral Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock at the Leiters Ford Methodist church; burial in the Leiters cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. cemetery, Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Jackson WAGONER, 1843-1914; Mary E. WAGONER, 1844-1918]

Tuesday, February 5, 1918

Mrs. Cora KROUSE, 47, died Saturday morning. When in good health, she was a great helper in her church. She leaves four sons and one daughter besides a host of relatives at Sand Hill. Rev. DAVIS has charge of the funeral services. - - - SAND HILL ITEMS.

Wednesday, February 6, 1918

Mrs. Wm. DELP returned Wednesday morning from Laketon where she was called by the serious illness of her mother, Mrs. Martha BLACKBURN. Mrs. Blackburn was not expected to live when Mrs. Delp left.
Later in the afternoon, Mrs. Delp heard that her mother had died.

Joseph CANNON, one of Kewanna's pioneer citizens, passed away at his home here, Wednesday, at the age of 81 yrs. Death due to complications. He leaves besides the wife, four sons and three daughters. He was a member of Eden lodge No. 69, I.O.O.F. Funeral at the home, Friday afternoon, interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Mrs. Loren JOHNSON received word Monday that her mother, Mrs. Jack WAGONER, was dead. - - - BETHEL ITEMS.

Martha Janice READ was born in Urbana, Ill., Jan 4, 1913, eldest child of Ludd and Lillie BURNS READ and died at Huntington, Ind., January 29, of pneumonia following an attack of measles and chicken pox. The body was brought to Akron Thursday morning and lay in state at the residence of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W. P. BURNS. Two children, Betty [READ] and Robert [READ], are left with the parents in the home circle. The parents have many friends that sympathize deeply in their sorrow. Funeral service was conducted at Akron M.E. church Thursday at 2:00 p.m., by Rev. COLE pastor of Huntington Christian church. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

George RARRICK of the Germany neighborhood died suddenly at his home Friday evening. Death was due to the ravages of old age. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Samuel PLANTZ died Saturday afternoon at his home in Leiters. Funeral services Tuesday at 10:30. Interment at South Germany.

Thursday, February 7, 1918

The funeral services over the body of the late Mrs. Martha BLACKBURN, who died Wednesday afternoon at the home in Laketon, will be held Friday at 9:00 a.m. at the U.B. church, Rev. Geo. CRANE in charge. Burial at Macy.

Friday, February 8, 1918

[no paper available]

Saturday, February 9, 1918

The son of Mr. and Mrs. John SHIREMAN of Huntington, found some arsenic tablets last week, ate them and died very soon. The father is a son of Mr. and Mrs. John W. SHIREMAN of Akron. John, Jr., is a fireman on the C. & E. railroad. He came home fagged out from an extensive trip of exposure, and was scarcely home when he became unconscious and developed pneumonia. The tablets the baby boy ate had been provided for the sick father. The bodies were taken to Akron.

Monday, February 11, 1918

The funeral of Deryl McDOWELL, 21, who was killed Friday evening at Laketon when struck by an Erie passenger train, was held Monday afternoon at the Methodist church in Akron, his former home. Mr. McDowell was a freight fireman on the Erie and was killed when he stepped down out of his engine upon the track over which the passenger train was approaching at great speed. He had been living for the past year with his wife and child in Montpelier, Ohio. The body was taken at once to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Horace McDOWELL, in Akron.

Special to the Sentinel
Macy, Ind., Feb 11 -- Miss Edna CROUDER, 24, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John CROUDER, of this town, died Saturday at the Methodist hospital in Indianapolis, a victim of pneumonia. She was taken to the hospital Feb 3rd from a home where she has been nursing. Miss Crouder was a graduate nurse. The body was brought to Macy Sunday evening. After a short funeral service at the home Wednesday, conducted by Rev. SCIFRES of the Christian church, of which Miss Crouder was a member, the body will be taken to Galveston, Ind., the former home, for the funeral under the direction of Rev. G. E. GARRISON, of this town.

Mrs. Mel GIBBONS and Miss Alice LOWRY, of South Bend, were among those who attended the funeral of Mrs. J. J. KING, at Akron, Sunday, visiting here briefly in the evening.

Tuesday, February 12, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. Emma BLACK, 70, (colored) wife of John BLACK, who lives north of the Erie tracks, will be held Wednesday afternoon at the home, Rev. R. F. SPOHN in charge.
Mrs. Black died Monday night after a long illness caused by dropsy. She leaves two children

by her first husband, John [RICKMAN] and Robert RICKMAN. She was born in Rush county, the daughter of Jesse and Fannie MABRAY. Her parents were born free, Mr. Mabray leaving Virginia when four years old.
Mrs. Black made her home in this county for the past 25 years.

John BRADEN arrived home from Ashland, Ohio, Monday, where he attended the funeral of his brother and visited relatives. - - - MACY ITEMS.

The body of Mr. John DITMIRE was brought from Logansport to the home near Delong. Mr. Ditmire had been at the home of his brother for several months when he passed away Thursday. The funeral was held Tuesday from the Zion Reform church. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

The body of Mrs. McMILLAN was brought from Logansport to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. MOSSMAN, where the funeral was held Saturday. Interment at the Leiters Ford cemetery. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Wednesday, February 13, 1918

[no obits]

Thursday, February 14, 1918

C. V. DUNFEE, 50, who has been ill for several years, died Thursday morning at Fulton a victim of cancer. He had been practically helpless for the past year. Mr. Dunfee leaves a wife and four children.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: Charley V. DUNFEE, 1862-1918; Rhoda M. DUNFEE, his wife, 1868-1946]

Mrs. E. P. KELLEY returned today to her home in El Reno, Okla., after attending the funeral of her mother, Mrs. Martha BLACKBURN.

Mrs. Frank REECE arrived home Saturday with the body of her husband, the late Frank REECE, who passed away Wednesday in Florida where they had gone for his health. The funeral was conducted Sunday from the M.E. church, interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Friday, February 15, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. Harvey ROSE, who died Saturday at Longcliff, was held in Fulton U.B. church Thursday afternoon.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: Harvey ROSE, 1850-1924; Sarah A. ROSE, 1853-1918]

Quite a few from this place attended the funeral of Mark MATCHETT at Tiosa Thursday. This community extends their sympathy to Mrs. Matchett and other relatives. - - - SAND HILL ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence MASTELLAR attended the funeral of Mrs. J. KING Sunday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Milton POFFENBARGER and Mrs. Tona MILLER attended the funeral of Mrs. Scott McMILLEN at Leiters Ford last Friday. - - - GERMANY ITEMS.

Saturday, February 16, 1918 to Tuesday, February 19, 1918

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 20, 1918

Mrs. Henry FROMM, Sr., sister-in-law of Mrs. E. FROMM of North Jefferson St., died Tuesday morning at her home in Arlington Heights, Ill. The funeral will be held Thursday in that city. Death was caused indirectly by a fall which she received about a year ago. Until last September, Mrs. Fromm lived in this city.

H. A. FRISTOE Tuesday received word of the death of his cousin, Mrs. D. B. ERWIN of Decatur. Mr. and Mrs. Fristoe went to Decatur Wednesday and will attend the funeral which will be held Thursday afternoon. The Erwins spent the past. - - - -

The funeral of Mrs. Harvey ROSE was held Wednesday at the U.B. church. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

The funeral of Chas. DUNFEE was held at the home Saturday afternoon. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

The body of Mrs. Laura McMILLEN, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles MOSSMAN, was brought Wednesday from Logansport and buried at Leiters Ford Friday. - - - MT. HOPE ITEMS.

Thursday, February 21, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, February 22, 1918

Mrs. Sanford O'BLENIS and Mrs. Sarah KEWNEY left Wednesday for Roann, Ind., to attend the funeral of Mrs. Nathan CLARK. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.

Saturday, February 23, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, February 25, 1918

John S. WAGONER, 82, died Monday morning at 3:30 in his home on South Main street, after an illness of a week caused by dropsy. He had been in poor health for several months.
"Big John" WAGONER was one of the best known farmers in the county and had many friends because of his extreme good nature. He came here with his family in 1873 from near Linsey, Ohio, where he was born. He married early and was the father of 12 children, six of whom are living: Walter S. [WAGONER], Edward [WAGONER], Harry [WAGONER], Charles C. [WAGONER], D. William [WAGONER] and Mrs. George CUNNINGHAM, all of this county. Mrs. Wagoner is living. He also leaves one sister and one brother, Mrs. Henry HETRICK and Alfred WAGONER of Lindsey, Ohio. He was a member of the Odd Fellows lodge.
Mr. Wagoner lived for many years on a farm south of Rochester, but moved to Rochester five years ago. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the house.

After being confined to his home on Elm street all winter, Michael HENRY, 90, died Saturday night as result of complications due to old age. His daughter, Mrs. Lizzie JOHNSON, was with him when he passed away. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 in the home.
Mr. Henry was born in Germany and when a young man, moved to the United States, coming to Rochester shortly before the outbreak of the Civil war. In 1861, he enlisted in Co F, 87th Indiana Volunteers, serving until the end of the war. As a result of his ervice, he came home broken in health and never fully recovered. He was always considered a peculiar character, because of his disposition and his manner of dress.
Mr. Henry leaves two daughters, Mrs. JOHNSON, who has been living here, and Mrs. Susan O'BRIEN, of New Jersey.

Tuesday, February 26, 1918

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 27, 1918

Word was received here today by W. J. LEITER of the death Tuesday of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Jere LEITER of San Jose, California. She suffered a stroke of paralysis last Thursday. The funeral will be held in San Jose Thursday afternoon. The Leiters lived in Kewanna for a number of years.

James J. BRAMAN, 76, died at his home, N. Michigan road Wednesday at 11:00 a.m., after a long illness. Death was caused by a cancer. The widow and five children, Chas. [BRAMAN], John [BRAMAN], Milo [BRAMAN] and Mrs. Fannie KINDIG, of this city, and Mrs. J. E. GOTTSCHALK, of Kewanna, survive. Funeral Friday afternoon at the Christian church, Rev. F. Z. BURKETT, of Greensburg, in charge. Burial at Citizens' cemetery.

Thursday, February 28, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, March 1, 1918

Mrs. Hubert QUICK and Mrs. Ed CAMERER went today to Argos. They will Saturday attend the funeral of Mrs. Alfred CAMERER at Plymouth.

Saturday, March 2, 1918

Mrs. Della A. BAKER, 28, wife of Robert BAKER, former local real estate merchant, died at the home in Logansport Tuesday night of pneumonia. Deceased is survived by the husband and two children, also by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel CALLOWAY, formerly of Monticello, now of Indianapolis, and two sisters, Mrs. Bessie GORMAN of Indianapolis and Miss Fay CALLOWAY of Indianapolis. Funeral at Idaville Friday. The Bakers lived here during the greater part of 1917.

Monday, March 4, 1918

The funeral of William BUTTS, 56, was held at the home in Akron Monday. He died Friday evening after being ill with pneumonia for several days. Mr. Butts leaves a wife and three children. He was section foreman for the Winona Interurban, out of Akron.

The funeral of Cyrus HALDEMAN, 38, a former resident of Akron, was held at his home in Elkhart, Sunday. He leaves a wife and two children. Mr. Haldeman was raised in Akron and leaves several brothers, Charles [HALDEMAN] and Frank HALDEMAN of that town. He was a carpenter by trade.

The funeral of Mrs. John RICKLE, who died Friday at the Odd Fellow's home at Greensburg, was held here Sunday afternoon at the Presbyterian church. The members of the Rebekah lodge had charge.

Mrs. Jessie LEWIS, wife of Byron LEWIS, of Tiosa, died at her home there late Saturday afternoon of blood poisoning and complications brot on by the birth of her fifth child three weeks ago. Funeral Monday at 10:30 a.m. at Tiosa. Burial at Mexico.

Harvey DRUDGE, of North Manchester, was killed near Laketon Sunday afternoon when struck by an Erie train. He was walking home from Akron, after spending the day with his mother. He leaves a wife and three children. Altho it was light, Drudge did not see the train from the west and stepped onto the track, to avoid a freight train from the east.

Tuesday, March 5, 1918

Mrs. Myrtle REED, who died with four others in a Decatur hotel as the result of mysterious poisoning, was buried Monday, at Kewanna, her birthplace. She leaves a husband and one daughter.

Wednesday, March 6, 1918

Mrs. Alice ROBBINS, 41, was found dead Wednesday morning in an outdoor sleeping room, at the rear of the Robbins' home on No. Jefferson St. Altho ill for several years with tuberculosis, she seemed to be feeling good Tuesday evening at 10 o'clock when visited by her husband, Alfred ROBBINS. The attending physician asserts that during the night, she suffered a hemorrhage, which caused death. Mrs. Robbins was born in Newcastle township. She was deaf and dumb and had graduated from an Indianapolis school for mutes. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins were married in Chicago in 1899. They were the parents of two sons, Alfred [ROBBINS] and Winston [ROBBINS], who are living.

Thursday, March 7, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. Alice ROBBINS at the home, three o'clock Friday afternoon, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. The body will be taken to Indianapolis for cremation and burial.

Friday, March 8, 1918 to Saturday, March 9, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, March 11, 1918

The body of Miss Maudie Ellen FRY, 31, who died January 16th, at the home of her sister, Mrs. Frank STETSON, and had since been in the Mausoleum, was buried Sunday afternoon in the Fulton cemetery. Funeral services, conducted by Rev. Irvin FISHER, were helt at Mt. Olive. Among those who attended the funeral were James M. FRY, of Peru, and Mr. and Mrs. John ENGLISH, of Corter.

Tuesday, March 12, 1918

Mrs. John SCHINDLER, 66, died at 6:45 Tuesday morning at her home on South Franklin Ave., after an illness of 14 months duration. Death was caused by complications of dropsy, tumor and heart trouble. Funeral Thursday at the house at 1:30 p.m., Rev. G. C. CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. Miss Mary A. RUDISILL was born in Certainville, Ohio, August 24, 1851. She had lived in Rochester for seven years. Her parents and a brother are deceased, her husband only surviving.
Word was received late Tuesday of the death of Mrs. Howard CALLOWAY, of Fulton, formerly of Rochester.

Orlando KING, 47, brother of Joseph KING, of this city, died Saturday at his home in Wabash. He leaves a wife and three brothers, Joe [KING] and William [KING] of near Mt. Zion, and Jacob [KING] of near Akron.

J. A. MYERS, went today to Akron to attend the funeral of his sister, Mrs. Sarah MEEK, who died at her home in Clairmont, Minn. Mrs. Meek was a former resident of Fulton.

Wednesday, March 13, 1918

Isaiah KATHERMAN, 71, a well known farmer of Newcastle township, dropped dead, Wednesday morning at eight o'clock while in the field watching some men erect a fence. He leaves one son, who lives upon the farm. He was formerly a county commissioner.

The funeral of Mrs. Howard CALLOWAY will be held at the Evangelical church Thursday afternoon at 2:30. Mrs. Calloway was the daughter of R. M. MATHEWS of near Fulton, where she died Tuesday. She [Lena Jane MATHEWS] was born Nov 12, 1890, and married Howard CALLOWAY, August 4, 1908 and leaves two children, Ida Virginist [CALLOWAY] and Charles Robert [CALLOWAY]. Mrs. Calloway was a member of the Eastern Star Chapter at Rochester and of the Rebekah lodge at Green Oak. She leaves one sister, Mrs. W. J. STOLETING, of Moline, Ill. Mr. and Mrs. Calloway moved to Rochester two years ago from the farm and last fall they went to Arizona and Colorado for her health, coming back here this spring.

The funeral of Mrs. John CARRUTHERS, who died Monday, was held at the home south of Macy Wednesday p.m. at 2:00 o'clock. The funeral service was read by Rev. GARRISON of the M.E. church and interment was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

John PALMER, 53, of Macy, died Tuesday evening at the county hospital in Peru, a victim of cancer. He leaves one son, Postmaster Frank PALMER of Macy. Mrs. Palmer and two children died of diphtheria, during an pidemic a number of years ago in Peru. Mr. Palmer later married Miss Nora WHISTLER, in which union four children were born. After working for a number of years on the Wabash as an engineer, Mr. Palmer moved to Macy, where he opened a meat market. A few years ago, he moved onto a farm near Macy.

Atch McCONKEY and family attended the funeral of Mr. HALL at Leiters Ford, Saturday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

The funeral of Mrs. George TOMBAUGH was held in the Christian church, Friday afternoon at one o'clock. A sister, Mrs. Theodore FOWLER and husband of Springfield, Ill., and a brother, Scott J. HURST and wife, of South Dakota, also Attorney Hurd HURST and family, of Peru, Mrs. Earl HURST and daughters, of Roann and Mr. and Mrs. Jesse TOMBAUGH of Chicago, attended the funeral. - - - MACY ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: George E. TOMBAUGH, 1885-1929; Josie M. TOMBAUGH, 1887-1918]

News just arrived of the death of Allen WILKINSON, aged about 70 years, at the Miami county hospital in Peru, where he has been for some time. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made. He was the son of Anderson and Hannah WILKINSON, and has lived in Macy and vicinity all his life. He leaves two sons. Archie [WILKINSON] is in the army, but is expected home soon. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mrs. John CARRITHERS died Monday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ben CARL, in Peru, where she made her home during the winter. She was more than 90 years old. Her home was southwest of Macy, and she has long been a resident here. Mrs. Wm. FENNIMORE is also a daughter. Funeral arrangements have not been made. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence BUNTON and family of Chalmers, and Mr. and Mrs. Ray EDINGTON of Elkhart, were called home Thursday on account of the death of their grandfather, Daniel HALL of this place. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Thursday, March 14, 1918

Funeral services of the late Isaiah KATHERMAN in M.E. church at Mentone, Friday afternoon, with Rev. BENDER of Summitville, in charge. Burial at Mentone. Cortege will leave the home at 1:00 p.m.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Mentone Cemetery, Franklin Twp.: Isaiah KATHERMAN, May 12, 1844 - no d.d.; also I. KATHERMAN, Co A 131 Penn Vol Inf Co K 26 Regt Penn Inf Co B 188 Penn Vol Inv (no dates); Susanah KATHERMAN, Sep 15, 1851 - June 27, 1907; Inf son of I. & S. KATHERMAN, (no dates)]

Friday, March 15, 1918

The Rev. Abel Milligan WORK, PhD, pastor of the Rochester Presbyterian church from 1878 to 1886, died at St. Petersburg, Fla., Tuesday, March 12th. Subsequent to his services in Rochester, Dr. Work held pastorates in Dakota Territory, South Dakota, Colorado and Iowa. During the last two years of his life he was incapacitated for the active ministry by ill health and went to Florida last fall in the belief he might be benefitted there.
He was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, September 13, 1851, was educated in the public schools of Indiana and at Wabash college where he graduated in the class of 1876. He finished a post graduate course at Wabash and pursued theological studies at Lane Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. His first regular charge was at Rochester and many of the older citizens remember Dr. Work and his family. Mrs. Work and six children survive. Interment was at Brookings, South Dakota, where the deceased served as Presbyterian pastor for many years.

Word was received here by Mrs. Julius ROWLEY of the death Thursday morning of her brother, James BROWN of Hoopeston, Ill. He was formerly a cigarmaker of this city. Besides a wife and two daughters, he leaves three sisters and one brother, Wm. BROWN, of Tipton. Funeral at Hoopeston.

Saturday, March 16, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, March 18, 1918

A large number of people attended the funeral of T. J. SAUSAMAN, held at the Akron Methodist church, Sunday afternoon.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Thomas J. SAUSAMAN, father, Aug 9, 1856 - March 15, 1918; Florence M. SAUSAMAN, mother, Feb 24, 1863 - May 24, 1924]

Tuesday, March 19, 1918

Harry BATCHELOR, 38, died Tuesday morning at 3:40 at his home on East 13th Street, as the result of an illness lasting several days, caused by pneumonia. He took sick a week ago Monday and despite the aid of several physicians, grew worse.
Mr. Batchelor leaves a wife and three children, William [BATCHELOR], Hattie Bell [BATCHELOR] and Dorothy [BATCHELOR]. On November 20, 1904, he married Myrtle EYTCHESON. He also leaves five sisters and one brother, Mrs. Lilly BROWN of Decatur, Mrs. Rose FULKERSON of Rochester, Mrs. Hattie LOVETT of Milwaukee, Wis, Mrs. Samuel CADE of Chicago, Mrs. Bert SALVAGE of Chicago and James BATCHELOR of Wabash, Ind. He was born in Rochester June 30, 1879, the son of Mr. and Mrs. David BATCHELOR, who are dead. Mr. Batchelor was a member of the Odd Fellows and Moose lodges.
Funeral Thursday afternoon at two o'clock at the Evangelical church, Rev. George PULLMAN in charge.

After a long illness caused by heart trouble and other complications, Mrs. Elizabeth ZEGAFUSE, 86, diedTuesday morning at two o'clock at her home on South Jefferson Street where she had lived for several years.
She moved to Rochester with her daughter who lived with her from a farm near the city. Mrs. Zegafuse was born in Ohio and came to Miami county with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. AULT, in 1849. Michael ZEGAFUSE, her husband, died more than 40 years ago. She leaves four daughters and three sons, Mrs. Julia KING of Macy, Mrs. Elizabeth FISHLEY of Deedsville, Mrs. Silas HOFFMAN of Akron, Miss Christina ZEGAFUSE, Rochester, Peter [ZEGAFUSE] and Emanuel ZEGAFUSE of Gilead and John ZEGAFUSE of near Rochester. Mrs. Zegafuse was a life long member of the Evangelical church.
Funeral Thursday at 1:00 p.m. in Evangelical church.

Wednesday, March 20, 1918

Mrs. Carrie TESTER, 49, died at her home on East Fourth Street, Wednesday morning after a long illness. Death was caused by hemorrhages of the stomach. Two sons, Corbet [TESTER] and Clarence [TESTER], who live here, survive. The body will be shipped Thursday to Tomah, Wis., for burial. Deceased had been a resident of Rochester for eight years.

Thursday, March 21, 1918

Silas MILLER, 78, is dead at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John GINTHER, of Indiana Harbor, according to a telegram received Thursday evening by his son,Vincent MILLER, of this city. No particulars have been learned, altho it is known that Mr. Miller had not been ill recently. Burial in Rochester.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: Silas V. MILLER, 1840-1918; Sarah A. REAM MILLER, his wife, 1844-1910]

Mrs. Eva MOW, wife of Marion MOW, who lives north of the river, died Wednesday evening after a short illness. Funeral Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the house.

Mrs. Mow died as the result of an illness caused by pneumonia. She leaves a husband and five children. Her age was 58 years.

Vivian COPLEN, seven, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey COPLEN of near Walnut, died Thursday morning after a short illness. She one one of four children.

Mrs. H. MEREDITH has returned to her home in Chicago after attending the funeral of her father, D. W. HUTCHINSON.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Durastus W. HUTCHINSON, father, 1836-1918; Caroline HUTCHINSON, mother, 1832-1913]

Friday, March 22, 1918

The body of Silas MILLER, who died in Indiana Harbor, will be brought here Saturday afternoon and the funeral services will be held in the Evangelical church at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. Geo PULLMAN in charge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, March 23, 1918

Oliver M. SHEETS, of Delong, died Saturday morning at the home of his sister, Mrs. John B. CAMPBELL, in Leiters Ford, a victim of cancer. He was about 50 years old and a bachelor. Mr. Sheets had been ill for the past six months but not seriously until two weeks ago. Besides his sister, he leaves two brothers, Commissioner L. L. SHEETS and B. F. SHEETS, of near Germany. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Monday, March 25, 1918

The funeral of Emma TUCKER, 64, who died Friday morning at her farm home near Sugar Grove, was held Sunday afternoon at the Omega church; burial at Akron. She leaves two sons, Sela [TUCKER] and Euna [TUCKER], of near Akron.

George MORAN, local agent for the Brunswick people, received word Sunday that his wife had died suddenly in Chicago.

Funeral services over the body of Oliver SHEETS were held Monday afternoon at two o'clock at the Leiters Ford M.E. church. Burial in the Leiters Ford Cemetery.

Tuesday, March 26, 1918

The funeral of Samuel ENYART was held Monday afternoon at the home of his granddaughter, Mrs. C. N. BAILEY, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge.

Wednesday, March 27, 1918

Elmer M. BYERLY, 23, son of Charles BYERLY, of Fulton Ave., died Tuesday with the American forces in France, a victim of peritonitis, according to a telegram received by relatives from Washington Wednesday.

The lad's mother lives in Louisville, Ky., where he joined the army. He was well known here, where he worked for several years for the Rochester Bridge Co. He leaves besides his parents, two brothers of this city, Charles [BYERLY] and Edward BYERLY.

Thursday, March 28, 1918

Mrs. Edith NOAKES went today to Stillwell to attend the funeral of John HANSON.

Friday, March 29, 1918

The funeral of John HANSON, 75, Civil war veteran, was cheld at Fulton Wednesday. He leaves a wife and three children. The Masons had charge of the services.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: John W. HANSON, 1843-1918 - also military marker John W. HANSON, Co B 12 US Inf; Amanda E. HANSON, 1848-1926]

Saturday, March 30, 1918

Eva Lenora CLARK was born in Ohio July 20, 1860 and died March 20, 1918, aged 57 years. At the age of 4 years she with her parents moved to Marshall Co., Ind., where they resided until the death of her parents, after which she went to live with Geo. MILLER of near Bethel.
On Dec. 25, 1881 she united in marriage with Marion L. MOW. To this union were born five children, who survive and with the father mourn the loss of a kind and loving companion and mother.
The sons are: Clarence [MOW], Dallas [MOW], Charles [MOW] and Calvin [MOW] of Michigan and Leo [MOW]; also a foster daughter Bernice CLARK.
She also leaves a half-sister, Hattie STEWARD of Marshall Co., and four brothers, Charles [CLARK] of Oregon, Calvin [CLARK], William [CLARK] and Thomas [CLARK] of Fulton Co.
She was a member of the Methodist church at Bethel and lived a consistent Christian.

Monday, April 1, 1918

Willard GOULD, 81, veteran of the Civil war and a member of the McClung Post, G.A.R., died Sunday morning at 10 o'clock at his home on North Jefferson St., after a long illness caused by dropsy and complications.
Mr. Gould was born in Sharon, Mass., Feb 15, 1837, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah GOULD. When a young boy, Mr. Gould's parents moved to a farm near Monterey, Ind. He later came to Rochester where he went into business with his brother, Daniel [GOULD], who is now living in Kansas City.
On June 9, 1874, Mr. Gould married Mrs. Elizabeth POND. After her death he married Miss Alice BARB, June 9, 1881. Three children were born to this union, George [GOULD] of Cairo, Ill., Francis [GOULD] of the United States army, stationed in the Phillipine Islands and Miss Mary [GOULD] of Rochester. He leaves one brother and one sister, Miss Emma GOULD of this city.
Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Presbyterian church, Rev. H. G. GAIGE in charge, assisted by Rev. H. E. BUTLER. The McClung post will conduct the services.

Mrs. Mary Jane CARR, 82, a resident of Rochester for nearly 60 years, died Sunday morning at five o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Levi YOUNG, on South Monroe St., due to complications, following advanced age. She had been confined to her bed for only two weeks.
Mrs. Carr [Mary Jane COPLEN] was born in Ohio, March 4, 1836, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard COPLEN. She was the only daughter and had five brothers. On May 3, 1855, she married David CARR at Talma, Ind. They shortly moved to Rochester, where Mr. Carr followed the carpenter trade until he died, Jan 16, 1898. Previous to moving to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Carr lived for more than 50 years in the home at the corner of 8th and Monroe Sts.
She was the mother of seven children, six of whom are living: Mrs. Sallenia MOON, Logansport; Mrs. Flora YOUNG, Rochester; Charles [CARR] and Frank CARR and Mrs. Charles HOOVER, of Chicago, and Mrs. Pearl HISEY of Rochester. Andrew CARR, the oldest son, died seven years ago. Mrs. Carr leaves two brothers, Isaac COPLEN, of near Athens, and James COPLEN, of Joplin, Mo. When 16 years old, Mrs. Carr became a member of the Baptist church. She was also a member of the Rebekah lodge. She leaves five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
After the death of Andrew Carr, Mr. and Mrs. Bert HISEY took care of Mrs. Carr for seven years.
Funeral Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 at the house, Rev. W. J. NIVEN of the Baptist church, in charge.

Ben COLLINS, 67, of near Macy, died Sunday morning at the Dukes hospital in Peru, a victim of pneumonia. He leaves two sons, Archie [COLLINS], of Chicago and Hugh [COLLINS], who is in the army; two sisters and five brothers, Mrs. T. KEEL of Rochester, Mrs. Hiram CARITHERS of near Rochester, George COLLINS of Liberty township, Jay COLLINS of Montana and Orinas [COLLINS], Burl [COLLINS] and Jacob COLLINS of Arkansas. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock in the Green Oak church.

Tuesday, April 2, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Ed BAKER and Elmer CLAYBAUGH and family went to Peru Saturday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Baker's brother. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Wednesday, April 3, 1918

Isaac NICODEMUS, who was in the city to attend the Willard GOULD funeral, returned today to his home in Jonesboro.

Thursday, April 4, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, April 5, 1918

Mrs. Isaac NICODEMUS of Jonesboro, returned home today after attending the funeral of her brother-in-law, Willard GOULD.

Saturday, April 6, 1918

Reuben R. DARR, 83, a well known farmer, east of Rochester, who was a resident of this county for more than 50 years, died Friday morning at 10:45, after an illness lasting less than a week. He had been in good health previous to that time. Death was caused by complications.
Mr. Darr was born in Berks county, Pa., November 17, 1834, the son of Mr. and Mrs. John DARR. When a young man he moved to Ohio, where he married Margaret R. WISE, who survives. They soon moved to Fulton county. Mr. and Mrs. Darr were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living: Mrs. Emery PROUTY of South Bend, John DARR of Huntington, Newton DARR of Rochester, Mrs. William MANLEY of Rochester, Margaret THARP of South Bend and Charles DARR of Rochester. Three children died in infancy.
Mr. Darr was a member of the Lutheran church and a charter member of the local order of Maccabees. He lived for 35 years upon the farm where he died.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2:30 at the home, Rev. George CRANE, of the United Brethren church, in charge.

Monday, April 8, 1918

The following who were here Sunday to attend the R. R. DARR funeral returned home Monday: Jesse CARR and N. E. THORP, of South Bend, Fred CRAVEN of Peru, Mrs. Laura STUMP and Mr. and Mrs. Frank KATZENBERGER, of Greenville, Ohio., Chas. WISE, of Roseburg, Ohio, Mrs. Adam MARKLEY, of Montpelier, and Mrs. Lee BARKER, of Farmland.

After an illness lasting all winter, Mrs. Mary Catherine KIRKENDALL, 76, wife of Nelson KIRKENDALL, died Sunday evening at 6:30 at the home on Franklin Ave. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Charles PYLE and Miss Claudia KIRKENDALL, and three brothers and one sister, Mrs. John DEVORE of near Rochester, Link OSBORN and A. A. OSBORN of Glendoria, Calif., and C. N. OSBORN of Stillwater, Okla. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the house.
Mary Catherine OSBORN was born March 9, 1842 in Ohio, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John OSBORN. She married John Nelson KIRKENDALL, Nov. 28, 1869. To this union six children were born, three of whom died in infancy. She was a member of the W.R.C., Rebekahs and of the Evangelical church.

Mel HAY has returned from Bakersfield, Calif., where he attended the funeral of his oldest brother, A. W. HAY.

Tuesday, April 9, 1918

[no obits]

Wednesday, April 10, 1918

William BROWN, of the K. of P. lodge, Monday evening received a telegram that James H. ISLEY, a member of the local order, was dead in that city. Mr. Isley joined the Rochester lodge when he was a resident of this city.

Thursday, April 11, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, April 12, 1918

Mrs. Ray PRILL has returned from Chili where she attended the funeral of Chas. McHENRY.

Saturday, April 13, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, April 15, 1918

Mrs. George TOBEY, who lives southeast of the city, had a telegram Sunday from Forest Grove, Ore., announcing the death of her sister, Mrs. Edwin ALLEN, who was formerly Miss Gertrude PORTER, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Marion PORTER, who lived near the city.
Mrs. Allen will be remembered by many friends in Rochester, as she attended high school here and afterward taught school in the township. She was married May 1, 1900 and had lived in Oregon since 1903, being the mother of eight children, six of whom, with the father, survive. Besides Mrs. Tobey, there are living one other sister, Mrs. Victor TOBEY, of Logansport, and one brother, Wayne PORTER, who lives in Rainier, Ore. One brother and one sister are dead.
Funeral and burial in Forest Grove Monday.

William BRINKMAN was expected home today from Cincinnati, Ohio, where he attended the funeral of his sister, Miss Amelia BRINKMAN.

Tuesday, April 16, 1918

C. R. BITTERS has received news from Salina, Kansas, of the death of his uncle, Samuel H. HOOD, 71, due to a general breakdown.
Mr. Hood was an old soldier, having enlisted as a boy at Akron, this county, and serving his country as a corporal in Co C, 155th Indiana Volunteers. He will be remembered as the husband of Allie KUHN, daughter of Andrew and Matilda KUHN, who for many years at an early day were the proprietors of the old "tavern" at Akron.
Immediately following their marriage, which was about 50 years ago, they drove a mule team through to Kansas where they homesteaded land and Mr. Hood became a leading business man of southeastern Kansas, was elected sheriff of Neosha county, and for the past 28 years had been a prominent farmer and live stock man of Salina county. Besides the widow, he leaves five children and one sister.

Wednesday, April 17, 1918

Laurence VOREIS died at Lockport Saturday evening after a ten years illness. He was brought to his brother Delbert's home and buried in the Poplar Grove cemetery Tuesday afternoon. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Poplar Grove Cemetery, Union Twp.: James L. VORIES, June 16, 1872 - Apr 13, 1918]

Mrs. Harley PONTIOUS received the message Sunday that her grandmother, Mrs. SOURS, died suddenly at her home in West Township. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Mrs. Lucinda BENNETT, aged 84, passed away at the home of her son, Schuyler [BENNETT], at Anderson Saturday. The body was brought here Monday for burial. Funeral at the M. E. church, interment in the Lake Bruce cemetery. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Thursday, April 18, 1918

Minor COOK, 19, son of Mrs. Thomas BECK, who lives on the Michigan road, south of Sand Hill, died Thursday morning at 1:00 o'clock, after an illness of five and one-half months, due to an abscess on a lung. An operation in February failed to give relief.
He was a son of Perry COOK, who died nine years ago, and since made his home with his stepfather, Mr. BECK. There survive, aside from the mother, two brothers and a sister: Chauncey [COOK], of Twelve Mile, and Ralph [COOK] of St. Paul, Minn., and Mrs. Mamie TEEMS, of Eagle Grove, Ia. Funeral services will be held at the Twelve Mile church at 11 o'clock Saturday morning, Rev. Daniel HOPKINS in charge. Burial will be made at that place.

Word was received here that Mrs. Edwin C. ALLEN, of Forest Grove, Ore., died Saturday, April 13, and was buried Monday. She was formerly Miss Gertrude PORTER, daughter of Marion and Lois (SMITH) PORTER, east of Green Oak. She leaves a husband and five children. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Friday, April 19, 1918

Samuel CONRAD, 41, who lived on a farm one mile west of Rochester, died Friday morning at the Woodlawn hospital. He underwent an operation Monday for gall stones. Mr. Conrad had been in poor health for 10 days, suffering from various ailments. He leaves a wife and four children, Daniel [CONRAD], Dee [CONRAD], Telford [CONRAD] and Mary [CONRAD], who are all at home. Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the U.B. church, Rev. Geo. CRANE in charge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

John E. TROUTMAN had word Friday morning of the death Thursday night of Mrs. Joe KEEVER, east of Akron. Mrs. Keever was the mother of Mrs. Earl TROUTMAN, of Hammond, who had been with her for some time. A cancer is believed to have been the cause of the death, an operation at Woodlawn last fall failing to avert the end. There survive the husband and daughter.

Saturday, April 20, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, April 22, 1918

Mrs. Will SMITH, of Disko, sister of Mrs. John E. TROUTMAN of Rochester, died Saturday p.m., at her home, after an operation at Huntington three weeks ago. Funeral Tuesday afternoon in Disko, with burial in Akron I.O.O.F. cemetery. Mrs. Smith was the first to die in a family of seven girls and one boy. She leaves a husband and six children.

Reuben BANEY, 44, died at Longcliff Sunday evening according to word received here by relatives. He was taken there about 18 months ago. He leaves a wife and two children.

Tuesday, April 23, 1918

Charles E. MORRETT, 79, a veteran of the Civil war, died Monday evening at 9:30 at his home in Akron, after an illness lasting two weeks. Previous to his last illness, he had enjoyed perfect health all of his life. Funeral at 1:30 Thursday afternoon in the Methodist church in Akron.
Mr. Morrett was born in Pennsylvania, August 11, 1839. When very young, his parents moved to Fulton county and at the outbreak of the Civil war, he enlisted in the 40th Indiana, serving until the end. He was a member of the Akron post, G.A.R. Returning to Fulton county after the war, he became a railroad engineer, working in that capacity for years.
On April 11, 1872, he married Mary PONTIOUS, who survives. He leaves four children: William MORRETT, of near Perrysburg; Mrs. Bertha LUKENS, of near Disko; C. F. MORRETT, of Huntington and Bruce MORRETT of Rochester. He also leaves two brothers and three sisters: John [MORRETT] and Newton MORRETT, of Kansas, Mrs. Mollie CASE and Mrs. Ella TUDOR, of Kansas and Mrs. Katherine GRIFFITH, of Summitville, Ind.

John W. CONDON, 88, died Monday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. A. Search, who lives south of the city. Death was due to senility. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock in the Search home; burial at Logansport.
Mr. Condon was born in Baltimore, Maryland, August 31, 1829. In 1855, he married Mary CRALK, who survives him. They were the parents of five children, four of whom are living: H. C. CONDON and Mrs. M. A. SEARCH of Rochester, and Mrs. Ida HUTCHESON and Mrs. Arthur BAKER of Logansport.
Mr. Condon was well known in Rochester where he lived for several years at a local hotel. His entire life was given to investigation and invention. He claimed to be the first inventor of the modern type of ice cream freezer, out of which he made a small fortune. His earnings on useful ideas were all spent in further inventions, mainly along culinary lines. He placed the first baking machinery upon the market and it laid the foundation for machines now in use but cost him all his savings.
Mr. Condon had been in every important city in the United States and Canada. His early married life was spent in various places, the five children being born in as many different states.

Wednesday, April 24, 1918

Mrs. James PALMER was in Argos today to attend the funeral of Chris DAVIDS.

Mr. and Mrs. Carl KEYS returned from Westville Wednesday where they had been called on account of the death of Mr. Keys' father. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, April 25, 1918

The burial of John W. CONDON took place Wednesday afternoon at Logansport, Rev. A. S. WARRINER of the Methodist church in charge. A number of out-of-town relatives and friends were here to attend the funeral services, which took place at the M. A. SEARCH home.

Friday, April 26, 1918

Mrs. Charles HALL, foster daughter of Mrs. Peter BIDDINGER, died Thursday evening at six o'clock at her home in Independence, Ia., a victim of pneumonia, according to word received by Mr. and Mrs. Biddinger. Funeral Saturday at Independence.
Mrs. Blanche BIDDINGER HALL was born in Boston, Mass. She leaves a husband and four children, two sons and two daughters. She also leaves two brothers, Walter SMITH, of Tipton, and Eliot YOUNG, of Rochester, a sister, Mrs. Lucy MAGUIRE, of Oxford, Ind., and a foster brother, Will [BIDDINGER], of this city, who was present when she died. She made her home in Rochester until her marriage to Mr. Hall, a number of years ago. She was adopted by the Biddingers when quite small.

Saturday, April 27, 1918

After an illness lasting two days, Mrs. Catherine PHILLIPS, 82, died Friday morning at three o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John PHILLIPS, on East Ninth street. Mrs. Phillips has been in declining health for several years. Funeral Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the house, Rev. H. E. BUTLER in charge.
Mrs. Phillips was born in Harrisburg, Pa., January 11, 1836, the daughter of Jacob and Sarah BROWN. When 27 years old, she moved to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, where she married F. M. MURPHY, who was killed in the Civil war. They were the parents of three children: Mrs. Ida PHILLIPS, Sam [MURPHY] and Albert MURPHY. She later married Louis PHILLIPS. They were the parents of two children, Mrs. Clara PORTER of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and Robert PHILLIPS.
Mrs. Phillips also leaves two step-sons, John PHILLIPS, of Rochester and James PHILLIPS of Bensonia, Mich. Four grandchildren are living. Mrs. Phillips made her home in Rochester with her daughter for the past 13 years, moving here from Mt. Vernon.

Lee SLONAKER, 75, died Saturday morning at his farm home north of Leiters after a month's illness caused by pneumonia. Funeral Monday afternoon at two o'clock at the house. Mr. Slonaker leaves a wife and three children, Dr. C. L. SLONAKER, of Leiters, Mrs. Alfred YOUNG of Texas and Mrs. Marie KEITZER of near Leiters.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. cemetery, Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Levi B. SLONAKER, father, Apr 19, 1843 - Apr 27,

1918; Margaretta HARTMAN SLONAKER, mother, May 28, 1843 - June 26, 1931]

Monday, April 29, 1918

Robert C. HOLDER, 74, a veteran of the Civil war, was found dead in bed at three o'clock Sunday morning, by his sister, Mrs. Josephine BEAL, 709 Monroe St., with whom he had made his home since the death of Mrs. HOLDER, Jan 7, 1917. Heart trouble with which he had been suffering for some time, was the cause, it is believed.
Mr. Holder leaves two other sisters, Mrs. Tamer BAKER and Mrs. Nancy CHANDLER, both of this city, and a brother, C. C. HOLDER, of Chicago. A step-son, Morry HILL, of Aurora, Ind., also survives. Deceased was born in LaPorte county, Ind., Nov. 19, 1843, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Absalom HOLDER. He enlisted at Rochester in Co. D, 87th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and fought in the Civil war. Since then, he had long been a traveling salesman for a buggy house at Cincinnati, where he lived.
Funeral Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. in the Beal home, with Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, April 30, 1918

Atty. Enoch MYERS was among those who attended the funeral of Lee SLONAKER at Leiters Ford Monday.

Wednesday, May 1, 1918

Mrs. R. J. OSBORN went today to Lafayette to attend the funeral of her nephew, George WALDRON.

Mrs. Martha HOLDER returned home Tuesday to Argos after attending the funeral of her uncle, R. C. HOLDER.
Morry HILL, of Cincinnati, O., has returned home after attending the funeral of his stepfather, R. C. HOLDER.
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. HARDY and Clark A. HOLDER have returned to their home in Chicago after attending the Holder funeral here.
Chester HOLDER and granddaughter returned today to their home in Chicago after attending the funeral of his brother, R. C. HOLDER.
Mrs. Mary DEMONT and daughter Josephine [DEMONT] of Michigan City, who were here to attend the R. C. HOLDER funeral will be the guests of her mother, Mrs. Josephine BEAL, until Saturday when they will return home.

Harry REAM, Mrs. Frank DURKES, Mrs. Katherine KENLEY and Albert [KENLEY] and Miss Mary GREGORY went today to Peru to attend the funeral of Mrs. Valentine DURKES.

Thursday, May 2, 1918

Several from this place attended the funeral of Frank OVERMIRE, Jr., of Chicago, which was held at Burr Oak on last Tuesday.

Friday, May 3, 1918

[no obits]

Saturday, May 4, 1918

Mrs. Donna SMITH, 38, wife of Edward SMITH, the former manager of the South Bend ball team, died Friday afternoon. The body will be brot to Rochester Monday evening, burial at the Citizens' cemetery. Mrs. Smith leaves a husband, a foster son and a sister, Mrs. Grace VanDIEN of near this city.
Mrs. Smith was born near Rochester, October 7, 1879. The family moved to South Bend 15 years ago.

Mrs. Gideon BOWMAN, 65, a former resident of Rochester, died April 24 at the home in Copemish, Mich., where she moved from this city in 1902. She leaves a husband, one daughter, Mrs. Jennie SILVER, and three grandchildren. She was a member of the Baptist church at Chili, Ind. Her maiden name was Diana Ellen ATKINS.

Rochester relatives received word Saturday of the death in Buffalo, N.Y., of Larue SOUTHARD, son of Mrs. Laura SOUTHARD, of this city. The young man was a victim of pneumonia. He was well known in Rochester where he attended school. Several years ago he left here to make his home in Buffalo, at the home of an aunt. At the time of his death, he held a responsible position with a steel company. His father, Gene SOUTHARD, died two years ago.

Mrs. Phillip DEMONT and daughter, Miss Josephine [DEMONT], returned today to their home in Michigan City. They were here to attend the C. E. HOLDER funeral.

Monday, May 6, 1918

The body of Mrs. Ed SMITH will be brot to Rochester at six o'clock for burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, following funeral services at the home in South Bend, Monday afternoon. Thru a misunderstanding, it was stated in Saturday's SENTINEL, that the burial would be made in the Citizens' cemetery.

A telegram was received in Rochester Monday announcing the death of A. C. ELLIOTT, 84, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ira WERT, in St. Paul, Minn. The body will arrive in Rochester Tuesday afternoon, where a short funeral service will be held at Hoover's chapel.
Mr. Elliott was a resident of Rochester for more than 35 years. He was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, August 5, 1833. His parents moved to Marshall county in 1846 and in 1855 Mr. Elliott went to Pittsburgh, where he graduated from college. He crossed the plains in 1859 and engaged in mining, returning later to this county. In 1863, he married Miss Elizabeth M. RALSTIN of Rochester. They were the parents of four children, three of whom are living, Mrs. J. J. SEEKINS, of St. Paul, Minn., Hal ELLIOTT of Toledo, Ohio, and Mrs. Gail WERT, of St. Paul, Minn. Mrs. ELLIOTT and a daughter, Mrs. Retta McDONALD, of Indianapolis, are dead.
After moving to Rochester in 1872, Mr. Elliott worked in a dry goods store and later entered into a partnership with Major BITTERS in the loan, real estate and insurance business. This firm

was later dissolved and Mr. Elliott entered partnership under the firm name of ELLIOTT and JACKSON.

Mrs. Addie MOORE GRAFFIS, 60, wife of L. M. GRAFFIS, died Sunday evening at the home on the corner of Madison and 13th streets, after a long illness. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Presbyterian church, Rev. J. T. REEDER, of Kewanna, in charge.
Mrs. Graffis leaves a husband and the following children: Clarence [GRAFFIS] and Estel [GRAFFIS] of Rochester, and Mrs. Ray DULL of Monroe, Mich. She also leaves a brother, E. B. MOORE of Cass county and a sister, Mrs. William CUSTER of Twelve Mile. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Miss Cora SHEETS, 37, who died Saturday afternoon at four o'clock at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William SHEETS, on South Monroe St., was held Monday afternoon at 1:30 at the house. Miss Sheets had been ill for several days. She was a life long cripple, never being able to walk. Despite her affliction, she was known for her sweet disposition, never complaining or finding fault. She leaves her parents and one brother, Edgar SHEETS.

Adam ONETH, 55, died Sunday morning at the home of his brother-in-law, Charles HIATT, west of Rochester. Mr. Oneth had been ill for several weeks with heart trouble. He never married and lived nearly all of his life in this county.
Funeral Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 in Germany church. Funeral at South Germany cemetery.

Tuesday, May 7, 1918

The body of A. C. ELLIOTT was expected from St. Paul, Minn., late Tuesday afternoon and was to be interned in the I.O.O.F. cemetery after a short service at the Hoover chapel.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: Alvin C. ELLIOTT, 1833-1918; Elizabeth M. ELLIOTT, 1845-1911]

Wednesday, May 8, 1918

[no obits]

Thursday, May 9, 1918

Mrs. Malissa EISEMAN of Columbia City, Ray EISEMAN of Fort Wayne and Mrs. Lilah SMITH of Grand Rapids, Mich., were here to attend the funeral of Grandma BECKER. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. RUSSELL left Monday for Judson to attend the funeral of the latter's sister. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Mrs. James TERRY, of LaPorte, who was here to attend the SMITH funeral and who has since been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Alf VanDIEN, returned home Wednesday evening.

Friday, May 10, 1918 to Saturday, May 11, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, May 13, 1918

After an illness lasting several months, Scott SHIELDS, 68, died at the county farm Sunday evening, a victim of paralysis. Mr. Shields was well known in Rochester where he lived for years. He was taken to the county farm four years ago, never returning again to Rochester. For years he lived with his mother, on South Madison St. He never married. Mr. Shields was a painter by trade but spent several years in Washington, D.C., where he held a government position under President Harrison. He leaves no close relatives.

Tuesday, May 14, 1918

The funeral services for Scott SHIELDS will be held Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock at Hoover's chapel, burial in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Adam ONETH, who died last week, was of no relation to Mrs. Charles HIATT. He had lived for 15 years with the Hiatts.

The little son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond RIDDLE died Monday morning, death being due to leakage of the heart. Funeral at the home at 2:00 p.m., Tuesday. Burial at Reichter cemetery. - - -TIOSA ITEMS.

Mrs. I. L. SEEKINS, of St. Paull, Minn., who was here for the [A. C.] ELLIOTT funeral and who has since been visiting friends and relatives in the city, went today to Indianapolis.

Wednesday, May 15, 1918

Kenneth Andrew [RIDDLE], son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond RIDDLE, was born near Tiosa, Ind., May 1st, 1918, and died May 13th, 1918 at the age of 12 days. He leaves father, mother, four grandparents and a host of relatives. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Ora E. OXLEY of Rochester, at the home Monday afternoon.

Thursday, May 16, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, May 17, 1918

Dan HISEY, of Ohio, spent a few hours in Rochester today with friends. He had been called to Warsaw to attend the funeral of a granddaughter.

Saturday, May 18, 1918 to Monday, May 20, 1918

[no obits]

Tuesday, May 21, 1918

Chas. Austin EYTCHESON, 43, dropped dead Monday afternoon at his farm home east of the lake, as he was preparing to take a fishing trip. The body was discovered by a son, who ran to his mother crying, "What is the matter with Dad?" A physician, who was called, said that death was caused by apoplexy.
Mr. Eytcheson leaves a wife and seven children, the oldest of whom is 19. The family three weeks ago moved from Rochester to the HOOT farm, east of the lake. He was born June 12, 1874 in Tipton county, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel EYTCHESON, who are living. He was one of 12 children, six of whom survive, Ab. [EYTCHESON], Curry [EYTCHESON], Perry [EYTCHESON], Nate [EYTCHESON], Mrs. Martha LATCHAW and Myrtle Gertrude [EYTCHESON]. On August 2, 1897, he married Bernice MAGNAM. Mr. Eytcheson worked for a number of years for the Rochester Telephone Co.
Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the home, Eugene HUNTER in charge.

Wednesday, May 22, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. James SHAW was held in the Christian church Friday afternoon, in charge of Rev. C. E. SCIFRES. Besides a husband, she leaves two sons and a daughter, nine grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. - - - MACY ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: James A. SHAW, 1854-1930; America V. SHAW, 1855-1918]

Thursday, May 23, 1918

Alonzo SARBER, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. SARBER, of Peru, was drowned Wednesday at Camp Shelby, Miss., according to a telegram received by his parents. The body will be shipped to Peru for burial. No particulars of the accident are known.
He enlisted in Indianapolis, May 25th, 1917, and at the time of his death was a member of the 139th Machine Gun Battalion at Camp Shelby. Mr. Sarber is a nephew of John J. WERNER, who lives southwest of Rochester, and visited often in this city.

Dr. Newton J. CLYMER, 81, a pioneer physician of Fulton county, died Wednesday evening at seven o'clock in his home on West Eighth Street after a three weeks illness due largely to hardening of the arteries. Just previous to that time, Mr. Clymer had been in fairly good health and visited his office daily, altho he was seriously ill for some time during the winter.
Dr. Clymer was born in Miami county, March 24, 1837, the son of Joseph and Eliza (KEEVER) CLYMER. Dr. Clymer spent his youth upon the farm. When 20 years of age, he began the study of medicine in the office of his brother, Dr. Keever CLYMER of Waupecong, Indiana. Two years later he moved to Illinois and later to Bourbon, Indiana. In 1862, he came to Fulton county locating at Talma, where he remained until 1893, when he moved to Rochester. On February 9, 1860, Dr. Clymer married Lenora A. MOORE who survives, to which union five

children were born, three of whom are living, George [CLYMER] of Peru, Harry C. CLYMER of near Talma and Mrs. Florence HAIMBAUGH of Denver, Colorado. He also leaves one sister, Mrs. Eliza KING of Ft. Benton, Montana, seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.
Dr. Clymer was a member of the Odd Fellows and Masonic lodges, being one of the organizers of the I.O.O.F. lodge at Talma. He was once a candidate on the democratic ticket for joint representative from Pulaski and Fulton counties, being defeated by 15 votes. In 1893, he was appointed examiner for the bureau of pensions at Rochester, serving two years.
Of late years, his advanced age prevented much active practice, but he was at his office almost every day, and really worked at his job until his last illness forced him to stop.
Funeral at the Methodist church Friday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Margaret DAUGHERTY went today to Tiosa to attend the funeral of her cousin, Margaret LEEDY.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Richland Twp.: Mannasseh LEEDY, father, Co H 11 Reg Ind Vol, Dec 17, 1847 - Nov 24, 1914; Margaret M. WYNN LEEDY, his wife, mother, Jan 28, 1846 - May 21, 1918]

Friday, May 24, 1918

Burial of the body of Alonzo SARVER, Peru soldier, who drowned at Camp Shelby, Miss., will take place in the I.O.O.F. cemetery here about 4:00 oclock Sunday afternoon. Funeral at M.E. church in Peru, at 1:30 p.m.. The body is expected to reach Peru Saturday.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: Amos C. SARVER, 1862-1929; Sarah E. SARVER, 1875-1950; Alonzo D. SARVER, 1896-1918]

Members of Plymouth commandery Knights Templar, of which the deceased was a member, had charge of the funeral services for Dr. N. J. CLYMER in the M.E. church at 2:00 p.m. Friday. Rev. A. S. WARRINER preached the sermon. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. C. B. CARLTON was called today to Zion City, Ill., by the death of her sister, Mrs. Ella MARTIN.

Saturday, May 25, 1918

Mrs. G. R. NELSON went today to Peru to attend the funeral of Alonzo SARVER, who will be buried here Sunday.

Monday, May 27, 1918

David SHAW, 60, died Sunday in a hospital at Callespell, Mont., a victim of cancer. He leaves a wife and two brothers. Mr. Shaw left Rochester four years ago to work for the government as a cook in Montana. He was well known here, where he conducted a pool room for several years.

In accordance with his oft-repeated request, burial of the body of Alonzo SARVER, soldier, who drowned near Hattiesburg, Miss., last week, was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery here Sunday afternoon, after funeral services in Peru. The Sarvers formerly lived near Rochester and the young man had spent much time here. He was a nephew of John [WERNER], Phillip [WERNER] and William WERNER.
Sarver's death was the second by drowning in Leaf river since the cantonment was formed at Camp Shelby. A companion saw Sarver's difficulty, but was not strong enough a swimmer to reach him. The body was quickly recovered and sent to the home of the soldier's father, Amos C. SARVER, Peru, Ind., in the charge of Corporal Oscar W. WERNER. Sarver was a member of the 139th machine gun batallion. In reporting the drowning, Captain John B. DILWORTH, his commander, said that Sarver had been an excellent soldier and that he died in the line of duty. His beneficiaries will therefore realize on his war risk insurance.

Rochester relatives received a telegram Sunday afternoon announcing the death in a hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y., of Mrs. Robert MARSH, 56, a former resident of Rochester and a sister of Mrs. John RANK, Mrs. Angelina BURTON, Mrs. John McMAHAN, Mrs. Sylvester ALSPACH and Mrs. Frank MARSH, all of this city.
Mrs. Marsh went to the hospital to undergo an operation for gall stones and other complaints. She had been in ill health for a year. She [Mary GOSS] was born in Fulton county, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George GOSS. Besides her husband, Robert MARSH, she leaves one daughter, Mrs. Roxie SOWERS, of Brooklyn. Mr. and Mrs. Marsh moved to Brooklyn from Rochester about 11 years ago. He was long in business here.
The body will be brought here Tuesday for the funeral at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester ALSPACH. Mrs. Charles TAYLOR, a niece, was on her way to Brooklyn Sunday, when a telegram reached her at Lima, O., announcing the death. She returned home atonce.

After lying perfectly helpless for six months, as the result of strokes of paralysis, Mrs. Sarah Ann EMERSON, 73, died Sunday afternoon at four o'clock in the Arlington block apartments of her daughter, Mrs. B. L. Perschbacher.
Mrs. Emerson [Sarah Ann MECHLING] was born in Perry Co., Ohio, Jan 6, 1845, the daughter of Samuel and Eva MECHLING. When very young, she moved to Fulton county with her parents, where she later married Edward EMERSON, who died 35 years ago. They were the parents of four children, three of whom are living: Mrs. Frank GOOD of Rochester, Claude EMERSON of Plymouth, and Mrs. B. L. PERSCHBACHER of Rochester. She also leaves two sisters and four brothers, Mrs. Emma St.PETER and Mrs. Mattie BLOCK, of South Bend, Isaac MECHLING and Henry MECHLING of near Tiosa, Acton MECHLING, of South Bend and James MECHLING, of Grand Rapids.
Mrs. Emerson was a member of the Brethren church of Tiosa. Funeral Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock in the Brethren church at Tiosa, conducted by Rev. A. S. WARRINER.

Mrs. James W. HURST, 65, of Macy, died at the Dukes hospital in Peru Saturday morning while undergoing an operation. Romania C. HOOVER was born in Missouri and married James W. HURST April 12, 1876. Besides her husband, she leaves the following children: Earl J. HURST, Mrs. May FOWLER, Scott J. PARSHALL, Attorney Hurd HURST, of Peru, Blaine [HURST] and Judd HURST, of Montana, Esther [HURST] and Nina HURST at home and Mrs. Ruth QUICK of Macy. She was a member of the Christian church.

Claude EMERSON came from Plymouth today to attend the funeral of Mrs. Sarah EMERSON.

Tuesday, May 28, 1918

The body of Mrs. Robert MARSH arrived from New York Tuesday afternoon and was taken to the home of her sister, Mrs. Sylvester ALSPACH where the funeral will be held at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Interment in the mausoleum. Robert MARSH and Mrs. Marion SOWERS and children came with the body.

Mrs. Bessie HURST and son and Jake HOOVER went today to Macy to attend the funeral of Mrs. J. W. HURST.

Wednesday, May 29, 1918

Mrs. W. D. EVANS was called to Peru Thursday on account of the death of her nephew, Alonzo SARVER. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Mrs. Mannasseh LEEDY'S funeral was held at this church on last Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Harley DAVIS. Burial was made in I.O.O.F. cemetery. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Mrs. Paul SNEPP is returning this evening to her home in Kokomo after attending the funeral of her grandmother, Mrs. Sarah EMERSON.

Thursday, May 30, 1918

Mike EASH went today to Delphi to attend the funeral of Edward POWELL.

Mrs. O. GOSS went today to Decatur, Ill., to attend the funeral of her brother-in-law, Henry STIMMEL.

Friday, May 31, 1918

[no obits]

Saturday, June 1, 1918

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene BROWN was buried Friday afternoon in the Citizens cemetery. The funeral service was read at the home by Rev. Geo. CRANE.

Monday, June 3, 1918

Funeral services for Charles EASH, 57, who died Saturday, June 1, at his home in Muncie, were held Monday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Ed GOSS, of Rochester, with interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Mr. Eash was born near North Vernon, Ind., the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jonas EASH. At the age of 11 he moved with his parnts to Fulton county where he grew to manhood. He received an

education in the common schools and later attended college at Ada, Ohio.
He had been a life long member of the Methodist Episcopal church and was long a Mason. He was married to Martha TRIMBLE, of Rochester, in 1888 and is survived by the widow; three sons, Clarence [EASH], of the U. S. Navy, Ralph [EASH] and John EASH; one sister, Mrs. Amelia GOSS, and two brothers, John [EASH] and Michael EASH, of Rochester.

John R. HILL, 76, a farmer living southwest of Rochester, died Sunday evening at nine o'clock after a long illness caused by stomach trouble and complications. Funeral, Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the house.
Mr. Hill was born in Sweden and moved to America when a boy. He settled in Illinois and 14 years ago moved to Fulton county. He leaves a wife and a daughter, Miss Hilda HILL, who is at home. He was a member of the Lutheran church.

Mr. and Mrs. P. J. STINGLY and Mrs. B. F. LOUDERBACK, Sunday p.m., were in Fulton to attend the funeral of Mr. Stingly's cousin, Mrs. Geo. W. WEAVER, 51, who died Thursday evening at her home in Logansport. Rev. DAKIN, of the Logansport Baptist church was in charge and the services were held in the Baptist church, with interment in the Fulton cemetery. Mrs. Weaver was a sister of Jacob STINGELY [sic], of near Fulton and formerly resided in this county.

Mrs. Sadie BAUM went to Gilead Monday to attend the funeral of a relative.

Tuesday, June 4, 1918 to Thursday, June 6, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, June 7, 1918

Mrs. Elizabeth DUKES left Wednesday for Cincinnati, Ohio, to attend the funeral of her niece, Georgia FREEL. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Saturday, June 8, 1918

Lawrence V. MANNING, 81, died Saturday morning at three o'clock in his home on West 3rd St., after being bedfast for 11 weeks, due to a stroke of paralysis. Previous to that time he had been very active for a man of his years.
Mr. Manning was born in Tompkins Co., N.Y., June 24, 1836, of English and Scotch parentage. After the death of his father, his mother married again and in 1845 he came with his step-father to Indiana. When 20 years of age, he married Miss Armilda J. SWISHER, who died here three years ago. They were the parents of 13 children, seven of whom are living: Mrs. William SANDERS, Rochester; Mrs. Ella GARVER, of near Rochester; Mrs. T. J. GAUMER, of near Rochester; Miss Lillian MANNING, at home; L. L. MANNING and A. G. MANNING, Rochester and J. O. MANNING, of Denver, Colo. Three children, Sherman [MANNING], Marion [MANNING] and Eva [MANNING], died in recent years.
Mr. Manning was married in Iowa and then moved to Illinois where he lived until the year 1902 when he purchased the ROWLEY farm east of Rochester. In 1904, Mr. Manning moved to the home where he died. He was a veteran threshing machine man, following that vocation for years in Illinois, where he was well known. He was a life long member of the republican party and

while living in Illinois held various offices. He was a member of the New Light church.
Funeral Monday afternoon at 2:30 at the home, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge.

The funeral of Mrs. Will WEAVER, of Logansport, was held at Fulton Sunday afternoon.

Monday, June 10, 1918

Mrs. Maude DOWNEY Sunday morning received a telegram from Grand Rapids, Mich., announcing the death of Lucius MACKEY, which occurred Saturday evening at nine o'clock. No details are known here. As Mr. Mackey was an engineer on a railroad, it was thot that he had been killed in a wreck, but as the city papers say nothing of such an accident, it is now believed that he died from natural causes.
Lucius Mackey was well known in Rochester where he was reared by Shannon MACKEY. He left here about 10 years ago, going to Ft. Wayne, where he took employment in a railroad shop. He advanced rapidly and several years ago was promoted to the position of engineer on a fast passenger train. He married a Grand Rapids girl, who survives. He leaves two children, a boy and girl. His mother also survives.
Funeral Tuesday afternoon, at the home in Grand Rapids. Mrs. Downey left Monday morning to attend the funeral.

Tuesday, June 11, 1918

Mrs. Joe WHYBREW and Mrs. George NICKLES have gone to attend the funeral of Grandfather HUBBARD, who died at Danville, Ill., Friday. - - - BLUEGRASS ITEMS.

Wednesday, June 12, 1918

Mrs. Rebecca OSBORN, 71, died Tuesday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Orville Miller, north of the river, after an illness of seven weeks caused by complications due to old age. She leaves three daughters, Mrs. Claude COLE, of the same neighborhood, Mrs. Orville MILLER and Mrs. Joseph THOMPSON, of near Richland Center. Funeral Friday afternoon at two o'clock at Richland Center church.

Thursday, June 13, 1918 to Saturday, June 15, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, June 17, 1918

By International News Service
Wabash, Ind., June 17 -- Gladys GROGG, five, of Gilead, was run down by an auto at Lukens lake Sunday afternoon, dying shortly after. The driver of the care was exonerated by witnesses.

Jap HORNER was called to Hammond this morning on account of the death of his brother.

Tuesday, June 18, 1918

Funeral service for Gladys GROGG, who was killed at Lukens Lake Sunday, were held at Gilead Tuesday afternoon. Sam UNGER, of Rich Valley, was the driver of the car, which ran over the little girl.

Mrs. C. J. DONAHUE, formerly of Wayne township, died at her home south of Logansport Monday. Funeral services at St. Vincents church in Logansport Wednesday. Mrs. Donahue was well known here.

Rebecca ELLIS, daughter of Nehemiah and Della ELLIS, was born September 25th, 1842 in the state of Tennessee. Her mother died while she was very young. At the age of three years she, with her father, moved to Indiana. On October 20, 1861, she was united in marriage to Cyrus COX. To this union was born one child who died in infancy. The husband died April 8, 1862. After the death of her companion, she made her home for 11 years with Dr. BARR and family at Argos and on Nov 27, 1873, was united in marriage to William G. OSBORN. To this union three daughters were born, Laura [OSBORN], Mary [OSBORN] and Daisy [OSBORN]. On Feb 20th, 1899, after a companionship of 26 years the husband died. She lived a long and useful life and on Tuesday night, June 11, 1918, she fell asleep at the home of her daughter, Laura, after an illness of seven months. Her age was 75 years, eight months and 16 days.
She leaves to mourn her departure three daughters, Mrs. Laura MILLER, Mrs. Mary THOMPSON and Mrs. Daisy COLE, seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. She was raised in the Friends church, but afterwards became a member of the Christian church at Argos, under the labors of Rev. DIXSON.
Funeral Friday 2:30 at Richland Center, burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery, in charge of Rev. EMERT, of Defiance, Ohio, assisted by Rev. DAVIS.

Wednesday, June 19, 1918

Mrs. Emma LEAVELL, 55, wife of County Commissioner John T. LEAVELL, died Tuesday evening, at the farm home south of Fulton, following a stroke of paralysis on Friday, June 7th. Besides the husband, six children survive. They are: Mrs. Cleo WILLIAMSON, of Wyoming; Mrs. Della McCLURE, south of Fulton; Mrs. Anna OLIVER, southwest of Rochester and Clyde [LEAVELL], Dewey [LEAVELL] and Miss Garnet LEAVELL, of this county. She also leaves three brothers and two sisters. Funeral at the Fulton Baptist church Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at the Fulton cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. R. P. TRUE, Mrs. Emma CAMERER and Lon ZIMMERMAN went to Akron this morning to attend the funeral of the late Jerome JOHNSON.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Jerome JOHNSON, father, 1845-1918; Eliza JOHNSON, his wife, mother, 1851-1934]

Thursday, June 20, 1918

Mrs. Marietta BUSH, 62, of Tiosa, died Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. at the hospital following an operation, on Monday, for gall stones. She had only been ill since Saturday. Mrs. Bush was a

widow, two children, Mrs. Bev BUSSERT, Rochester and Mrs. Nell STAUFFER, north of the city, surviving. The body was taken to the home at Tiosa Wednesday. Funeral at Tiosa, Friday.

C. C. CAMPBELL and family went to Winamac Wednesday to attend the funeral of Mr. Campbell's uncle. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

The funeral of Mrs. William OSBORN was held at this church on last Friday afternoon. Services were conducted by Rev. EMMERT, assisted by Rev. Harley DAVIS. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Miss Metta REED went to Tiosa this morning to attend the funeral of Mrs. Marietta BUSH, Friday.

Friday, June 21, 1918

D. A. RANNELLS, 63, of Plymouth, died at his home Wednesday evening after suffering two years from anemia. Besides a wife, he leaves one son, Fred RANNELLS of that city. Until the past eight years, the deceased was a resident of this city. Funeral arrangements will be announced later. Wm. RANNELLS, who is a cousin, went to Plymouth Thursday evening.

Saturday, June 22, 1918

William WILDERMUTH, 73, one of Rochester's most revered citizens, died Friday at 5:00 p.m. at his home on So. Jefferson St., lafter a severe illness of five weeks duration. Death was due to arterio sclerosis. Funeral at the Evangelical church Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. E. Q. LAUDERMAN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
William Wildermuth was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, Oct 7th, 1844. In February 1864, he enlisted as a volunteer in the 17th Ohio Infantry, serving until the end of the war in 1865, when he followed his parents to Fulton county where they moved. Here he taught school for a period of four years.
In April 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda ZABST and to this union two children were born, Mrs. John LAIDLAW and Mrs. Jerome SWIHART, who with the widow, three sisters, Mrs. Isberry FERREE, of Hammond, Mrs. Rebecca ROUCH, Fulton, and Mrs. Oscar MARTIN, Los Angeles, Calif., and three brothers, Joseph [WILDERMUTH], South Bend, Daniel [WILDERMUTH], Wagoners and St.Clair [WILDERMUTH], Fulton, survive. He was a member of McClung Post G.A.R.
Mr. Wildermuth, who had united with the Evangelical church when young, in 1871 became a licensed minister of the church, in which capacity he served about 25 years. About 11 years ago he lost his eye sight, due to paralysis of the optic nerve. Since that time he manufactured household novelties in a work shop at his home, until several months ago when he was forced to quit. During the period of his life in which he was blind, he was able to find his way all over the city. Five weeks ago he began to fail rapidly and from that time, until death came, he was unable to recline. In his last illness, while suffering greatly, he was very patient. Mrs. Wildermuth, the daughters and several friends and neighbors were with him at the time of his death. Arrangements were made Saturday morning to have six ministers of the city act as pall bearers at the funeral.

Word has been received here of the death of O. P. ENYART, 50, which occurred in Barrytown, Mich., with funeral there last Sunday. The widow and five children survive. Enyart was well known here. He formerly lived in Macy.

Wm. RANNELLS went to Plymouth this morning to attend the D. A. RANNELLS funeral.

Mr. and Mrs. Earl RALSTON went to Plymouth this morning to attend the funeral of his uncle, D. A. RANNELLS.

Monday, June 24, 1918

The body of Mrs. Isabella BLASINGHAM, who died January 12, 1918, at her home in Johnson City, Tenn., was brot to this city Sunday for reburial Monday afternoon at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Mrs. Blasingham was a sister of Mrs. Mary C. WOLF, Mrs. Charlotte RIDENHOUR, Mrs. Catherine AWALT and Mrs. Chas. CAFFYN, of this city. A daughter, Mrs. O. P. COHEN, has been visiting here and Mr. Cohen came with the body.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: Isabella AWALT BLASINGHAM, our Mother, 1918 (one date only)]

Vivian Veleta [VIVRETT], three year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. VIVRETT, died Saturday at the home of her parents on No. Pontiac St. Death was caused by chloroma. Funeral at the house Monday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, June 25, 1918

Henry McMILLEN, 71, died Tuesday morning at nine o'clock at his home east of Green Oak, after suffering all spring and summer with heart trouble. There survive the widow and seven children: Charles [McMILLEN], Paw Paw, Ill., Harry [McMILLEN], Ephrata, Wash.; Mrs. Rollo BACON, Perrysburg; Mrs. Robert WILEY, Rochester; Mrs. Elmer OLIVER, near Green Oak and George [McMILLEN] and Guy [McMILLEN], of near Green Oak. Four sisters and three brothers also survive. Funeral arrangements later.
Dewey LEAVELL, of Ft. Wayne, was home to attend the funeral of his mother, Mrs. John LEAVELL. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Wednesday, June 26, 1918

The funeral services for Henry McMILLEN, who died Tuesday at his home near Green Oak, will be held at the home Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. Schuyler NORRIS, of Culver, in charge. Burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.

Mrs. John McKALE returned to her home in Sturgis, Mich., this morning after attending the funeral of Vivian VIVRETT.

A large number of people attended the funeral of Mrs. Mary BUSH Friday at the Christian church, many from a distance. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

Thursday, June 27, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, June 28, 1918

Thomas MURRAY, aged about 60, a farmer living in the Shanley neighborhood on the county line in Wayne township, was instantly killed Thursday afternoon, when his team ran away near the Vandalia station in Kewanna.
Murray had driven to the town to secure a wagon load of coal, when his horses became frightened at a passing train. He was unable to check them and was thrown out, his neck being broken, it is declared. He was dead when picked up. Funeral Saturday from the home at 2:00 p.m. Burial in Round Lake cemetery.
Murray is said to have been a native born Englishman who came to this county when the pipeline was built thru Lucerne, on its way to Whiting. He took employment on the farm of the woman whom he later married and had lived there since. There are no children or other relatives near here.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Grass Creek Cemetery, Wayne Twp.: Thomas C. MURRAY, 1853-1918; Minerva J. MURRAY, 1845-1926]

Saturday, June 29, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, July 1, 1918

Mrs. Sarah A. HOWARD, 77, widow of the late Henry A. Howard, died Sunday at 6:00 a.m. at the home of her son, William A. HOWARD, W. 6th St., after an illness of two weeks. Death was caused by heart failure. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at the Methodist church, Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Miss Sarah A. KAISER was born Dec 6th, 1840 at Batesville, Ohio. She moved 33 years ago with her family to Fulton county, where she has since resided. Two children, William A. [HOWARD] of this city and Mrs. Della HILDELBRAND of Los Angeles, Calif., survive. A daughter preceded her in death. One sister, Mrs. Katherine LORRY, of Saco, Mont., is living.

Tuesday, July 2, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Omar TORRENCE, of Peru, and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. COOK went to Argos today to attend the funeral of Mrs. Torrence's and Mrs. Cook's father, Charles WARNER.

Wednesday, July 3, 1918

[no obits]

Thursday, July 4, 1918

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, July 4, 1918

Mrs. Ruth ANDERSON, Mrs. Mabel BLOSSER and Mrs. Ella SEARS went to Wolf Lake Tuesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Susan BRICKLE. Mrs. Sears will visit her daughter, Mrs. Logan BLY and family at Albion before returning home.

Saturday, July 6, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, July 8, 1918

Mrs. James SHARP, aged about 40, died Saturday afternoon at her home in Tiosa of blood poisoning. The husband and eight children survive. Funeral was held Monday afternoon at the home. Burial at Metea cemetery. E. E. CLARY, of this city, was a cousin.

Mrs. Sarah RICHARDS, 76, died Sunday morning at five o'clock at the county farm after an illness of four months duration, due largely to senility. She has been an inmate of the farm since February, 1903. Two brothers, Nathaniel WILLARD, of Lyons, Kans., and Edward WILLARD, of Lamont, Okla., and a sister, Mrs. James ALLEN, of Lamont, Okla., survive. She was separated many years ago from her husband, John RICHARDS, who is now an inmate of the Marshall county infirmary. Funeral Monday afternoon at two o'clock at Hoover's chapel. Burial at the Washington cemetery in Marshall county.

Mr. and Mrs. John L. ROBBINS, of near Mud Lake, motored to Mishawaka today to attend the funeral of Mrs. PACKER.

Tuesday, July 9, 1918

Mrs. William PACKER, of Mishawaka, well known here, died Thursday morning at two o'clock after a six months illness of complications. She was born in Miami county, Ind., Sept 25, 1849 and was 69 years old. She had resided in Mishawaka for 10 years, going there from Knox, Ind.
Mrs. Packer is survived by her husband, two twin daughters, Miss Edna [PACKER], at home, and Mrs. E. J. ROBBINS, of Mishawaka, one granddaughter, Helen Elizabeth ROBBINS, two sisters, Mrs. BEATTY, Hammond, Mrs. KINSEY, Kokomo, four brothers, Dr. EIDSON of Plymouth, Thomas EIDSON, California, Arthur EIDSON, St. Louis, and Marcy EIDSON, of Rochester.
The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at 2:30, Dr. B. Earle PARKER officiating. Burial in Riverview Cemetery, South Bend.

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., July 9 -- Peter DENNEY, 25, colored, drowned in Summit Lake Monday evening at about five o'clock when a boat, in which he and several other men were fishing, sank.
Denney was an assistant cook with a gang of R.R. surveyors working on the Erie near here. After supper, several of the men decided that they would go fishing. The boat in which they started out was not a very good one and was overloaded, with the result that it filled with water

and sank when about 40 or 50 feet from shore. Denney was able to swim, altho not very well and fell behind the other men. When they looked around for him he was gone and his cap was seen floating on the water.
They immediately started a search for the body, which evidently sank but once, as no cry was heard from the drowning man.
He was last seen when about 10 or 15 feet from shore. The body was found later in the evening by Mr. DUNLAP, chief of the gang of survey.
It was in about seven feet of water and was in an erect position, entangled in moss.
The body was taken to Akron where it remains pending word from Denney's brother at Mobile, Ala. Little of the dead man's history could be learned except for the fact that his residence had formerly been in Mobile, where his brother now lives.

Wednesday, July 10, 1918

Mrs. Lon AULT of this city has received word of the death Sunday of her brother-in-law, Audra J. JARRETT, of Logansport, whose neck was broken at the base when he dived into shallow water in Pipe Creek. His wife died about nine weeks ago; two small children survive. Mrs. Jarrett was formerly Miss Maud BOGGESS of this city.

William PETERSON, 59, died at his home, Cor. 12th and Elm Sts., at 10:15 Tuesday evening, after an illness of some duration. He leaves a widow, three sons and a daughter.
The widow, Mrs. Carrie PETERSON, three sons, Raymond [PETERSON], of Forsyth, Mont., Elbert [PETERSON], of Baltimore, Md., and Jesse [PETERSON], of Rochester, a daughter, Miss Zola [PETERSON], of Rochester, two brothers, John [PETERSON], of Culver, and Madison [PETERSON], of Greenhurst, and two sisters, Mrs. Alf ALLEN, and Mrs. Mary CUNNINGHAM, of Flora, survive. Funeral Friday, at Flora, in the Baptist church. Interment in Flora cemetery. Mr. Peterson was a resident of Fulton county for a number of years, moving to Rochester from his farm near Leiters last January.

Eva Lucile [BRYANT], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orbie BRYANT, passed away at her home early Thursday morning after only two days illness with pneumonia. She was born Sept 27, 1916 and died July 4th, aged twenty-one months.
The funeral was held at the house Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, by Rev. Thomas DAVIES, of the M.E. church. Interment in Plainview cemetery west of town.
The relatives who attended were Trustee Charles JONES and family, of Talma, Prof. Arthur DEAMER and wife, of North Dakota, Mr. and Mrs. Joshua BLACKETOR, of Logansport, Mr. and Mrs. Meade HAIMBAUGH, Mr. and Mrs. George DEAMER, Mr. and Mrs. Maine DEAMER and Mrs. Lucile KESSLER and baby of Talma, Mr. and Mrs. Will DEAMER, of Mentone, Mrs. Mary CLIFTON and daughter Evelyn [CLIFTON] of Rochester and Mrs. Roy JONES and daughter Viola [JONES] of Akron and Mrs. Vernon CARL of Peru. - - - MACY ITEMS.
Mrs. R. J. DAVIS, Dr. and Mrs. B. F. DAWSON and Mr. and Mrs. Quimby LOWE attended the funeral of a relative, Mrs. Jud FENNEY, at Warsaw, Thursday. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

The will of the late Jerome JOHNSON, of Akron, was probated at the court house Thursday afternoon. The estate amounts to approximately $25,000 including a 170 acre farm. Two daughters, Mrs. Bessie WHITCOMB and Mrs. Glendora RAMSEY, fall heir to the property. Hub STONER, of Akron, has been named executor.

Thursday, July 11, 1918

Several from this place attended the funeral of Mrs. Lawson LELAND at Poplar Grove last Sunday afternoon. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Poplar Grove Cemetery, Union Twp.: Mary M. LELAND, 1898-1961; Lawson L. LELAND, 1882-1957; Nettie E. LELAND, wife of L. L., July 14, 1886 - July 4, 1918]

Friday, July 12, 1918

When she stepped from the shallow waters near the banks of the Eel river at Stockdale, where she was wading, into the deep waters near a huge water wheel, Carrie CROFT, 22, was carried down and drowned. The drowning was witnessed by two Roann women who were fishing close to the scene, but they were unable to summon help in time.

Several persons from here attended the funeral services of Wm. PETERSON at Flora, Friday. A short service was held at the home in this city, by Rev. W. J. NIVEN, before leaving for Flora by automobile.

Saturday, July 13, 1918

The funeral services of Henry FITTERLING, 78, who died of senility at the home of his son, Silas [FITTERLING], in Fulton Thursday, were held at the Fulton U. B. church Saturday afternoon. Burial in Fulton cemetery. The son, a daughter and the widow survive.

Monday, July 15, 1918

Two of the old residents of this community, both well known over the county, passed away over the week end.
Samuel L. DAWSON, 82, died Monday at 1:00 a.m., at his home on East Eighth street, after an illness of five weeks duration. Death was caused by old age and complications. The widow, Mrs. Racheal DAWSON, four children, Charles [DAWSON], of South Bend and Joseph [DAWSON], of Hammond, Mrs. Kattie WATTIES and Mrs. William BEDENBACK, of Chicago, and two brothers, Mose [DAWSON], of South Bend, and Richard [DAWSON] of Plymouth, survive. Funeral at the home Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Samuel L. Dawson was born in 1836 in Munsingham county, Ohio. He moved to Fulton county in 1862 where he has since resided. He served as a private in the Second Indiana regiment for three years, enlisting in 1893. He was a member of the Red Men's lodge.

John L. PRILL, 79, well known farmer of Fulton county, died Sunday afternoon at 3:40 o'clock at his home east of Rochester after a long illness. Death was due to kidney trouble and complications.
The widow, Mrs. Mary PRILL; three daughters, Mrs. Wm. GARNER, west of Rochester, Mrs. Irene GLADE, St. Joseph, Mich., and Mrs. Pearl MIKESELL, Athens, and one son, Ray PRILL, of Rochester, survive. Four children preceded him.

John Prill was widely known in Rochester and surrounding territory, being a unique character in many respects. Many tales have been told concerning his prowess as a maker of maple syrup, which he sold in the city for many years, even after he was unable to leave his rig when he drove into town.
Funeral Wednesday at 2:30 p.m., at Athens, Rev. Daniel HOPKINS, of Twelve Mile, in charge. Burial at Athens cemetery.

Macy, Ind., July 15 -- Sergeant Carl HORTON, who is reported as dead in France, was Carl PANCAKE, the son of Mrs. Addison E. HORTON, of Macy.
He was 25 years old and had been in the army for five years, going to France one year ago. His mother received a letter last week from a nurse in France, telling her that her son had been perhaps fatally injured.

Tuesday, July 16, 1918

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 17, 1918

Benjamin HARTMAN, 66, died early Wednesday morning at his home at 322 Ohio St., after a long illness. Death was caused by a complication of diseases. The widow, Mrs. Clara E. HARTMAN, and two sons survive. Mr. Hartman was born in Putnam county, Ohio, February 17, 1852. A large part of his life was spent on a farm near Athens. Funeral arrangements later.

The first Macy boy to pay the supreme sacrifice for his country is Carl PANCAKE, son of Mrs. Addison HORTON, southwest of Macy. The news of his death was received Saturday. He died from wounds received in the trenches in France. Macy should have a community funeral for him. The telegram read that his body would be interred in France until after the war. - - - MACY ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Carl Pancake HORTON, Sgt 15th Co 6th M.G. Batt US Marines AEF, 1891-1918]

Thursday, July 18, 1918

Audry Ray BECHTEL, 30, a former Rochester resident, died suddenly of heart failure at his home in Aberdeen, S.D., July 15, according to word reaching this city. The widow, his parents and three sisters survive.
Funeral Wednesday, July 17, at Cresbard, S.D., the home of his father. Bechtol was born and reared here but moved West after his marriage about five years ago. Mrs. Fred YEAZEL, of Rochester, is a sister.

Word has been received in this city of the reported death in France of Aviator Fred FENIMORE, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed FENIMORE, of Macy.
The Fenimores are said to have received an official government announcement of the death of their son on June 29th. He was a flyer and his death was caused by heart failure, when he reached a high altitude.

It is also reported that William E. DAVIS, a former Macy boy and a nephew of Mrs. Tom WAITE, of Akron, has been wounded in action in France and that blood poisoning has set in. He served as mechanic in the aviation corps in France. His parents, who live in New York, however, have not received definite word, either of his injury, or reported demise.

The funeral of Mr. FETTERLING was held Saturday afternoon at the U.B. church. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Friday, July 19, 1918

[no obits]

Saturday, July 20, 1918

Jonas GOSS, 81, a well known and highly respected citizen, who for years resided on South Main St., died at his home at 3:30 Saturday morning, after an illness extending over a period of six or eight months. For the past two months, he had been bedfast, gradually sinking away.
At the bedside were the wife, a daughter and two sons the other surviving son, Capt. Byron C. GOSS, being with the American forces in France. Two daughters, Mrs. Minerva Ella MOW, wife of the late Finley MOW, and Clara Sevilla GOSS are dead. The other children are: Mrs. Martha GOSS SEYMOUR, of Rochester, and Samuel W. [GOSS] and Ira D. GOSS, of Evanston, Ill.
Jonas Goss was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, April 15, 1837, and later removed with his family to Fulton county, where he was married Oct 12, 1862, to Mary HOFFMAN. He was on his farm, southwest of Rochester, until 1888, when he came to the city, engaging in the hardware and later the monument business. Altho interested in a farm, he had been retired during the past several years.
He was long an enthusiastic church worker, becoming a member of the Evangelical denomination early in life. He was also a leader in many civic moves.
Aside from the immediate family, there survive a brother, Tobias [GOSS], of this city, a brother-in-law, Samuel HOFFMAN, of Rochester, and five grandchildren, Arthur GOSS, of Carbondale, Ill., Harold G. MOWE, of Wilmington, Del., Kathryn [GOSS], Virginia [GOSS] and David GOSS, of Evanston, all of whom will be here. One brother, Emanuel [GOSS], and a sister, Mrs. Aaron BUNCH, are dead.
Funeral at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the home, with Revs. E. Q. LAUDEMAN and A. S. WARRINER in charge. Interment at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Benjamin HARTMAN was born in Putnam county, Ohio, Feb 17, 1852 and died at his home in Rochester, Ind., July 17, 1918. He was united in marriage to Clara E. MOONSHOWER, Nov 3, 1873. To this union were born 10 children, nine of whom are living: Arthur [HARTMAN], of Athens, Mrs. Estel BEMENDERFER and Vernon [HARTMAN], of this city; Mrs. B. MORGAN, of Gage, Mont, Irvin [HARTMAN], of Macy, Estil [HARTMAN], of Messick, Mich, and Clyde [HARTMAN], of Canton, S.D. He was patient thru his long illness and, while we mourn his departure, we feel that our loss is his gain. Besides a wife, he also leaves 25 grandchildren, three brothers and three sisters. The funeral services were held in the United Brethren church.

Monday, July 22, 1918

Mrs. Lydia ELLIOTT, Mrs. Ida CORBETT and Mrs. Julia HOOVER attended the funeral of their cousin, Mart CORBETT, in Winamac, Saturday.

Tuesday, July 23, 1918

The body of Aubra Ray BECHTEL, who died last week, was not buried in South Dakota as announced but was brought to Walkerton, Ind., and interment was made there Sunday morning.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam GOSS and daughter, Kathryn [GOSS], and Ira GOSS returned Monday to Evanston, Ill., after attending the funeral of their father, Jonas GOSS, Sunday afternoon.

Wednesday, July 24, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Sol ALLMAN were called to Cincinnati Wednesday by the death of her brother, Max KOCH.

George KRATHWOLL, 40, son of Mr. and Mrs. John KRATHWOLL, of Peru, died Sunday at his home in Michigan, a victim of typhoid fever. The Krathwolls were formerly residents of this community and were well known here.

Thursday, July 25, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, July 26, 1918

Special to the Sentinel.
Fulton, July 26 -- Charles LENHART, 28, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo LENHART, south of Fulton, drowned at 4:30 p.m., Thursday at Fletcher's Lake, when he jumped off a springing board and for some unknown reason was unable to swim back to shore.
Lenhart, who was employed by Harley MOORE on his farm near Metea, had gone to the lake with Moore late in the afternoon. While Moore was washing a buggy, Lenhart jumped in the lake for a dip, and Moore's attention was attracted to Lenhart by his call for help. Lenhart only came up once and Moore's frantic efforts to pull him out were of no avail. Assistance was immediately summoned and a search instituted for the body, which was not recovered until three hours later.
The body was taken to the home of his parents, just across the Cass county line on the Michigan road. The parents and three brothers, all residents of this county, survive.
Lenhart was recently discharged from military service at Camp Taylor, Ky., on account of defective hearing.
No funeral arrangements have been made.

Horace G. KEWNEY, brother of Mrs. E. VonEHRENSTEIN, of this city, who died Wednesday, will be buried at Toledo, Ohio, Saturday. Besides a wife, he leaves a son, Paul [KEWNEY], who is in France.

Saturday, July 27, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, July 29, 1918

Mrs. Clinton T. MURPHY, 26, of Denver, died at the Woodlawn hospital here Sunday morning at 11 o'clock, following an operation for gall stones. The body was taken to Peru for burial.

Tuesday, July 30, 1918

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 31, 1918

Miss Flo DELP has returned from Denver, after attending the funeral of Mrs. Clinton MURPHY.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Chili Cemetery, Richland Twp.: Clinton T. MURPHY, 1887-1946; Clara B. MURPHY, 1892-1918; Jettie A. MURPHY, 1890-1963]

Thursday, August 1, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Omer ROSS received word of the death Wednesday of Mrs. Mary KLINE, of Argos. She was a sister of the late Mrs. Harriet [Bell JONES] ROSS, of this city. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, at the Richland Center church, burial at that place. Her husband [Jonathan W. ROSS] survives.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: Jonathan W. ROSS, July 25, 1832 - Apr 25, 1882; Harriet B. ROSS, Aug 2, 1834 - July 12, 1918]

Friday, August 2, 1918

Charles HALL, 39, died Thursday in Denver, Col., according to word received here. No further particulars concerning the death were available. The body will be brot to this city for burial.
Besides the widow, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom HALL, of Rochester, three brothers, John [HALL], of this city, Lou [HALL], of Warsaw and DeVere [HALL], who is in the army and two sisters, Mrs. Nora NEWELL, of Mentone and Mrs. Emma BARNES, of New York, survive.
Charles Hall had been ill for some time and went to Denver two weeks ago in a vain attempt to build up his health.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: Chas. HALL, Co B 158 IVI, 1877-1918]

The funeral of Chas. LENHART, who drowned at Fletchers Lake Thursday afternoon, was held at Fairview Saturday. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Saturday, August 3, 1918

Eauret [MANSON], 18 year old son of Fred MANSON, of this city, was fatally burned at Bryan, Ohio, where he had been taking training at the radio school. The funeral was held at Bryan Friday afternoon. Mr. Manson is expected home Saturday evening.

The funeral services of Charles M. HALL, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas HALL, will be held at the residence, 429 West Third street, at 2:30 p.m. Monday.

Those from a distance who attended the funeral of Robert A. KELSEY Friday were: an uncle, Capt. W. H. KELSEY and a sister, Mrs. HARPER, of Ft. Wayne; a brother, Ambrose KELSEY and wife of Kansas; two sisters, Mrs. Olive PIERCE of Indianapolis and Mrs. J. L. HOOVER and family of Marion; Reuben [MOYER] and Will MOYER and mother of North Manchester; C. A. MOYER, Geo. MOYER and mother of Laketon; Mr. and Mrs. A. B. MOYER of Silver Lake; Mr. and Mrs. Herman DENNISON and children of Kewanna and Mr. and Mrs. Truman WARD and children of Macy. The last two were Mr. Kelsey's daughters. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Monday, August 5, 1918

[no obits]

Tuesday, August 6, 1918

B. F. GREEN Tuesday received a telegram stating that his cousin, Mrs. David SWARTZEL of Farmersville, O., had been killed and her husband seriously hurt in an auto accident. Mr. Green had planned to attend the Swartzel reunion to be held at that place Aug 7th, but because of the accident it will be postponed.

William V. JAMISON, of Huntington, son of Thomas JAMISON, So. Main St., was here Monday to visit his father and attend the HALL funeral with a number of union railway men.

The funeral of Mrs. Mary KLINE was held at this church on last Friday afternoon by Rev. Harley DAVIS, interment in Citizens' cemetery here. - - - ATHENS [?] ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Richland Center Citizens Cemetery, Richland Twp.: Debolt KLINE, Dec 22, 1856 - March 18, 1932; Mary E. JONES KLINE, his wife, Nov 21, 1849 - Aug 1, 1918]

Wednesday, August 7, 1918

Pvt. Lowell COREY, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. COREY, of Argos, was killed in action with the Marines in France on July 19th, according to a cablegram reaching his home Wednesday. There were no particulars.
Corey enlisted last November and went overseas in April. Besides the parents, two brothers, Lieut. Lawrence COREY, of Chillicothe, O., and Earl [COREY], of Argos, and a sister, Miss Hattie [COREY], of Argos, survive. Mr. and Mrs. Corey are in Deerwood, Minn.

Samuel Orville DOLPH, 11, son of Mr. and Mrs. William DOLPH, of Elkhart, former residents of this city, was drowned Tuesday evening while bathing in Cristiana creek at Elkhart, according to information reaching this city Wednesday. The boy was seized with cramps, and went down before aid could reach him, altho there were a large number of people bathing there at the time. The parents and three sisters survive. Funeral in Rochester Methodist church Thursday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. A. S. WARRINER in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. NOLAN and Mrs. Belle JACKSON of South Bend came Friday for the week end with Mrs. Dema HAGAN. Mrs. Nolen suffered a severe attack of acute indigestion Saturday night, death following within an hour. The body was taken to South Bend Sunday where the funeral will be conducted Tuesday. Mrs. Dema Hagan, Mrs. Ida HAGAN and two children accompanied them home. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

G. E. KLINE and wife and F. M. KLINE attended the funeral of Mrs. Debolt KLINE at Richland Center Friday afternoon. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Omer STEFFEY Wednesday received word of the death of his aunt, Mrs. Hiram STEFFEY, of Craig, Mo. She leaves two children, Rex [STEFFEY], of that city, and Mrs. Leone FITZGERALD, of near Craig. Her husband, who formerly lived here, died several years ago.

Thursday, August 8, 1918

Fred HAMES, linotype operator at the Sun office, Wednesday received word that his father had been killed in an accident at Portsmouth, Ohio. He departed at once for that city.

Newton ESTES, 59, a former resident of this city, was recently killed in a munition factory in West Virginia, according to word reaching this city. The widow and six children survive.

Friday, August 9, 1918

Mrs. Katherine J. SHIVELY, 79, a resident of Fulton county for more than 65 years, died Thursday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. H. JOHNSON, east of Rochester, after a long illness. Death was caused by complications and old age.
Two children, Mrs. JOHNSON, and a son, Leander SHIVELY, of Spokane, Wash., survive. The husband, James SHIVELY, and three children preceded her.
Funeral Saturday at 2:00 p.m. at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. GOODRICH, East Ninth St., Rev. G. R. CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, August 10, 1918

Word was received here Saturday of the death of Noah HORN, at Memphis, Tenn. No particulars were given. Mr. Horn was about 60 years old and leaves a wife and one daughter. He was a brother of Mrs. L. A. BARKMAN and of Mrs. David BUSENBURG. For many years he lived near Big Foot. Funeral at the Sycamore church, northeast of this city, Sunday afternoon.

[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Sycamore Cemetery, Newcastle Twp.: Noah HORN, father, 1858-1918; Sarah M. HORN, his wife, mother, 1861-1922]

Monday, August 12, 1918

Mrs. Mary A. STAHL, 90, widow of the late Samuel STAHL, probably the oldest woman in Fulton county, died Saturday evening at her home in Leiters, following a stroke of paralysis Friday morning.
Mrs. Stahl was born in Illinois in April, 1828. Four children, Frank STAHL, southwest of Leiters, Mrs. Catherine CAPRON, who lived with her mother, Mrs. Nancy SALES, of Leiters and Mrs. William LUCAS, of near Leiters, survive.
Funeral Monday afternoon at the Leiters M.E. church, Rev. HARRIS in charge. Burial at Leiters cemetery.

Word was received by friends here Monday of the death of Mrs. P. A. RITCHEY, aged about 45, Tuesday, Aug 6th, at her home in Emporia, Kansas. The funeral was held at that place on Friday. Mrs. Ritchey had been confined to her bed for the past six months, with tuberculosis. The family moved from this city about three years ago. The deceased had a number of brothers and sisters, who were with her at the time of her death. The husband also survives.

The 15 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Martin HAZEL, of Goshen, died Sunday, after a short illness. She was a niece of Mrs. Jack CHAMBERLAIN, who was called there Saturday on account of her illness. Mr. Chamberlain and son, Jerome [CHAMBERLAIN], will go to Goshen this evening.

Tuesday, August 13, 1918

Mrs. Martha SEAMAN went today to Peru, where she attended the funeral of her cousin, Mrs. Benjamin HARRISON.

Wednesday, August 14, 1918

Mrs. Susanna (SEIDNER) POWELL died at her home east of Macy Thursday afternoon after a short illness. She was the wife of Isaiah POWELL, who died several years ago. She leaves two sons, Orlando [POWELL] and Charles [POWELL], three daughters, Mrs. Milo NORMAN, Mrs. Joe ZARTMAN and Mrs. Chloe WRIGHT, the latter living near Roann. She also leaves a number of grandchildren. She was about 86 years of age. Funeral services were held at Gilead, conducted by Rev. S. C. NORRIS, of Lake Maxinkuckee. Interment in Gilead cemetery. - - - MACY ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Gilead Cemetery, Perry Twp.: Isaiah POWELL, father, 1829-1911; Susanna SEIDNER POWELL, his wife, mother, 1842-1918]

Thursday, August 15, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, August 16, 1918

Thomas KAUFMAN, 69, of Columbia City, died Thursday night, a victim of heart trouble. He leaves a wife, two daughters and a stepson. Mrs. Fred TIPTON, of this city, is a daughter. Funeral Sunday afternoon at his home.

Saturday, August 17, 1918 to Tuesday, August 20, 1918
[no obits]

Wednesday, August 21, 1918

Special to the Sentinel
Macy, Ind., Aug 21 -- I. B. MULLICAN, 76, died suddenly, Tuesday afternoon, while trying to drive a calf out of a cornfield. He called to his wife, but before she could reach him, he was dead. Besides a wife, he leaves three sons, Charles [MULLICAN], L. A. [MULLICAN] and Ben [MULLICAN], and a daughter, Mrs. DARNELL, and 15 grandchildren. For many years Mr. Mullican had been a member of the M.E. church and I.O.O.F. lodge here. The funeral will be held Friday or Saturday and interment will be made in the Macy cemetery. Among those who will come from a distance for the funeral will be Dr. L. A. MULLICAN of Indianola, Ia., and Dr. and Mrs. DARNELL and Henry [DICKMAN] and William DICKMAN of Sumner, Ia.

Mrs. J. T. BLACKBURN and son went today to Peru to attend the funeral of a friend.

Thursday, August 22, 1918 to Friday, August 23, 1918

[no obits]

Saturday, August 24, 1918

Among those from Rochester who attended the funeral service for I. B. MULLICAN at Macy Friday were Mr. and Mrs. J. F. WASHINGTON, Mrs. H. S. DRAKE, Mr. and Mrs. Adam ZARTMAN and Mrs. Minnie CONGER and daughter, Mildred [CONGER].

Monday, August 26, 1918

Mildred MARTIN, 14, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marion MARTIN, of Akron, was drowned while bathing at Rock Lake, two miles east of Akron, Saturday afternoon at one o'clock.
The Martin girl, together with her sister, Mary [MARTIN], and some other little girls, was paddling about in the water when the accident occurred. She saw another of the party out a little distance from the shore, and attempted to follow. She evidently got beyond her depth and before anybody knew what was going on, had gone down for the last time. She evidently made no struggle and if she called for help nobody heard her. The parents and sister survive.
Funeral Monday at 10:00 a.m. Burial at Ijamsville.

Tuesday, August 27, 1918

Mrs. Octavia STEFFEY, 73, widow of the late Hiram STEFFEY, died Wednesday, August 6th, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. B. FITZGERALD, near Craig, Mo. Mrs. Steffey was a former resident of Fulton county, having moved to Missouri in 1872.

Mr. and Mrs. Valorous BECK were called Sunday morning to the bedside of Mrs. Beck's niece, Pauline LEITER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George LEITER, of Pierceton. She was the victim of blood poisoning and died Sunday evening. The funeral was held at two o'clock, Tuesday, at Pierceton. - - - SAND HILL ITEMS.

Wednesday, August 28, 1918

Margaret [COLLINS], 10 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed COLLINS of Danville, Ill., died Tuesday morning. Besides her parents, she leaves a sister and two half-sisters, Mrs. Amos JACKSON, of St. Louis, and Lena [COLLINS], at home. Altho she had suffered for the past eight years with infantile paralysis, it was not the direct cause of her death. The Collins family formerly lived here. Mrs. Jesse COLLINS, of this city, an aunt of the deceased, left Wednesday for Danville, where she will remain for several days.

Thursday, August 29, 1918 to Friday, August 30, 1918

[no obits]

Saturday, August 31, 1918

Isaac B. MULLICAN, the announcement of whose death was made last week, was born in Defiance county, Ohio, December 15, 1841, and died suddenly August 20, 1918, aged 76 years. He was the son of Conrad and Mary MULLICAN and the eldest of seven children, and the last remaining member of the family.
July 3, 1864, he was married to Emily REEK, who died three months after their marriage, of typhoid fever. May 31,, 1866 he was married to Catherine DICKMAN, of Defiance, Ohio, to which union eight children were born. Four preceded him in death.
The funeral services were held at the church Friday afternoon at two o'clock. There were five ministers in the pulpit, Rev. E. H. KENNEDY, of Amboy, Rev. GARRISON, of Macy, both former pastors, Rev. DAVIES, present pastor, Rev. Will FREELAND, a lifelong friend, and each one assisted in the services. Rev. S. C. NORRIS, a former pastor, of Lake Maxinkuckee delivered the sermon. Interment was made in I.O.O.F. cemetery west of town.
The relatives present from a distance were Dr. L. A. MULLICAN, of Indianola, Iowa, Dr. and Mrs. G. W. DICKMAN, of Sumner, Iowa, William [DICKMAN] and Henry DICKMAN, also of Sumner, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob DICKMAN, Wallace DICKMAN and sister, Mrs. Rose MILLER, of Defiance, Mr. and Mrs. Albert FURTHMILLER and Wm. FURTHMILLER of Ft. Wayne, Mrs. Ira BUTLER of New Haven, Mrs. H. DRAKE of Rochester and Miss Trella HARTER of near Mt. Zion. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Truman LONG were called to Nappanee Sunday evening on account of the death of the latter's cousin. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Monday, September 2, 1918

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, September 3, 1918

Joseph POWNALL, member of the McClung Post G.A.R., and a former resident of Liberty township, died Sunday at Logansport, according to word reaching this city.

Wednesday, September 4, 1918

John W. SMITH of near Gilead, and former trustee of Perry township, died suddenly Wednesday evening from a stroke of apoplexy. The funeral was held in Macy M.E. church Saturday afternoon at two o'clock, by Rev. Charles ELLIOTT.
Mr. Smith was 72 years old and had been a christian for many years. He leaves a wife and a foster daughter, Mrs. Irvin TRACY. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, September 5, 1918

Daniel MOONSHOWER, 70, died Thursday morning at the home of his nephew, Este MOONSHOWER, of Akron, where he had made his home for the past six years. Death was caused by a cancer, which brought a two months illness.
Four sisters, Mrs. Marion CURTIS, of Rochester, Mrs. Kate MOORE, of Athens, Mrs. Ella HARTMAN, of East Rochester, and Mrs. Maranda HIATT, of California, and two brothers, Henry MOONSHOWER, of Akron and Noah MOONSHOWER, of Marion, survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, September 6, 1918

John Fred MOORE, 18 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred MOORE, west of the city, died Thursday at the home of his parents after a short illness. Burial Saturday at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Blanch [DANIELS], 11 year old daughter of Elbert DANIELS, passed away Saturday evening. Blanch had been ill for several months. Her father, step-mother, a brother and a sister survive her. A short service was held at the home Tuesday at 8:00 a.m., conducted by Rev. Harley DAVIS, who accompanied the funeral party to Bennett where the funeral service was held at 1:30. Burial at Galveston. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Saturday, September 7, 1918

[no obits]

Monday, September 9, 1918

Mrs. John FISH, 40, who lived about three miles west of Kewanna, was accidently killed in Winamac Saturday evening, when run down in the streets by an automobile, according to word received here Monday. Her husband was with her at the time of the tragedy.

Atty. Orbra F. MONTGOMERY, 59, for more than 30 years a member of the Fulton County Bar Association, and one of Rochester's most prominent attorneys, died at 1:15 Monday morning at his home on South Jefferson St., after a paralysis illness of nine years duration, the last three of which confined Atty. Montgomery to his home.
The widow, Mrs. Madge MONTGOMERY, and two brothers, Frank [MONTGOMERY] and Lee MONTGOMERY, both residents of this county, survive. Funeral at the house, Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Orbra F. Montgomery was born at the farm home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore MONTGOMERY, just west of Rochester on October 3rd, 1858. He attended school here, graduated from high school in 1878, one of the early classes, and completed a course in the early eighties at Indiana university, where he was a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity and prominent in college athletics.
He studied law with the firm of Holman and Essick until he was admitted to the bar in 1884, practicing law until his demise. In 1901 he was married to Madge TAYLOR, who survives.

Tuesday, September 10, 1918

Mrs. C. J. IRWIN, 45, died at 3:20 p.m. Monday at the home on South Pontiac St., after a baffling illness of more than 10 years, during the last few of which she was a helpless invalid.
Besides the husband, there survive three sisters, Mrs. G. N. CLYMER, of Ft. Wayne, Mrs. H. H. CROSS, of Chicago and Mrs. M. J. HAMMEL, of Indianapolis and two brothers, Dr. M. O. KING, of this city and Dr. L. A. KING of Williamsport. Funeral at the home Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Miss Anette KING was born in Fulton county on May 3rd, 1875, the daughter of John and Susan KING. She graduated from the Rochester schools and took a course of study at a musical conservatory in the East where she met Mr. Irwin, and was married to him in 1905. With the exception of three years in California and a year in Minnesota, she has spent her whole life in this county. She was a member of the Presbyterian church.

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred MOORE died Thursday after a short illness. The buriel took place Saturday at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. - - - LOYAL ITEMS.

Wednesday, September 11, 1918

Among those here for the funeral of Mrs. C. J. IRWIN, Wednesday afternoon, were Lark IRWIN, Ada O.; Dr. and Mrs. Lee KING, Williamsport, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. G. N. CLYMER, Ft. Wayne; Mr. and Mrs. Harry CROSS, Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Mervin HAMMEL, Indianapolis; Mrs. Sarah BEALL, Columbus, O., and Miss Francis GRAHAM, Lancaster, O.

Thursday, September 12, 1918

The funeral of Mrs. Hattie STEWART was conducted by Rev. Harley DAVIS at this church on last Saturday afternoon. Burial was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery here. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Friday, September 13, 1918

David HISSONG, 64, who formerly lived near the Pendleton bridge, northwest of this city, died Thursday evening at the home of his niece, Mrs. Geo. HACKER, at Maxinkuckee. Mr. Hissong was born in Cass Co., April 12, 1854, the son of John and Elizabeth HISSONG. His wife died a few years ago. He leaves two children, Marvin [HISSONG], of Lawton, Mich., and Mrs. Roy GOSS, of Mishawaka.
Funeral services Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the South Germany church and burial in the South Germany cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, South Germany Cemetery, Richland Twp.: David HISSONG, Apr 12, 1854 - (no d.d.); Sarah E. HISSONG, Feb 22, 1866 - Dec 13, 1909]

Sylvester McCARTER died Thursday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Albert LEWIS, in South Bend, a victim of a complication of diseases. For many years he was a resident of this county, but for the past three years has been living in that city. Besides a wife, he leaves three daughters, Mrs. Emanuel BROWN and Mrs. Sidney WALTERS, of Chicago, and Mrs - - - - and seven grandchildren.
The body will be brourht to this city for burial services at the Evangelical church Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: Sylvester McCARTER, 1847-1918; Sarah J. McCARTER, his wife, 1848-1926]

Saturday, Sepetember 14, 1918 to Monday, September 16, 1918

[no obits]

Tuesday, September 17, 1918

Isaac COPLEN, 85, died early Tuesday morning at the farm home seven miles northeast of Rochester, a victim of paralysis and complications. Three children, Melvin [COPLEN] of Rochester, Charles [COPLEN], who lived on the old homestead and Mrs. Chas. MILLER, north of Rochester, survive. Mrs. Coplen died in June, 1917. Funeral at Athens U.B. church Thursday at 2:00 p.m., leaving house at 1:30. Burial at Athens.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Isaac COPLEN, Sep 16, 1833 - Sep 17, 1918; Amira GROVE COPLEN, his wife, Dec 2, 1835 - June 25, 1917]

Mrs. Ella SMITH was called this morning to Wabash to attend the funeral of her brother-in-law, Fremont McLEAN, of Hammond.

Wednesday, September 18, 1918

[no obits]

Thursday, September 19, 1918

Jacob POLAY had word Wednesday evening from the adjutant general's office at Washington that his brother-in-law, Jacob GOLUB, a private in the U. S. Infantry, has been missing in action since July 19. Promise was made that information would be furnished as soon as received.
Golub, who is about 23 years old, is a brother of Mrs. POLAY, and previous to enlistment in the spring of 1917, made his home with her for about two years. It will be remembered that he entered the army following a bet of $10 with Abe BEREBITSKY, who wagered that the recruiting officer would take him. Golub thot he wouldn't and lost.
He was sent to Columbus Barracks, O., with Willie DOVICHI and assigned to an infantry regiment, which sailed for France early in the summer of 1917. Since then, the Polays had word from him several times. While here, Golub bought junk.

Mrs. Isaac JONES, 49, of Tippecanoe, died Tuesday afternoon at Woodlawn hospital. Funeral Friday at the home of the deceased.

Friday, September 20, 1918

[no obits]

Saturday, September 21, 1918

Private LeRoy SHELTON, 31, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. E. SHELTON, of Mt. Zion, was killed in action in France on Saturday, August 10th, according to an official communication received by his parents from the War department Friday night. Private Shelton is the first Fulton county boy to give his life for his country on the firing line in France.
Private Shelton was first reported killed in a letter from a Rochester girl in Washington to a friend in this city and also in letters from Harley ANDERSON, George BIGGS and Harvey CLARY. The Anderson boy said in his letter that Shelton's death was too horrible to be told. He is supposed to have been killed by a bomb.
Shelton was in a draft contingent that left Rochester for Camp Taylor, Ky., early in April. His brother, Private Ray SHELTON, who left with the same unit, was gassed on June 26th, taken to base hospital 32 and according to latest reports, is now in a replacement camp.
After a week at Camp Taylor, Shelton and the others were sent to Long Island, where they remained for two weeks, sailing for France just three weeks after leaving Rochester. He was a member of Company A, 111th Infantry, 28th Division, A.E.F. The last letter received from him was written on July 31st. The parents, two brothers, and a sister, Mrs. Frank Van DUYNE, of Mt. Zion, survive. Shelton was born in Fulton county on September 1st, 1886.
The other brother, Private Ralph SHELTON, who was in the last draft, went to Camp Taylor on June 3rd last and after two weeks there, was sent to Camp McClellan, Ala., lwhere he is now stationed.

Rev. Joseph Henry LACEY, 71, died at seven o'clock Friday evening at his home on South Madison St., after an illness of several years duration, the last two of which he was an invalid. Death was caused by hardening of the arteries and complications.
The widow, Mrs. Elizabeth LACEY, a daughter, Mrs. L. W. FELDER, of Fulton, and two sons, C. H. LACEY, of Fostoria, Ohio, and R. W. LACEY, of Elkhart, survive. A daughter

preceded him. Funeral Sunday morning at 11:00 o'clock at the Christian church, Rev. C. W. CAUBLE, of Indianapolis, in charge. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Joseph Henry Lacey was born March 28th, 1847 in Nottingham, England. He moved to the United States when he was 21 years of age and for the past 25 or 30 years had been a resident of Rochester and Fulton county. He preached at the Rochester Christian church for one year about 27 years ago and had occupied the pulpit of several other Indiana churches. He was educated in Liverpool, England, and became a citizen of the U.S. soon after coming to this country.

Monday, September 23, 1918

Word was received here Monday morning of the death Sunday night at 11:55 in the hospital at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station, Chicago, of Dean W. MIKESELL, 22, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. MIKESELL of near Wagoners.
He was taken to the hospital on Sunday, Sept. 8, suffering with grip and pneumonia, and as his case was quarantined, it is believed that he was afflicted with Spanish Influenza, an epidemic of which is now sweeping the country. With him at the end, were his parents and Miss Dawn REED, of Akron.
Mikesell was a radio student at the station, having entered June 7, of this year. He was a 1915 graduate of the Rochester high school and after a normal course at Tri State college, Angola, Ind., taught school in this county for three years, the last at Woodrow school, near Rochester.
Besides the parents, who were expected home Monday afternoon, there survive four brothers, Von [MIKESELL], Victor [MIKESELL], Kenneth [MIKESELL] and Arthur [MIKESELL] and a sister, Orpha [MIKESELL].
The body will be brought here for burial. Arrangements later.

Arthur MOORE, 56, died Saturday evening at his home in Athens, a victim of dementia. There survive a sister, Miss Laura [MOORE], with whom he lived on the Moore homestead, two brothers, Wilson [MOORE], of Logansport, and Marion [MOORE], of Athens, and three other sisters, Mrs. John MOORE, of Winamac, Mrs. Chas. DRUDGE and Mrs. Sol BURNS, of this county. Mr. Moore was a bachelor. Funeral Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the Mt. Hope church. Burial at the Mt. Hope cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed DAY, who reside just south of the city, have received word that their son-in-law, A. Gordon WEAVER, of Indianapolis, has been killed in action in France. He was well known here where he spent a winter several years ago, employed in the South Side barber shop.
Official notification came to Mrs. Weaver just recently altho she had heard indirectly of her husband's death before. She is expected here soon to visit her parents. Weaver was shot thru the arm earlier in the year, but had recovered and gone back to the firing line. He was a native of Edinburg, Ind., where his parents now reside. A brother is in the service. Weaver was drafted from Indianapolis in October, 1917.

So large a crowd attended the services at the Evangelical church Sunday evening that Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN abandoned his program and devoted the entire service to the memorial for Leroy SHELTON, who was killed in action. This was praticularly fitting, as Sunday was Heroes' Day in Indiana.

Mrs. Wilson DRUDGE will go this evening to Athens to attend the funeral of her uncle, Albert MOORE.

Tuesday, September 24, 1918

Funeral services for Dean W. MIKESELL, who died Sunday at Great Lakes, will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Evangelical church, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge, assisted by Rev. H. G. GAIGE. The bodywas brot here Tuesday morning.

Rev. Schuyler NORRIS, of Culver, will preach a memorial sermon Sunday morning at 11:00 in the Green Oak church, in honor of Leroy SHELTON, first Fulton county boy killed in action. All Odd Fellowswho come, are to meet at their hall near the church at 10:00 and march to the service in a body. Shelton was a member of this lodge.

Several members of the Royal Neighbor and Eastern Star orders attended the funeral of Mrs. Archie LATIMER, at Mentone, Friday afternoon. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

E. W. LACEY has returned to his home in Elkhart, after attending the funeral of his father, Rev. J. H. LACEY.

Wednesday, September 25, 1918

Guy PONTIOUS went this morning to Wagoners, where he attended the funeral of Dean MIKESELL.

Several members of the Royal Neighbor and Eastern Star orders attended the funeral of Mrs. Archie LATIMER, at Mentone, Friday afternoon.

Thursday, September 26, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, September 27, 1918

Rev. S. C. NORRIS, of Culver, will have charge of the Memorial services for Leroy SHELTON at the Green Oak church Sunday. All subordinate and encampment members of the I..O.O.F. are requested to meet at the I.O.O.F. hall, in this city, at 9:00 a.m. Leroy Shelton was a member of the Green Oak lodge, No. 600 and Mt. Horab Encampment No. 24. The line of march will form at Green Oak lodge hall and from there will go to the church.

Mrs. Jack HAIMBAUGH and Mrs. Henry HAIMBAUGH went today to St. Joe, Mich., where they will attend the funeral of the latter's grandson, Harry HAIMBAUGH, son of Chas. HAIMBAUGH, of that city.

Saturday, September 28, 1918

John THOMPSON, of the Safdicator Co., went today to Wabash to attend the funeral of his uncle, Chas. S. ROSE.

Miss Etta NORMAN has returned from Detroit, Mich., where she attended the funeral of her sister, Mrs. John OSWARD, and visited a week with friends.

Monday, September 30, 1918

[no obits]

Tuesday, October 1, 1918

Jasper CRAIG, about 65, of Warsaw, who formerly lived south of Akron, died Monday evening after a long illness from diabetes. Besides a wife, he leaves three sons, two daughters, and three grandchildren. He was a relative of M. O. SHIPLEY, Mrs. B. F. FRETZ and the FENSTERMAKERS of this city. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at the Episcopal church near Gilead.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Gaerte Cemetery, Perry Twp.: Jasper J. CRAIG, 1851-1918; Phebe R. CRAIG, his wife, 1855-1934]

Word has been received of the death of Alvin A. OSBORN, of Glendora, Calif., on Sept. 21. He was a brother of Mrs. John DEVORE, of this county.

Mrs. J. B. HAIMBAUGH, Mrs. Henry HAIMBAUGH, Mr. and Mrs. Obie HAIMBAUGH and Mrs. Ocie BRUGH have returned from St. Joe, Mich, where they attended the funeral of Harry HAIMBAUGH.

Wednesday, October 2, 1918

B. C. McCLURE, 33, of Harvey, Ill., a former Rochester resident, died Wednesday morning at the Cook county hospital in Chicago, a victim of pneumonia. The widow, Mrs. Mary McCLURE, and a son, Alfred [McCLURE], survive.

Thursday, October 3, 1918

Wm. C. BENNETT, formerly of Fulton county, died at Lafayette, his home for a number of years. He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Annie FULTZ, and three children: Racy [BENNETT], of Dayton, Ohio, and Don [BENNETT] and Miss Marian [BENNETT], at home. He was a brother-in-law of F. M. FULTZ, John FULTZ, Harley FULTZ, Mrs. Alfred ALLEN, Mrs. Sam CONRAD and Mrs. James VANLUE. Funeral in Lafayette at 2:00 o'clock Wednesday.

A Hysham, Montana newspaper tells of the death of Mrs. Carson CONN, 53, who was formerly Miss Carrie FITZGERALD. Mrs. Conn was born here and lived here until 1898, when she went to Montana and married. In 1903 Mr. and Mrs. Conn moved to Forsythe, and six years

later went to Hysham and took up a homestead, where they resided at the time of her death. Besides the husband, she is survived by her mother, Mrs. Helen FITZGERALD, of Hysham; a brother, Edward FITZGERALD, of Seattle, Wash., and a niece, Mrs. Miles MARSH, of Lewistown.

Pvt. Jacob GOLUB, aged about 24, a brother of Mrs. Jacob POLAY, of this city, who was recently reported missing in action since July 19, was killed sometime between July 18 and 22, according to a telegram from the adjutant general's office in Washington, received by Mr. Polay Thursday morning.
Golub enlisted here in May 1917, following a wager with Abe BEREBITSKY and had been in France with an infantry regiment since shortly after that time. While here, Golub bought junk. His parents are dead, but three sisters and four brothers survive, one of the latter having been a soldier in the Russian army. Nothing is known of his fate, but the others live in this country.

Friday, October 4, 1918

Mrs. Hiram G. CARITHERS, 65, who resided just east of the city, died at 5:00 p.m. Thursday at the Woodlawn hospital, after an operation for goiter, a weak heart being the cause. She had been in ill health for several years.
Besides the husband, there survive five children: Louise [CARITHERS] and Franklin [CARITHERS], at home; Mrs. Fred MOORE and Albert [CARITHERS], of this city and Mrs. Walter BROOKER, of Leiters Ford. Mrs. J. T. KEEL, of this city, is a sister.
Melissa COLLINS was born in Fulton county in 1853, the daughter of Solomon and Sarah COLLINS and had always been a resident of this county. She was a member of the Methodist church.
Funeral arrangements later.

Word was received by relatives in this city Friday morning of the death of Fred PEARSON, 30, of Waltham, Mass., a son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles PEARSON, of South Bend, and a former resident of this city. He was a nephew of Mrs Minta HOLEMAN and a grand-nephew of Mrs. A. J. BARRETT. Death was caused by pneumonia, probably Spanish influenza.
Mr. Pearson was in the aero service and was stationed at Pensacola, Fla. He is survived by a wife, a father and mother, two sisters and a brother, Walter [PEARSON], who is now in the U. S. Navy. The body will be brot to South Bend for burial.

The funeral services for B. C. McCLURE, of Chicago, who died in that city Wednesday, were held at one o'clock Friday afternoon at the home of his mother, Mrs. Alice EDSON, on Monroe St. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, October 5, 1918

Funeral services for Mrs. Hiram CARITHERS at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Burial in mausoleum.

Monday, October 7, 1918

Word was received early Monday of the death of the second Fulton county boy in a training camp, due to Spanish Influenza, Pvt. Claude CLYMER, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry CLYMER succumbing at Camp Taylor at 1:45 a.m. Dean MIKESELL was the first to die.
Clymer was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry CLYMER, of near Talma, who were with him when he died. He had been ill a week. He was among the 33 Fulton county boys who went to camp early in September. Besides the parents there survive a brother, Forest [CLYMER], at home, and a sister, Mrs. Clarence POWERS, Argos.
Funeral arrangements are unknown.

Lillian Ruth [DEMONT], six months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl DEMONT, west of Rochester, died Saturday evening after a two weeks illness of pneumonia. Funeral at the home Monday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, October 8, 1918

Reuben BATZ, 65, for years a citizen of Rochester, died at 11:00 p.m. Monday, at the home of his sister, Mrs. Dan TIPTON, in Mentone. Cancer of the liver was the cause, altho he had been seriously ill but a few weeks. He had lived here during the past summer and at many other times.
There survive four sisters, Mrs. TIPTON, Mrs. Clara GROVE, of Michigan and Mrs. Lizzie THOMAS and Mrs. Sarah KESLER, of Marion, and a brother, Henry BATZ, of near Talme. His wife, who was Miss Malinda KESLER, died a number of years ago and there are no children.
Funeral and burial at Sycamore Christian church near Talma. Time to be announced later.

Pvt. Martin Augustine IRVINE, 24, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. A. IRVINE, of this city, died Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. at Fort Wood, New York, a victim of pneumonia, according to a telegram received by his parents Tuesday afternoon. He was probably another influenza victim.
Pvt Irvine was born in Rochester, October 21st, 1893, where he made his home up to the time of his enlistment in the Quartermaster Corps in December, 1917. Besides the parents, there survive five brothers, Charles G. [IRVINE], now in France and Conrad [IRVINE], Wilbert [IRVINE], Milo [IRVINE] and Galebert [IRVINE] and a sister, Rozine [IRVINE], all of Rochester.
The body will be brot to Rochester for burial. No funeral arrengements have been made.
Mr. and Mrs. Irvine's first word of their son's illness came in a letter from him received last Friday, in which he stated that he was slightly ill with the grip, but expected to be out soon.
Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock, the Irvines had a telegram from their son's medical officer that he was very low and a second telegram about two hours later telling of his demise.

Miss Mary BAUGHER, 45, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry BAUGHER of Talma, died at the home of her parents Monday evening at eight o'clock, a victim of pneumonia, which developed from Spanish influenza. Miss Baugher, who was ill only a week, was a spinster and had no brothers or sisters. Funeral arrangements not made.

Miss Bertha MYERS is in Gilead to attend the funeral of an aunt.

Charles TALBERT has been called to Canton, Ohio, on account of the death of his mother, Mrs. D. B. TALBERT.

Wednesday, October 9, 1918

Harry GINTHER, 32, a former resident of Fulton county and Rochester, died at eight o'clock Wednesday morning at his home in Covington, Ky., a victim of Spanish Influenza, according to word received here.
The widow, Mrs. Carrie GINTHER, a daughter, Marjorie [GINTHER], of Leiters, a sister, Miss Louisa GINTHER, of Leiters, and two brothers, Will GINTHER, of Culver, and Henry GINTHER, of Colorado, survive.
The body will be brot to Rochester for burial.

Funeral services for Claud E. CLYMER Thursday afternoon at 1:00 p.m. from the home, Rev. O. E. OXLEY in charge. Deceased was a member of the Brethren church.

Alice M. KALE, 15, died Wednesday afternoon at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alva P. KALE, near Tiosa. Death was caused by Spanish influenza. Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, October 10, 1918

The body of Martin Augustine IRVINE, who died in New York Tuesday, was expected in this city Thursday evening, following word received by the parents to the effect that it had been shipped Wednesday. Funeral arrangements were postponed pending the arrival.

The funeral services for Harry GINTHER, formerly of this city, who died of Spanish Influenza at Covington, Ky., were held this morning at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, shortly after the body arrived on the 10:35 train. Mrs. Emma CAMERER, mother of Mrs. Ginther, Wednesday evening received a telegram stating that Mrs. Ginther's four year old daughter was seriously ill with the same disease and that she would be unable to come for the funeral of her husband.

The funeral services for Miss Alice M. KALE, who died Wednesday afternoon will be held at the graveside Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the South Germany cemetery, Rev. O. E. OXLEY in charge.

Friday, October 11, 1918

The funeral services for Pvt. Martin Augustine IRVINE, who died in New York, a victim of Spanish Influenza last Wednesday, will be held Saturday afternoon at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Strong IRVINE, west 12th St. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
The funeral announcement had been withheld pending word as to the arrival of the body, which was expected Thursday, but will not reach this city until Friday evening. The Rochester lodge L.O.O.M. of which Irvine was a member and the Rochester company of Liberty Guards will attend the services in a body.

Robert LOWRY, of Oklahoma City, died Thursday according to word received friends here. He was the son of Ex-Auditor Robert LOWRY, formerly of this city. His parents are dead but he is survived by one sister, Miss Alice LOWRY, of South Bend, who was with him at the time of his death. He was about 33 years old. The body will be brought here Sunday for burial.

Word was received by relatives here late Thursday afternoon of the death of Miss Irene BUTLER, 20, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Warren BUTLER, of Logansport. She died of Spanish influenza, at Pittsburgh, Pa., where she was attending college. Her mother was at her bedside during her illness. Besides her parents, she is survived by a brother, Ben [BUTLER], who lives at home. She was a niece of Mrs. George BLACK and Mrs. John HOOVER, of this city.

George COX, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben COX, died Tuesday morning at the home of his parents, a victim of pneumonia. He had not been well all summer but his last illness was of only a few days duration. He leaves besides his parents, his wife, Ruth [COX], two step-children, two sisters, Mrs. Nora ZUMBAUGH east of Argos and Miss Cora [COX] at home, besides numerous other relatives and friends. - - -GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Mrs. Eli WOLF attended the funeral of Lulu RINEHOLT at Monterey Thursday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Saturday, October 12, 1918

Mrs. Nancy Jane CORBETT, 82, died Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Julia A. HOOVER, on West Fifth St., after an illness of practically a year's duration. Death was caused by old age and complications. Mrs. Corbett had suffered two paralytic strokes some time ago.
Nancy Jane CLINGER was born in Miami county on July 16th, 1836. After her marriage to Andrew J. CORBETT, who preceeds her, she moved to Fulton county in 1860 where she has since resided. Two children, Mrs. HOOVER and Burton H. CORBETT, of Denver, Col., survive. Another son, William [CORBETT], died in 1916.
Funeral at the home at 416 W. Fifth St., Monday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral services for Pvt. Martin Augustine IRVINE, who died of Spanish influenza in New York on Wednesday, will be held at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. IRVINE, West 12th St., Sunday morning at 10:00 o'clock, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The Rochester lodge, L.O.O.M. and the Rochester company of Liberty Guards will be in attendance.
A delay in the arrival of the body, which did not reach this city until Saturday morning, necessitated the change in the funeral arrangements, which had been formerly set for Saturday afternoon.

Monday, October 14, 1918

Spanish influenza took a toll of three in Fulton county over the week end: Mrs. Ed. SQUIRES, of Rochester, Miss Lannie BECK, north of Rochester, and Robert WAGONER, south of the city.
Despite this fact, Dr. C. J. LORING, county health officer, stated Monday morning that "in the past two or three days, we have been getting the upper hand of the epidemic." The death rate here has been small.
Dr. Archie Brown, city health officer, said that while many new cases were reported, he did not believe that the epidemic was growing. "There are just as many recoveries as there are new cases," he said.
Dr. Brown also said that if city residents continued to ignore his order regarding the burning of leaves after four o'clock, prosecutions would follow. When there is so much throat and lung sickness abroad, the smoky atmosphere induced by burning leaves, causes increased irritation.

Mrs. Etta SQUIRES, 28, wife of Edward SQUIRES, died at 1:30 a.m. Monday at her home on Monroe St., a victim of pneumonia, developing from Spanish influenza. She was taken ill on Thursday last.
Besides the husband, who is under a physician's care with the same disease, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harrison MARTIN, west of Rochester survive. A brother and sister are dead.

Miss Lannie BECK, 19, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John BECK, north of Rochester, died Monday morning at four o'clock at the home of her parents, a victim of Spanish influenza. She was ill only a week.
There survive the parents, four sisters, Norah [BECK], of Rochester; Martha [BECK], of Claypool and Jennie [BECK] and Etta [BECK], who live with the parents, and three brothers, B. B. BECK, of this city; George [BECK] of Indianapolis, and Tom [BECK], who is in a military camp in Georgia.
Funeral arrangements later.

Robert WAGONER, six, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward WAGONER, died Sunday afternoon at the home of his parents, six miles south of Rochester, after less than a weeks illness. Death was caused by Spanish influenza, from which the entire family is suffering, altho none is seriously ill.
Besides the parents, three brothers, Russell [WAGONER], Melvin [WAGONER] and Milo [WAGONER], who live with the parents, survive.
Funeral in the yard at the home at 2:00 p.m. Tuesday. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Among the list of those dead from disease in Monday's casualties is the name of Clarence O. BENGE, whose near relative is listed as Miss Almeda BENGE, emergency address, Akron, Ind.
Inquiry develops that Benge was a nephew of Dan SECOR, Akron hardware man, with whom he and his sister, Miss Almeda, formerly made their home. The young man, who was about 26 years of age, enlisted in California, several years ago, as a mechanic in a heavy artillery unit and had been abroad just a few months. Akron relatives had had two letters from him "over there." Besides the sister named, who is now Mrs. Jess ONSTOTT, of Kokomo, another sister survives. The parents are dead.

Tuesday, October 15, 1918

One of the county's aged and respected citizens turned his face to the wall Tuesday morning at 7:00 o'clock, when Joseph HARDING, 87, died at his home just north of Loyal, after a general breakdown lasting a little more than 10 days. The end was gradual and peaceful.
Mr. Harding had resided on the farm where he died for a period of about 45 years, coming there from Miami county. He was born in Buckingham, England in 1831 and came to this country when about 21 years of age, settling in Ohio, after traveling considerably.
In 1853. he married Mary E. VANKIRK, of Newart, Ohio, and to this union, seven children were born, two of whom, Edward [HARDING] and an infant, are dead. Those surviving are: Mrs. Lou ZOOK, Manchester, Tenn.; Mrs. Mason PERRY, Akron; Dr. G. W. HARDING, Warsaw; Mrs. Oscar TILDEN, near Portland, Ore.; and Mrs. Milton H. POFFENBERGER, near Loyal.
Mr. Harding married again, after his first wife died, and after the second wife passed away, wedded Mrs. Eliza EMMONS, of Rochester, 13 years ago this month. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and spent practically all of his life on a farm. A brother died in this country two years ago and a sister in England, several years ago. There are no other relatives.
Funeral at 11:00 a.m. Thursday from the home. No flowers.

T. Fred McKAY, 34, died at the hospital Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. another Fulton county victim of Spanish influenza. McKay, who was stricken with the disease just a week before his death, gradually grew worse until Monday night, when on account of the illness of his wife, Mrs. Pearl McKAY, he was taken to the hospital in a dying condition.
Besides the widow, his mother, Mrs. Viola McKAY, of Kokomo, two sisters, Mrs. Minnie IRVIN, of Kokomo and Mrs. Mary HALL, of Oklahoma, and a brother, Commodore McKAY, of Bremen, survive. The body will be taken to Kokomo for burial.
T. Fred McKay was born in Kokomo on September 9th, 1884, where he made his home with his parents until his marriage in 1907. Three years ago he moved to Rochester where he opened a wall paper and paint shop, conducting his business in this city until his demise.
Mrs. McKay was able to be up on Monday, and the grief stricken, was believed to be in a much improved condition on Tuesday.

Wednesday, October 16, 1918

Another death, that of Mrs. Estil GRAFFIS, was added to the influenza toll Wednesday, while several other cases, notably that of Mrs. Milo COPLEN, of Rochester, were reported very serious. Health officers insist, however, that the epidemic is abating.
Mrs. Estil Graffis, 29, died Tuesday evening at nine o'clock at her home five miles northeast of Rochester, a victim of Spanish influenza. She had recently recovered from an attack of typhoid fever, was taken ill with the influenza about two weeks ago and later contracted pneumonia. Outdoor funeral at the home Thursday at 2:00 p.m. Burial in Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.
There survive the husband; three children, Wendell [GRAFFIS], Ruth Marjorie [GRAFFIS] and Levi Jacob [GRAFFIS], Jr.; the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob ZIMPLEMAN, of North Manchester; a sister, Carrie [ZIMPLEMAN], of Wisconsin; and five brothers, George [ZIMPLEMAN], Clarence [ZIMPLEMAN], Roy [ZIMPLEMAN] and Russell ZIMPLEMAN, of North Manchester, and Orvin ZIMPLEMAN, of Pulaski county.

The funeral services for Mrs. Edward SQUIRES were held at the home, corner Seventh and Monroe Sts., Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. Geo B. CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral services of Fred McKAY, who died at the hospital Tuesday afternoon, will be held Thursday at Kokomo, at the home of Mrs. McKay's sister, Mrs. Ernest MUMAUGH, on 741 South Macan St.

Word has been received here of the death of Andrew AULT, brother of Lon AULT, and a former resident of this city, at Shelbyville, Indiana. He was a victim of Spanish influenza.

The body of Fred HOFFMAN, son of Mrs. Susan HOFFMAN of Grass Creek, was shipped to his home Tuesday. He died at Camp Taylor Tuesday, a victim of influenza.

Harry Elmer GINTHER, son of Mr. and Mrs. John GINTHER, was born near Leiters Ford, Ind., April 26 1885, departed this life Oct 8, 1918, age 33 years, five months 12 days. In the spring of 1909 he was united in marriage to Miss Carrie CAMERER, of Rochester, Ind.; to this union was born one daughter, Marjorie Roslyn [GINTHER]. Besides a wife and daughter he leaves a father, mother, two brothers, Henry [GINTHER], of Pueblo, Colo., William [GINTHER], of Culver, Ind., one sister, Louise [GINTHER], at home, a grandmother and many other relatives and friends to mourn his untimely death. Harry was a kind and loving husband, father, son and brother and his death has cast a dark cloud over all.

Mrs. Matilda SHORT has returned to her home in Kokomo after being called here on account of the death of her son-in-law, Fred McKAY.

Thursday, October 17, 1918

Edward William THOMPSON, 35, died at his home in East Rochester, Wednesday evening at seven o'clock, after being ill with Spanish influenza for less than a week. During the last three days of his illness, Mr. Thompson was delirious and spoke of nothing but the bridge factory, where he had been employed for the past 11 years. Mrs. Thompson is also ill with the prevalent disease.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Hertha THOMPSON; two children, Everett [THOMPSON], seven, and Marjorie [THOMPSON], four; the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel THOMPSON, of Leiters Ford; three brothers, James [THOMPSON], of Churubusco, Elva [THOMPSON], of Talma, and Frank [THOMPSON], of South Carolina, and a sister, Mrs. Fred BATZ, of Leiters Ford. A son, Lloyd [THOMPSON], died just a year ago.
Edward William Thompson was born in Fulton county on February 6th, 1883. On July 27th, 1907 he was married to Miss Hertha RUSSELL. He had been a life long resident of Fulton county and Rochester.
Funeral arrangements later.

The body of Mrs. Clyde HOPPER, 33, who died Monday morning at her home in Rockford, Ill., of Spanish influenza, was brot to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.George W. MITCHELL Wednesday.
She is survived by the husband, three children, Raymond [HOPPER], Max [HOPPER] and Phyllis BRYANT, the parents, two sisters, Mrs. Daisy KELLEY and Mrs. C. M. RHODES,

Rochester, and two brothers, W. T. MITCHELL, of Rockford and Roscoe MITCHELL, of Amerett, Minn.
Funeral at Athens Friday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. David LEININGER in charge. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Lester COPLEN, 16, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. COPLEN, of Talma, died Wednesday night of influenza, after a weeks illness. Besides the parents, there survive two brothers and three sisters, two of the latter being Mrs. Estil FISH, at Mentone, and Mrs. Everet STOCKBERGER, of Tiosa.

Friday, October 18, 1918

FLU BAN EXTENDED TO OCT. 26
By International News Service
Indianapolis, Oct 18 -- Dr. J. N. HURTY, secretary of the State Board of Health, announced today that the ban on schools, churches and all public meetings in Indiana would not be lifted until midnight of October 26.
The ban was to have been lifted Sunday night, but following receipt of reports from 43 counties, Dr. Hurty said he was convinced that influenza epidemic was not well enough in hand to permit the opening of public places on Sunday. New cases reported Thursday totalled 2,688.
__________

One more death occurred in Fulton county as a result of the Spanish influenza, that of Mrs. Milo COPLEN, 26, of this city. Mrs. Boyd BIDWELL, a former resident of this city, was also a victim. Her death occurred in New Mexico.
City and county physicians Friday were much cheered by the drop in temperature, the general concensus of their opinion being that clear frosty weather would do more towards crushing the influenza epicemic than anything else.
It was again emphasized, however, that too much care cannot be taken to avoid the malady, nor can persons afflicted, or those caring for the sick, take too many precautions against spreading the disease.
Particular stress is being laid upon the absolute necessity for using gauze breathing masks when near those who are ill. __________

Mrs. Milo COPLEN, 26, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marion PORTER, East 14th St., Thursday night at 11 o'clock a victim of Spanish influenza. She was taken ill just 10 days preceding her death. The husband, parents and a son, Francis Porter COPLEN, three, survive. Funeral at the house Saturday afternoon, Rev. F. Z. BURKETTE, of Greensburg, in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Mrs. Hannabel COPLEN was born in Rochester on March 25th, 1892, the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Marion PORTER. She was educated in this city, making her home with her parents until her marriage in August 1914 to Milo COPLEN. Just before the wedding she was for some time the bookkeeper at the SENTINEL office.

Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Boyd BIDWELL, formerly Miss Ethel O'DAFFER, of this city. Mrs. Bidwell was enroute from her home to Los Angeles, California, to South Bend, for a visit with her parents, when she became ill with Spanish influenza on the train.

She was in New Mexico at the time of her death. Besides her husband, she leaves a mother, father, two brothers and two sisters. The body will probably be brought to this city for burial.

Funeral services for Ed THOMPSON, who died Wednesday evening, will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in the yard at the home, the Moose lodge in charge and the service by Rev. George CRANE. A brother, Frank THOMPSON, stationed at Camp Sevier, S.C., is expected here Saturday. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. Marie HARDING, who died at her home south of Macy Wednesday morning, at the age of 80 years, was held at the home, conducted by Rev. S. C. NORRIS, of Culver, assisted by Rev. DAVIES, of the Macy M.E. church. Burial was made in Plainview cemetery west of town. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed McGEE and daughter, Grace [McGEE], and Fred ROWE attended the funeral of Claud MOORE at Adamsboro last Thursday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Saturday, October 19, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. John DUVALL, northeast of this city, received a telegram Friday stating that their son, Ben [DUVALL], of Jamestown, North Dakota, had died of influenza. They formerly lived west of this city, but nine years ago he moved his family to North Dakota, where he resided until the time of his death. Benjamin DUVALL was born in Illinois, Sept 27, 1872. He leaves a wife, six children, father, mother and one brother, Bert DUVALL.

The body of Mrs. Sherman PECK, aged about 43, who died in Watford City, N.D., Friday will be brought here for burial, relatives here learned Saturday. She had been an invalid for a number of years. The Pecks formerly lived in Rochester. The husband survives, and West HARTMAN, of Peru, is a brother.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: Sherman J. PECK, 1869-1933; Lydia PECK, 1872-1918; Thomas W. PECK, 1872-1902]

Monday, October 21, 1918

Alfred MECHLING, 65, of near Tippecanoe, committed suicide Monday morning by shooting himself, it was learned here late in the afternoon.

The funeral services for Mrs. Sherman PECK, who died last week at her home in Watford City, N.D., were held privately Monday afternoon from the Hoover chapel, Rev. A. E. WRENTMORE being in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery. Among those here to attend the funeral were Mr. PECK, Mr. and Mrs. Wesley HARTMAN, of Peru, Harley HARTMAN, of South Bend, Mr. and Mrs. Ed CRON, (nee Marguerite HARTMAN), of Virginia City, Minn., and Frank PECK, of Rochester.

The Spanish influenza epidemic exacted a toll of three more lives in Fulton county over the week end and there are still several people who are said to be lying at death's door with the disease. Those who succumbed were Estil GRAFFIS, northeast of the city, Claude CHESNUT,

Rochester and Emil [DAGGY], son of Del DAGGY, Rochester.
It was stated, however, by local and county physicians that the epidemic has abated to some extent and with cold weather promised, it is believed that another week will see a marked change in this locality.
__________

Claude CHESNUT, 25, died at three o'clock Sunday afternoon at his home on South Elm St., after a short illness. Death was caused by Spanish influenza. The widow, Mrs. Esther CHESNUT, and daughter, Myrtle Jane [CHESNUT], who are also afflicted, were reported somewhat improved Monday.
Besides the widow and daughter, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. CHESNUT and two sisters, Misses Edith [CHESNUT] and Irene CHESNUT, of Chicago, survive. For some time, he has been employed at the bridge factory.
Funeral at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles CHESNUT, corner of 14th and Elm Sts., on Tuesday afternoon, at 2:00 p.m. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Estil GRAFFIS, 28, died Monday morning at four o'clock at his farm home northeast of Rochester, a victim of Spanish influenza, just six days after the death of his wife from the same cause. There survive three children, Wendell [GRAFFIS], Ruth Marjorie [GRAFFIS] and Levi Jacob [GRAFFIS]; the father, Levi M. GRAFFIS, of Rochester; a brother, Clarence GRAFFIS, southwest of the city and a sister, Mrs. Ray DULL, of Monroe, Mich. Outdoor funeral at the house Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Emil Ray DAGGY, 21 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Del DAGGY, Elm St., died Sunday afternoon after an illness of one week of Spanish influenza. The funeral service was held Monday afternoon at the home and burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The Daggys have resided in this city for the past three years. The father, who is employed at the bridge factory, and the six surviving children are suffering from the disease.

The body of Mrs. Boyd BIDWELL, who died of influenza in California, will be brought to Rochester for burial some time this week.The party did not start home until Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. Terry MOON, Mr. and Mrs. Frank YOUNG and Mr. and Mrs. Otto RICHARDSON, all of Logansport, Mr. and Mrs. L. BABCOCK, of Peru, Mr. and Mrs. Voris LOWE, of Marion and Walter PORTER, of Pontiac, Ill., attended the funeral of Mrs. Milo COPLEN in this city Saturday.

Lannie Viola BECK, the youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. John BECK, was born in Fulton county, Indiana, July 20, 1899, died October 14, 1918, age 19 years, two months and 13 days.
When but a small child she united with the Sand Hill M.E. church. Since that time she has taken an active interest in church work and at her death was Secretary of the Sand Hill Sunday school. She was a member of the Rebekah lodge.
She graduated from the common school at Sand Hill and had started on her fourth year of high school. She was interested in school work and was very anxious to obtain an education.
She leaves to mourn their loss a loving father and mother, four sisters, Mrs. Jessie HALTERMAN and Mrs. Ettie OVERMYER of near Sand Hill, Mrs. Nora BALDWIN, of

Rochester, and Mrs. Martha DILLMAN, of Claypool; three brothers, Valorous BECK, near Sand Hill, George BECK, of Indianapolis, and Thos. BECK of Chickamauga Park, Ga., and a host of other relatives and friends.

Mrs. Floyd CLEMANS, 63, a life long resident of Fulton county, died Monday, October 14th at her home west of Rochester, a victim of dropsy. The husband, a daughter, Mrs. Lucy ROGERS, of Rochester, two brothers, Frank [CLEVENGER] and David CLEVENGER, of this county, three sisters, Mrs. Ellen NYE, Mrs. Lydia CLEMANS and Mrs. Emmie WOOLPERT, of this county, and three foster children, Lawrence HACKETT and Mrs. Grace BEUHLER, of Leiters and Floyd LAMBERT, at home, survive.

Tuesday, October 22, 1918

Mrs. Frank HOFFMAN Tuesday received word that Miss Elsa R. FARNHAM, daughter of Mrs. Louise FARNHAM, died Tuesday in Pittsburg, Pa., of pneumonia following Spanish influenza. Miss Farnham was born in this city Mar. 13, 187, [sic], but lived in Calumet, Mich., most of her life. She was a graduate of Northwestern university and had been employed until this fall at Marshall Field's in Chicago. At the time of her death, she was taking a post graduate course in the Carnegie institute at Pittsburgh. The funeral was held Saturday at Calumet. Miss Farnham often visited the HOFFMANS here.

Word was received Tuesday of the death of Miss Ellen ROSEBORG, of Hoopeston, Ill., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore ROSEBORG, of this city, caused by Spanish influenza. She is survived by a father, mother, three sisters and two brothers.

Mayor H. G. MILLER has received word of the death on Friday of Spanish influenza, of his uncle, George F. LOFBERRY, of Elizabeth, N.J. The body was taken to Valparaiso for burial on Tuesday.

Raymond [BRYANT] and Max BRYANT have returned to South Bend, after attending the funeral of their mother, Mrs. Etta HOPPER.

Wednesday, October 23, 1918

Dr. E. H. SUTHERLAND received word of the death Tuesday afternoon at his home in Grand Rapids, Michgan, of his aged father, Henry SUTHERLAND. Senility was the cause. Dr. Sutherland went on Wednesday to Grand Rapids for the funeral in that city Thursday afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed CRON left this morning for their home in Virginia, Minn., after attending the funeral of Mrs. Sherman PECK.

Thursday, October 24, 1918

Miss Bertha Helena ROMIG, 18, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel ROMIG, 1217 S. Elm St., Thursday morning, a victim of the influenza. Besides the parents, two brothers survive. Private funeral at the house Saturday at 10:00 a.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Charles GATRELL, 36, formerly Miss Ella EASTERDAY, of this city, died Tuesday afternoon at her home in Logansport, a victim of Spanish influenza followed by pneumonia. There survive the husband, a son, Charles [GATTRELL], Jr., three sisters, Mrs. B. CHAMBERLAIN, of Rochester, Mrs. Nina GIBBONS, of Bass Lake and Mrs. Pearl SMITH, of Clearwater, Mich., and two brothers, Frank [EASTERDAY] and Elmer EASTERDAY, of this city. The body was brot to this city Thursday afternoon for burial at the Citizen's cemetery. Funeral at the graveside, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge.

Fred HARTZ, of Delong, died Wednesday a.m. at Ft. Benj. Harrison after a sickness of three weeks. His mother and sister, Mrs. Eli WOLF, left Tuesday, called by a message concerning his serious illness.

The funeral services for Mrs. Boyd BIDWELL, who died in Fresno, Calif., were held Thursday afternoon at the graveside. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body arrived in this city Wednesday afternoon.

Friday, October 25, 1918

Although health officers Friday believed that influenza was abating in the county, the epidemic struck this community one of its most severe blows at 12:55 p.m., when it caused the death of Dell KESSLER, 38, a well known citizen, at his home just north of the city on the Michigan road, where he had lived since his mother died four years ago.
Mr. Kessler, who was one of the leading insurance men of the city and the candidate on the democratic ticket for county treasurer, became ill with the prevailing disease just a week ago Thursday and gradually grew worse. On Thursday his case developed into pneumonia and on Friday morning delirium came. Weak lungs are believed to have aided in bringing the end.
Dell Kessler was a son of Mr. and Mrs. George W. KESSLER, and was born in March 1880, on a farm north of where he died. His youth was spent on the farm, after which he taught school for five years and then entered the insurance and loan business. At the time of his death, he was a partner in the firm of KESSLER and MILLER, a successful insurance concern. Practically all of his life, with the exception of several winters in the West, was spent in this county.
In November, 1899, he married Miss Etta CONNER, who, with four children, Homer [KESSLER], Ralph [KESSLER], Marie [KESSLER] and George [KESSLER], survive, together with the father; a brother, Martin [KESSLER], of Detroit and a sister, Mrs. Charles JACKSON, of near Rochester.
He was a prominent member of the I.O.O.F. and Masonic lodges.
Funeral arrangements later.

Louis N. [BAKER], four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil BAKER of Fulton, died Friday morning at the home of his parents with influenza and whooping cough. Besides his parents, he is survived by a baby sister. Mrs. Baker is dangerously ill with influenza.

Mrs. Mary KREIGHBAUM and son, Jacob [KREIGHBAUM], were called to the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. WILFERT, of near Leiters Ford, by the death of her granddaughter, Ruth [WILFERT]. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Jesse GLAZE, of South Bend, Thomas CLARK, of LaPorte and Kenneth CLARK, of South Bend, attended the funeral of Lannie BECK. - - - SAND HILL ITEMS.

Mrs. Fred GERDES has returnef from Cissna Park, Ill., where she was called on account of the death of her brother-in-law, Wm. KOGLER.

Saturday, October 26, 1918

The funeral services for Del KESSLER will be held at the home north of the city Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. A. S. WARRINER of Terre Haute, assisted by Rev. George CRAIG, in charge. The services which will be held out of doors, will be attended in a body by the Masonic and Odd Fellow lodges, of this city, of which Mr. Kessler was a member. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, October 28, 1918

Pvt. Leroy SNYDER, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. William SNYDER of Mt. Zion, died Sunday at 11:00 a.m. at Camp Taylor, Ky., after a four weeks illness. Death was caused by pneumonia contracted from Spanish influenza. Two half brothers, James [SNYDER] and Willie SNYDER and six half sisters, Lillian [SNYDER], Minnie [SNYDER], Mary [SNYDER], Nora [SNYDER], Ethel [SNYDER] and Edna SNYDER, survive. Private Snyder was born in Cass county February 2nd, 1897 and moved to this county with his parents when a boy. For the past three years he was employed at the Louderback garage. He was a member of the Rochester Liberty Guards and left this city with a draft contingent on September 4th. Recently he was reported wounded in bayonet practice.
The body was expected to arrive in the city on Monday, but pending the arrival , no funeral arrangements were made.

Earl MILLISER, 27, a life ong resident of Fulton county except for two years that he spent in the Army in the Philippenes, died Sunday afternoon at the hospital, a victim of Spanish influenza. Two brothers, Surphes [MILLISER] and Henry MILLISER, of this city and five sisters, Mrs. Ruth CRABILL, of Bruce Lake, Mrs. Elizabeth WOODCOX, of Burton, Mrs. Mary WALES, of Loyal, Mrs. William HOLLIDAY, of Oklahoma and Mrs. Esther WOLF, of Peru survive. The parents and a brother and sister preceded him. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at the Sharon church at 1:00 o'clock.

Robert Ira [THRASHER], three months old son of Mr. and Mrs. William A. THRASHER, died Monday at 9:00 a.m. at the home of his parents, 518 Monroe Street, a victim of Spanish influenza. Two brothers and three sisters survive. Burial Monday afternoon at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The entire Thrasher family is suffering with the prevalent disease, the mother and father being in a critical condition.

Ohmer Guy REISH, 31, died Sunday at Camp Taylor, Ky., a victim of Spanish influenza, accoring to word received here Monday. Reish was a former resident of Leiters Ford, where he was employed on the Erie railroad. Besides the widow, Mrs. Goldie L. REISH, several brothers and sisters survive.

Tuesday, October 29, 1918

George Washington DuBOIS, 71, ex-county auditor, dropped dead of heart failure while eating breakfast at his farm home south of Rochester early Tuesday morning. The death was a shock to the family, as Mr. DuBois had been apparently hale and hearty, having visited Rochester Monday, at which time he paid his taxes and visited with many friends in the city.
There survive seven children, Mrs. Andrew BABCOCK, Rochester; Mrs. L. M. SHUMAKER, Kewanna; M. L. DuBOIS, at home; F. H. DuBOIS, Pontiac, Mich.; Don L. DuBOIS, Kewanna; Dr. Dwight L. DuBOIS, Roann and Rex DuBOIS, at home; three brothers, Jonathan [DuBOIS] and Henry [DuBOIS], Green Oak, and Frank M. [DuBOIS], Rochester, and two sisters, Misses Katherine [DuBOIS] and Mary DuBOIS, Green Oak. A brother, Wilhelmus [DuBOIS], is dead.
George Washington DuBois was born in 1847 at Green Oak, on the old DuBOIS homestead, son of Mr. and Mrs. Methusalem DuBOIS. He lived with his parents until he reached young manhood when he moved to Roscoe, Mo., where for some time he conducted a general store.
Returning to Fulton county, he was united in marriage to Miss Amy HORTON in 1870. He later moved to Cass county where he at that time owned a farm and resided for about 10 years.
Moving back to Fulton county he resided on several farms, in later years purchasing the present home south of Rochester.
At two different times Mr. DuBois was a candidate for county treasurer on the democratic ticket. He was in 1906 elected on the same ticket to the office of county auditor, retiring from public life at the expiration of his term of office in 1911.
Mr. Dubois was a member of the Masonic lodge, a strong advocate of temperance and a life long member of the democratic party.
Funeral arrangements later.

The body of James Leroy SNYDER, who died at Camp Taylor, of influenza, was brought Tuesday morning to the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. SNYDER, near Mt. Zion. Short funeral service Wednesday morning at the home, about eight o'clock, Rev. H. G. GAIGE in charge, after which burial will be made at Deer Creek, south of Logansport.

Wednesday, October 30, 1918

Funeral services for George DuBOIS at the home, three and a half miles north of Rochester, Thursday afternoon at 2:00 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Word has been received by friends here of the death of Leonard PHILLIPS, of Chicago, son of late John C. PHILLIPS, of this city. Mr. Phillips had been ill for some time with anemia. He was about 40 years of age and was in the plumbing business. The funeral was held at his home.

Thursday, October 31, 1918

Word was received here late Wednesday of the death in Cleveland, Ohio, of Pvt. Carl MOORE, 26, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Anderson MOORE of Rochester, who both died about two years ago. Moore enlisted in Goshen some time ago. Relatives here include three uncles, Frank [FLYNN], Lee [FLYNN] and Wilson FLYNN. Particulars of the death are not known to them, but the body will be brought here for burial alonside the parents, in the Citizens cemetery.

Isaiah SWIHART, 71, died Thursday morning at two o'clock at his home in Athens, after an illness of a few weeks. Death was caused by old age and complications. Mr. Swihart had been bedfast for only a short time but had been in ill health for the past few months.
There survive 10 children, Misses Mable [SWIHART] and Blanche [SWIHART] and John SWIHART at home, Jerome SWIHART, of Rochester, and Mrs. Myrtle BOWMAN, Mrs. Maude SAGERS, Mrs. Edell BARKMAN, Mrs. Susan BRYANT, Mrs. Rose BOWMAN and Rex SWIHART, all of Elkhart. A brother, Annanias [SWIHART], of Beaver Dam, and two sisters, Mrs. Susan THOMPSON, of Akron, and Mrs. Catherine DAVIS, Ohio, are living. Mr. Swihart was a widower, his wife having died three years ago. He was a member of the Dunkard church and had made his home in Athens for the past 18 years.
Funeral at the home in Athens Saturday at 10:00 a.m., Rev. HOFFMAN, of Twelve Mile, in charge. Burial at Athens cemetery.

The remains of Jas. WATSON, of Chicago, were brought here Thursday for interment. Deceased was a brother-in-law of Mrs. Geo. MOTT. Walter MOTT, of Van Buren, and Mrs. G. E. BASKE and son, of Plymouth, were among those from a distance to attend the funeral.
- - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Mary Anita [ENYART], thirteen months old daughter of Mrs. Verne ENYART, died at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William BOOKWALTER, Friday evening of whooping cough. Besides the mother, she leaves four brothers, Leroy [ENYART], Russell [ENYART], William [ENYART] and Howard [ENYART]. Her father, Orange P. ENYART, died four months ago in Michigan, after which Mrs. Enyart and five children came to make their home here. The funeral was private and was held at the home Sunday morning at 10:30 o'clock. Rev. Thomas DAVIS of the M.E. church had charge of the services. The burial was in Plainview cemetery, west of town. Mr. and Mrs. Merton BOOKWALTER, of Peru, atttended the funeral. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Henry Joy [HITTLE], son of Mr. and Mrs. William HITTLE, was born in Green Tp., Marshall Co., Ind., Sept 3, 1896 and died Oct 20, 1918, aged 22 years, one month and 17 days.
Joy attended the Santa Anna school until his graduation in 1914. His schooling was piece-meal, because he was an asthma sufferer since a child and health never permitted him to go to school as other children. He was ambitious and so much desired to finish common school that he studied whenever possible to keep pace with his classmates, finally graduating with class honors.
In Dec 1916, he united with the Jordan Baptist church and remained a true Christian till he was called.
Sunday Oct. 13, he became afflicted with influenza and after a weeks intense suffering his

frail form succumbed to the disease. Four brothers and four sisters preceded him in death. He leaves to mourn, his heartbroken parents, three brothers: Ernest [HITTLE] in service in France; Lawrence [HITTLE], in training at Camp Sheridan, too ill to attend the funeral, and Ralph [HITTLE], at home; two sisters, Iva [HITTLE] at home and Mrs. Gladys PERSONETTE, besides numerous other relatives and friends.
On account of the prevailing epidemic and illness of othr members of the family, the funeral was held Monday afternoon at the Jordan cemetery. The service was conducted by Rev. A. L. VERMILLION. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

The body of Fred HARTZ was brot here Saturday from Fort Benjamin Harrison for burial, which took place Sunday afternoon. The funeral was held at the house. Rev. J. HARRIS was in charge of services and burial was at Leiters Ford.
Fred was one of a family of twelve children, of Mrs. Elias HARTZ. His father and one brother preceded him in death. Aside from the brother, Benjamin [HARTZ], who is with the American forces in France, all the children attended the funeral. Fred entered the service early in Sept., first at Camp Taylor and then at the camp where he died of pneumonia. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph SHONK attended the funeral of the little son of Mr. and Mrs. James WILSON, near Star City, Monday. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Mrs. Geo. WRIGHT returned from Detroit, Mich., Sunday evening where she attended the funeral of her brother-in-law. When she returned she found all three of her children sick with Spanish influenza. Mr. Wright works at the bridge factory at Rochester. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.
Friday, November 1, 1918

Oliver RUSSLER, 66, died Friday at 1:30 p.m. at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Salone MINTER on Madison St., after an illness covering a period of seven months. Death was caused by a cancer of the stomach.
A brother, John [RUSSLER], and a sister, Malinda RUSSLER, both of Shafersville, Pa., survive. The wife and their only son are dead.
Mr. Russler had been a resident of this county for the past 15 years, and lately has been employed by John HILL at his blacksmith shop. Funeral arrangements later.

Frank FLYNN says that rumors circulated in Rochester to the effect that Carl MOORE, who died recently in Oklahoma, had deserted, are absolutely false. Moore enlisted in Goshen, June 5, 1916, and has been serving his country since that time.

Saturday, November 2, 1918

John D. BITTERS, 84, died Friday at 9:00 p.m. at the Odd Fellows home at Greensburg, where he had made his home for the past 18 months, according to word received by his brother, A. T. BITTERS, of this city, Saturday morning. Death was caused by old age and complications.
Mr. Bitters was a resident of this county for more than 50 years, moving here from his former home in Pennsylvania in 1859 with his parents, John D. and Sarah BITTERS. Mr. Bitters was married twice, both wives and four children preceding him. Three sons, Charles [BITTERS], of

Milwaukee, Wis., Edwin [BITTERS] of Richmond and Milo [BITTERS], of California, survive.
The body will be brot to this city for burial. Funeral arrangements later.

William BURNS, aged about 60, a rural mail carrier, died suddenly at his home in Akron Saturday morning, while at work underneath his automobile. Hemorrhages followed a severe stroke, it is thot. He was a son of the late George BURNS and leaves a widow, son and daughter, both married, and one brother, Albert BURNS, also of Akron.

Word has been received here of the death Friday morning at her home in Harvey, Ill., of Mrs. Perry BABB, well known in this city where she had often visited her cousin, Mrs. Glen ROUCH. The body was taken to Marion for burial.

Floyd SHAFFER, aged about 30, died Friday night at his home on South Elm St., a victim of Spanish influenze. The widow, Mrs. Alice SHAFFER, and three children, who survive, are seriously ill with the same disease.

Monday, November 4, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde WILSON motored Monday to Burr Oak to attend the funeral of a his nephew, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob WILSON, who died Friday at the home of his parents, in South Bend, a victim of Spanish influenza.

The funeral services for Guy REISH, who died at Camp Taylor, were held Friday at one o'clock at his home in Leiters Ford. Burial at Leiters Ford cemetery.

Fred BIGGS, a former resident of this city, died at his home in Holcomb, Wis., according to word received by his cousin, Joe EWING. No details were contained in the message.

Tuesday, November 5, 1918

The funeral services for Floyd SHAFFER, who died of influenza, were held from the residence Monday afternoon. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

There were quite a number attended the funeral Wednesday of the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ike BURNS, west of Grass Creek, who was killed by a piece of coal falling while he was at his post at sea. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Grass Creek Cemetery, Wayne Twp.: Ernest V. BURNS, son of Isaac R. & Rhoda A. BURNS, born, Dec 19, 1897, killed as Fireman on U.S. Battleship Delaware, Oct 16, 1918, ae 20y-9m-27d]

D. A. WALLER left this morning for Farmer City, Ill., to attend the funeral of his sister, Mrs. Martha MORLEY.

Wednesday, November 6, 1918

Martin L. BURNS, 70, died at noon Wednesday at his home, 542 East Eighth St., after suffering for the past two years with cancer. He was born in Fulton county in 1848 and has lived in this and Kosciusko counties almost all his life.
In 1874 he was united in marriage to Ellen A. YOUNG and to this union were born three children, Earl E. [BURNS], of Hammond, Mrs. Geo. SMITH, who died more than a year ago and another child who died in infancy. Mrs. Burns died about five years ago.
For several years Mr. Burns was janitor at the north school building in this city. After the death of his wife he lived in Hammond for three years and then returned to this city in Oct., 1917.
Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

Thursday, November 7, 1918

Clarence POWERS, 38, son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac POWERS, of near Argos, died at his home in Argos early Wednesday morning. Death was caused by pneumonia, following influenza. He had been sick for about six weeks. Besides a wife he leaves two small children. He was a son-in-law of Harry CLYMER, of near Talma.
No funeral arrangements have been made.

Mrs. Caroline BEERY, 88, widow of the late Henry BEERY, and for more than 50 years a resident of Fulton county, died Thursday at 4:00 a.m. at the home of her son, Corwin Beery, four miles west of Rochester, after an illness of two years duration. Death was caused by dropsy.
There survive five children: Charles [BEERY], Stillwater, Okla.; Mrs. Ella BERRIER, Burton neighborhood; Frank [BEERY], Leiters Ford; Corwin [BEERY], west of Rochester and Mrs. Loretta NEFF, near Kewanna and six sisters, Mrs. Chas. JACKSON, Rochester; Mrs. Chas. A. BATES, New York; Mrs. Samuel KEELEY, Rochester; Mrs. Andrew DAVIDSON, Sioux City, Ia.; Mrs. Cordelia NAFE, Muskegon, Mich., and Mrs. Cyrentia NAFE, Peru.
Funeral arrangements later.

Nelson RADER, 65, of near Akron, died suddenly Wednesday evening of heart trouble. He was a nephew of Captain RADER, formerly of this city. Besides a wife, he leaves several children.
Funeral services for the late Martin BURNS, 10:00 a.m. Friday, at the home of George SMITH, South Elm Street, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge.

Isaiah [SWIHART], son of Joshua and Katherine SWIHART, was born in Wabash county, Ind., 1847; died at his home in Athens, Ind., Oct 31, 1918, aged 71 yrs., eight months and 19 days. On Sept 12, 1873 he was united in marriage to Mary Elizabeth MOORE, who preceded him in death in 1915. To this union were born 10 children, three sons and seven daughter, all of whom survive him. He also leaves one brother, Annanias [SWIHART], of Akron, and two sisters, Mrs. Susan THOMPSON, of Akron, and Mrs. Katherine DAVIDSON, of Nova, Ohio, and seventeen grandchildren.
Early in life he united with the Brethren church in which faith he remained until death. His last illness was fraught with much pain but he bore it patiently and expressed his willingness to go. He was a kind husband, a loving father and a helpful neighbor. He leaves a host of relatives and

friends.
Funeral services were held at the home on Saturday, conducted by Rev. D. A. HOPKINS, of Twelve Mile, and interment was made in the Mt. Hope cemetery.

Friday, November 8, 1918

Charles BURGENER, 56, a farmer living near Converse, died Friday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the hospital from injuries sustained when the car in which he and his son, Guy [BURGENER], were driving thru to LaPorte to visit another son ill in a hospital there, was struck by a west bound Erie express train at the Main St. crossing at 5:45 a.m. Friday. The train does not stop here.
The son, late Friday afternoon, was still in a critical condition, but the exact chance he stood for recovery could not be definitely stated.
Another son, H. O. BURGENER, of Marion, arrived in this city Friday morning. The dead man also leaves a widow, Mrs. Lucinda BURGENER.
Young Burgener's injury consisted of two severe fractures of the skull and had flesh lacerations while the other occupant of the ill fated car suffered a broken leg, broken arm, crushed elbow and was badly cut and bruised. The car in which the men were traveling is a complete wreck.
The victims were not found until six o'clock, when Robert QUINN, Erie night man, discovered that there had ben an accident and summoned aid to get the victims to the hospital.
Miss Bertha PRILL, of the R. P. TRUE restaurant, stated that shortly after five o'clock two men, one young and the other evidently the father, came into the restaurant and inquired the road to Plymouth. They told Miss Prill that they were from Grant county. (Converse is almost on the Miami-Grant county line) and were enroute to LaPorte, where they had a brother and son in the hospital.
The men were taken to the hospital in the Arlington bus, and given surgical and medical attention. At an early hour Friday, it was stated that neither had much chance for recovery, as the exposure and shock, coupled with the nature of their injuries, made their cases very critical. Young Burgner's skull was so badly crushed that it was necessary to remove a piece nearly two inches square.

Word was received here today of the death in October of Miss Mary A. EAMEN, of Detroit, Mich. She was 79 years old. Several years ago after the death of her brother, who was well known here, she presented the Presbyterian church in this city with a pipe organ in fulfillment of a wish she had often heard him express.

Saturday, November 9, 1918

Raymond ADAMSON, 33, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. ADAMSON, of this city, and a former resident of Rochester, died Friday afternoon at his home in Madison, Wis., a victim of pneumonia, contracted from Spanish influenza. The widow, Mrs. Effa KING ADAMSON, is also ill.
Besides those named, there survive two children, Alice Belle [ADAMSON] and Raymond King [ADAMSON], a sister, Mrs. Emerson FELDER, of Fulton, and five brothers, Roy [ADAMSON], a twin, of Mentone, Earl [ADAMSON], of South Bend, Clarence [ADAMSON], of Havre, Mont., Arthur [ADAMSON], with the Amex Forces in France, and Edgar [ADAMSON], of Great Lakes.

The funeral details have not yet been received, but it is thot that the body will be brot to this city for burial.

Relatives received word of the death at his home in Towner, N.D., Friday evening of Peter HANSON, son-in-law of C. C. CASTLEMAN, who lives west of the city. Death was caused by pneumonia following influenza. Mr. Hanson is a nephew of Isaac ONSTOTT and Mrs. John HOLMAN and visited here this summer. He leaves a wife, Mrs. Bertha HANSON. Mrs. Chas. SEE, of Leiters Ford, and Verna CASTLEMAN left Saturday for Towner.

Mr. and Mrs. Joel TOWNSEND went Saturday to Logansport to attend the funeral of his granddaughter, Miss Hulda MILLER, of that city, who died Friday in a Cleveland hospital where she was nursing. Death was caused bby pneumonia, contracted from Spanish influenza. Miss Miller had often visited the Townsends here and was well known among the young people of the city.

Walter LOEHR, of Claypool, who has been working at the Hugo factory in Warsaw, was instantly killed Friday night by electricity, while apparently turning a switch on leaving the factory. Mr. Loehr was an excellent young man and a nephew of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. BEYER, of this city.

Mrs. Lucile FOLKER went today to Indianapolis where she will attend the funeral of her nephew.

Monday, November 11, 1918

Word was received here Monday of the death in Argos Sunday night of M. L. COREY, secretary of the National Hdw. Assn. and well known here. A combination of flu, pneumonia and Bright's disease proved fatal to him.

Miss Clara REED, 40, died Saturday at 10:00 a.mm at Oatman, Ariz., where for the past two years she made her home with her brother, Lee Reed, according to word received by her sister, Miss Metta Reed, of ths city. The cause of the death is unknown, the message merely stating the time. The first word of Miss Reed's serious illness was received on Friday.
Miss Clara Reed was born at Tiosa on August 26th, 1878, one of a family of six born to Mr. and Mrs. E. T. REED, of this place. There survive four brothers, Howard [REED] and Jake [REED] of the Whippoorwill neighborhood, George [REED], of Argos, and Lee [REED] of Oatman, Ariz., and a sister, Miss Metta REED, of this city. The parents and a sister, Mrs. Wesley HARTMAN, preceded her. Miss Reed with the exception of the past two years, spent her entire life at the home of her parents in Tiosa, where she was a member of the Lutheran church. The body will be brought here for burial. Funeral arrangements later.
Orlen E. BORDEN, 47, died Monday at 6:00 a.m. at the Woodlawn hospital where he had been taking treatment for peritonitis. Since the death some time since of his wife and only child, Mr. Borden had traveled about, but for the past two years he had made his home with his brother, Arthur BORDEN, of Tiosa. Four other brothers survive, Elmer E. [BORDEN], Rochester, Oliver [BORDEN], Athens, John [BORDEN], Mishawaka, Frank [BORDEN], Manhatten, Ill., and Edward [BORDEN], Howard county. Funeral Wednesday. Burial southeast of Peru.

George Paul MOONEY, three, infant son of Joseph and Elnora MOONEY, of Ft. Wayne, died Saturday at the home of his grandfather, George DOWNS, a victim of pneumonia. Funeral at the graveside Monday at 2:00 p.m. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Funeral services for Ray ADAMSON in Baptist church, Tuesday at 1:30 p.m., Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge, Rev. W. J. NIVEN assisting. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body was expected Monday afternoon and was to be taken to the home of W. E. JEWELL, South Monroe St. The widow, being ill, was unable to come.

Helen [FRY], 10, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur FRY, of Fulton, died Thursday at the home of her parents, a victim of Spanish influenza and typhoid fever. Mrs. Fry and a son are both seriously ill with little chance of recovery.

Tuesday, November 12, 1918

Those from out-of-town who attended the funeral of Ray ADAMSON were: Miss Anna O'BRIAN, of Peru, T. L. ADAMSON, of Middletown, Ind., Mr. and Mrs. Clarence ADAMSON, of Montana, Mr. and Mrs. Earl ADAMSON, of South Bend, Mr. and Mrs. Jack RICE, of Anderson and Mr. and Mrs. Conn BLUE, of Mentone.

The funeral services for Peter HANSON, who died in his home at Towser, N.D., of pneumonia, following influenza, were held Tuesday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock from the residence of Isaac ONSTOTT, Rev. HARRIS, of Leiters Ford, and the Masons having charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, November 13, 1918

Wm. THOMAS, 37, died Wednesday morning at the home of his brother, David THOMAS, on South Main Street. About six weeks ago Mr. Thomas broke his leg while hunting, and last Thursday, he took influenza which developed into pneumonia a few days ago, causing his death.
He was born in Fulton county, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. THOMAS. Besides the father, he leaves another brother, John [THOMAS], and two sisters, Mrs. Walter MEHRLEY, of Marmaduke, Ark., and Mrs. Norman WRIGHT, of Leesburg.
Funeral services at the home at 2:00 o'clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge.

Thursday, November 14, 1918

The body of Miss Clara REED, who died in Oatman, Arizona, arrived Thursday afternoon and was taken to the home of C. D. SHOBE on West Eighth St. Funeral services Friday morning at 10:30 o'clock, Rev. J. WEYGANDT, of the Lutheran church of Tiosa, having charge. Burial will be made in Reichter cemetery near Talma.
Mr. and Mrs. Joel STOCKBERGER and Mr. and Mrs. N. R. STONER attended the funeral of M. L. COREY, at Argos Wednesday.

Friday, November 15, 1918

Mrs. Henrietta HUDTWALKER, 82, died Thursday afternoon at her farm home south of Rochester, after a long illness. Death was caused by old age and complications.
There are no surviving blood relatives. Mrs. Hudtwalker lived alone on her little farm since the death of her husband 36 years ago. She was born near Hamburg, Germany, and had lived in this county for more than 50 years.
Funeral at the home Saturday at two o'clock, Rev. G. C. CHANDLER, of Franklin, in charge. Burial at Citizen's cemetery.

The following persons from out-of-town attended the funeral of Miss Clara REED Friday morning: Mrs. Mike FULKER, Mrs. Ella EDSON, Mrs. Carrie SWINEHART and Mrs. Lavina SUDERS, of Mishawaka; Mrs. Hala COREY and daughter, Hattie [COREY], Mrs. Ella WELLS and Mr. and Mrs. Roy KANOUSE, of Argos; Mr. and Mrs. Ed KESSLER, daughter Artella [KESSLER], and son, Menian [KESSLER], of Mentone.

Saturday, November 16, 1918

Lee REED left today for Oatman, Arizona. He brot the body of his sister, Miss Clara REED, here for burial. [sic]

Monday, November 18, 1918

A message from the war department received Thursday told of the death of Sergeant John M. AGNEW, age twenty-six, son of Mrs. Elizabeth AGNEW of Winamac. Sergeant Agnew died of influenza while on board a transport to France. He was a nephew of Daniel AGNEW, of this city.

JESSE PETERSON, 19, PNEUMONIA VICTIM
Jesse PETERSON, 19, died at four o'clock Saturday afternoon at the hospital after a week's illness. Death was caused by pneumonia, contracted from Spanish influenza.
Jesse Peterson was born at Flora on July 23rd, 1899. He was educated in the public schools there, moving to Fulton county in 1914 with his parents. For the past year he made his home in Rochester, where he was employed at the Woodlawn hospital. He was Assistant Superintendent of the Baptist Sunday school and active in other church societies.
There survive the mother, Mrs. Carrie PETERSON, of this city, a sister, Mrs. Vernon HARTMAN, of Rochester, and two brothers, Raymond [PETERSON], of Rochester and Sgt. Everett R. [PETERSON], Camp Ethan Allan, Vermont. The father, William PETERSON, died just four months ago and a brother also preceded him.
Funeral at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon HARTMAN, corner 12th and Elm Sts., Tuesday at 8:00 a.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge.Burial at Flora.

J. M. TONER today received word of the death at Fresno, Calif., of Mrs. Roy DUNCAN. She had been ill for some time with influenza. The telegram stated that she had been buried there.
Mrs. Duncan was about 24 years old and leaves a sister, Mrs. Stella ZOLMAN of Ft. Wayne and Frank ZOLMAN, in France. Before her marriage, she lived with an uncle, Earl MOORE, near Loyal.

Tuesday, November 19, 1918

[no obits]

Wednesday, November 20, 1918

Edward COX, five, died late Monday afternoon at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer COX, on College Ave., a victim of blood poisoning contracted from an injury to his leg. Besides his parents, six brothers and sisters survive. Funeral at the house Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. George R. CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Clara A. REED passed into the spirit world Nov 9, 1918, at the age of 40 years, two months and 13 days. She leaves four brothers, George [REED], Howard [REED], Jacob [REED] and Lee [REED] and one sister, Metta [REED], besides a host of friends and relatives to mourn her loss. Clara was a faithful member of the Evangelical Lutheran church since 1892 and was a loving member of the family, having spent a number of years of her life caring for her mother during a long illness. The past two years of her life were spent in the far western state of Arizona, where she died.

Several from here attended the funeral of Mrs. Paul LIVESY at her home near Poplar Grove Thursday. Mrs. Livesy was formerly Miss Grace RIDDLE and lived in this vicinity. - - - JORDAN-GILEAD ITEMS.

Mrs. Paul LISBY died Thursday, Nov. 14, a victim of the flu. She leaves two small children besides her husband, who is also very ill with the flu. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

We are very sorry not to have chronicled the deaths of Mrs. Horace WILTSHIRE and Mrs. Stinson BOOKS, who died two weeks ago, both beng about 72 years of age, the former died of heart trouble. Mrs. Wiltshire's remains were interred in Athens cemetery and Mrs. Books was buring in Ebenezer cemetery.
Mrs. Lucia GREENER returned to her home in Chicago, after attending the funeral of her mother, Mrs. Wiltshire. She was accompanied by her daughter, Levon WILTSHIRE [sic], who will make her home with her. Mr. Wiltshire will hold a sale soon and will then go to Chicago to spend the winter.
Mrs. Elizabeth SAVAGE, aged 85, died at her farm home two miles east of Macy, Friday night of heart trouble. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Charlotte WOODRING of Peru, and Mrs. Rosa GRIMES, of Chili, and two sons, Noah [SAVAGE], who lives on the home place and James [SAVAGE], of Ft. Benton, Montana. The funeral was held Monday afternoon at 1:00 o'clock at the home, in charge of Rev. Thomas DAVIES of the M.E. church. Mrs. Davies sang three solos. The body was interred in the Gilead cemetery. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, November 21, 1918

[no obits]

Friday, November 22, 1918

Phillip LITTLE, 27, a former resident of this city, died Wednesday evening at Aurora, Ill., where he had moved recently from Dockson, Mont. Death was caused by influenza. The widow, Mrs. Clara LITTLE and three children, Glen [LITTLE], Lee [LITTLE] and Norm [LITTLE], who had been in Montana, were visiting relatives near Macy at the time of the death.
Three sisters of Mr. Little live in Fulton county, Mrs. Wellington SEVERNS, Mrs. O. A. KEEL and Mrs. D. M. SECOR, the first two near Rochester and the last, at Akron. John LITTLE, a brother, lives in Magee, Ark. Mr. Severns went to Aurora Friday.
Funeral arrangements are not yet known.

Saturday, November 23, 1918

Isaac BRYANT, 56, died Thursday evening at his home in South Bend after suffering for more than a year with cancer. He was formerly a resident of Fulton county.
Besides a wife, he leaves two daughters and two sons, one in France. Mrs. E. A. SMITH, Luther McVEY and Miss Nellie BRYANT, of this city, are nieces and Leroy BRYANT, a nephew, of the deceased. Funeral Sunday at the residence in South Bend and burial in that city.

Funeral of Phillip LITTLE Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock in the Nichols church northwest of Akron, Rev. S. C. NORRIS in charge. Burial in the Nichols cemetery.

Monday, November 25, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. BRYANT have returned from South Bend where they attended the funeral of Isaac BRYANT.

Tuesday, November 26, 1918

Mrs. George SHONTZ, of this city, received word Saturday that her nephew, Corp. Donald C. BRYAN, of Mishawaka, had died in France, as the result of wounds received in action on October 9th. Corp. Bryan was 23 years old and previously employed by the Gillette Motor Car Co. He was a member of the First Christian church of Mishawaka.

John W. BLACK, 24, died at 10:00 o'clock Monday evening at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George BLACK, over the postoffice, a victim of cerebro spinal meningitis, contracted from Spanish influenza. Besides the parents, a brother, Tom BLACK, in training at West Point, Ky., survives. The brother was summoned to Rochester, but did not arrive.
John Black was born in Rochester on June 16, 1894. He was graduated from the high school of this city, later taking employment at the Bridge factory and then at W. A. Howard's jewelry store, where he was in charge of the Victrola department. During the past six months he was employed in Indianapolis, joining the Red Cross in Chicago for ambulance driving three weeks ago. He was in training at Camp Scott, Chicago, when he was taken ill. He came home to Rochester just a week before his death. During his illness he was delirious much of the time.
He was a member of the Methodist church and of Rochester lodge No. 79, F. and A. M. He was well known and popular in Rochester, numbering his friends by the score. He had made numerous attempts to get into the service, but failed each time, because of physical shortcomings. He was rejected for an officer's training camp, for conscription and for Y. M. C. A. service, but finally was admitted to training as a Red Cross ambulance driver.
Red Cross authorities at Chicago have advised that John Black be buried in his Red Cross uniform and be given full military honors.
Funeral Thursday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. George CRAIG in charge.

Word was received here Monday of the death of Mrs. Ray C. NUDING at her home in Elwood, from complications following Spanish influenza. Mrs. Nuding had often been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. Ralph BROWNE, So. Main St., and was well known here. Her health had been bad for several years and it is believed that this may have hastened the end. Mr. Nuding is an Elwood hardware dealer.

Word was received here that Noble ROBBINS, a son-in-law of Wm. ALSPACH, had died. No particulars were learned. He had been in an aviation camp in California. He lived here with his parents a number of years ago. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Wednesday, November 27, 1918

Funeral services for John W. BLACK Thursday afternoon at three o'clock at the Methodist church, Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, November 28, 1918

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, November 29, 1918

George Henry (Dick) ELKINS, 55, a well known character of this city, was found dead in his chair over Sheward's feed store early Friday morning.
The body, which was discovered by Tom SHAFFER and O. L. OSBORNE, who also have rooms over Sheward's, was found sitting in a chair. He had evidently been dead for a number of hours as the body was cold and rigor mortis had set in. A cat was found lying on his lap.
Elkins had taken Thanksgiving dinner Thursday with his daughter, Mrs. A. D. MUTCHLER, whose house he had left at about four o'clock in the afternoon. His habit had been to stop in and visit Shaffer and Osborne before retiring for the night, but altho Shaffer and Osborne heard him enter his rooms late in the afternoon, he did not come back and visit them. This aroused their suspicions, especially as they heard nothing of him in the morning, with the result that they entered his room and found him dead.
Elkins had often told friends that he was injured internally from a fall sustained a year or two ago in a local livery barn. Besides the daughter, a half-sister, Mrs. Riley McINTIRE, of this city, and a half-brother, Frank COLLINS, of Tiosa, survive.
Funeral Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. MUTCHLER, east Rochester, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The Methodist church was well filled Thursday afternoon with those who attended funeral services for John W. BLACK. The body rested in state at the church from 1:30 to 2:00 p.m.

Saturday, November 30, 1918

The death of George Henry (Dick) ELKINS was caused by organic heart trouble, probably arterio sclerosis, according to Dr. A. E. STINSON, of Athens, county coroner.

Word has been received here of the death in Indianapolis Friday afternoon of Mrs. Thusnelda PEEMOLLER, aged about 75, formerly of Rochester, a step-daughter of the late Mrs. Henrietta HUDTWALKER and a sister-in-law of Mrs. Eliza HUDTWALKER, of this city. There survive a daughter, Mrs. Thusnelda BARRETT, of Indianapolis, and a son, John [PEEMOLLER], of St. Paul, Minn. Funeral Monday with burial probably here.

Monday, December 2, 1918

Funeral services for Mrs. Thusnelda PEEMOLLER were held Monday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Thusnelda BARRETT, 6500 Central Ave., Indianapolis. Burial at Crown Hill cemetery in that city.

Tuesday, December 3, 1918

Cancer of the abdomen proved fatal to Mrs. George CUNNINGHAM, 33, who died at 5:10 p.m. Monday in her home, 1120 Pontiac St., after an operation performed 15 weeks ago in an attempt to give her relief. The end was peaceful.
Elsie Matilda WAGONER was the daughter of John and Matilda WAGONER and was born Aug 17, 1884, in Fulton county, where she resided most of her life. About 15 years ago, she was married to George CUNNINGHAM, who survives, with five children, Claude [CUNNINGHAM], Ethel [CUNNINGHAM], Wilbur [CUNNINGHAM], Puges [CUNNINGHAM] and Avonelle [CUNNINGHAM], ranging in age from 13 to five.
There are also five brothers living: Edward [WAGONER], Wallace [WAGONER], Charles [WAGONER], Harry [WAGONER] and Del [WAGONER]. The father died about a year ago, but the mother resides on So. Main St.
Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the U.B. church, Rev. Geo. R. CRANE in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Perry Michael SHORE, 86, a pioneer citizen of Fulton county, and for 45 years one of Rochester's leading business men, died at his home, corner Fifth and Pontiac Streets, Tuesday morning at 8:45 o'clock. Mr. Shore has been ill for the past six months. Death was due to apoplexy and complications.
Perry M. Shore was born on December 7th, 1852, on the old Shore homestead, five miles north of Rochester. He was one of a family of five children born to Tolbert C. and Lydia Anne SHORE, deceased. His brothers, Kline W. [SHORE], of this city; A. L. [SHORE], of Los Angeles, Calif.; Tolbert C. [SHORE] of San Diego, Calif.; and a sister, Mrs. Elizabeth SIDELL, of Arcadia, Calif., all survive.
When a young man, Mr. Shore moved to Rochester where he started in business for himself, launching into his prosperous career with a peanut stand, which was later developed into the leading drug and general business of the city. With the exception of a short period, during which Mr. Shore was the proprietor of a drug store in Monticello, Mo., he was in business in this city all of his life, retiring from active work about 12 years ago.
In 1874 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. SMITH, of Bruce Lake, who survives. To this union were born three children, all now residents of this city: Earl [SHORE] and Arthur SHORE and Mrs. Artella WILSON.
Mr. Shore was a republican and active in politics. For three successive terms he sat in the chair of the town council and was once elected a member of the city council.
Funeral at the Presbyterian church Thursday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE in charge. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body may be viewed at the church Thursday between the hours of one and two o'clock.

Word was received here Tuesday noon of the death at 11:00 o'clock of Frank BUNN, 63, a farmer, who had lived near Richland Center all his life. He had been ill for more than a year with paralysis. Besides the widow, there survive five children, Mrs. Perry LOWMAN and Mrs. Clyde LOUGH, of Rochester, Mrs. Ralph BRESICK, of Preble and Bert [BUNN] and Ed BUNN.

A telegram was received here Monday from Garrett, Ind., saying David CARTER was killed by the bursting of pipes in the water works and electric plant plant there. He had been employed as head man in that plant for many years. He was a half-brother of Mrs. Sam WENGER and Mrs. Marsh HILL, of Rochester.

Wednesday, December 4, 1918

Mrs. Levi CREG was found dead in bed Saturday night by her husband. She had been ill for some time. She was the mother of eight children, all of whom are living. Two sons are in the service, on in France, and one in camp here. Burial will be made at Washington cemetery, Monday morning a 10:30. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Miss Ellen HUDTWALKER and Mrs. E. ALEXANDER have returned from Indianapolis, where they attended the funeral of Mrs. T. PEEMOLLER Monday.

Thursday, December 5, 1918

Altho the guns have been silent in France for almost a month and peace reigns the world over, many American homes are still waiting anxiously to hear from loved ones in France.
Such anxiety turned to deepest grief in a Rochester abode Wednesday night, when a message from Admiral General Harris, at Washington, brought word to Mrs. Gertrude MADARY that her son, Private Verle MADARY, 23, 60th C.A.C. Company, was killed in action in France, Oct. 14. The last word from Pvt Madary came in a letter written Oct. 4, at which time he was near the front lines. He is the second Fulton county boy to be killed in action.
Madary enlisted here early in March, of this year, joining the Coast Artillery, being sent first to Columbus, O., and then to Camp Stewart, Newport News, Va. He went overseas about the first of May and for some time was located near Bordeaux, assisting in dental work in a training camp. Later, he was placed in charge of an ambulance in the Medical Corps, C.A.C., and went up to the front lines in September. There are no particulars available regarding his death.
Verle Madary was born near Fulton and came to Rochester with his family about the time of the death of his father, 10 years ago. He attended the city schools, held a number of positions, including a reportorial job on the SENTINEL, and developed considerable vocal ability. He was very active in the Baptist church, of which he was a member. Besides his mother, there survive a sister, Miss Inez [MADARY], and a brother, Roy [MADARY], who is a SENTINEL, carrier. They reside on So. Main St.

Friday, December 6, 1918

The following persons from out of town attended the funeral of P. M. SHORE Thursday: Mr. and Mrs. Harry SMITH, of Goshen; Mr. and Mrs. Sam SMITH, Mr. and Mrs. Dan SMITH, Mr. and Mrs. Frank SMITH, Mr. and Mrs. Ben SMITH and Mr. and Mrs. Frank HUDKINS, all of Kewanna; George SMITH and Silas SMITH and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. SHINE, of Bruce Lake.
In an effort to verify and learn particulars of the death of Pvt. Clarance Verle MADARY in France, Ernest GREEN, his uncle, of near this city, has cabled Lieut. ENGLISH of the 60th C.A.C. Co., and other communications have been sent to officials who might be able to give information. It was learned Friday that Pvt. Madary had $10,000 war risk insurance, which in due course of time will come to his family here.
Rev. W. J. NIVEN, who wired Congressman BARNHART for information, Friday received a confirming telegram from the representative, in which he explained that the delay in the notification (Madary was killed Oct 14th) was due to confusion in names cabled from overseas.

Saturday, December 7, 1918

J. W. HUTCHINSON, of Chicago, a former resident of this city and brother of J. H. HUTCHINSON, of near Athens, was shot and killed on November 25 by a bandit who entered his place of business in Chicago and stole $149 in cash. Hutchinson, who had a cigar store at 171 W. Dearborn St., was shot three times thru the head. He died two hours afterwards. A widow survives. The body was taken to Belvidere, Wis., for burial.

Mrs. Sam AIKENS went today to LaPorte, where she will attend the funeral of a relative.

Monday, December 9, 1918

Mrs. Samantha MURPHY, 70, widow of the late John MURPHY, a life-long resident of this city, died early Monday morning at the home of her son Attorney E. E. MURPHY. Death was caused by hardening of the arteries.
Mrs. Murphy, who had been in ill health for the past year, was only confined to her bed about two weeks.
Besides the son, a brother, William TRUE, and three grandchildren, Edward CAPP and Robert [MURPHY] and Hugh MURPHY, all of this city, survive. Two brothers and a sister preceded her.
Mrs. Murphy was a member of the Manitou chapter D.A.R., the W. R. C., Ben Hur lodge and the Spiritualist church.
Funeral services held at home on South Madison Street, Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, December 10, 1918

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 11, 1918

Information of the death of Mrs. St.Clair WILDERMUTH, who resided about 10 miles southwest of the city, reached here Wednesday. The aged woman passed away Tuesday morning, leaving a husband and several children. Funeral at the home, 1:00 p.m., Thursday, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial in Salem cemetery.
Altho Mrs. Wildermuth, who was about 68 years old, had been ill with heart trouble for a year, she grew better this fall until Thanksgiving evenng, when she became severely sick and gradually sank to the end, which came at 8:00 a.m., Tuesday.
Sarah ZABST, was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George ZABST, of Liberty township, both deceased, and lived in the neighborhood where she died, all her life. She was long a member of the Evangelical church.
She married St.Clair WILDERMUTH 51 years ago, the surviving children being Mrs. Morton ENYART, of Fulton and Mrs. W. V. LANE and Floyd WILDERMUTH, who live near their parents. There also ar four sisters: Mrs. Mary SMITH, of Peru, and the Misses Emaline [ZABST] and Leah ZABST and Mrs. William WILDERMUTH, of Rochester, and one brother, John ZABST, of Peru.

Thursday, December 12, 1918

Fred McKINNEY, 37, died early Thursday afternoon at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John McKINNEY, west of Rochester, a victim of influenza. He had been ill only since last Friday. His father and sister, Miss Mable [McKINNEY], were also ill for a short time, but have recovered.
Besides the parents, there survive three sistrs, Miss Mable, at home and Mrs. Gresham BEARSS and Mrs. John WERNER, both west of Rochester, and two brothers, James [McKINNEY], at home, and John [McKINNEY], Jr., west of the city. Funeral arrangements later.

Miss Madaline WORTHINGTON, 14, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Artice WORTHINGTON, of Akron, died Thursday morning after a short illness caused by influenza. Funeral Sunday morning at the home.

Mrs. L. A. CAULK received a message Sunday from her son, Harry CAULK and wife, who live at Fresno, Calif., stating that their eight month old baby, Helen Lucille [CAULK], had died Saturday evening after only two days illness. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Friday, December 13, 1918

Omar D. HAGAN, 31, died at 2:30 p.m. Friday a victim of pneumonia, contracted from Spanish influenza, from which he suffered for the past two weeks.
As a last resort, three pints of blood were taken from him Thursday and a salt water injection given as a stimulant.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Lola HAGAN; a son, Gerald [HAGAN], five; the partnes, Mr.

and Mrs. John HAGAN, south of Rochester; four brothers, Charles [HAGAN], of Canada; Ed [HAGAN], west of the city; Otis [HAGAN], of Rochester, and Lloyd [HAGAN], who is in the Navy; and four sisters, Miss Pearl HAGAN, of Detroit; Mrs. Effie KLINE, southwest of the city; Mrs. Mollie SAUCERMAN, south of the city and Miss Ruth [HAGAN], at home.
Omar D. Hagan was born in Fulton county on the old Hagan homestead, southwest of Rochester, October 9th, 1887. He attended a district school and then later the Rochester Normal University. He finished his education at the Marion Business College, returning to Rochester where he was employed by the First National Bank for the past eight years. In 1912 he was married to Miss Lola EBER. He was a member of Rochester lodge No. 47, I.O.O.F. and was an active worker in the Evangelical church.
Mrs. Hagan, who has also been ill with the same disease, is somewhat improved, altho not yet entirely out of danger.

Funeral services for Fred McKINNEY at the home of his father, John McKINNEY, Sr., southwest of the city Saturday at 11:00 a.m., Rev. H. G. GAIGE in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery. McKinney contracted the disease at the stock show in Chicago, from which he returned last Thursday night but did not get a doctor until Sunday, when his condition was serious. The other members of the McKinney family are improving.
Saturday, December 14, 1918

Funeral services for Omar HAGAN, who died Thursday afternoon, a victim of influenza, will be held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the home on west 10th Street, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. An open air service will be held. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Friends may call at the home between the hours of 10 and one.

Monday, December 16, 1918

Mrs. Walter STICKLES, recently of Elkhart, but formerly of Rochester, died at Los Angeles, Calif. The husband, two daughters and one son survive. Mr. Stickles was for years a well known Rochester printer and his wife was active in local church and lodge work.

Fred Stewart McKINNEY, eldest son of John and Mary McKINNEY, was born near Piper City, Ill., October 25, 1881. He died of influenza, December 12, 1918, age 37 years, one month, 18 days - - - - -
It is easy to think of Fred as the same, his character needed so little to fit it for the better world. He was always forgetting self, in iterest of others. His loving devotion to the family never interfered with the loyalty to his friends or the interest with the welfare of the community. His sympathies were broad in this world. He glorified friendship, making it not only for time but for eternity. The memories of his friendship will never die. His cheerful patience and careful consideration of those about him for the family made the closing days of his life a benediction to them all. But we will still think of him as the same. - - - - -
He was a member of the First Presbyterian church, of Rochester. He leaves to mourn his loss the father, mother, two brothers, James [McKINNEY] at home and John W. [McKINNEY], near Rochester, and three sisters, Mabel [McKINNEY], at home, Bessie WERNER and Anna BEARSS.

Tuesday, December 17, 1918

Charles E. "Doc" HIATT, 40, died Monday evening at his home in Leiters Ford, a victim of ponia, contracted from influenza. The widow, Mrs. Pearl HIATT, a brother, W. A. HIATT, of near Leiters Ford and a sister, Miss Estella HIATT, of Leiters Ford survive. Burial at Darlington, Ind.
Hiatt attended Rochester college here, where he was well known. For a number of years he had managed the Overmyer general store in Leiters.

Reuben WHITTENBERGER, 33, son of Miller WHITTENBERGER of Akron, a former resident of Rochester, died Monday evening at his home in South Bend, a victim of influenza. Besides the father, the widow, Mrs. Rose TRUE WHITTENBERGER; three children, Mabel [WHITTENBERGER], Retha [WHITTENBERGER] and Walter [WHITTENBERBER] and two sisters and a brother survive. Burial at Omega, near Akron, Wednesday.

Mr. and Mrs. William KEIM and son attended the funeral of Mrs. Ellen YAKLEY of Logansport Thursday. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

M. F. JENKINS and wife attended the funeral of Mr. Jenkins' sister at Star City Thursday. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

George NICKLES and wife attended the funeral of Mrs. Martin WHYBREW of Fulton Friday. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

J. C. ASHLEY and wife and Mr. and Mrs. Lee ASHLEY attended the funeral of Mrs. Mary PHUNSON of Royal Center Friday. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Wednesday, December 18, 1918

Mrs. Mollie GELBAUGH, 66, widow of the late Levi GELBAUGH, died Tuesday evening at her home north of Rochester after a seven weeks' illness. Death was caused by complications following paralysis.
There survive two sons, Frank [GELBAUGH] and Leslie [GELBAUGH], both at home, four grandchildren and a sister and two brothers in Ohio. A son, Roy [GELBAUGH], preceded her.
Mary E. BOGAN was one of the 11 children of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel BOGAN, of Crawford county, Ohio, and moved to near Kewanna in 1870, shortly after marrying Levi GELBAUGH. In October, 1894, the family moved on the farm they have since occupied, just north of the Glaze hill. The husband died September 10, 1917.
Funeral at the Sand Hill church, Thursday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. Harley DAVIS in charge. Burial at Richland Center cemetery.

Mrs. Frank DAVIDSON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe ANDERSON, northeast of Rochester, died Tuesday morning at her home in Chicago, of heart trouble, according to word received by Rochester relatives. Besides the husband and arents, a daughter, Marjorie [DAVIDSON], two brothers and two sisters. The body will be brot to this city Thursday for burial.

The funeral of Martin KELLER, of Monterey, was held Tuesday at the home. Mr. Keller took sick several weeks ago and while very ill, the news was received that his son had been killed in action in France. Despite his constant demands for information concerning the boy, the death report was held until it was thot that he was out of danger. When told the sorrowful news, the father immediately became worse and died the next day.

How Private Verle MADARY met death from a piece of a high explosive shell, while at his post of duty, is described in a letter written Oct 20 and received Tuesday by his mother, Mrs. Gertrude MADARY, from Major Edward M. COLIS, Medical Corps, 60th Artillery C.A.C. The dead Fulton county boy's officer speaks highly of him. The letter follows:
"My Dear Mrs. Madary:
"By the time that this note of appreciation arrives at your home, you will have had notice thru official channels that you have at once lost and won a boy. I put it this way because as surgeon in this regiment, I am in contact with the men who made up the regiment and particularly with the medical department men, of whom Verle was one.
"He was, as his mother should know, a real man, young in years, of which all of the men who have spoken to me have remarked. He made himself felt, that is what I meant by winning men of that type are not permanently lost. That thought would be unsupportable. The sense of loss to all too recent for any word of mine, however appreciative, to mitigate it. But please feel that you have given and given fully and freely that those things which we at home held most dear and sacred may be preserved.
"He was killed by a scrap of a high explosive shell which entred the house where he was working. He was at his post of duty at the moment. He was, you know, assistant to one of our dentists. His grave lies under my window in a small flower garden and there are with him ten others one of whom was struck down in the same way. The other day I saw one of the boys gathering a bunch of such flowers as still bloom. He reverently placed them upon the mound which covers not Verle, but that which was Verle's body.
"If you are as certain as I am, that there is nothing wasted in this world and I believe it in spite of what I have to see here, then feel very proud that you have given so largely for that which we cannot clearly see, but which our faith tells us is surely there."

Funeral services for Charles HIATT were held at 2:30 Wednesday afternoon in the yard of the home at Leiters Ford. The body was to be taken to Darlington, Ind., for burial.

Thursday, December 19, 1918

The body of Mrs. Frank DAVIDSON, Jr., who died in Chicago, arrived in this city Thursday afternoon. Funeral arrangemnts later.

Theodore DAVIDSON, of Ohio, is in this city on account of the death of Mrs. Frank DAVIDSON, Jr.

Silas CLEMANS, 60, died Monday morning of heart disease, following influenza. For several years he had suffered from paralysis. He was at his home, two miles southeast of Macy, and had gone out to feed some pigs, but failed to return. His son went in search of him and found him unconscious but before the physician arrived he had died.
Besides the widow, he leaves a son, Marvin [CLEMANS], a step-daughter, Miss Helen MILLER, two sisters and two brothers, Mrs. E. A. HENDRICKS, of Deedsville, Mrs. M. J.

WHITMORE, of Pulaski, New York, John [CLEMANS] and Thomas CLEMANS, near Macy.
Funeral services were held from the home Thursday morning, Rev. Thomas DAVIS in charge. Burial in Plainview cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Silas CLEMANS, Feb 18, 1856 - Dec 16, 1918; Eva CLEMANS, May 29, 1864 - June 15, 1903; Mary CLEMANS, Dec 9, 1877 - Oct 13, 1919]

Friday, December 20, 1918

Mrs. Malissa HOFFMAN, 56, died Friday morning at the home on South Elm Street, after a short illness caused by pneumonia, which followed an attack of influenza.
Mrs. Hoffman was born near Loyal, Ind., and on March 13, 1883, married Phillip HOFFMAN. They were the parents of three children, two of whom survive, Mrs. Charles E. BRAMAN, and Mrs. Ray B. FRETZ of this city.
After the death of Phillip HOFFMAN, on June 22, 1892, she married Harvey HOFFMAN on March 1st, 1893. They moved to Rochester in 1900.
She leaves one sister and two brothers, Mrs. John WALTER, of this city, George HARVEY, of Elbing, Kans., and Frank HARVEY of near Rochester. She was a member of the Christian church.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2:30 at the home, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge.

Funeral services for Mrs. Frank DAVIDSON, Jr., who died in Chicago, Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe ANDERSON, northeast of this city. Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, December 21, 1918

Fort Wayne, Dec. 21 -- The body of Dr. George GROGG, of Roann, Ind., who escaped from a sanitarium here, was found dangling from the end of a rope in a sheep shed on the farm of John REBBER, near here Friday. Dr. Grogg, a veterinary surgeon, suffered from the delusion that government officials were after him and this is believed to have led him to taking his life.

According to relatives, the SENTINEL erred Friday in stating that Mrs. Malissa HOFFMAN's death was caused by pneumonia which followed an attack of influenza. They assert that she die not have influenza.

Monday, December 23, 1918

J. D. BONINE, Sunday received a letter from Miss Ruth P. MANAHAN, of Angola, stating that her brother, L. D. PARISH, a former employe of the Arlington hotel, who enlisted in July 1917 as a stretcher bearer, had been killed in France. Parish, who was about 23 years of age, is survived by a foster-mother, two sisters and two brothers. He was recently listed in the government casualty list as missing in action. Parish was employed in this city for more than five years.

Mrs. Flora Belle SINGLETON, 25, died at noon Sunday at her home on Cottage Avenue a victim of pneumonia contracted from influenza. She was ill only 10 days.
Besides the husband, Roland SINGLETON, there survive the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. CLINGER, of this city, three children, William [SINGLETON], Frederick [SINGLETON] and Benjamin [SINGLETON], two sisters, Mrs. George METZGER, of Aurora, Ill., and Mrs. Clarence O'BRINER of Logansport, and two brothers, Clyde CLINGER, of Texas and Charles D. CLINGER, of Rochester.
Funeral Tuesday at 2:00, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, December 24, 1918

Dr. Joseph S. GENTILE, of Chcago, who was fatally shot by a patient, whom he was called to attend, was a brother of Mrs. Ralph R. BONFIGLIO of Elkhart, a former resident of Rochester. The Bonfiglios formerly conducted a candy store in the room occupied by Elmer BORDEN.

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. MURRAY, of Kewanna, who have been spending a few days here, went today to Huntington to attend the funeral of a relative.

Wednesday, December 25, 1918

[no paper - holiday]

Thursday, December 26, 1918 to Friday, December 27, 1918

[no obits]

Saturday, December 28, 1918

Mrs. Walter PORTER, 28, of Frankfort, died Christmas day at El Paso, Texas. She was formerly Miss Vera KREIG, of this city. Mrs. Porter had gone to Texas on account of her very poor health but influenza was the direct cause of her death. She leaves a husband, two children and a brother, Charles KREIG, of Frankfort. Funeral services Sunday at Logansport.

Monday, December 30, 1918

The community was shocked Sunday and Monday by death reports -- five in all -- coming in rapid succession.
John B. McMAHAN passed away at 5:30 Sunday morning, after a long illness, and half an hour later, just two block away, Maier LEVI dropped dead. Complications following influenza proved fatal to Manson YIKE and Mrs. O. M. MILLER Sunday and heart trouble resulted in the death of Mrs. Claude BOWMAN, on the same day.

John B. McMAHAN, 73, for more than 70 years a resident of Fulton county, died at 5:30 o'clock Monday morning at his home on South Main St., a victim of heart trouble and complications, from which he had been suffering for the past year. Altho he had been very ill at times recently, he was able to be up for an hour Sunday.
John B. McMahan was born at Columbus, Ind., on October 4th, 1845, one of a family of 10 children born to Mrs. and Mrs. William McMAHAN, four of whom, Mrs. Frank MOORE, of Rochester; Miss Clara McMAHAN, south of the city; Mrs. Louise MYERS, of Leiters, and William W. McMAHAN, of Hammond, survive. Three sisters and two brothers preceded him.
When two years of age, he moved with his family to Fulton county residing from that time until 12 years ago on a farm south of Rochester. Upon retiring, he moved to Rochester where he lived until the time of his demise.
On December 8th, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca GOSS, who survives. To this union there were born 12 children, 10 of whom survive: Mrs. John SCHAAF, north of Rochester; Mrs. Mel HAY, Postmaster Otto McMAHAN, Hugh [McMAHAN], Tom [McMAHAN], John [McMAHAN], James [McMAHAN] and Miss Jesse [McMAHAN], all of Rochester, and Pat [McMAHAN] and Bill [McMAHAN], southwest of the city. Two daughters, Mrs. Dal BLACK and Mrs. Omar SMITH, are dead.
While not a member, Mr. McMahan's religious tendencies were towards the Methodist church. He was a charter member of the Ben Hur and Maccabee lodges.
Funeral at the house Tuesday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Interment in mausoleum.

Maier LEVI, 67, for more than 40 years a resident of this city, where he engaged in the drygoods business, dropped dead Monday morning at 6:30 o'clock at his house on South Pontiac St., while preparing to go to his store. Death was caused by apoplexy.
Mr. Levi, as was his custom, arose early and after dressing went downstairs. He was evidently headed for the kitchen, passing thru the dining room of his home where he dropped. Mrs. Levi hurried downstairs when she heard him fall, but death had been instantaneous.
Maier Levi was born in Furt, Germany, a son of Albert and Havetta LEVI, on January 17, 1851. In 1869 he came to the United States, spending some time in New York and Cincinnati. For a number of years previous to moving to Rochester, he was employed in Plymouth.
Moving to Rochester, he engaged in the drygoods business with Ben [HEILBRUN] and Levi HEILBRUN, continuing the store when his partners dropped out. In 1870, he was united in marriage to Miss Bertha HEILBRUN, of this city, who survives. To this union were born the two surviving children, Mrs. Clyde ENTSMINGER of this city, and Miss Florence LEVI, of Washington, D. C. Another child died in infancy. A brother, Joseph [LEVI], of Rochester, also survives.
Mr. Levi was a member of the Masonic, Maccabee, K. of P. and Eastern Star lodges.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. O. M. MILLER, 40, died at 2:30 a.m. Sunday at the farm home southeast of Rochester, a victim of complications, folling an attack of influenza. She was ill only a week.
There survive the husband, O. M. MILLER, an instructor in the Chicago university and Hyde Park, (Ill.) high school, four children, Allen [MILLER], Alida [MILLER], Robert [MILLER] and Donald [MILLER], a stepmother, Mrs. Mary POCOCK and sister, Miss Retta POCOCK, of Oklahoma City, Okla., and two half-brothers, Charles [POCOCK] and Frank POCOCK, of

Shaney, Kansas. A daughter, Mabel [MILLER], is dead.
Funeral at the home Tuesday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Grace Ellen POCOCK, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. E. A. POCOCK, deceased, was born in Argos, March 12, 1878. She was a graduate of the Valparaiso high school and attended the Rochester university and Indiana University. With the exception of seven years spent in Chicago, her entire life was passed in Marshall and Fulton counties.

Manson L. YIKE, 34, died Sunday afternoon at five o'clock at his home on South Bancroft Ave., a victim of pneumonia, contracted from influenza. He had been ill only 10 days.
There survive four children, Claude [YIKE], Floyd [YIKE], Harold [YIKE], and Mary [YIKE], his mother, Mrs. Julia YIKE, who made her home with him, one brother, Link YIKE, of this city and three sisters, Mrs. John YODER, of Denver Mrs. P. F. YODER, of Peru, and Mrs. Milton HECKATHORNE, of Logansport. Mr. Yike was a widower, his wife having died more than a year ago.
Funeral at the home Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. George CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Claude BOWMAN, 28, died at six o'clock Sunday evening at her home in Lily Park, east of Rochester, a victim of heart failure. Mrs. Bowman had been suffering with her heart for some time, but was not confined to her bed.
Besides the husband, two daughters, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wright P. BIRDLOW, of Vandalia, a brother at home and two sisters, Mrs. Pearl HEMINGER, of Newcastle, and Mrs. James BURK, of Vincennes, survive.
Funeral services at graveside, Oakdale cemetery, Peru, Wednesday noon.

Tuesday, December 31, 1918

Mrs. Mary HOUSTON, South Madison St., Tuesday received word of the death in Long Beach, Calif., Monday of her sister, Mrs. Isaiah WALKER, formerly a resident of this city. Death is supposed to have been caused by old age, as Mrs. Walker was almost 90 years old. She had been ill for some time.
Two daughters survive, Mrs. Con WELCH, of Long Beach, and Mrs. Isaac MONTGOMERY, of Glendora, Calif. Mr. Walker died several years ago.
Funeral services will be held Jan 2 at Long Beach, and the body will probably be brought here in the spring for burial.

Funeral services for the late Maier LEVI at the home, South Pontiac St., at 7:00 p.m., Wednesday, conducted by Rabbi WEINSTEIN, Ft. Wayne. Masons in charge of the interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery. Among those here for the funeral are Miss Florence LEVI, of Washington, D. C., Ben [HEILBRUN] and Ferd HEILBRUN, Osage City, Kan., Sam [HEILBRUN] and Joe HEILBRUN, Kansas City, Mo., Sidney HEILBRUN, Chicago and Mrs. Belle RICH, Nashville, Tenn.

Funeral services for Mrs. Susannah E. ELLIS, 81, widow of the late David ELLIS, who died Thursday, Dec. 26, were held at Athens last Friday. She was born in Missouri.