Print
FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1919

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1998

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

1919

Wednesday, January 1, 1919

Six sons of John B. McMAHAN -- Hugh [McMAHAN], Otto [McMAHAN], Thomas [McMAHAN], William [McMAHAN] Pat [McMAHAN] and John [McMAHAN], served as pall-bearers at their father's funeral here Tuesday afternoon, with the seventh son, Lieut. James McMAHAN, as a guard of honor. Two solos were sung by Frank E. BRYANT and the funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Geo. F. CRAIG. Interment in the mausoleum. Among those here for the services were Mrs. Lou MYERS, of Leiters Ford, Mrs. Alida RHODES, of Battle Creek, Mich. and Mrs. Wanda MOHLER, of Culver.

Mrs. Beatrice FOOR, 20, died at eight o'clock Tuesday evening at her home in Huntington, a victim of influenza. She had been ill over two weeks. There survive the husband, Oris FOOR, an Erie employe; the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ely BUTLER, of this city; two brothers, Basil [BUTLER] and Samuel [BUTLER], and a sister, Miss Maude BUTLER, all of Rochester. The body was brot to this city Wednesday afternoon for burial.

Among those from out of this city, who were here to attend the funeral of Meier LEVI, were Miss Florence LEVI, of Washington, D.C., Ben [HEILBRUN] and Ferd HEILBRUN, Osage City, Kan., Sam [HEILBRUN] and Joe HEILBRUN, Kansas City, Mo., Sidney HEILBRUN, Chicago, Mrs. Julius RICH, Nashville, Tenn., and Lee [LAUER] and Joe LAUER, of Plymouth.

Thursday, January 2, 1919

Relatives here have received word of the death of Mrs. Wm. BIBLER, at Wapakoneta, Ohio. She was formerly Miss Emma PYLE of this city. Death was caused by anemia. A. L. CARTER and John PYLE went Thursday to Wapakoneta to attend the funeral.

Dulcey UTTER, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob UTTER, who live southeast of Athens, died Wednesday evening after being ill for one week with influenze.
Besides the father and mother he leaves three brothers and three sisters. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Funeral services for Mrs. O. A. FOOR, who died Monday evening in Huntington, were held at the Christian church Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, Rev. J. H. JONES in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The body of Mrs. Bruce LOWMAN of Maxinkuckee was brought to Poplar Grove cemetery for burial last Saturday. She leaves a husband to mourn her loss. Death was caused by influenza. - - - POPLAR GROVE ITEMS.

Friday, January 3, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Frank LOWMAN, of this city, Friedy received word that their cousin, Mrs. Chancy COOK, and her infant daughter, of Twelve Mile, had burned to death. The accident was due to an explosion, caused by pouring kerosene into a cook stove. Two small sons were also burned, one of whom is not expected to live. Funeral services Saturday afternoon at Twelve Mile.

Mr. and Mrs. Loy COOK, of Leiters Ford, went today to Denver, where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Cook's mother.

Saturday, January 4, 1919

Word has been received here of the death in Chicago of Mrs. J. W. JOHNSON, 65, wife of a traveling salesman, who has taken orders in Rochester for a Chicago paper house, during many years. The death followed an operation for gall stones and the funeral was held Wednesday at the home in Hoopeston, Ill., with the burial there. Mr. Johnston was a cousin of the late Mrs. H. A. BARNHART, of this city.

Funeral services for Mrs. Paul MASTELLER, formerly Miss Sadie HAMMOND, of Henry township, who died at her home in Hammond, a victim of influenza, were held Thursday afternoon at Akron. Besides the husband, she left two children, a boy and a girl.

Monday, January 6, 1919

Mrs. Lula A. EYTCHESON, 24, wife of William Henry EYTCHESON, died at 10 o'clock Saturday evening at her home on the corner of 10th and Elm St., a victim of pneumonia contracted from influenza. Funeral at the home Monday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, January 7, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, January 8, 1919

The body of Samuel ROSENTHAL, of Chicago, formerly a produce dealer of this city, was brought here Wednesday afternoon for burial. A short service was held at the cemetery. He leaves a widow. The Rosenthals moved away from Rochester about 15 years ago.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: Samuel ROSENTHAL, 1853-1919]

Arthur L. KISSINGER, son of Chas. and Amanda KISSINGER, was born in Cass county, Ind., May 25th, 1898 and died Dec. 24th, 1918, aged 20 years, six months and 29 days. Surviving him are his parents, two sisters, Miss Ruth KISSINGER, of South Bend and Mrs. Earl WYNN, of Tiosa, and one brother, Albert KISSINGER, of Converse, and a host of relatives and friends. He united with the Pleasant Hill Evangelical church at the age of 12 years and remained a member until his death.

Mr. and Mrs. Alvah STOCKBERGER received the sad news Sunday that their daughter-in-law, Mrs. Everett STOCKBERGER, of Ladysmith, Wis., had died a victim of pneumonia following influenza and that her husband was very low. A telegram was received Monday afternoon that Everett had died and that their baby was very low. Mrs. Stockberger left Monday morning for Wisconsin. - - - TIOSA ITEMS.

Thursday, January 9, 1919

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., Jan. 9 -- Lemual RICHTER, 75, was found dead in a hen house on his farm near Akron this morning by David SECOR, a neighbor, who had gone over to borrow some corn fodder. It is believed he had been dead since Tuesday.
Richter lived alone and leaves no close relatives. A son, Richard [RICHTER], hung himself about a year ago, because, it is said, he feared to go to war.

Mrs. Sarah MERLEY this morning had a telegram from the War dept. notifying her of the death of her eldest son, Adolph [MERLEY], 23, a soldier in France.
Just two days ago she had a letter from the young man's nurse telling of his influenza illness, but saying he would probably recover. Merley enlisted in June 1917 and is thot to be the first Henry twp. boy to died in service. Besides the mother, he leaves two brothers and a sister.

Friday, January 10, 1919

Mrs. Sarah POWELL, 90, died Wednesday morning at her home near Pleasant Hill, death being caused by old age. She had been a resident of this county for many years.
Two sons, Lemuel [POWELL] and Oliver [POWELL], of Macy, and four daughters, Mrs. Martha ZOLMAN of this city, Lucinda POWELL, who lived with her mother, Mrs. John BEMENDERFER, of near this city, and Mrs. John SOWERS, of Macy, survive. The funeral services were held Friday morning at Athens.

The funeral services for Mr. and Mrs. Everett STOCKBERGER, who died in Wisconsin, were held Thursday afternoon at the Lutheran church at Tiosa, Rev. O. E. MILLER, of Mentone, in charge. Burial was made in the Rochester cemetery.

Winamac, Ind., Jan. 10 -- The funeral of James M. GILL, 60, for many years president of the Baltimore & Ohio Railway, was held from his old home here, a large crowd attending. He resigned from the railway 15 years ago, and came to his former home here to lead a retired life. He is reputed to have accumulated a fortune of $1,000,000.

Akron, Ind., Jan. 10 -- Funeral arrangements for Leonard RICHTER, 70, who was found dead at his home near here Thursday, are being held up pending arrival of a son, Sgt. Vernon RICHTER, from service. Mr. Richter left four daughters, three sons and a mother.

Saturday, January 11, 1919

T. W. IRWIN and son Elmer [IRWIN] were at Lapaz over Sunday attending the funeral of the former's niece, Mrs. Elmer ALBERTS. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Monday, January 13, 1919

A memorial service for Pvt. Verle MADARY, who was killed in France, is announced to take place at the Baptist church next Sunday night.

Funeral services for Leonard RICHTER, who was recently found dead at his home near Akron, Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock, at the Olive Bethel church, Rev. J. H. RIGGLE in charge. Burial at Nichols cemetery.

Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN will go this evening to Bremen, Ind., where he will attend the funeral of his sister-in-law, Mrs. H. S. LAUDEMAN.

Tuesday, January 14, 1919

Rev. Richard SPOHN writes the SENTINEL of the death in Shelbyville of a 10-year old daughter of Rev. Joseph WAINSCOTT, well known here. Funeral Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Spohn. Four other members of the family are sick, according to the local preacher.

Herbert Lee SHELTON, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac W. SHELTON, of Leiters Ford, died at his home Monday of pneumonia, which followed influenza. He had been ill five weeks. Besides the parents, there survive a sister, Mrs. A. J. HENDERSON. John CHAMBERS, of near Rochester, was an uncle of the deceased. Funeral at 2:00 p.m. in the Leiters M.E. church, to which the young man belonged, Rev. DAVIS in charge. Burial at Leiters. Young Shelton was an employe of the Vandalia R.R.

Miss Theresa WEHR, Latin instructor in the high school was called to her home at Terre Haute by the death Monday of her brother, who was run down and instantly killed by a train. No particulars of the accident were available.

Wednesday, January 15, 1919

William SHIVELY, 74, a member of the McClung Post G.A.R, died Tuesday evening at his home eight miles northeast of Rochester, a victim of heart trouble.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Ellen SHIVELY, five sons, Charles [SHIVELY], of Michigan, George [SHIVELY], of North Dakota, and Noah [SHIVELY], Everett [SHIVELY] and Elmer [SHIVELY], of Fulton county, and two daughters, Miss Ola [SHIVELY] and Mrs. Ida BRYANT. Another daughter is dead.
William Shively was born in Union county, Pennsylvania, december 3d, 1844, a son of Levi and Elizabeth SHIVELY. He had made his home in Fulton county for many years and was a member of Company A, 155th Indiana Volunteers.
Funeral arrangements later.

Sarah BIDDLE POWELL, daughter of William and Rebecca BIDDLE, was born in Mercer County, Pa., Jan. 8th, 1829, and departed this life Jan. 8th, 1919, at the age of 90 years. She was the oldest child of a family of eight children, five having preceded her in death.
Two sisters are left to mourn her departure, Miss Susan BIDDLE, of Rochester, and Mrs. Acanetha ANDERSON, of Akron.

She moved with her parents to this state in the year 1836 and located in Fulton county near Rochester.
At the age of eight years, she heard her Master's call, united with the United Brethren church and continued a Christian until her death.
On Feb. 2d, 1847, she was united in marriage to William POWELL, who died July 20th, 1910. To this union were born 12 children, eight sons and four daughters. Four of the sons died in infancy, Schuyler [POWELL] at the age of 14 and Benjamin Franklin [POWELL] at the age of 30. Four daughters and two sons with 11 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren survive. After their marriage the Powells lived on a portion of her father's farm near Rochester until Nov, 1849, when they moved near Gilead, Miami Co. In the year 1866., they moved on a farm west of Pleasant Hill, where she lived until her death.

Mr. and Mrs. H. O. BLACKBURN attended the funeral of Mrs. Blackburn's cousin, Hubert SHELTON, at Leiters Ford. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Omer LONG and daughter, Marjorie [LONG], attended the funeral of Mrs. Charles LONG, of Walnut. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Mrs. Mat ZOLMAN has returned to care for Mr. and Mrs. Geo. MOORE, after being absent a couple of weeks on account of the illness and death of her mother, Mrs. [Sarah] POWELL. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Thursday, January 16, 1919

Valentine RAUSCH, 63, died Wednesday evening at Rochester, Minn., where he had on Monday undergone an operation for the removal of gall stones, from which he had been suffering for the past year. Mrs. Rauch was with him at the time of his death.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Mary RAUSCH; a son, Karl Frederick [RAUSCH], of Peru; a daughter, Miss Emma K. RAUSCH, at home and a granddaughter, Jane RAUSCH, of Peru. A brother preceded him.
Valentine Rausch was born in Tiefenfort, in Saxon Wolmar, Eisenach, Germany, on March 25th, 1865.
He came to America at the age of 15, making his home first in New York and then Chicago.
He later moved to Columbia City, Indiana, where he lived for 12 years, going from there to Angola, Ind., where he was in business for two years. In 1893, he moved to Rochester where he has since resided, being employed first at the LAUER clothing store and then at Sol ALLMAN'S. At the time of his demise, he was employed by J. F. DYSERT at the Allman clothing store.
Mr. Rausch was a charter member of the Angola lodge, Knights of Pythias, a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and a member of the Presbyterian church.
His son, Karl, of Peru, left Wednesday for Rochester, Minn., to be with his mother. The body will be brot to this city Friday afternoon at 3:28.
Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, January 17, 1919

[no obits]

Saturday, January 18, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. HUCK, of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey BROWN, Mrs. Edward EDGAR and Mrs. Emma WEIZEL, of Columbia City, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. LONG and Mr. and Mrs. Karl RAUSCH of Peru, were among those from out-of-town, who were here to attend the funeral of Val RAUSCH Saturday.

The funeral of Valentine RAUSCH, who died in Rochester, Minn., following an operation, was held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 p.m., from the residence on North Fulton Ave., Dr. Harry NYCE, of Peru, and Rev. H. G. GAIGE, in charge of sevices. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, January 20, 1919

Mrs. Ralph HEETER, 84, died at her home northeast of Rochester Monday morning, a victim of cancer, from which she had been suffering some time.
There survive two daughters, Mrs. William SHIVELY, with whom she made her home, and Mrs. Laura RALSTON, of Plymouth, and a son, Warren HEETER, of Fulton county.
Funeral arrangements later.

The Baptist church was crowded Sunday evening at the memorial services held there for the late Private Verle MADARY, son of Mrs. Gertrude MADARY, of this city, who was killed in action in France on October 8th. A large delegation of soldiers from all over the county, headed by Lieut. James McMAHAN, was present. . . .

Tuesday, January 21, 1919

Mrs. Louisa MILLER DOWNEY, 74, widow of the late Dr. Levi DOWNEY, of this city, died Monday evening at the Longcliff asylum at Logansport.
There survive two sons, Omar DOWNEY, of Churubusco, and Edward DOWNEY, of Logansport, a brother, John MILLER, of this city, and a sister, Mrs. Daniel AGNEW, also of Rochester.
The body was brought to Rochester Tuesday. Private funeral at Agnew residence. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Cora HARSH, 42, died Monday afternoon at 12:30 o'clock at her home in East Rochester, a victim of Bright's disease, from which she had suffered for more than two months.
The husband, Henry HARSH, five children: Donald [HARSH], Hazel [HARSH], May [HARSH], Esther [HARSH] and Glen [HARSH], two sisters Mrs. Ella ESHELMAN, of Akron, and Mrs. Myrtle DAUGHERTY, of Richmond, and two brothers, Edward HENDERSON, of Akron, and Earl HENDERSON, who is in the army, survive.
Funeral at the home Wednesday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. Eugene HUNTER in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Funeral services for Mrs. Noah HEETER, Wednesday at 10:30 a.m., at Mt. Hope United Brethren church, Rev. LEININGER in charge. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

It develops that pneumonia, and not his operation, proved fatal to the late Valentine RAUSCH at Rochester, Minn. The lung disease appeared on Tuesday and the victim succumbed the next day, according to his son, Karl [RAUSCH], who returned to Peru Monday evening.

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey BROWN and Mrs. Edward EDGAR have returned to their home in Columbia City, Ind., after attending the funeral of Val RAUSCH in this city.

Wednesday, January 22, 1919

Dr. Samuel W. GOULD, of Argos, died Monday night following a general failing of health of several weeks. The funeral was held from his home in Argos, Wednesday at 12 o'clock, and the body was taken to Ft. Wayne for cremation.

Everett Raymond STOCKBERGER, son of Alva and Mary STOCKBERGER, was born in Marshall county, Feb. 19, 1897, and died Jan 6, 1919 at Ladysmith, Wis. He was united in marriage with Miss Gladys COPLEN of Fulton county on Sept 7, 1915 and to this union were born two children, Arlos Lowell [STOCKBERGER], a son who died in infancy, and Wanita Duphane [STOCKBERGER], a daughter who survives her parents. He also leaves to mourn their loss his parents, two brothers, Luther [STOCKBERGER], of Ladysmith, Wis., and Delbert [STOCKBERGER], of Fulton, Ind., and a sister, Mrs. Pearl UMBAUGH. Mr. Stockberger died of influenza, the day following the death of his wife by the same disease.
Gladys Marie COPLEN, daughter of Alvah and Delilah M. COPLEN, was born at Talma, Ind., May 11, 1897 and died Jan 5, 1919 at Ladysmith, Wis., a victim of influenza. She leaves to mourn their loss, her parents, two sisters and two brothers. She united with the Methodist church at Talma several years ago and remained a member until her death. She was united in marriage Sept 7th, 1915 with Everett STOCKBERGER. One daughter of this union survives.

Thursday, January 23, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Omer DOWNEY and Byron DOWNEY, of Churubusco, Ind., were here Wednesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Louisa DOWNEY.

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. RALSTON have returned to their home in Gary, after attending the funeral of Mrs. Noah HEETER.

Friday, January 24, 1919 to Satu4day, January 25, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, January 27, 1919

Mrs. Susanna ZERBE DAVIS, 67, for more than 50 years a resident of Rochester, died Monday morning at five o'clock at her home on North Jefferson St., a victim of inflamation of the stomach, from which she had suffered for only five days.
There survive the husband, Harvey Marcellus DAVIS, and three sisters, Mrs. S. E. HARBORN and Mrs. Clara VAMPNER, of Guthrie, Ohio, and Mrs. E. E. BURNETT, of Attica, Ka.

Funeral arrangements later.

Kathryn Mae CURTIS, five, died Saturday evening at 8:30 o'clock at the home of her parents on East Ninth St., a victim of pneumonia contracted from influenza. She had been ill just a week. The other members of the family, who also had been afflicted with the prevalent disease, have recovered.
There survive besides the parents, two brothers, Vine [CURTIS], Jr. and Percy Watson [CURTIS] and a sister, Francis [CURTIS].
Funeral from the home Tuesday at 10:30 a.m., Rev. C. S. DAVISSON in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetry.

Tuesday, January 28, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. Marcellus DAVIS, Wednesday at 2:30 p.m., at the Presbyterian church, a Peru minister in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Word has been received here of the death at sea on the tanker Royal Arrow on January 10th, of Will LOUDERBACK, 43, a former resident of this city and a son of Mrs. Martha LOUDERBACK, East Ninth Street.
The death, which occurred on a return voyage of the vessel from China, was caused by influenza. Burial was made at sea. Besides the mother, two brothers, Mell [LOUDERBACK], of Seattle, Wash., and Glen [LOUDERBACK], of Chicago, survive.

Wednesday, January 29, 1919

Susan CLAYTON was born near Dayton, Montgomery Co., Ohio, Jan 11, 1835 and died Jan 20, 1919, at Athens, Ind. In June, 1854, she was united in marriage to Noah HEETER. Three years later they moved to Wabash Co., Ind., and later to Akron where her husband died in 1893. Grandma Heeter, as she was known by everyone, lived alone for a number of years but had recently lived with her daughter, Mrs. Ellen SHIVELY. Three children survive, Mrs. Ellen SHIVELY, Warren HEETER and Mrs. Laura RALSTON, of Gary, Ind. Two daughters, Mrs. Sarah McINTYRE and Martha [HEETER], preceded her in death. She also leaves 22 grandchildren, 38 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren. She was a member of the Dunkard Brethren church.

William SHIVELY, son of Levi and Elizabeth SHIVELY, was born in Union county, Pa., December 3, 1844, and died January 4, 1919. He came with his parents to Indiana when he was a small boy and had always made his home here. On December 14, 1871, he was united in marriage to Mary Ellen HEETER. They were the parents of ten children, eight of whom are living: Elmer [SHIVELY] and Charles [SHIVELY] of North Dakota; George [SHIVELY], of Montana; Martin [SHIVELY], of Michigan; Mrs. Ida BRYANT, Everett [SHIVELY], Noah [SHIVELY] and Viola [SHIVELY]. He also leaves 18 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, two sisters and one brother. He served during the Civil War in the 138th and 155th regiments and received his honorable discharge at the end of the war. At the time of his death he was a member of the McClung Post G.A.R. Mr. Shively was a man well known in this community where he had endeared himself to a host of friends. There remains the memory of a kind, loving companion, father and friend.

Thursday, January 30, 1919

Mrs. Sarah SHAFER went today to LaPaz, where she attended the funeral of Abram SHAFER.

Friday, January 31, 1919

Isaac WALTERS, 90, for the past three years an inmate of the county farm, died there Friday morning at10:00 o'clock of senility. A son, Phillip [WALTERS], whose whereabouts could not be learned, survives. Funeral at Hoover chapel Saturday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at county farm cemetery.

Saturday, February 1, 1919

The funeral of Isaac WALTERS, which was to have been held Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at Hoover's chapel, was postponed. Phillip WALTERS, of near Culver, son of the deceased, will come to this ciy Saturday evening to complete the funeral arrangements.

Charles Tilden GRIBBEN, 42, for the past three years a resident of this city where he was engaged in the drug business, died at his home on South Madison St., Friday at 8:15 p.m., a victim of bubnerculosis, from which he had been suffering for two years. He was brot home last Sunday from Albuquerque, N.M., where he had gone in an effort to benefit his failing health.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Koda GRIBBEN, two children, Dwight [GRIBBEN] and Hester [GRIBBEN], the father, E. K. GRIBBEN, of Pennsylvania, two brothers, J. L. GRIBBEN, of Pennsylvania and J. H. GRIBBEN, of Newton Ia., and a sister, Mrs. M. M. RUSH, of Pennsylvania.
Private funeral at the home Monday at 1:00 p.m., Rev. Noah McCOY, of Frankfort, in charge. Burial at North Manchester.

Monday, February 3, 1919

Mrs. Emma M. McINTIRE, 44, died Sunday at midnight at her home on Park St., in the east part of the city, a victim of influenza and dropsy. She had been seriously ill with dropsy for some time when the influenza set in.
There survive the husband, Riley McINTIRE, a son, Edward [McINTIRE] and three daughters, Mrs. Fred BAHL and Misses Fern [McINTIRE] and Pauline McINTIRE.
Funeral arrangements later.

Gerald [HARTLE], 10-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter HARTLE, of Leiters Ford, was killed Saturday evening about seven o'clock when he was struck by an automobile driven by Omer REICHARD, of near that place.
The accident happened in front of the L. LUKENBILL store in Leiters, where a number of small boys were playing. No blame for the accident is placed on Mr. Reichard as the boy was in front of the machine. He was taken into the Lukenbill store where he died about five minutes later. Besides the parents, he leaves two brothers and one sister.
Funeral services at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the Methodist church in Leiters and burial in the cemetery there.

Funeral services for Isaac WALTERS Sunday afternoon at Hoover's chapel, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at South Loyal cemetery.

Dr. Charles GOULD has received word that his aunt, Miss Emma GOULD, died last Friday at the home of her brother, Daniel GOULD, in Kansas City. Death was caused by a cancer. She was a former resident of this city.

Rev. and Mrs. Geo. F. CRAIG went Monday to Belding, Mich., to attend the funeral of their nephew.

Tuesday, February 4, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. D. H. HIESTAID, of Findley, Ohio, J. L. GRIBBEN, of Harveys, Pa., and K. K. GRIBBEN, of Claysville, Pa., were here Monday to attened the funeral of Charles GRIBBEN.

Mrs. Howard COOK, 32, died Tuesday morning at her home on College Ave., of pneumonia, following influenza. She had only been ill for a week.
Besides the husband, she leaves a daughter, Pauline [COOK], and a son, Robert [COOK], also her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. BRUCE, of Kewanna, five sisters and two brothers.
Mrs. Cook had lived in this city since her marriage 14 years ago. She was a member of the Zion church at Bruce Lake Station.
Funeral arrangements later.

Funeral services for Mrs. Riley McINTIRE at the home Tuesday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at Citizen's cemetery.

Judge S. N. STEVENS was in Plymouth today to attend the funeral of Mrs. Clay METZKER.

Wednesday, February 5, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. Howard COOK from the home Thursday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at Citizens' cemetery.

Mrs. Nathan JULIAN died Tuesday at her home in Fulton, following an operation which she underwent about a month ago at a Logansport hospital. Besides the husband, she leaves a son, Paul [JULIAN], two daughters, Mabel [JULIAN] and Faye [JULIAN], her father, William WALTERS and two sisters, Mrs. Maurice LOWMAN, of Detroit, and Miss Stella WALTERS, of Fulton. She had always resided in the vicinity of Fulton and was a member of the U.B. church of that place.

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel FRY attended the funeral of their granddaughter, Miss Elsie POLLY, at Culver, Tuesday. Miss Polly had been at the tuberculer camp at Rockwell and was improving ncely until she contracted the influenza, which proved fatal. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, February 6, 1919
[no obits]

Friday, February 7, 1919

E. von EHRENSTEIN and family have received word of the death of H. J. TILLETT, of Peru. He was the father of Grover C. TILLETT, who is well known here. He leaves one son and two daughters. Death was caused by old age. The funeral will be at Peru.

Saturday, February 8, 1919

The people in the community of Leiters were shocked Saturday evening when Gerald [HARTLE], 10-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter HARTLE, was run over and killed by an auto driven by Omer REICHARD. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Monday, February 10, 1919

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., Feb. 10 -- Joseph DAY, 75, for years a resident of this town, and a veteran of the Civil war, died at his home here Monday morning after a long illness, due to a general breakdown. There survive four children, Ray [DAY], of Los Angeles, Guy [DAY], of Iowa, Charles [DAY], at home and Mrs. Chas. HALDEMAN, of Akron.

Hubert McGINNIS, 27, died Sunday morning at five o'clock at the CAMERER farm south of Rochester, where he was a tenant, a victim of influenza, from which he had suffered only a week.
Just four hours later, his daughter, Catherine Irene [McGINNIS], two, died of the same disease.
The widow, Mrs. Irene McGINNIS, an infant son, Glen [McGINNIS] and the father, are all seriously ill with the influenza. Besides the above named survivors, he leaves a mother, Mrs. Will McGINNIS, of Rochester, a brother, Roy [McGINNIS], of Flint, Mich., and a sister, Mrs. Estil HARTMAN, also of Flint.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Anna MILLS, 51, died early Sunday morning at Longcliff, a victim of tuberculosis, from which she had suffered for some time.
There survive the husband, Meredith MILLS, 1225 Elm St., two daughters, Mrs. Wiley JOHNSON, of this city, and Mrs. Laura ALLEY, of Peru, and a foster son, Earl MOORE, who is in the army.
Funeral at the home Tuesday at 10:30 a.m., Rev. Ora OXLEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, February 11, 1919

Funeral services for Hubert McGINNIS and infant daughter were held from the Christian church at Macy Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, Rev. Schuyler NORRIS, of Culver, in charge. Burial at Plainview cemetery at Macy.

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., Feb. 11 -- Despondent because of secret trouble, which he did not divulge in the farewell note left to his family, Lumna MYERS, 31, shot and killed himself at the home of his father, Elijah MYERS, six miles northwest of Akron, Monday afternoon about one o'clock.
Myers, who is single and was recently discharged from the army, used a .22 calibre rifle to kill himself. The shot penetrated his head and death was evidently instantaneous, for when his father, who heard the shot, rushed to the son's bedroom where the deed was committed, he had breathed his last.
In a note he left, he decalred that he had had secret troubles and asked the forgiveness of his family for his act. No reason could be assigned by his family or friends, who did not know of his having had any trouble recently.
There survive the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elijah MYERS, with whom he made his home, two brothers and a sister.
Funeral Thursday at the North Bethel church.

Hazel Almeda SMITH, eight, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John R. SMITH, died Monday evening at the home of her parents, five miles northeast of the city, a victim of complications. Besides the parents, four brothers and sisters survive.
Funeral Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. at the Mt. Hope U.B. church. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Wednesday, February 12, 1919

Word was received here late Tuesday of the death in Logansport of R. F. BAKER, formerly a local real estate man. Influenza was the cause, it is said. Baker's wife died shortly after leaving here, last year, and he and his two children had since made their home at the Barnett hotel in Logansport. His parents reside in Logansport, also. Baker was in Rochester several times recently. Funeral Friday p.m.

George W. MILLER, 69, died at 7:10 Wednesday morning, at his home southwest of Richland Center, after having been bedfast for six weeks due to hardening of the arteries and complications. He had resided on the farm where he died since he was four years old, and was one of the prominent farmers of his section.
Deceased was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Elijah MILLER, of Rochester, who originally came here from Ohio, where he was born Sept 23, 1849. When a young man he married Miss Mary BEEHLER, who died about 35 years ago, leaving five children: Alvah [MILLER], on the farm; Orville [MILLER], near Sand Hill; Mrs. Frank COOK, LaPorte; Arthur [MILLER], of Rochester and Clem R. [MILLER], of this city, who is the county surveyor-elect. Later Mr. Miller married Mrs. Ella MILLER, a sister of Leroy MYERS, of Rochester. She died about three years ago. One brother, Marion [MILLER], who lives on the farm, also survives.
Funeral at 2:00 p.m. Friday in the Richland Center M.E. church, Rev. DAVIS in charge. Burial at Richland Center.

Mrs. Ellen HARTMAN, 78, widow of James M. HARTMAN, died early Wednesday morning at the home of her son, L. D. HARTMAN, of this city, a victim of senility. She had been ill for the past six years.

There survive two sons, L. D. [HARTMAN], of this city, and Howard [HARTMAN], of Akron, three daughters, Mrs. Cora CARPENTER, of Rochester, Mrs. Carl CHURCHILL, of South Bend, and Mrs. Sarah SHIREMAN, of Akron, and a brother, Samuel CALENTINE, of South Bend.
Funeral at the home at 526 Ohio St., Friday at 1:30 p.m. Burial at Athens.

Mrs. Mary A. OLDFATHER, 77, widow of Elijah OLDFATHER, died late Tuesday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Chas. GREGORY, South Elm St., after an illness extending over a period of two years. Death was caused by old age.
There survive besides Mrs. Gregory, a son, David [OLDFATHER], of Mishawaka, three other daughters, Mrs. David HARP, of Germantown, O., Mrs. A. H. FOOR, of Athens, and Mrs. Chas. SILVER, of Farmersville, Ohio and three brothers, Allen [PULSE], Joseph [PULSE] and William PULSE, all of Farmersville, Ohio.
Funeral arrangements later.

The community was shocked Sunday when the news came of the death of Hubert McGINNIS and his little daughter who live near Green Oak. Mrs. McGinnis is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank BEMENDERFER, who reside north of Macy. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Miss Mabel FOOR has returned to her duties as teacher in the Peru schools, after spending a couple of months with her sister, Mrs. Wm. CRAIG, of Lebanon. She was there during the illness and death of Mr. Craig. Mrs. Craig has taken up her old vocation as milliner and is employed in Indianapolis. - - - MACY ITEMS.

The Odd Fellows of Green Oak lodge had a call meeting at their hall Monday evening to make arrangements for the funeral of Hubert McGINNIS. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, February 13, 1919

[no paper]

Friday, February 14, 1919

Funeral services for Nelson KIRKENDALL Saturday at 1:30 p.m. from the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. PYLE, southwest of this city, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah AULT Saturday at 3:30 p.m. from the Evangelical church, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial in Citizen's cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Noah WIDEMAN and son, Cleo [WIDEMAN], have returned to their home in Niles, Mich., after attending the funeral of Lumna MYERS.

Mrs. Clara CHURCHILL and son, Clarence [CHURCHILL], and James CALENTINE, of South Bend, were here today to attend the [Ellen] HARTMAN funeral.

Saturday, February 15, 1919

Mrs. Emaline BISHOP, 82, widow of Daniel BISHOP, died at 10:45 a.m. Saturday morning at the James T. GAINER residence where for the past 16 years she had made her home with Mrs. Newton WILEY. Mrs.Bishop had been ill for some time. Death was caused by old age and complications.
There survive two sons, John SNOWGRASS, of this city and Harvey SNOWGRASS, of Chicago.
Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, February 17, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. Emaline BISHOP Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. at the Hoover chapel, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. D. M. DUMBAULD has returned to her home in Niles, Mich., after attending the funeral of her brother, Nelson KIRKENDALL.

Tuesday, February 18, 1919

Miss Mae CUMMINS received word today of the death of her grandfather. She will go to Middletown, Ind., Wednesday to attend the funeral.

Wednesday, February 19, 1919

Newton Augustus McCLUNG, aged nearly 73, a well known and prominent farmer, died at 1:30 Wednesday afternoon in his farm home near Mt. Zion, five miles southeast of Rochester. He had been ill with heart trouble and arterial sclerosis for two years, but only became bedfast last Thursday, gradually sinking to the end.
There survive the widow, three sons, Ralph [McCLUNG] and Arthur [McCLUNG] at home and Paul [McCLUNG], in the army in California, and one daughter, Mrs. Lucien SAVAGE, of near Macy. Four brothers are dead. Mr. McClung was born in Rush county, Feb. 23, 1846, the son of Mr. and Mrs. William McCLUNG, but lived for 70 years on the farm where he died.
For the past 15 years he has been president of the Farmers' Co-Partnership Insurance Co., and for 12 years, a director in the Indiana Mutual Cyclone Insurance Co. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and of the I.O.O.F. lodge.
Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, February 20, 1919

The Great White Plague has claimed another victim.
Meade Cleveland BLACKBURN, 34, passed away at 3:00 o'clock Thursday morning in his home on 9th Street, near Monroe, a victim of tuberculosis, from which he had suffered for some time. The same disease, in the past, proved fatal to a sister.
There survive the widow, two sons, George [BLACKBURN], Eight, and Wayne [BLACKBURN], four; four sisters, Mrs. E. P. KELLEY, of El Reno, Okla., Mrs. Vivian ESSICK, of near Rochester, Mrs. Sam Van BLARICOM, of Laketon and Mrs. William DELP, of Rochester

and two brothers, George [BLACKBURN], west of Rochester, and Charles [BLACKBURN], of Atwood.
Mr. Blackburn was born Oct 17, 1884, in the Antioch neighborhood, southwest of Rochester, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram BLACKBURN, who are both dead. He was married May 18, 1907 to Miss Coral O. BRYANT, of Macy and later came to Rochester, as a section boss for the Lake Erie and Western R.R. He was a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge.
Funeral services at 2:00 o'clock, Friday afternoon, in the U. B. church here, Geo. C. CRANE in charge. Interment at Macy.

Funeral services for N. A. McCLUNG Saturday at 1:30 p.m., from the home near Mt. Zion, Rev. H. G. GAIGE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. No flowers.

Friday, February 21, 1919

Funeral services for N. A. McCLUNG Saturday at 1:30 p.m., from the home near Mt. Zion, conducted by Rochester lodge I.O.O.F. and Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE. Burial at Mt Zion cemetery.

Milo H. BRYANT, 20 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy BRYANT, died at the home of his parents, in East Rochester, Friday morning, a victim of influenza and brain fever. Besides the parents there survive a brother, Devon [BRYANT], and a sister, Pauline [BRYANT]. The sister and father are suffering with the same disease. Funeral at the home of Mrs. G. W. HAYWOOD, East Rochester, Sunday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. Geo. CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, February 22, 1919

Mrs. Alice HUGHSTON KELLEY, 68, a life long resident of Rochester and Fulton county, died at her home on Jefferson St., at 5:30 o'clock Saturday morning, a victim of leakage of the heart. She had been ill for nine months.
There survive two sisters, Mrs. S. S. HENDRICKS, of Ft. Wayne, who was with Mrs. Kelley when death came and Mrs. William CHINN, of Dayton, Ky., and a half-sister, Mrs. Dorothy SWIHART, of Chicago.
Mrs. Alice Hughston Kelley was well known in this city where she conducted a millinery store for more than 30 years. She was an active church worker and enthusiastically placed her efforts behind any good philanthropic enterprise.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. George WILLIAMS died suddenly Thursday evening of heart trouble in South Dakota, where she and Mr. Williams were spending the winter with their children, Arthur CHAMP and family and Mrs. Herbert BELDING and family. The body was brought to Macy Monday evening. Mrs. Williams was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McGINNIS and was one of three daughters. The sisters are Mrs. Arthur McCARTER, of Logansport, and Mrs. John CARVEY.
She and her first husband, Mr. CHAMP, were the parents of two children, Arthur [CHAMP] and Cora [CHAMP], the latter now Mrs. Omer ROBERTS. After Mr. Champ's death she was married to George WILLIAMS, and to this union two daughters, Mrs. Pearl BELDING and Mrs. Florence ROBERTS were born. Mrs. Williams was about 60 years of age. Several years ago she

united with the M.E. church here and was an active member of the Rebekah Odd Fellows lodge.
The funeral was held in the M.E. church here Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock and was conducted by Rev. Thomas DAVIES. Interment in Plainview cemetery west of town. - - - MACY ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Alice I. WILLIAMS, 1859-1919; George W. WILLIAMS, 1859-1937]

Mr. and Mrs. Daurcy SMITH have returned from Niles, Mich., where they attended the funeral on Friday of his father, George SMITH, who died Tuesday.

Monday, February 24, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. Alice HUGHSTON KELLEY, were held in the home Monday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. FRY, of Fulton, were here Sunday to attend the [Milo H.] BRYANT funeral.

Tuesday, February 25, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 26, 1919

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., Feb. 26 -- Geo. E. COLE, 76, died here early Wednesday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Stanton THOMPSON. Death was caused by leakage of the heart, from which disease he had suffered for several years.
Mr. Cole moved with his family from Illinois to this county more than 20 years ago, but since had spent a number of years in the West. After the death of his second wife in October 1916, he has made his home with his children, of whom there were nine by his first wife, who died in 1900. In 1903 he married Jennie EASH.
The surviving children are: Bert COLE and Mrs. Phillip WERNER, of near Rochester, Mrs. THOMPSON, of Akron, Mrs. Willard JACKSON of Frankfort, Mrs. Theodore WHITE of Winchester, Frank [COLE] and Lee COLE of Tulsa, Okla., and Albert COLE of Bunker Hill.
Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, February 27, 1919

Funeral services for George COLE Friday at 1:30 p.m., from the residence of Stanton THOMPSON of Akron. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, February 28, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. Joseph STEM, aged nearly 78, who died of pneumonia Wednesday evening at 9:00 o'clock at her home in Fulton, Saturday at 2:00 p.m. in the Fulton Baptist church with burial in the cemetery there. The only surviving relative is Mrs. Drugitt MADARY, of Fulton, a sister-in-law. Mr. Stem died about six months ago.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: Joseph R. STEM, 1852-1918; Nancy J. STEM, his wife, 1841-1919]

Hubert McGINNIS, son of Mr. and Mrs. William McGINNIS, was born in Fulton county, Ind., June 28th, [1891] and died Feb 9, 1919, age 25 years, eight months and 12 days.
On Jan 19, 1916 he was united in marriage to Miss Glatis Ethel BEMENDERFER, of Macy, and to this union two children were born, Katherine Irene [McGINNIS] and Glenn [McGINNIS]
Mr. McGinnis was a graduate of the Akron high school and was a member of the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church. He lived a devoted christian life and was a kind and loving husband and father.
Besides the wife and little son, he leaves to mourn their loss, a father and mother, one sister, Mrs. Estel HARTMAN, and brother Roy McGINNIS, of Flint, Mich. One brother preceded him in death.
Katherine Irene McGINNIS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hubert McGINNIS, was born in Fulton county Dec. 24th, 1916, and died Feb. 9th, 1919, a few hours after the death of her father. She was two years, one month and 15 days old. She leaves a mother and brother.

Saturday, March 1, 1919

Mrs. Ellen HARTMAN, daughter of Henry and Ellen CALENTINE, was born in Putnam county, Ohio, May 1, 1842 and departed this life at Rochester, Ind., Feb. 12, 1919, aged 76 years, 9 months and 11 days.
She was united in marriage with James HARTMAN in 1860 and to this union ten children were born. The husband and five children preceded her in death. She leaves to mourn their loss the children: Mrs. Sarah SHIREMAN and Mrs. Howard HARTMAN, of Akron, Mrs. Clara CHURCHILL, of South Bend and Mrs. Cora CARPENTER and Mrs. L. D. HARTMAN of this city, and one brother, Samuel CALENTINE.
Mrs. Hartman united with the Methodist church several years ago and remained a member until her death. She had made her home for the past 16 years with her children and had been ill for more than six years.
Funeral services were held Friday at the Mt. Hope U.B. church, Rev. A. ESHELMAN in charge. Burial was made in the Mt. Hope cemetery.

Willie [TAYLOR] and Dessie TAYLOR spent a few hours in Grass Creek with their cousin, Mr. TEFF of Iowa, who was on his way home after attending his brother's funeral. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS]

Mrs. Wm. CHINN left today for her home in Dayton, Ky., after being called here by the death of her sister, Mrs. Alice HUGHSTON.

Monday, March 3, 1919

[no obits]

Tuesday, March 4, 1919

Marjorie A. [HOLLOWAY], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. HOLLOWAY, died Sunday at the home of her parents near Talma. Eight brothers and sisters suvive. Funeral Tuesday at the Talma Christian church. Burial at Reichter cemetery.

Wednesday, March 5, 1919

Mrs. Paul TILLETT, of near Peru, well known here, is dead of influenza at Lafayette.

Thursday, March 6, 1919

Word was received here Thursday of the death in Kalamazoo, Mich., of Mrs. Margaret PARSON, formerly of Rochester, widow of John N. PARSON, who died here a number of years ago.
The information came from the only son, Casper PARSON, to Frank STETSON, by whom arrangements for the funeral here are being made.

Mrs. Carrie MERGY, a sister of Mrs. Nancy MEYER, of this city, and well known in Rochester, died at her home in Wabash Wednesday evening after a long illness. Mrs. Meyer, who was called to the bedside of her sister recently, and Miss Rose MEYER will attend the funeral Friday afternoon.

Friday, March 7, 1919

[no obits]

Saturday, March 8, 1919

The body of Mrs. Maggie PARSONS PEARSON was brought here Saturday and was buried in the Citizens' cemetery, the Rebekahs having charge. The funeral services were held Friday in Kalamazoo, Mich., lwhere she died.

Mrs. M. SHERIDAN and daughter and J. M. TONER called on Delong friends Wednesday en route to Culver to attend the funeral of Grace HAWK. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mrs. Chas. SLIFER, aged 36, and her infant son, Harvey Lee [SLIFER], aged one year, died at their home southwest of town.
The funeral was held at the M. E. church, conducted by Rev. Thos. DAVIES and burial in Mt. Zion cemetery. The cause of their death was influenza and pneumonia.
She leaves a husband, one son Everett [SLIFER], three step-sons, Cleo [SLIFER], who is in France, Von [SLIFER] and Clement [SLIFER]. She was a member of the Methodist church. - - - MACY ITEMS.
Rochester Sentinel, Saturday, March 8, 1919]

Ernest ZIEBART, a young farmer west of Akron, died Sunday of pneumonia, after a short illness. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Mrs. Joe STEM died Wednesday of pneumonia at her home in Fulton. She was buried Saturday afternoon. - - - FULTON ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: Joseph R. STEM, 1852-1918; Nancy J. STEM, his wife, 1841-1919]

Mrs. Elizabeth LEEDY died March 2nd at the home of Frank BIDDINGER, at North Judson, Ind. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Omer LONG received the news of the death of their niece, Edith LONG, at South Bend Saturday evening. Miss Long had many friends here who were sorry to learn of her demise and who extend their sympathy to the bereaved family, Mr. and Mrs. George LONG and sons. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Monday, March 10, 1919

Joe URBIN, 63, of Wayne township, and ex-commissioner of Fulton county, died Sunday afternoon at his home three miles south of Kewanna, a victim of influenza.
Besides a wife he leaves four children, Toner [URBIN] of South Bend, Guy [URBIN] of Kewanna, Mrs. Fay HENDRICKSON of South Bend and Mrs. Floyd BROOKS of Marion, Ind. No funeral arrangements have been made.

William M. REED, 23, died Sunday morning at 3:30 o'clock at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. reed, East Fourth St., a victim of tuberculosis of the bones. He had been ill for nine months and was bedfast for about 12 weeks.
There survive besides the parents, a brother, Alvin [REED] and two sisters, Miss Edith REED and Mrs. Mabel NEHER. A brother, George [REED], and a sister, Miss Lucile [REED], preceded him.
Funeral at the house Tuesday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth MARQUIS, 18, wife of Walter MARQUIS, 163 Fulton Ave., died at her home Sunday, a victim of pneumonia contracted from influenza.
There survive besides her husband a daughter, Alberta [MARQUIS], the parents, Mr. and Mrs. George W. HOLLOWAY, four brothers, three sisters and one half-sister. Funeral arrangements later.

Tuesday, March 11, 1919

Funeral services for Joe URBIN were held Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from his home near Kewanna.

Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah MARQUIS were held Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock from the residence on Fulton Ave., Rev. George CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, March 12, 1919

Mrs. Amy W. FINNEY, 40, of near Talma, died Tuesday afternoon at the hospital following an operation. There survive the husband, Joseph D. FINNEY, two children, a boy and a girl, the father, Thomas PARTRIDGE, north of the city, and several brothers and sisters. Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, March 13, 1919

Reuben Sylvester KARN, 67, for nearly 30 years a resident of Rochester, where he was actively engaged in business to within a week of his demise, died at his home on North Pontiac St., Wednesday at 9:20 p.m. Death was caused by locomotor ataxia, from which he had suffered for a period of seven years. He had been bedfast for only a week.
There survive besides the widow, Mrs. Millicent KARN, four sons, Walter [KARN], Oren [KARN], Russell [KARN] and Harry [KARN], all of this city, three brothers, Levi [KARN] and Ira [KARN] of Deedsville and John [KARN] of Peru, and a sister, Mrs. Emma LEEDY, of Deedsville.
Reuben Sylvester Karn was born in Ohio, January 7th, 1852. When a year old, he moved with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel KARN, to Miami County, in 1853, where he was later engaged in farming. In 1877 he was united in marriage to Millicent MURPHY, moving to Rochester in 1889 where he had since resided.
For 19 years he was engaged in the meat market business, and for the past 10 years had been associated with his son, Oren, in the American restaurant and bakery. He was a member of the Baptist church and I.O.O.F. and Maccabee lodges.
Funeral services Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, in the Baptist church, conducted by Rev. W. J. NIVEN with the I.O.O.F. lodge in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Funeral services for Mrs. Joseph D. FINNEY were held Thursday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. from the Talma Christian church. Burial in Reichter cemetery near Tiosa.

Mrs. L. F. LEEDY and Ira KARN, of Deedsville, were called here Wednesday evening by the death of their brother, Reuben KARN. They returned home today.

Friday, March 14, 1919

Loren L. WOOD, 56, well known auctioneer, died at his home on West Third St., at 9:30 o'clock Thursday evening, a victim of influenza and complications. He had been ill for three weeks.
There survive besides the widow, Mrs. Dora WOOD, a daughter, Mrs. Omer MONTGOMERY, of Talma and four brothers, William [WOOD] of Mentone and H. H. [WOOD], J. J. [WOOD] and Namon [WOOD], of Ohio. William and J. J. were born at the time of his demise.
Mr. Wood had been a resident of this city for the past 33 years, moving here from his boyhood home in Ohio. During the entire time of his residence in Rochester, lhe was an auctioneer, being known for miles around. He was a member of the K. of P. and Moose lodges.
Funeral at the Evangelical church Saturday at 2:00 p.m. conducted by Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN with the L.O.O.M. in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Maggie PARSONS PEARSON, a former resident of this city for many years, died at the home of her son, Casper E. PARSONS, in Kalamazoo, Mich., March 5th, 1919, from acute gastritis, at the age of 72 years and six months.
She was the wife of John M. PARSONS, who died in this city April 25, 1894. In 1896, Mrs. Parsons, with her son, moved to Hartford, Mich., where in Oct 1897, she married Chas. S. PEARSON, who died at that place Dec 9, 1911.
Mrs. Pearson for the past five years had resided with her son in Kalamazoo, Mich. Mr. Parsons brought her body here Friday and on Saturday it was laid to rest beside that of his father.

Saturday, March 15, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, March 17, 1919

Mrs. J. A. BOLLER, 60, died at her home on Madison St., early Monday morning after being confined to an invalid's chair for a period of six years. Death was caused by rheumatism.
There survive the parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. WHEADON, of this city, the husband, two children, Glen [BOLLER], of Duncan, Okla., and Miss Dorothy [BOLLER], at home, and three sisters, Mrs. S. J. REITER and Mrs. Grace FARNER, of Rochester and Mrs. George RICKLE, of Big Flats, Wis., and a brother, Albert [WHEADON], of Rochester. Three children died in infancy. Mrs. May [WHEADON] BOLLER was born in Cook county, Illinois, May 18, 1868. She had been a resident of this city for the past two years. Mr. Boller is an Oklahoma oil operator.
Funeral arrangements later.

George SWANK, 78, died Saturday afternoon at his home near Green Oak after suffering for some time from dropsy. Besides a wife he leaves a son, William [SWANK], and three daughters, Mrs. Adam HOFFMAN, of Anderson, and Mrs. William [GOTTSCHALK] and Mrs. George GOTTSCHALK, of near Green Oak. He also leaves a brother, Frank SWANK, of Twelve Mile. Funeral services in the Green Oak church Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. S. C. NORRIS in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Glen RUSSELL, 34, a former resident of Fulton county, died at his home in Chicago Sunday evening at 9:30 o'clock, according to word received by his father, Zane RUSSELL, of near Big Foot. No further particulars as to the cause of death were known. B. F. BARKMAN has gone to Chicago to bring the body to the home of the father, where the funeral will be held, altho no date has been set.
There survive besides the father, a sister, Mrs. Beulah BARKMAN, northeast of the city, and two brothers, Fred [RUSSELL], of Charleston, S.C., and Charles [RUSSELL] of Detroit, Mich.

Tuesday, March 18, 1919

The body of Glen RUSSELL, who died in Chicago, was brought here Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services Thursday morning at 10:00 o'clock from the Athens U.B. church. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery in Athens.

Funeral services for Mrs. J. A. BOLLER, Wednesday at 8:00 a.m., Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Burial at Van Buren Ind.

Wednesday, March 19, 1919

Mrs. Charles PEARSON, 25, died Tuesday at her home in Middlebranch, O., a victim of pneumonia contracted from influenza, according to word received here Wednesday. The husband, three daughters, parents, Mr. and Mrs. Posy JOHNSON, east of the city, and two sisteers, Mrs. Charles GOODRICH and Mrs. Glen WRIGHT, of this city survive.

Sylvester GROVES was born in Marion County, Indiana, Jan 24, 1836 and died March 12, 1919 at the advanced age of 83 years, one month and 18 days. When about seven years of age, the parents of the deceased, with their family came to Kosciusko county and settled on a farm near the Sycamore church. His whole life since then had been spent in Kosciusko and Fulton counties, the last few months being in Mentone at the home of his daughter, Mrs. F. M. COPLEN, where death overtook him.
On December 26, 1857 Mr. Groves was married to Margaret THOMPSON, who still survives after married bliss of more than 62 years. To them were born two daughters, now Mrs. F. M. COPLEN of Mentone, and Mrs. Wilbur EWING, of Kewanna. Besides these, he leaves seven grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, and one sister, Mrs. Marion KAY, of Warsaw, Ind. Funeral services were held at the home of his daughter, March 14, 1919, conducted by Rev. O. E. MILLER, of Mentone. Interment in Sycamore cemetery.

Misses Bertha [GOTTSCHALK], Alice [GOTTSCHALK] and Laura GOTTSCHALK returned Saturday from Peru on account of the death of their grandfather, George SWANK. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. H. O. BLACKBURN Saturday attended the funeral of L. L. WOODS at Rochester. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Earl CRANE and family, of Detroit, arrived here Wednesday, accompanied by the remains of their infant son, who died of influenza. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Union Twp.: John W. CRANE, d. March 11, 1919, ae 11m-17d]

E. C. CANNON and Mrs. Bernice KINGERY went to Flora Wednesday to attend the funeral of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. KINGERY. Both died from influenza. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

A. D. TONER and J. M. TONER and family attended the funeral of J. E. URBIN at Kewanna Tuesday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, March 20, 1919

The following went Wednesday to Van Buren, Ind., where the body of Mrs. J. A. BOLLER was taken for burial: Mr. and Mrs. W. F. WHEADON, J. A. BOLLER and daughter Dorothy [BOLLER], Miss Myrtle BOLLER, Albert WHEADON and Mrs. Sherman FARNER and daughter, Margaret [FARNER].

Friday, March 21, 1919

Leland Glen RUSSELL was born Feb 9, 1885 and died Mar 16, 1919, aged 34 yrs., one month and one week. For the past five or six years he had been living in Chicago. His employment was in the railway service. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen. He had paid a recent visit to his father at the old home, and at this time his failing health was revealed, but his illness was not considered of such a serious nature as to occasion undue alarm, or to cause his friends to expect as untimely a death. Mr. Russell was of a family of 11 children, three of whom mourn with the aged father.

Saturday, March 22, 1919

County Recorder-Elect John N. DOWNS, 44, died at his home on East Ninth St., Saturday at 12:30 p.m. Rochester's first victim of the "sleeping sickness," now prevalent all over the country following the influenza epidemic.
Mr. Downs was taken ill with influenza seven weeks ago, with no untoward symptoms, according to his physician. A gradual amelioration of the symptoms was noticed, followed by nausea and constant vomiting. When this condition has been controlled, Downs lapsed into a semi-coma state, gradually deepening. At this time he suffered no pain. His sensibilities became more obunded, but when commanded he would arouse, merely to resume a peaceful easy sleep, which was his condition when death came.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Myrtle DOWNS, three daughters, Rose [DOWNS], Josephine [DOWNS] and Florence [DOWNS], a son, John [DOWNS], the mother, Mrs. Anna DOWNS, of Reading, Pa.; a sister, Miss Vinnie DOWNS, who lives with her mother and two brothers, Joseph [DOWNS] and Louis DOWNS, both of Pennsylvania.
Mr. Downs, who lost both legs in a railway accident at Sayres, Pa., when but 10 years of age, came to Rochester about 10 years ago from Covington, Ky., where he had moved from his birthplace in Reading, Pa. While in Rochester he followed his trade of cigar maker, until he was elected county recorder on the republican ticket in the fall of 1918.
Funeral arrangements later.

The body of Mrs. Charles PEARSON, who died at her home in Ohio, was brought to this city Friday afternoon. Funeral services were held at 2:00 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the grave. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Perry Oliver RICE, 79, for the past 30 years a resident of the Burton neighborhood and a veteran of the Civil war, died at his farm home southwest of the Burton church early Saturday morning, a victim of heart trouble and old age. He had been ill for a long time.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Elizabeth RICE, two sons, William [RICE], of Rochester, and Albert [RICE], of Michigan and six brothers, Isreal [RICE], of Rochester, Douglas [RICE] and Samuel [RICE] of Michigan, Michael [RICE] and Crist [RICE], of Ligonier, and Elmer [RICE], of Fulton county.
Funeral at the Burton church Monday at 2:00 p.m. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, March 24, 1919

Funeral services for John N. DOWNS in the Christian church at 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, under auspices of the L.O.O.M. lodge, Rev. J. Herbert JONES in charge. The body will be taken Wednesday to Covington, Ky., for burial.

Tuesday, March 25, 1919

Mrs. Claudia SINGLETON GOODALL, of Lockport, Ill., a niece of Miss Lou HOOVER, of this city, died Monday morning. She was a former resident of this city. Funeral Wednesday in that city.

Mrs. A. C. SHEPHERD, 75, died Monday night at her home in LaPorte after a short illness. Funeral services in the Odd Fellows cemetery in this city Thursday morning at 10 o'clock, in charge of the O.E.S.
The Shepherds were former residents of this city. Besides the husband, three children survive: Bert SHEPHERD and Mrs. Carrie EHERENMAN, of LaPorte, and Mrs. Edith POOR, of Massachesetts. Three children are dead.
Ellen STANTON, a native of Indiana, born in 1844, was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benajah STANTON, of LaPorte. On Feb 18, 1864, she was united in marriage to Andrew C. SHEPHERD, then a captain in the Union army. After the war he engaged in business here and prospered, until later years, when reverses came.
About 10 years ago, the Shepherds moved to LaPorte where they had since resided. Mrs. Shephere was a sister of the Late Elwood STANTON, of this city.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: Andrew C. SHEPHERD, Feb 27, 1841 - July 31, 1925; Ellen S. SHEPHERD, his wife, Oct 20, 1843 - March 24, 1919; Brice SHEPHERD, 1813-1867, ae 54y; Prudence A. SHEPHERD, his wife, Dec 25, 1817 - Oct 27, 1909; Children of Andrew C. & Ellen S.: Lucy SHEPHERD, Jan 2, 1870 - Feb 11, 1872, ae 2y-1m-9d; Fred E. SHEPHERD, July 11, 1874 - Sep 21, 1874, ae 2m-10d]

Mr. and Mrs. Heber DUNLAP went today to South Whitley, Ind., to attend the funeral of his uncle, W. H. LANSDOWNE.

Mrs. Adam HOFFMAN has returned to her home in Indianapolis, after being here on account of the death of her father, Geo. SWANK.

Wednesday, March 26, 1919

Friends wishing to view the body of Mrs. A. C. SHEPHERD may call at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank STERNER between 9:00 an 9:30 Thursday morning. The services will be conducted by the order of the Eastern Star at the Odd Fellows cemetery at 10:00 a.m.

Thursday, March 27, 1919

Among those here Thursday morning for the burial services of Mrs. A. C. SHEPHERD, of LaPorte, held at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, were Mr. SHEPHERD, Mr. and Mrs. Egbert SHEPHERD and daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Adam EHERENMANN, of LaPorte, Mr. and Mrs. POOR, of

Massachusetts, and a number of other relatives and friends. The Eastern Star, of which order Mrs. Shepherd was a member, were in charge of the services. The body was brought early Thursday to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank STERNER, W. 9th St.

Claude Omar LAUDEMAN, 26, of Colorado Springs, Col., and a former resident of Rochester, died Wednesday in a hospital at Pocatello, Idaho, a victim of pneumonia, according to word received by his parents, Rev. and Mrs. E. Q. LAUDEMAN, of this city.
Laudeman was ill but a few days, but had only recently recovered from an attack of influenza. The widow, Mrs. Mary LAUDEMAN and infant son, Claude Omar [LAUDEMAN], Jr., were visiting his parents at the time of his demise. Besides the parents, widow and son, there survive two sisters, Misses Faye [LAUDEMAN] and Fern LAUDEMAN, of this city. The body is expected to arrive in this city on Sunday. Funeral at 2:30 p.m., Rev. D. O. WISE, of Berne in charge. Interment in the Mausoleum.
Claude Omar Laudeman was born in Bremen on May 13th, 1892. He was educated in the common schools of various cities where he lived, making his home in Rochester for five years at two different times. He was a student of Winona college for two years, when he was forced to abandon his education and move to the West on account of ill health.
On July 17th, 1917 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary LOND, of Barage, Mich., making his home in Colorado Springs. At the time of his death he was employed as a salesman for the N. K. Fairbanks Co.

Misses Bertha [GOTTSCHALK], Alice [GOTTSCHALK] and Laura GOTTSCHALK returned Thursday to Peru, after being called home on account of the death of their grandfather, Geo. SWANK. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Friday, March 28, 1919

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., Mar 28 -- The funeral of L. L. HIVELY, who died a few days ago in Reed Deer, Saskatchewan, Canada, was held here this afternoon. Hively recently sold everything he owned here, and with his wife and four children, started for the Dominion to locate. En route, he was taken ill, was removed from the train and died of pneumonia in the Reed Deer hospital. The body arrived home this week.

Saturday, March 29, 1919

Funeral services for the late Claude LAUDEMAN will not be held until Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, in the Evangelical church, it was announced Saturday. Shipment of the body from Pocatello, Idaho, was delayed and it is not expected here before Monday night.

Mrs. Minnie May HOOVER, 49, of Chicago, died Friday at the home of her sister, Mrs. Bert HISEY, where she was visiting, after a long illness due to bronchitis.
There survive the husband, Charles HOOVER, three sisters, Mrs. HISEY, Mrs. Levi YOUNG, of this city, and Mrs. George MOON, of Logansport and two brothers, Frank [CARR] and Charles CARR, of Chicago.
Funeral at the home of Mrs. Levi YOUNG Sunday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. J. H. JONES in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Arthur METZLER was summoned Friday to McLean Ill., on account of the death there Thursday of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Chas. DISHER, 40. Besides the husband, four children survive. Funeral at McLean Sunday afternoon.

Mrs. Joel STOCKBERGER went today to South Bend to attend the funeral of a relative.

Monday, March 31, 1919

Mrs. Arthur OSBORN, 23, of Marion, Ind., died Monday morning of pleural pneumonia. She was taken ill last Thursday and grew steadily worse.
Isabelle BEANE was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. BEANE, of Goshen, Ind. In June 1913 she was united in marriage to Arthur OSBORN and they were the parents of one son, Joe [OSBORN], aged about one and one-half years. Besides the husband, son and parents, she leaves one sister, Mrs. Dean L. BARNHART, of this city.
Mr. and Mrs. Beane and Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart were called to Marion Sunday. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Willis HUNTER, 68, died Sunday afternoon at the county farm after a two weeks severe illness of brain trouble. Mr. Hunter was also a cripple.
He leaves two brothers, Otis HUNTER of this city and Cass HUNTER at Loyal and a sister, Mrs. May NORRIS, of Elkhart. Mr. Hunter had been an inmate at the county farm since Oct. 1, 1918.
The funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock in the Poplar Grove church. Burial at Poplar Grove cemetery.

Martha Ellen ZINK, daughter of Wm. R. and Amanda ALEXANDER, was born Dec 31, 1860 in Mechanicsburg, Ind. When about six years old she moved with her parents to Fulton county where she lived until her death, Mar. 13, 1919.
On October 20, 1881 she was married to Joseph F. ZINK and they were the parents of four children, Joseph [ZINK] Finley [ZINK], Mrs. Vady BRUBAKER and Mrs. Dell RAHFELDT. She also leaves to mourn their loss, her parents, four sisters and 15 grandchildren.
The funeral services were held Mar 16th at the Richland Center church, by the Reverends J. S. KROFT, BUEHLER and DAVIS. Burial was made in the Richland Center cemetery.

Kate M. JOHNSON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry JOHNSON, was born at Rochester, Ind., Aug 7th, 1893 and died Mar 18th, 1919 at Middlebranch, Ohio, a victim of influenza.
She was united in marriage in 1908 to Charley H. PEARSON, of Athens, Ind., to which union three children were born: Marguerite [PEARSON], Charleen [PEARSON] and Madge [PEARSON]. Besides the husband and children she leaves her parents and two sisters, Mrs. Charles GOODRICH and Mrs. Della WRIGHT of this city.
The body was brought to Rochester and burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Geo L. SWANK, son of John and Sarah SWANK, was born in Schuylkill county, Pa., May 30, 1840 and died at his home near Green Oak, Mar 15, 1919 aged 78 years, nine months and 15 days.
He was united in marriage Aug 31, 1862 to Miss Fietta R. NOECHER and to this union was born one son, William [SWANK], and four daughters, Mrs. Adam HUFFMAN, of Anderson, Mrs.

Wm. GOTTSCHALK, and Mrs. Geo. GOTTSCHALK, of near Green Oak, and Dora [SWANK], deceased. Besides the wife and children he leaves one brother, Frank SWANK, of Twelve Mile, 18 grandchildren, and one great-grandchild, a number of other relatives and many friends.
At the time of his death, Mr. Swank was a member of the M.E. church at Green Oak. He was a good citizen and a kind neighbor.
Funeral services were held Mar 18 in the Green Oak church, Rev. S. C. NORRIS, of Culver, in charge. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery at Rochester.

If the body of Claude O. LAUDEMAN arrives tonight as expected, it will lie in state at the home of Rev. and Mrs. E. Q. LAUDEMAN Tuesday afternoon and evening. Wednesday forenoon the home will be closed to the public.

Tuesday, April 1, 1919

William "Billy" TRUE, 69, died Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the home of his nephew, Mel TRUE, in East Rochester, after an illness of but a week's duration. Death was caused by pneumonia.
William True was a life long resident of Rochester and was the last of a family of 10. He was practically alone in the world and recently had been in business on Main St., as the proprietor of a peanut stand.
He had been married, but his wife died 16 years ago and there were no children. Mr. True was a baker by trade and for 35 years was a member of the Citizen's Band.
Funeral Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., at the Methodist church, Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body will lie in state in the church from one until two o'clock.
Among those who will be here to attend the funeral are Mr. and Mrs. Fred TRUE and son Ralph [TRUE], Mrs. Samantha TRUE, and Arthur TRUE, all of Chicago.

Funeral services for Mrs. Arthur E. OSBORN at 2:00 p.m. Wednesday in the Marion home of Mr. and Mrs. George A. OSBORN, her parents-in-law. Temporary interment in a mausoleum at Marion.

The body of Claude LAUDEMAN, son of Rev. and Mrs. E. Q. LAUDEMAN, arrived in this city Monday evenong. The remains may be viewed by friends from one until two o'clock Wednesday afternoon in the Evangelical church. Funeral at 2:00 p.m.

The funeral of Mrs. Lucian DOUD was held at the U.B. church Saturday afternoon at 1:30. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Kerch ROBBINS, of Indianapolis, came Friday to attend the funeral of his aunt, Mrs. DOUD. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy BARR, Misses Marie THORPE and Katherine STEVENS and Lee WILE will go Wednesday to Marion, where they will attend the funeral of Mrs. A. E. OSBORN.

Mrs. A. L. DENISTON, Mrs. Floyd Van TRUMP, Mrs. Guy BARR, Mrs. Perry HEATH, Miss Marie THORPE, H. A. BARNHART and several others will attend the funeral of Mrs. Arthur OSBORN at Marion Wednesday.

Wednesday, April 2, 1919

N. R. STONER has received word of the death Wednesday morning at his home in Mentone of his uncle John Riley BLACK, 79, who had been ill for a long time. A widow and seven children survive.

Thursday, April 3, 1919

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, April 3 -- Elwood THOMPSON, 65, a former resident of Rochester, where he was employed as a grocery clerk, committed suicide at his home in South Bend, Wednesday evening, according to word received by relatives here.
The manner in which he took his life was unknown, but he had previously stated that he would commit suicide. Ill health was probably the cause of his act. The funeral will be held here, altho no definite date has been set.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Elwood THOMPSON, 1860-1919; Sue THOMPSON, 1871-1933]

Mrs. J. J. MEYER returned today to her home in Indianapolis after attending the funeral of Claude LAUDEMAN.

Floyd NEFF has returned to his home in Ft. Wayne after being in this city to attend the funeral of Claude LAUDEMAN.

Friday, April 4, 1919

Word from South Bend regarding the suicide of Elwood THOMPSON, 58, formerly of Rochester, reveals that he shot himself late Wednesday and died at four o'clock Thursday morning.
A deep gash was torn in his side just below the heart by the heavy hunting shot which the 12 gauge shot gun contained. After the shooting affray Thompson was rushed to the Epworth hospital in the police ambulance, but efforts to save his life proved futile.
Thompson is said to have been despondent. He had been suffering with paralysis for some time and his continued ill health is believed to have been the cause of his suicide.
The deceased was born Sept 14, 1860, in Akron, Ind., and went to South Bend from Akron seven months ago. Surviving are his wife; three children, Harold [THOMPSON], of South Bend, Mrs. Dwight WERTZ, of South Bend and Howard [THOMPSON], at home; one brother, Wesley [THOMPSON], of Akron, and two sisters, Mrs. James KITCHEN, of Dubuque, Ia., and Mrs. David LEININGER, of Akron.
The body was sent to Akron for funeral services and burial Saturday afternoon.

Mrs. Rebecca Ellen McGEE, 69, died Thursday evening at the home of her son, Francis McGee, east of Athens, after two days illness. She was afflicted with paralysis of the brain.
She is survived by two sons, Edward [McGEE] and Francis [McGEE], and a daughter, Mrs.

Frank MOORE, all of Athens. One daughter and two sons are dead.
Mrs. McGee had always lived near Athens.
Funeral services Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the Athens U. B. church. Burial in Mt. Hope cemetery at Athens.

James ZOLMAN, 70, died of pneumonia Thursday night at his home north of Athens, after an illness of several days. He was first taken ill with influenza. Besides a wife, several children survive. He was a life-long resident of Athens. Funeral services Sunday morning at 10:00 o'clock from the Athens U.B. church. Burial in Mt. Hope cemetery at Athens.

Mr. and Mrs. Foster HAZLETT received a telegram this morning announcing the death of their cousin, Mrs. James SWEENEY, of Chicago. Death was caused by pneumonia. The Sweeneys have a cottage at the lake and spent their summers here.

Saturday, April 5, 1919

Mrs. Ida A. HAINES, 51, died Friday afternoon at her farm home east of Rochester after a long illness. Death was caused by complications.
There survive the husband, John HAINES, and three daughters and two sons. Funeral Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at the Bethlehem Baptist church, Rev. SMITH in charge. Burial at Sycamore cemetery.

Mrs. Gertrude MADARY is in receipt of a letter from C. S. LATHBURY, of Havana, Ill., in which he tells in detail how her son, Clarence Verle MADARY, met his death while with the medical corps in France, about five kilometers from the German lines.
Lathbury states that Madary, together with another orderly in the dental unit in which they were serving, had just completed caring for a wounded soldier when a high explosive shell burst in the trees very close to where they were located. Fragments of the shell passed thru the walls of the building, one of them striking Madary just over the heart. As he dropped to the floor, his companion caught him and summoned a medical officer at once, but death had been instantaneous, an artery having been severed.
Lathbury plans a visit to Rochester in the near future.

Monday, April 7, 1919

Mrs. Sarah MANN, 90, for more than 80 years a resident of Fulton county, died Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the home of A. P. COPELAND after an illness covering a period of 18 months. Death was caused by old age and complications.
Sarah CHINN was born January 23d, 1829 in Shelby county, Ind., the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chichester CHINN. She was one of two boys and nine girls. She moved to this county at the age of nine. Her father was among the first settlers in this locality and the family was here when the Indians were removed from the county.
She received her education in a little log cabin that stood on the present location of the Cy DAVIS Variety store, which was used for a school house, church and court house.
In 1851 she was married to Dr. H. W. MANN, who died in 1864. They were the parents of four children. For 50 years she lived on the corner of Main and Seventh Sts., where the Fieser block now stands.
There survive a daughter, Mrs. H. C. DEVENY, of Oakland, Calif., a sister, Mrs. Lucy

BROWN, of this city, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Mann was the oldest member of the Presbyterian church, joining in 1850. For the past 15 years she had made her home with the Copelands.
Funeral Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. at the Copeland residence on South Main St., Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, April 8, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, April 9, 1919

Mrs. Ruth WAGONER, 21, died at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the farm home east of Rochester, a victim of pneumonia contracted from influenza after a two week's illness. There survive the husband, Harvey WAGONER; two infant daughters; the father, James KOFFEL, of Athens; a brother, Omer KOFFEL, of South Bend and two sisters, Mrs. Lula CARR and Mrs. Ida HART, both northeast of Athens.
Funeral services Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the Athens church, Rev. S. P. STRANG in charge. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery at Athens.

Mrs. C. C. CISSEL went today to Noblesville, Ind., to attend the funeral of her uncle.

Mr. and Mrs. Homer KOFFEL, of South Bend, came today on account of the death of his sister, Mrs. Harvey WAGONER.

Thursday, April 10, 1919

Mrs. Pearl WINTERS CORREL, 22, died Thursday morning of pneumonia, at her home in Wabash. She was a daughter of Mrs. Mel TRUE, of this city. She leaves a husband, mother and one daughter, four years old. Funeral Sunday afternoon at Burket and the burial at Palestine.

Indianapolis papers of Wednesday carried death notices of Rezin REAGEN, evidently the former Rochester high school principal. He died Monday and funeral was held Thursday at West Newton, Ind., from the Friends church. Reagen, who was in the local schools from 1907 to 1910, when R. C. JOHNSON came, studied medicine after leaving here and up until last summer, was practicing in South Dakota. His wife died last summer, after which he inlisted in the Red Cross and went overseas. It was not known here that he had returned or that he was ill. Three children and the parents, Rev. and Mrs. Lindley REAGEN, survive.

Friday, April 11, 1919

Rev. and Mrs. S. P. STRANG returned today to their home in Lapaz. Rev. Strang preached the funeral of Mrs. Harvey WAGONER.

Mrs. Belle ENYART has returned to her home in Elkhart after being called here by the death of her sister, Mrs. Rebecca McGEE.

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin KELSEY and daughter, Vivian [KELSEY], were at Twelve Mile Saturday to attend the funeral of Mr. Kelsey's grandfather. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Saturday, April 12, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, April 14, 1919

George Oliver ANDERSON, 15, until recently a pupil of the Rochester high school, died at the home of his mother, Mrs. Peter MUTCHLER, southwest of the city early Sunday morning, a victim of tetanus contracted from a blister on his heel.
Young Anderson's heel had become chafed from his shoe, but the blister had healed about two weeks ago. Several days before his death, the heel became infected and sore and on Saturday morning, tetanus developed. Serum was used, but to no avail.
There survive, besides the mother, a brother, Robert ANDERSON, of Michigan; three sisters, Mrs. Norah YODER of this city, Miss Beryl ANDERSON, of Chicago and Mrs. Wm. D. WAGONER, northeast of Rochester and the step-father, Peter MUTCHLER. His father preceded him.
Funeral from the Mutchler residence Tuesday at 1:00 p.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at Sycamore cemetery.

Tuesday, April 15, 1919

Mrs. Lottie ROMIG, 47, died at her home on South Elm St., at seven o'clock Monday evening, a victim of dropsy and leakage of the heart, from which she had been suffering for the past nine months.
There survive the husband, Samuel ROMIG, and three sons, Jesse [ROMIG], Fred [ROMIG] and Byron [ROMIG], all residents of this city. The Romigs moved here last fall.
Funeral at the house Wednesday at 11:00 a.m., Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Forsettia Mae [CUNNINGHAM], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George CUNNINGHAM, died Saturday morning at the home of her parents in this city.

Wednesday, April 16, 1919

John W. EISENMAN, 48, a life long resident of this county, died Tuesday afternoon at his home on North Madison St., a victim of tuberculosis, from which he had suffered for the past year.
There survive the mother, Mrs. Margaret EISENMAN; the widow, Mrs. Rachael EISENMAN; two sons, Glen [EISENMAN] and Fred EISENMAN; a daughter, Mrs. Inez PYLE; a step-son, Clarence CALENTINE, now in France; a sister, Mrs. Sadie BEATTIE and two brothers, Henry [EISENMAN], of Kewanna, and Jake [EISENMAN]. All are residents of Fulton county.
Deceased was a son of John G. and Margaret EISENMAN and was born Feb. 4, 1871, in Fulton county. He was one of a family of six children, the father, a sister and brother having preceded him in death.

In 1893, he married Dolla A. BRAMAN, who died in 1900, leaving two sons and a daughter. In 1901, he married Rachael A. BRAMAN. He was baptized early in infancy and united with the U.B. church last October.
Funeral Thursday at 2:00 p.m. at the U.B. church, Rev. George CRANE and Rev. CROFT in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Abner McCAY and daughter, Letha [McCAY], Mrs. Jasper McCAY and son, James [McCAY], and Tom McCAY were in Kewanna Tuesday afternoon to attend the funeral of Mrs. George SCHIRM, who died of heart trouble Saturday evening, her body being found by Mr. SCHIRM, upon his return from town. There survive three daughters, Mrs. Dee ULRICH, of near Rochester, Mrs. James WILSON, of Star City and Mrs. Meta DOCKERY, of Logansport.

Thursday, April 17, 1919

[no obits]

Friday, April 18, 1919

Funeral services for Alphonzo DREW, who died at the home of his son, Chas. DREW, of Whiting, Friday afternoon at three o'clock, at the Tiosa Brethren church, Rev. Ora OXLEY in charge. Burial at Reichter cemetery. Alphonzo Drew was formerly a resident of the Tiosa neighborhood.

Miss None TURNER Friday morning received a telegram stating that Mrs. L. A. BEARD had died at her home in Indianapolis, a victim of blood poisoning. Mr. Beard was the Christian minister in this city about 10 years ago, and at that time the family resided here. Besides the husband, there survive two daughters. Funeral Saturday at Indianapolis and burial at Roachdale, Ind.

Twins, a boy and a girl, were born to Mr. and Mrs. Edward STREBE, north of Macy last week. The boy who weighed the most, died a few minutes after birth. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Funeral services for Mrs. Elmer CORRELL were held Sunday p.m. at the Saints church. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Lester MIKESELL went to Tippecanoe Monday to attend the funeral of an uncle. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Mrs. Dan McINTIRE has gone to Ft. Wayne to attend the funeral of a relative.

Mr. and Mrs. P. M. BUCHANAN were called today to Onward, in Cass county, to attend the funeral of a relative.

Anthony BRAMAN, of Shelbyville, Ill., was called here to attend the funeral of his son-in-law, the late John EISENMAN.

Saturday, April 19, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Emil EVANS and Misses Isabelle [TURNER] and None TURNER will motor Sunday to Roachdale, Ind., to attend the funeral of Mrs. L. A. BEARD.

Monday, April 21, 1919

John Wesley EDMONSON, 64, for the past 16 years a resident of this county, died Sunday evening at nine o'clock at his farm home northeast of Rochester after three years illness. He had been very low during the past few months. Death was due to congestion of the brain.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Mary Ella EDMONSON, two daughters, Mrs. Ray JACKSON, north of Rochester, and Mrs. Samuel ROBBINS, of near Leiters; a sister, Mrs. Anna BEATTIE, of Helena, O., and three brothers, David [EDMONSON], of Helena, O., Nola [EDMONSON], of Flora, Ind., and Frank [EDMONSON], of Frankfort, Ind.
Funeral at the home Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Sarah LISTON, 87, mother of James T. LISTON, died Sunday morning at her home in Waupecong, according to word received here. Besides Mr. Liston, another son, Chas. [LISTON] of Waupecong, and two daughters, Mrs. Isaac MYERS, of Waupecong and Mrs. A. B. ZOOK, of Peru, survive. Funeral at Waupecong at 2:00 p.m. No further details concerning the death were received.

Mrs. Pearl WINTERS CORRELL was born in Kosciusko county, on June 13th, 1897 and departed this life on April 10th, 1919, age 21 years, 9 months and 28 days. The cause of her early departure was influenca and pneumonia. She passed away at the home of Miller CORRELL in the little town of Disko.
In 1913 she was united in marriage to Joseph LOVE of Hammond, Indiana. To this union was born one daughter, Nadine Fay [LOVE]. After separation from her husband, she was again united in marriage with Elmer CORRELL, of Disko, and they made their home at Wabash, Indiana.
At the age of 11 years, Mrs. Correll became a member of the Lincoln M. P. church. She was a faithful attendant at the church for several years, and in the closing moments of her life she expressed herself as being at peace with God.
She is survived by husband; daughter Nadine, four years of age; her mother, Mrs. Melvin TRUE, who resides at Rochester; one brother, Paul WINTERS, and three sisters, Beulah [WINTERS] and Ruth WINTERS and Mrs. Carrie CARROLL, of North Manchester. Her father passed away several years ago at Lucerne, Indiana. - - - -
The funeral service was held at the Church of God at Akron, Indiana on Sunday, April 13th, by Rev. A. J. ESHELMAN. Burial took place at Palestine cemetery.

Tuesday, April 22, 1919

Freemont HOOVER, 65, retired shoe merchant, died Monday evening at his home in Akron, a victim of erysipelas, from which he had been suffering only three days. The widow and a son, Raymond [HOOVER], of Warsaw, survive. Funeral Thursday at the Akron Christian church at 2:30 p.m. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery in Akron.

Mr. and Mrs. Sherman MARSH and son, Earl [MARSH], Friday attended ther funeral of John CLARY at Lucerne. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Wednesday, April 23, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, April 24, 1919

Those from a distance who attended the funeral of J. W. EDMONSON Wednesday p.m., were: Mrs. S. W. BEATTY and daughter, Helena, O.; Mr. and Mrs. E. N. EDMONSON and daughter, Mary [EDMONSON], Flora, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. Nola ROSENBARGER, B. ROSENBARGER, Joe ROBBINS and Geo. McDOWELL and daughter, Delphi, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. James P. BINKERD and Mr. and Mrs. William BINKERD and daughter, Peru, and John MORTON, daughter Mable [MORTON] and son Lawrence [MORTON] and Cecil HALL, Winamac.

Friday, April 25, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Sam ROBBINS were called to Rochester Sunday evening on account of the death of Mrs. ROBBINS' father. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Saturday, April 26, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, April 28, 1919

Everett Dewey BRAMAN, 20, son of Schuyler BRAMAN, of this city, died in a hospital in Lima, Ohio, at 9:00 p.m. Friday as the result of an accident Friday afternoon at Spencerville, O., when he fell from a moving freight train and both legs were cut off.
Braman, who had been employed on the Erie as fireman until recently, was traveling from Huntington to Marion, O., where he intended to seek employment. The father, a brother, Harvey [BRAMAN], of this city, and three sisters, Mrs. Minnie MOORE, Mrs. Robert RESSLER and Mrs. Walter McINTYRE, all of Huntington, survive.
The body was brot here Monday. Funeral Monday at 2:00 p.m. at the Christian church, Rev. Mrs. E. W. COLE in charge. Burial in Citizens' cemetery.

Mrs. Eunice STOFFER, 23, of Disko, formerly a resident of Fulton county, died at the hospital here Saturday evening, a victim of complications.
She is survived by the husband, Bruce STOFFER, five brothers, Clinton [BRYANT], John [BRYANT], Theodore [BRYANT], Howard [BRYANT] and Wesley [BRYANT], the last two named of Argos, and the balance of this county and two sisters, Mrs. Grace MILLER, of Ft. Wayne, and Mrs. Laura MOORE, of this county.
Funeral at the Athens Saints church, Tuesday at 10:00 a.m., Rev. H. M. RIGGLE in charge. Burial at Athens.

Tuesday, April 29, 1919 to Wednesday, April 30, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, May 1, 1919

Mrs. Isaac MECHLING, 60, died Wednesday afternoon at her home five miles north of the city after a long illness of dropsy and heart trouble.
Besides the husband, she leaves one daughter, Mrs. Chas. LEEDY, of near Tiosa, and a sister, Mrs. Caroline CODDY, of Logansport, Ind.
Deceased was a member of the Brethren church at Tiosa, where the funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, Rev. Ora OXLEY in charge.

Friday, May 2, 1919 to Saturday, May 3, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, May 5, 1919

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, Ind., May 5 -- Daniel WHITTENBERGER, 94, the oldest resident of Fulton county where he had made his home for the past 83 years, died at three o'clock Sunday morning at his home here a victim of old age. He had been bedfast for the past three months, but had retained his mentality, in spite of his many years.
Daniel Whittenberger was the fifth son of William and Joanna WHITTENBERGER and was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, April 24, 1825. He was one of a family of 11, 10 boys and one girl, all of whom preceded him. He was the last survivor of the original Akron colony.
When he was seven years of age, the family moved to Ohio and thence, together with six other families to the village of Akron. The last miles of the trip were blazed thru dense forests.
Daniel Whittenberger spent his minority with his parents during which time he acquired sufficient education to enable him to teach a country school. Later he moved to Warren county, Ohio, where he learned the carpenter trade and upon returning to Henry township, erected all of the more substantial buildings of the village.
On February 2nd, 1851, he was united in marriage to Miss Fanny CLOUD, who died on March 7th, 1907. To this union were born three children, two of whom survive, Scott WHITTENBERGER and Mrs. Chas. A. VICKERY, both of Akron. There also survive six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. A son, Charles A. [WHITTENBERGER], is dead.
After his marriage, Mr. Whittenberger and his wife never spent a night apart and it is said that one dollar would pay for all the meals he ate away from home. After he had settled down, he made but one trip out of Fulton county, and was of a very saving and cautious disposition. He had no bad habits such as the use of tobacco, drinking, gambling or swearing and was a steadfast member of the Methodist church. In politics, he was a staunch republican.
Funeral at the Akron M.E. church Tuesday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. W. W. BROWN in charge. Burial at Akron I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, May 6, 1919

Wm. S. McKINNEY, 58, died Tuesday morning at his home in Chicago, according to word received here by his brother, John McKINNEY, Sr. Death was caused by complications. Besides the wife, four children survive. Funeral services from the home Wednesday.
John McKinney went Tuesday to Chicago to attend the funeral.

Wednesday, May 7, 1919

Mrs. Grace MILLER has returned to Ft. Wayne, after attending the funeral of her sister, Mrs. Bruce STOFFER. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

The DANIELS families were called to Miami county the first of the week to attend the funeral of Mrs. M. V. DANIELS' mother. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Rev. George HILL came Tuesday from Michigan, where he had been to attend the funeral of his mother. Today he returned to his home in Crawfordsville.

Thursday, May 8, 1919

The body of Mrs. Mary GREGORY, 62, who died in a hospital at Newcastle Tuesday, arrived here Thursday afternoon and was taken directly to the Citizens cemetery where a short service was held, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Mrs. Gregory, who was a former resident of this city leaves four children, James BATCHELOR, of Newcastle, John BATCHELOR, of Logansport, Ace BATCHELOR, of Greencastle and Mrs. Maggie NICHOLS, of Noblesville.

Friday, May 9, 1919

Miss Dorothy TURNER, 18, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank TURNER, of Center Point, died Wednesday evening at Brazil, Ind., following an operation. She was a granddaughter of F. S. TURNER, of this city.
Miss Turner had been seriously ill only a short time. Miss Isabelle TURNER was called Monday to Brazil and was there at the time of her niece's death. Deceased ws well known here.
Besides her parents, she leaves a younger brother and a number of other relatives. Funeral services at Center Point. The body will be brot Saturday to this city for burial Sunday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Fred TIPTON has received word of the death of his twin sister, Mrs. Alice BOATMAN, 52, of Hennessey, Okla., on May 1st. The funeral services were conducted in that city on May 2nd.

Eunice Marie BRYANT STOFFER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John F. BRYANT, was born in Fulton Co., Ind., Nov. 2d, 1895 and died April 26, 1919, aged 23 years, 5 months and 24 days. She was united in marriage to Bruce STOFFER, Sept 4th, 1917. She leaves to mourn her untimely death, her husband, father, mother, five brothers and two sisters and a host of other relatives and friends. She had a kind and loving disposition, and to know her was to love her. She sought the Lord and found his pardoning love.

Saturday, May 10, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, May 12, 1919

William RUSSELL, 87, died Saturday evening at the home of his granddaughter, Mrs. Ed THOMPSON, of this city, where he had lived for the past 10 years. Death was due to senility. There survive one son, John [RUSSELL], of Seattle, Wash., and a daughter, Mrs. Frank SEVERNS, of this city. Funeral services Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Athens church. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery at Athens.

Tuesday, May 13, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, May 14, 1919

Mrs. Adda QUICK, 55, died very suddenly Wednesday morning at her home one mile north of Athens, a victim of heart failure. She had recovered from an attack of influenza some time ago, but on the morning of her death stated that she was much better. She had eaten breakfast and started working about the house when she fell over. Death was immediately.
There survive the husband, Hubert QUICK, two daughters, Misses Pearl [QUICK] and Grace [QUICK], both at home, and a brother, Omer CAMERER, of this county. Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, May 15, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. Hubert QUICK Sunday afternoon at the Baptist church at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. S. C. Norris, of Culver, in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Alfred TURNER, 31, a former resident of this city, died Wednesday at his home in Breckenridge, following an attack of influenza and complications, according to word received by his father, Frank TURNER, of this city, Thursday morning.
Turner, who was single, was well known in this city and had only recently located in Michigan. He leaves besides the father, two brothers, Sam [TURNER], of Center Point, Ind., and Ray [TURNER], of Decatur, Mich., and three sisters, Isabelle [TURNER], Leone [TURNER] and Marie [TURNER], of this city.
The body will be brot here Saturday according to the present expectations of the family, and the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at the Turner home, Rev. J. Herbert JONES in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Elijah COPELAND, 84, of Chariton, Ia., died at his home Wednesday. He was the last surviving brother of A. C. COPELAND, late Rochester banker. Burial at Marion, Ohio, Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Omar B. SMITH and A. P. COPELAND plan to attend.

Mr. and Mrs. Abner McKAY, Miss Aleatha [McKAY] and Tom McKAY, of near this city, Mrs. O. V. NORRIS, of Fulton, Mr. and Mrs. John WILSON and Hobart WILSON, of Kewanna, motored Wednesday to Linden, Ind., where they attended the funeral of an uncle, Wm. McKAY, 92.

Friday, May 16, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. Hubert QUICK Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Baptist church, Rev. S. C. NORRIS, of Culver in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. It was previously announced that the funeral would be held on Sunday.

Mrs. Rachael BETZ, 82, widow of the late Richard BETZ and for many years a resident of this city, died early Friday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry MEYER, a victim of senility. She had been bedfast only a short time and retained consciousness almost to the end.
There survive two children, the daughter and a son, Eugene BETZ, of South Bend, who was with her at the time of her death. Another son, Grant [BETZ], preceded her.
Funeral arrangements later.

After an illness lasting for nearly a year, Wesley THOMPSON, 67, father of Stanton THOMPSON, died Wednesday afternoon at his home in Akron, a victim of nervous trouble. Funeral Friday afternoon at two o'clock at the Church of the Living God, Rev. RIGGLE in charge.

Alphonzo "Grandpa" DREW was born in Shenango county, New York, July 22, 1832, and died at his home in Whiting April 16th, 1919, after suffering for some time with cancer.
He was united in marriage July 13, 1851 to Celia M. WHALEY. To this union six children were born: Wm. W. [DREW], Lafayette [DREW], Mrs. Zadie M. KESSLER, John H. [DREW], Jake N. [DREW] and Thomas P. [DREW]. He leaves to mourn their loss four children, 15 grandchildren, a number of great-grandchildren and many other relatives.
In 1854 he moved to Fulton county from New York and had lived her until the last four years. He was a minister in the Church of God and a member of that church for more than 50 years.
The funeral services were held at the Brethren church at Tiosa and burial was made in the Reichter cemetery.

Saturday, May 17, 1919

Funeral services for Al TURNER Sunday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the home of his father, Frank TURNER on West 10th St., Rev. J. H. JONES of the Christian church in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Mrs. John BROOM and daughter, of Indianapolis and Ray TURNER, of Decatur, Mich., are here to attend the funeral.

Funeral services for Mrs. Rachael BETZ at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry MEYER on So. Franklin Ave., Sunday afternoon at 2:00 p.m., Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, May 19, 1919

Cal HOOVER was called Sunday to West Superior, Wis., on account of the death of his sister, Mrs. Cora GLAZE. The funeral will be held Tuesday at Mikant, Wis.

Mrs. Omar B. SMITH and A. P. COPELAND were expected home this afternoon from Marion, O., where Saturday they attended the funeral of Elijah COPELAND, of Chariton, Ia.

Tuesday, May 20, 1919

Benjamin Willis COPLEN, 49, died Monday evening at seven o'clock at his home in Clovis, N.M., a victim of blood poisoning, according to word received by his sisters, Mrs Sabitha MOW and Mrs. Rene RUSSELL, of this city.Coplen was well known in this city where he had charge of the Western Union office for a period of two years. The body will be brot to Rochester for burial.

Beulah E. [IRELAN], daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Finley P. IRELAN, died Sunday and was buried Monday at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam TURNER, of Center Point, Ind., and Ray TURNER, of Breckenridge, Mich., have returned to their homes, after being here to attend the funeral of Al TURNER.

Wednesday, May 21, 1919

Mrs. Nellie Jane LINDLEY, 45, died Wednesday morning at her home north of Rochester, a victim of tuberculosis of the spine. She had been ill for a long time. A husband survives but there were no children.Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. James KITCHEN and daughter of Iowa, came Thursday to Akron, having been called by the death of her brother, Wesley THOMPSON. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Adda May CAMERER was born in Fulton county, Oct. 29, 1863 and died May 14, 1919 at her home in Athens. She was the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob CAMERER.
On September 23, 1884 she was united in marriage to Hubert QUICK. They were the parents of five children, three sons who died in infancy and two daughters, Pearl [QUICK] and Grace [QUICK], at home. Besides the husband and daughters she leaves one brother, Omer CAMERER of near this city. Death was caused by heart trouble following influenza.
Mrs. Quick was a member of the Baptist church at Ebenezer and had always lived a devoted Christian life. She was a helpful, sympathetic neighbor and friend.
Funeral services at Baptist church at 2:30 Friday afternoon, lMay 16 with burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery. Rev. S. C. NORRIS of Culver read the service.

Thursday, May 22, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. William LINDLEY, Friday afternoon at the Evangelical church at two o'clock, Rev. J. H. RIGGLE in charge. Burial at Citizens' cemetery.

Otto CARLSON went Wednesday to Wellman, Iowa to attend the funeral of a relative.

Friday, May 23, 1919

Otto CARLSON is in Wellman, Ia., to attend the funeral of Mrs. Henry ENDBE, who died there on Wednesday following an operation. Mrs. Endbe was a sister of Henry PFEIFFER and J. E. BEYER of this city.

Saturday, May 24, 1919

Mrs. Con WELCH and Mrs. Samuel TERRY, both of California, are expected to arrive here Monday afternoon with the body of their mother, Mrs. Hulda WALKER, a former Rochester resident who died last year in the western state. Eastern Stars have been asked to take charge of the services at the grave in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body has been held in a receiving vault at Long Beach until it could be brought here.

Funeral services for Willis COPLEN Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. John W. FERREE, 412 West 4th St., Rev. Geo. F. CRAIG of the Methodist church in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, May 26, 1919

Those from a distance who were here to attend the funeral of Willis COPLEN, which was held Sunday afternoon in the home of his sister, Mrs. Sabitha FERREE, were Mr. and Mrs. Hiram COPLEN of Frankfort, Mr. and Mrs. Simeon COPLEN, of Logansport, Mrs. F. R. POFF, of New York, Mrs. Wm. BUEHLER, of Richland Center, Miss Cleo BRETZ, of Hammond, and Mrs. Sam SHOBE and son, of Plymouth.

Eugene DAVIS, 63, for the past six months an inmate of the county farm, died there late Saturday afternoon, a victim of tuberculosis. Davis, who came to the farm from Wayne township, where he had resided, leaves one brother, whose whereabouts are unknown. Burial at the county farm cemetery Monday afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose OVERMYER, Mrs. Nellie ANDERSON and Howard OVERMYER attended the funeral of Mrs. Overmyer's nephew, at Plymouth, Monday. - - - SOUTH ZION CEMETERY.

Tuesday, May 27, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, May 28, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. Hulda WALKER were held at graveside in I.O.O.F. cemetery here Monday afternoon, with the Eastern Stars in charge. The body was brought here from Long Beach, Calif., by Mr. and Mrs. Con WELCH after interment in a receiving vault since the death.

Mr. and Mrs. Ben McGRIFF motored Friday to Milford to attend the funeral of Lou BECKNER. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth ROMIG was held at this place Tuesday of last week. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Thursday, May 29, 1919

William R. McCARTER, 75, a life long resident of Fulton county, who lived two and a quarter miles northeast of Rochester, died at seven o'clock Thursday morning at the hospital as the result of an accident Wednesday afternoon when the auto which he was driving in Rochester, was struck at the Anchor Mills crossing by a Lake Erie freight train.
Mr. McCarter suffered a fractured pelvis and numerous other bruises and cuts. He was rushed to the hospital immediately following the accident and treatment was given. It is believed that death was largely due to shock.
William R. McCarter was born in Fulton county on March 21st, 1844, within a half mile of where he now resides. He spent his entire life in the same neighborhood, with the exception of the time he was in the Civil war, serving in Co. F, 87th Indiana infantry. He was a member of McClung Post G.A.R and the Evangelical church.
In December 1867, he was united in marriage to Miss Catherine HAIMBAUGH, who survives. There are two children, Mrs. Harley BARKMAN, at home, and Frank McCARTER, of the First National Bank, Rochester.
Funeral at the farm home Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, May 30, 1919 to Saturday, May 31, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, June 2, 1919

Word was received here Saturday evening of the death of Melvin MILLER, of Ft. Wayne. He is well known here having married Miss Grace BRYANT, of this city. He died of tuberculosis, which he contracted while in training at Camp Taylor. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at Ft. Wayne.

Funeral services for Mrs. Louisa BRUGH, 92, one of the oldest women in Fulton county, were held Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church in Leiters Ford, Rev. ROUSCH in charge. Burial in the nearby Leiters cemetery.
Mrs. Brugh died Thursday evening at the home of her son, Wilson, with whom she had lived for a number of years. Some time ago, she broke her hip in a fall and had since gradually failed. For 51 years she had made her home in Aubbeenaubbee township, Fulton county. Her husband, William BRUGH, who was just six months her senior, died about 18 years ago.
Louisa KLINK was born in Pennsylvania, in the year 1827 and moved soon afterward to Ohio, later coming to Steuben county, Indiana, and in 1863 moving to the locality where she resided the rest of her days, and where she was well and favorably known.
There survive five sons, Wilson [BRUGH], at home; Charles [BRUGH], of Charlotte, Mich.; Joe [BRUGH], of near St. Joe, Mich.; Lafe [BRUGH], of Jackson, Mich., and Eli [BRUGH], of Grand Rapids, and three daughters, Mrs. John GINTHER, Mrs. Caroline SALES and Mrs. Ida CORBETT, all of near Leiters.
Among those from a distance at the funeral were the two sons, Chas. and Levi, and Mrs. Elizabeth BRUGH, daughter-in-law of the latter, and her daughter, Maxine [BRUGH]. Her

husband was killed about a year ago in a rail accident.

Mrs. Lewis MURRAY, 57, a resident of Newcastle township, died Sunday of heart failure. She was a sister of Charles [ROSS], Albert [ROSS], Loy [ROSS] and Wm. ROSS, of this city. Besides her husband and the four brothers in Rochester, she leaves one sister, Mrs. Lee TIPPY, of Talma, and a brother, Ferd ROSS, of Detroit, Mich. Funeral services Wednesday afternoon from the home, Rev. Geo. CRAIG in charge.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: Lewis S. MURRAY, 1869-1957; Minnie C. MURRAY, 1861-1919; Fannie R. MURRAY, 1884-1951]

Tuesday, June 3, 1919

Mrs. Fannie WORKING, 68, died Monday evening of dropsy in the home of her daughter, Mrs. Milton ALSPACH, West Fourth St., with whom she made her home. She had always been a resident of this city. her husband, Mack WORKING, was killed about three years ago on the Erie railroad. About three weeks ago, she underwent an operation at Woodlawn hospital, after having been ill for some time.
There survive three daughters and one son, Mrs. Henry FELTY and Mrs. Milton ALSPACH, of this city, and Mrs. C. H. TYLER, of Grand Rapids and M. BRUGH; a sister, Mrs. Carrie STUBBS, of Marion, Ind., and a brother, Tony KEELY, of Hartford City.
Funeral services Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the residence of Milton ALSPACH, Rev. Geo. CRAIG in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Jacob Franklin [MYERS, Jr., 21 [?] months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray MYERS, died Monday evening at the home of his parents on East 8th Street. Death was caused by spinal meningitis, altho the child's illness was at one time pronounced erysipelas. Mrs. Myers is prostrated as a result of the death. The child was ill but a short time.
Funeral services Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock in the Presbyterian church, Rev. H. G. GAIGE in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, June 4, 1919

Fannie KEELY WORKING, was born December 5, 1850, in Fulton county, the daughter of James and Mary KEELY. In 1869 she was united in marriage to William J. BRUGH, of this county. To this union were born six children, two of whom, with the husband, preceded her in death. Several years later she was united in marriage to Marquis E. WORKING, who was killed. Early in life she united with the Methodist church and for years took an active part in the work, until incapacitated in late years by ill health.
Funeral services Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the residence of Milton ALSPACH, Rev. Geo. CRAIG in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, June 5, 1919

A touching letter has been received by Mrs. Gertrude MADARY, of this city, mother of Clarence Verle MADARY, who lost his life in France, from Dr. E. M. COLLE, Jr., of New York, who was the young man's commanding officer.
The doctor writes under date of May 28th, as follows: "I do not want to let Decoration Day

go by without sending you a word both from me and from Mrs. Colle, for we both feel equally for you in your genuine and honest pride in Clarence's work and in your sense of loss.
"In my mind's eye, I can now see the grave in the flower bed at Pleinchamps Farm, near Chebery. Then it was torn by shell fire and by the newly turned earth of the half dozen graves that are in that little plot, now it is all green at the borders and I doubt not that there are flowers there, for I knew something of the Farm and of the family that live there. They were attached to the place from having lived there for several generations.
"Sergeant Chartbonneau, the present owner, was in the French Army as a medical department soldier and not very long after Clarence's death he visited us there. He had a short leave and took that chance to see for the first time since the outbreak of the war the place where he had spent his childhood. He was a very pleasant and serious minded man and spoke English very well. I have had one or two letters from him and I feel that Clarence's grave is situated with friends.
"We both, Mrs. Colle and I., send you kindest regards to all."

Helen Louise BASSETT, five, daughter of Wm. and Mrs. Cleo BASSETT, 43 North Randolph street, Indianapolis, formerly of Rochester, was fatally injured Tuesday night when an automobile in which she was riding was in collision with another machine. She died early Wednesday at her home.
The child was riding with her grandmother and Frank OLDHAM, who rooms at the Bassett home. When the car was struck she was thrown to the pavement and suffered a fractured skull. Oldham's machine was moving east in New York street when an aubomobile driven by E. SKAGGS, South Sixth avenue, Beech Grove, which was moving south in Rural street struck them.
The little girl's father is in France with the army. Funeral services from the home Friday afternoon with burial in Crown Hill Cemetery.
The Bassetts formerly resided in Rochester, where he managed a motion picture show, and later ran a launch at the lake, where his mother has a summer home. The parents of the child were divorced some time ago.

Minnie C. ROSS was born in Marshall county, Indiana, Oct 5th, 1861, and died June 1st, 1919. She was united in marriage to Lewis S. MURRAY, August 23, 1884. They resided in Mishawaka for a number of years before coming to Talma in 1915, where they resided since on a farm. Mrs. Murray leaves a husband, Lewis MURRAY; one sister, Mrs. Etta TIPPY, of Talma and five brothers, Charles [ROSS], William [ROSS], Albert [ROSS] and Loy [ROSS], all of Rochester, and Ferd [ROSS], of Detroit, Mich. In early life Mrs. Murray showed a decided interest in spiritual matters, and demonstrated this by uniting with the Episcopal church, of which she was a faithful member until her death. Her social nature found expression in various activities. She was a charter member of the Evergreen, Rebekah lodge, of which she was an active member until her death. Funeral in M.E. church at Rochester, Wednesday, June 4. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. John TYLER, of Grand Rapids, Mich., and Mont BRUGH, of Hammond, were in this city to attend the funeral of their mother, Mrs. Fannie WORKING.

Friday, June 6, 1919 to Saturday, June 7, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, June 9, 1919

Another Fulton county soldier made the supreme sacrifice in the world war, according to a telegram received last week by Mrs. William NICODEMUS, of this city, in which her son, Private John A. NICODEMUS, previously reported missing in action between Oct. 1, and 11, 1918, is now reported killed. The message was signed by Harris, adjutant general.
Wm. Nicodemus, the father, stated Monday, he would start action to secure the six months insurance now due, in order to verify his son's death, because of the many conflicting reports he has received.
Mr. Nicodemus recently had word from the Red Cross that his son had returned to his division, the 1st, and was with the Q.M. corps, so he had asked the War Dept to verify this by cable. The boy's last letter home was dated Mar. 21, 1918, altho several cards were received last fall, evidently written by a nurse. John was twice wounded.

Margaret Alice NYE, 58, wife of H. E. NYE, northeast of Talma, died Saturday evening in the offices of Dr. M. O. KING, of this city, where she had been taken for treatment while suffering from a heart attack.
Mrs. Nye was riding in an auto when she first became ill. Her breath came in gasps and she was hurried to Rochester for medical attendance. Two minutes after she was taken in the doctor's office she died. There had been no previous indications of any illness. Besides the husband, a son survives. Mrs. Nye was born in Defiance county, Ohio, Mar. 30, 1861, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John SANDERS.
Funeral Tuesday at 11:00 a.m. at the Mount Hope church. Burial at Mount Hope cemetery.

Word has been received here of the death at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John TAYLOR, at Peru on Sunday, of Mrs. Rachel LIVESAY, 76, a former resident of this city. She had been an invalid for the past eight years. Funeral at Mt. Olive church Tuesday at 10:30 a.m.

Lee [WILE], Arthur [WILE] and Miss Rose WILE have gone to Indianapolis, where they will attend the funeral of an uncle.

Tuesday, June 10, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 11, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. John STAYTON, who died Tuesday evening in her home west of Argos, will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Athens church, Rev. Albert VERMILLION of Maxinkuckee in charge. Burial in Mt. Hope cemetery.

Thursday, June 12, 1919 to Friday, June 13, 1919

[no obits]

Saturday, June 14, 1919

Friday, June 13th, was a black day for Fulton county, two suicides, a man and a woman, between whom there was not the remotest connection, having been committed on that unlucky day.
Mrs. Doris EWER, 38, swallowed an ounce bottle of carbolic acid at her home in Fulton at six o'clock Friday evening, and altho everything possible was done to alleviate the horrible burns she suffered, death overtook her two hours later.
Mrs. Ewer, who had been ill for the past two years, and who was said to have been suffering with a nervous affliction, had indicated that life was no longer sweet to her and intimated that she would commit suicide.
Friday afternoon she sent her little daughter, Earsel [EWER], to the drug store for an ounce of carbolic acid, which she explained was to be used to poison insects.
Later in the day she prepared the evening meal as usual, and when her husband and daughter sat down to eat, she arose from the table declaring that she did not feel like eating.
She then went into her bedroom where she swallowed the acid. Fearing such action, altho he did not know of the acid, her husband followed her into the room, but not before she had taken the poison.
Medical aid was summoned immediately, but she died at eight o'clock, two hours after.
That her act was premeditated was shown not only by the fact that she had previously intimated it, but also by the fact that she left three notes, one to her husband, another to her daughter and a third to her father, Henry RICHARDSON, of near Twelve Mile.
The contents of these notes were kept secret, but it was intimated that they contained not only her words of parting to her family, but also the reason for her act, which was said to have followed family trouble.
Besides the husband, daughter and father, a step-mother and brother, Elbert [RICHARDSON], survive. Funeral at the home Sunday at two o'clock, Rev. Harley STYTH in charge. Burial at Skinner cemetery, east of Twelve Mile.
The husband, Ben F. EWER, is in the coal and cement business and able to furnish all of the wants of his family, but is was said to be a lack of fidelity that caused her action.
__________

Benjamin Theodore BALDWIN, 38, ended his life by hanging himself in a buggy shed on the farm of his brother, William BALDWIN, of near Loyal, late Friday afternoon.
Baldwin, who had made a previous attempt at his life by hanging, following an attack of influenza last year, had been declared of unsound mind by an insanity commission and had been committed to Longcliff.
It had been impossible, however, since that time, to get him into the asylum, which is crowded, and as a result he has been cared for by the members of his family.
For eight weeks, following his first attempt at suicice, he lived with a brother in Mishawaka, returning later to the Baldwin farm near Loyal. It was known that he again contemplated suicice, and careful watch was maintainced at all times.
He was very weak and under a physician's care at the time he took his life, but even tho these conditions prevailed, ropes, straps, harness, etc., were kept hidden, as it was believed that if he again attempted his life it would be by the hanging method.
Friday aftrnoon he went to the house and took his medicine as usual. From there he started for the barn and Mrs. Wlliam BALDWIN, who was in the house, noticing about 10 minutes later that he was not seated in an old buggy as was his custom, sent her daughter to look for him. The girl came back to the house shortly and reported that he could not be found.
Mrs. Baldwin then left the house herself and noticing that a buggy-shed door was open, went in and found him there hanging with his feet only a short distance from the ground with a piece of binder twine about his neck. He had jumped from a manure spreader.
She got him down, and altho not dead at this time, she was unable to bring the fleeting life back. He only moved his arm once and could speak no words.
There survive the widow, Nora BALDWIN, three sons, Charles [BALDWIN], John [BALDWIN] and Thomas [BALDWIN], a daughter, Anna [BALDWIN], four brothers, William [BALDWIN], of near Loyal and Norman [BALDWIN], Omar [BALDWIN] and Albert [BALDWIN], of Mishawaka, and three sisters, Ella BALDWIN, of Ohio, and Mrs. Ruth KEHLER and Mrs. Sarah HIRSCH, of Mishawaka. The parents and a son preceded him.
Funeral at the U.B. church in Rochester Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. George CRANE in charge. Burial at Sand Hill cemetery.

Rachel Ann MILLER, daughter of Wm. and Martha MILLER was born in Fulton county May 29, 1843 and died June 8, 1919 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John TAYLOR, at Peru. Most of her life was spent in this county.
In October 1871 she was united in marriage to George W. LIVESAY. They were the parents of four children, Wm. B. [LIVESAY], of Seattle, Wash., Mrs. TAYLOR, of Peru and two daughters who preceded her in death. She also leaves two brothers, John W. MILLER and Ben F. MILLER, of Rochester, four half-brothers and two granddaughters. She was a member of the United Brethren church of Rochester. Funeral service was held Tuesday morning at the Mt. olive church with burial in the Mt. Olive cemetery.

Monday, June 16, 1919

James Melvin GIBBONS, 46, of South Bend, a former resident of this city, died at 5:37 p.m. Saturday at the Woodlawn hospital, where he had been under treatment following an operation Monday, May 26, for major internal disorders. At the time of the operation, attending physicians held no hope for his recovery, and while he fought hard, death was triumphant. Altho probably afflicted for years, his ill health only became apparent recently.
James Melvin Gibbons was born at the Gibbons homestead near Richland Center on May 7th, 1873, a son of James B. and Julia A. GIBBONS, deceased.
He was educated in the schools of the county, taking normal work and later teaching in local schools. He was united in marriage to Adella A. HORNER, of Howe, Ind., on September 18, 1907. To this union were born two children, Margaret Elizabeth [GIBBONS], nine, and James Joseph [GIBBONS], three, who with the widow, two brothers, Chas. M. GIBBONS, (a twin), of Terre Haute and W. S. GIBBONS, of Rochester, and two sisters, Carrie M. OVERMYER, of this city and Cora E. OSBORNE, of Argos, survive.
Of late years, he was employed by Swift & Co., of Chicago and Kingan and Co., of Indianapolis, as salesman and for the past three years was the branch manager at South Bend for the Holland Furnace Co. He always enjoyed the complete confidence of his employers and those with whom he was associated.
He was a member of the Rochester Masonic and Knights of Pythias lodges. A distinct and predominating feature of his life was the ease with which he made friends and the acceptability of these friends. His home life was replete and he took great interest in the present and future welfare of his family.
Funeral at the Methodist church at 2:00 p.m. Monday conducted by Masons of Rochester lodge No. 79, with sermon by Rev. George F. CRAIG. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, June 17, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 18, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. STINSON attended the [James M.] GIBBONS funeral Monday at Rochester. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Thursday, June 19, 1919

[no obits]

Friday, June 20, 1919

Further information of the death of John NICODEMUS in France was received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William NICODEMUS, of this city, when they had word from the War department reporting information as to the disposition of the body in case death is a fact. They indicated that the body should be returned to Rochester. Mrs. Nicodemus has been prostrated since first receiving reliable information of the death of her son, altho the family still has hopes that a mistake has been made.

Mrs. Lincoln McINTOSH, 18, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John FIELDS, of the Burton neighborhood, died Thursday evening at her home in Grass Creek, after an operation for appendicitis too long delayed. Besides the husband and parents, she leaves six brothers and a sister. She was married only last December. Funeral Saturday at 1:00 p.m. in Burton church. Burial in Moon cemetery.

Benjamin Theodore BALDWIN was born in Kosciusko county July 24, 1882, and after a long period of ill health, died June 13, 1919, age 37 years, 11 months and 11 days. On Feb 10, 1908 he was united in marriage to Miss Norah BECK. To this union five children were born: Anna [BALDWIN], John [BALDWIN], Charles [BALDWIN] and Tom [BALDWIN] and one son who died in infancy. Mr. Baldwin will be missed by his family for he was a kind husband and father. He was a faithful member of the U. B. church, where the funeral was held, Rev. Geo. R. CRANE in charge.

Saturday, June 21, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. L. J. EWER, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. EWER, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. ROSS and family and Mr. and Mrs. Otis LOSHER attended the funeral of Mrs. Ben EWER Sunday at Fulton. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Monday, June 23, 1919

Absalom NELLANS, 86, southeast of Fulton, and formerly a resident of Rochester when he served as county treasurer, died at his farm home Sunday morning after suffering for a long time from gangrene, according to word received by his daughter, Mrs. William ROUCH.
Besides Mrs. Rouch, the widow, Mrs. Mahalia NELLANS and five other children, Clara NELLANS, southwest of Fulton, William [NELLANS], at home, Francis [NELLANS], of South Bend, Guy [NELLANS], west of Fulton and Charles [NELLANS], of Goshen, survive.
Funeral at Fulton U. B. church Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock.Burial at Fulton cemetery.

Tuesday, June 24, 1919

Francis NELLANS came this afternoon from South Bend to attend the funeral of his uncle, Absalom NELLANS.

Wednesday, June 25, 1919

Daniel GOODRICH, 32, died very suddenly Wednesday morning at the home of his mother, Mrs. Mary GOODRICH on South Franklin Ave. Death, according to Dr. Archie STINSON, of Athens, county coroner, who was summoned, was caused by acute indigestion followed by neuralgia of the heart. The theory was also advanced that an apoplectic condition was predominant, altho his health had apparently been good up to the time of his death.
Goodrich, who was a cigar maker by trade and had been employed here recently, had been living with his half-sister, Mrs. Nora PARKER, for the past week or 10 days, but went to bed at his mother's home late Tuesday evening. He arose early Wednesday morning about six o'clock and went outside.
Returning to the house he got into bed and his mother, going in to see him, discovered that he was suffering intensely, evidently from stomach cramps. A physician was summoned at once, but death came before medical aid reached him.
Altho rational up to the time of death, Goodrich had little to say to his mother and sister, Mrs. Elizabeth STINSON, who was also in the house, except for the fact that he was very ill.
Daniel Goodrich was born in Rochester on June 3rd, 1887, a son of Mrs. Mary and Alfred GOODRICH, the latter deceased. He was drafted from this county and served in the army during the war at Camp Taylor and Camp Custer, having been recently discharged.
Since that time he was married, the widow, Mrs. Amelia GOODRICH, being in Ft. Wayne with her mother at the time of his death. There survive besides the mother and widow three brothers, Charles [GOODRICH], Alfred [GOODRICH] and Vernon GOODRICH, all of this city, two half-brothers, William PARKER, of Rochester, and John PARKER, of Kewanna, and two half-sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth STINSON and Miss Nora PARKER.
He was a member of the Plymouth aerie, F.O.E. Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, June 26, 1919

Funeral services for Daniel GOODRICH Friday at 2:00 p.m. at the home 1223 So. Franklin Ave., conducted by Rev. W. J. NIVEN, Rochester Aerie F.O.E. in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. Mrs. Goodrich, who was visiting in Ft. Wayne at the time of the death, and other relatives have arrived.

Milo WYNN, 36, died at nine o'clock Wednesday morning at his home in Tiosa, a victim of tuberculosis, from which he had suffered for the past six months. A brother, Jacob [WYNN], died just three months prvious of the same cause.
Wynn, who was a school teacher, was well known all over the county. There survive the widow, Mrs. Edna WYNN, a brother, William [WYNN], of Michigan, and two sisters, Mrs. Mary TOWNE and Mrs. Barbara FLETCHER, of Marshall county.
Funeral Friday afternoon at the Richland Center M.E. church. Burial at Richland Center cemetery.

Friday, June 27, 1919

[no paper available]

Saturday, June 28, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, June 30, 1919

[no paper available]

Tuesday, July 1, 1919

[no paper available]

Wednesday, July 2, 1919

George S. COOK, 78, died at his home on South Bancraft Ave., Wednesday at 12:30 p.m., a victim of a complication of diseases, from which he had suffered for nearly a year. He had been bedfast, however, only a short time. Four children survive, Mrs. William NEWCOMB and Howard [COOK], Elmer [COOK] and Avery COOK, all of this city, the latter being in the army. Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, July 3, 1919

Details of the horrible accident which resulted in the death of Howard STEININGER, 56, at Beebee, Ark., were related Thursday by Chauncey HIATT and Forest STEININGER, who returned Wednesday evening with the body, via Logansport.
It appears that Steininger took a team to his barn, which was some distance from the house, about noon on Saturday, June 28. When he did not appear in the evening, a search was made and his almost lifelike and unrecognizable body was found in a mule's stall, under the animal's feet. One leg was broken in two places, one ear was off, several ribs were broken, practically all of his clothes were torn off, and his body was a mass of cuts and bruises. He lived until Sunday morning.
Besides the widow, a son and two daughters in Redlands, Calif., there survive a daughter, Mrs. Charles FISHER, of Beebee, who with her husband, returned with the body; two sons, Irvin [STEININGER], of Auburn, and Forest [STEININGER], of near Rochester; a sister, Mrs. Chauncey HIATT, and two brothers, Henry [STEININGER] and Milo [STEININGER], all of near

Rochester, and a brother, Frank [STEININGER], of Copemish, Mich.
Funeral services at South Germany church, Friday morning at 10:00 o'clock, with Rev. S. KROFT and probably Rev. J. W. METZNER, of Elkhart, in charge. Burial at South Germany.

The funeral services for Geo. COOK will be held Saturday p.m. at 2:30 o'clock at the home, corner Bancroft Ave., and 13th St. Rev. W. J. NIVEN of the Baptist church will have charge of the services and burial will be made at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Emma [TROXAL], daughter of David and Susan TROXAL, was born July 27, 1859, in Dark Co., Ohio. In her early girlhood she moved to Indiana, where she was converted and united with the United Brethren church. She later transferred her membership to the Liberty Chapel Christian Church northeast of Rochester, of which she was a member at the time of her death.
She was united in marriage June 10, 1893, to Jackson MORRIS. Her first husband preceded her in death on Feb 8, 1905.
She was again united in marriage to John STAYTON,west of Argos, April 9, 1906. She departed this life June 10, 1919 aged 60 years, 10 months and 23 days.
Besides her husband she leaves an only daughter, Mrs. Fred AULT, of Rochester, four grandchildren, five step-children, a sister, Miss Mattie TROXAL of Dayton, Ohio, and many other relatives and friends.
Funeral services were held in the United Brethren church at Athens. Interment in the adjoining cemetery, Rev. A. L. VERMILLION in charge.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Andrew J. MORRIS, Mar 14, 1840 - Feb 8, 1905, ae 64y-10m-24d]

Mrs. James MASON returned Wednesday evening from Urbana, Ill., where she was called by the death of her brother-in-law, James GAULT. She visited friends a few days before returning.

Friday, July 4, 1919

[no paper - holiday]

Saturday, July 5, 1919

Lester S. REID, 51, died Friday morning at 9:30 o'clock at the home of his mother, Mrs. Frank REID on West Eighth St., after a long illness. Death was due to a complication of diseases.
Besides the mother, there survive the widow, Mrs. Sadie REID and two children, Paul [REID] and Marion [REID], of Warsaw and a sister, Mrs. James RYAN, of Chicago.
Funeral Sunday at 3:00 p.m. at the house, Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Nancy Catherine KILE, 69, died Friday at 12:30 p.m. in her home near Loyal, death being due to heart failure. Her husband has been dead for some time.
Funeral service Sunday at 11:00 a.m., from the Burton church. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, July 7, 1919

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 8, 1919

Friends here have learned of the death of Miss Mable THRASHER, 24, at Rockville, Ind., on June 15th. She formerly lived in this city.
Miss Flora Mable THRASHER, daughter of Chas. and Charlotte THRASHER, was born May 30, 1895 at Seafield, Ind. At the age of seven, she moved with her parents to Gilman, Ill., where they lived for five years. They then moved to Paxton, Ill., and later to Culver, Ill., [sic] where she graduated from high school in 1915. After attending normal school at Valparaiso, Miss Thrasher began teaching at Rochester and while here her health failed. In the fall of 1917, she entered the tuberculosis sanitarium at Rockville, where she satyed until her death.
Besides the mother, of this city, one sister, Miss Leota THRASHER, and a brother, Capt. Chas. Orval THRASHER, now in France, survive. Her father died in 1913. The funeral service was held at the Presbyterian church in Paxton on Friday, June 30th, Rev. O. G. HESS, assisted by Rev. Howard SMITH, in charge. Burial was made in the cemetery there.

Wednesday, July 9, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Ed SPARKS went to Aurora, Ill., last week to attend the funeral of a relative. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Thursday, July 10, 1919

Special to the Sentinel
Akron, July 10 -- Arlo [WHITE], nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John WHITE, northwest of Akron, died suddenly Thursday morning as a result of becoming overheated on Wednesday, according to a verdict returned by Dr. A. E. STINSON, county coroner.
The lad and his mother were in the house alone at the time of his death. Mrs.White ws awakened by the screams of the boy at about four o'clock in the morning. She rushed to his bedside, but her son had died before she could reach him.
Mr. and Mrs. White, who are prostrated by the death of their only child, declared that the boy's health had been almost perfect all his life. He showed no signs of illness in any form upon retiring Wednesday evening.

Mrs. Mary CARR, 65, died Thursday morning last at her home in South Bend, after a long illness, according to word received here. She was a former resident of Rochester and is survived by six children, five sisters and two brothers.

Friday, July 11, 1919

Alden K. ASHELMAN, aged about 66, made despondent by illness, hung himself in a corn crib on his farm six and a half miles northeast of Rochester, about 5:15 o'clock Friday morning.
The body was discovered by Ray KINDIG, who farms the place, at 5:30 and life was then

extinct. Mr. Ashelman had been bothered with cancerous trouble on his face for about two years. Operations had failed to give him relief, and of late it was noticed by relatives that his mind was becoming affected.
Besides the widow, there survive three daughters, Mrs. W. H. SHEETS, of Rochester, Mrs. J. S. THOMPSON, of Churubusco, and Mrs. Lyman HIGGINS, of Anderson; two sisters, Mrs. Helen CASE, of Topeka, Kas., and Mrs. James COPLEN, of near Akron, and a brother, Alvah ASHELMAN, of California.
Mr. Ashelman was born in Henry township, Fulton county, in 1853, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel ASHELMAN, now deceased. About 40 years ago, he moved on the farm where he died and had operated it continuously up until about two years ago, when his health failed.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Emma CAMERER went today to Rushville, Ind., where she will attend the funeral of Mrs. Lucinda HARCOURT.

Saturday, July 12, 1919

Funeral services for Alden K. ASHELMAN at home in country Sunday, July 13, at 1:30 p.m. Burial in Athens cemetery. Rev. Wm. REEDER, of Kewanna, in charge of services.

Monday, July 14, 1919

Mrs. Maria HATFIELD died Sunday at her home in Winamac. She was the mother of Loring W. HATFIELD, of Talma, and was a resident of this city for many years. Funeral Wednesday morning at Winamac. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery here.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: Lewis D. HATFIELD, d. Nov 27, 1888, ae 26y-20d; Henry HATFIELD, 1827-1900; Maria HATFIELD, his wife, 1831-1919]

Tuesday, July 15, 1919

Maurice A. SHARPE, 24, died in a hospital in Pittsburgh, Pa., Monday, after an illness of less than four weeks, during which he underwent three operations, the first for appendicitis and the latter two for abscesses of the stomach, according to word received by his sister, Mrs. Dow HAIMBAUGH, of this city.
Sharpe, who was well known in this city, had recently been discharged from military service, having served two years as an aviator in this country. He held a captain's commission.
He is survived by a widow, Mrs. Margaret SHARPE, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer SHARPE, of Greencastle, three sisters, Mrs. HAIMBAUGH, Mrs. Thad JONES, of Greencastle and Miss Edith [SHARPE], at home, and a brother, Russell [SHARPE], of New York.
Dr. and Mrs. Haimbaugh went Tuesday to Greencastle where the body was expected and where funeral will be held.

Wednesday, July 16, 1919

Floyd E. HARMON, 28, who is included as one of the men killed in the destruction of the American mine sweeper, Richard H. Buckley, by the explosion of a mine in the North sea, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. George HARMON, of near Gilead, Miami county. The young man received his training at the Great Lakes naval station at Chicago. He enlisted in Indianapolis in February, 1918. Besides his parents he is survived by four brothers and two sisters, Fred [HARMON], Russell [HARMON], Ray [HARMON] and George HARMON, Jr., and Misses Atha [HARMON] and Mamie HARMON.

Alden E. ASHELMAN was born in Darke County, Ohio, March 14th, 1863. Died July 11, 1919, age 66 years, three months and 25 days. He was a son of Samuel and Lydia ASHELMAN. When about 2 years old he came with his parents to Akron. Later they moved to the farm now owned by John BARR.
December 18, 1877 he was united in marriage with Villetta M. SWARTZLANDER and to this union were born six children, of whom three died in infancy. Those living are Lula M. SHEETS, of Rochester, Bertha E. THOMPSON, of Churubusco, and Eva G. HIGGINS, of Anderson. Those left to mourn the loss are his wife, three daughters and six grandsons, Estel [SHEETS], Loy [SHEETS] and Leon SHEETS, Forrest [THOMPSON] and Ralph THOMPSON and Alden HIGGINS.
In 1902 he united with the Bethlehem Baptist church. Funeral was held at the U. B. church Sunday, July 13, conducted by Rev. READER, of Kewanna; burial in cemetery nearby.

Thursday, July 17, 1919

The funeral of Maurice A. SHARP, who died in a hospital at Pittsburg, Pa., was held in the Locust Street M. E. church at Greencastle Thursday morning. The services were in charge of Dr. H. A. GOBLE, of DePauw University, Dr. D. W. NICHOLS, Prof. H. B. GOUGH and Dr. Salem D. TOWN. Burial at Greencastle.

Mrs. E. T. JONES Thursday received word of the death of her aunt, Mrs. Agnes COOK GRIFFIN, at Hamilton, Steuben county, Indiana. Funeral Saturday at 10:30 a.m., in Kewanna, her former home. Besides the husband, M. B. GRIFFIN, there survive two children by the first husband, Mrs. Wm. GREY, of Kewanna, and Alphus COOK, of Hamilton.

Friday, July 18, 1919 to Monday, July 21, 1919

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 22, 1919

Mrs. E. HOLZMAN, of this city, went Monday to Cincinnati to attend the funeral of her aged brother, Louis FEDER, who died recently in his home there. Mr. Feder was well known here where he was interested, a number of years ago, in the clothing firm of FEDER and SILBERBURG, on E. 8th St. His wife died many years ago, but there survive two sons, Mark [FEDER] and Walter [FEDER], who are also well known here. Ike FEDER, a brother, of New York, also is living. Particulars about the death were not learned.

Wednesday, July 23, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, July 24, 1919

John Williamson IRVINE, 72, died Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock at his home in Newcastle township after a long illness. Death was caused by a canceristic condition of the oesophagus. Mr. Irvine was born in Fulton county on Feb 15, 1847, and had always lived in this county.
Besides the wife, Ango Nettie IRVINE, he leaves two daughters, Mrs. Stella SURGUY and Mrs. Etta COONEY, of Newcastle township, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Another daughter, Anna Christina [IRVINE], died at the age of 13.
Funeral services at the residence Friday afternoon, Rev. THOMAS in charge. Burial at the Reichter cemetery.

Friday, July 25, 1919

Mrs. Neal STAUFFER and Mrs. Beve BUSSERT went today to Tiosa to attend the funeral of John IRVINE.

Louis ENSIGN, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank ENSIGN, of Boise, Idaho, is here for a months visit with relatives. He was met in Chicago today by his grandfather, C. E. PLANK, after having made the trip from Boise with his aunt, Mrs. Louis ENSIGN, who was bringing to Beloit, Wis., the body of her mother, who died recently.

Saturday, July 26, 1919

Word has been received here that A. P. JENKS, cashier of the City National bank at Logansport, and father-in-law of Carl McCLUNG, formerly of Rochester, dropped dead while at work Saturday morning. A daughter, Miss Ada JENKS, often visited here.

Monday, July 28, 1919

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 29, 1919

Word was received here of the death of Mrs. Mattie WARE at her home in Kewanna. She was the widow of Frank WARE and a sister of Miss Nannie McGRAW, formerly a teacher here. Funeral service at three o'clock Wednesday, at Kewanna.

Mrs. C. A. MITCHELL, Sr., went today to Kokomo to attend the funeral of a relative.

Wednesday, July 30, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, July 31, 1919

Mrs. E. HOLZMAN, No. Main St., has returned from Cincinnati, where she attended the funeral of her brother, Lou FEDER, well known here. It is said that his death was due to an injury to his spinal cord, sustained during chiropractic treatment in California. The chiropractor is said to have disappeared immediately after the mishap.

Friday, August 1, 1919

Mrs. Katherine NEWCOMB, 73, widow of the late Edwin NEWCOMB, died at four o'clock Friday morning at the home of her son, Elmer Newcomb, of near Athens, following illness of over a month's duration. Death was caused by complications and old age.
Mrs. Newcomb had been a resident of Fulton county for the past 37 years during which time she has spent all but two years on the Newcomb farm, south of the city. During two years she lived in Rochester, on So. Main Street. Four weeks ago, she was removed from her home to that of her son.
There survive two sons, Elmer [NEWCOMB] and Henry NEWCOMB, and four daughters, Mrs. Margaret HASTY, of Huntington; Mrs. Fanny HESS, of Columbia City; Mrs. Elizabeth SNYDER, of Edison, Neb., and Mrs. Mary SNYDER, of Burns, Mont.
Funeral service at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

James WATSON, 89, a well known pioneer farmer, died Wednesday evening at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William HERENDEEN, of Disko. He leaves four daughters and one son.

Saturday, August 2, 1919

After an illness of only four days duration, Mrs. Stella HILAND, 43, wife of Alonzo HILAND, south of the city, died Friday night at the hospital where she had been taken for treatment. Death was caused by strangulation of the bowls.
Besides the husband, there survive three brothers, William [GOSSETT], Roy [GOSSETT] and Frank GOSSETT, the former two of Valparaiso and the latter of Chicago. There were no children.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at three o'clock at the Monterey Methodist church. Burial at the Monterey cemetery.

Mollie NEWCOMER SHADLE daughter of John and Mary NEWCOMER, was born in Fulton county July 30th, 1852 and died July 24th, 1919, aged 66 years, 11 months and 24 days. Most of her life was spent in Aubbeenaubbee township. On Augut 2, 1877 she was united in marriage to Chas. W. SHADLE and to them, eight children were born, four of them dying in infancy. Those living are: Mrs. Grace ROBINSON, of Delong; Mrs. Sarah HAY, of Logansport and Edward SHADLE and Mrs. Amanda GREEN, of near Delong. A brother, Edward NEWCOMER, of Logansport and a sister, Mrs. Sarah FIKE of LaVelle, Wis., are also living. For many years Mrs. Shadle had been an active member of the Methodist church at Delong. The funeral service was held Sunday, July 27th at 10:00 from that church, Rev. Chas. ROUSH in charge. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery at Leiters Ford.

Milo [WYNN], son of Marion and Elizabeth WYNN, was born on a farm near Tiosa, Ind., Sept 29, 1885, and died June 25, 1919 after suffering from lung trouble following an attack of influenza. Mr. Wynn had been a teacher in the schools of the county for a number of years, having attended the township school where he lived, Rochester Normal school and Purdue University. His success in his work was due to the spirit and enthusiasm he put into it. Besides his wife, he leaves a step-mother, Mrs. Mary WYNN, one brother, Wm. WYNN of Detroit, Mich., two sisters, Mrs. Claude FLETCHER and Mrs. Wm. TOWN of Argos and many other relatives. Funeral services were held at the M. E. church in Richland Center on June 27th, Rev. A. A. DUNLAVY in charge.

Monday, August 4, 1919

George RICHARDSON, 67, died Saturday afternoon at his home near Mud Lake. Funeral and burial at Macy Monday afternoon. Mrs. Joseph EHLINGER, of this city, was a daughter.

Catherine [SHAUCK], the eldest daughter of Henry and Sophia SHAUCK, was born in White county, Ind., Nov 8, 1846 and departed this life after an illness of five weeks, at the home of her son, Elmer NEWCOMB, near Rochester, August 1, 1919 at the age of 73 years nine months and seven days.
She was united in marriage with Edwin A. NEWCOMB, deceased, March 4, 1869. To this union were born four children: Henry M. [NEWCOMB], Elmer M. [NEWCOMB], Daniel M. [NEWCOMB] and an infant daughter. She raised two step-daughters, Hattie BISHOP, now residing in Bellingham, Washington and Viola, deceased.
There remain to mourn her loss, four sisters, Margaret HASTY, of Huntington; Elizabeth SNYDER, of Edison, Nebraska; Fanny HESS, of Columbia City and Mary SNYDER, of Burns, Montana; eight grandchildren and a host of friends and neighbors.

Tuesday, August 5, 1919

Rev. Riley CONNER, 60, a Methodist minister, died Monday night at his home near Macy. He leaves a wife and two sons. Rev. Conner had been sick for three years.

Wednesday, August 6, 1919

The funeral of J. R. CONNER, 61, who died Monday evening about 5:00 o'clock, at his home near Wagoners, Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. in Macy, Rev. S. C. NORRIS, of Culver, officiating. Mr. Conner, who was ill for five years, was at one time a Methodist minister. He was the father of Mrs. Dell KESSLER, of this city. Besides the widow, several children survive.

John W. RICHARDSON, son of John and Salome RICHARDSON, was born in Henry Co., Ind., Oct 10th, 1851, and died August 2, 1919.
When about five years old he came with his parents to Fulton Co.
On April 1, 1874 he was united in marriage to Lydia STALEY and they lived 37 years on the farm where he died. They were the parents of four children: Clara E. EHLINGER, of Rochester; Elmer RICHARDSON, of Logansport, Cora B. DuBOIS, of Macy and Geo. O. RICHARDSON, of Rochester.
Besides the wife and children, he leaves 14, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, two brothers and two sisters. He was a member of the United Brethren church at Mt. Pleasant. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. O. L. RICHART, of Fulton, in the M.E. church at Macy. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery there.

Thursday, August 7, 1919

Funeral services for Mrs. J. E. KAISER, a resident of Culver, formerly of Peru, were held Thursday afternoon at Peru. She was formerly Miss Flora HETZNER, and is survived by her husband and three daughters and one son, Alfred HETZNER, of this city. Among those who attended the funeral from here were Mr. and Mrs. Michael HETZNER, Mr. and Mrs. Frank DAVIDSON, Mrs. Loy ROSS and a number of others.

Rev. J. Riley CONNER died at his home four miles east of Macy, Monday afternoon, after four years illness with bronchial asthma, during which time he was unable to lie down. Thruout his illness he was a most patient sufferer.
He leaves a wife; one daughter, Mrs. Etta KESSLER, of Rochesteer; two sons, Lawrence [CONNER] and Merrill [CONNER]; four grandchildren; one brother, Rev. Lincoln CONNER, of Cleveland, Ohio, and a host of friends.
In his younger days he was a frontier preacher, but later came back to this community and resided on his farm, and was a local preacher until his sickness. He was born in this community about 60 years ago, and for many years has been an active member of the Methodist church.
Funeral was held at the M.E. church here Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. S. C. NORRIS, of Culver, assisted by Rev. Thos. DAVIES, of this place. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Friday, August 8, 1919

Fred RANNELLS, 39, was instantly killed at 7:30 o'clock Friday morning when a two ton girder, which was being loaded into a gondola car in the yards of the ROCHESTER BRIDGE CO., broke loose and fell over on him, crushing his body against the iron sides of the car under its enormous weight.
Rannells, who has been employed at the factory over a year, was the foreman of the loading yards. It was his duty to direct the boom that controlled the huge pieces of structural iron as they were lowered from a crane into their places on the car.
Rannells and his assistants had been at work for almost an hour when this accident occurred, having already partly loaded one car. The victim of the accident was standing in the car, in the corner of which the piece was to be placed. Two steel hooks are used to lift the steel, and it was when one of these straightened out that the girder dropt down into the car and fell over against the side hitting Rannells.
The men working with him were made helpless by the appalling accident, but a nearby employe ran to the scene of the trouble and quickly placed new hooks on the girder and it was lifted from the body. His head was badly crushed and his neck broken. Death was instantaneous. The body was removed to the Zimmerman morgue.
Fred Rannells, who was a son of Dr. Scott RANNELLS (deceased), had long been a resident of this city and the neighboring town of Argos. Previous to his employment at the bridge factory, he had been for more than eight years driver of one of the Arlington Hotel busses, where he made many friends. Besides this city and Argos, he had also been a resident of Sevanstopol and Hoopeston, Ill.
There survive the widow, Mrs. Blanche RANNELLS, the mother, Mrs. Lewis BAILEY of Leiters Ford, and a half-sister, Miss Cora RANNELLS, of Los Angeles, Calif.
As a result of the accident, the Bridge factory was shut down for the day as a mark of respect to the victim, who was one of the most popular employes.
Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, August 9, 1919

Funeral services for Fred RANNELLS, killed Friday morning in an accident at the Rochester Bridge factory at 2:30 p.m., Sunday in the house on West Eighth St., conducted by Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN, I.O.O.F. in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, August 11, 1919

John KESLER, 83, two miles southeast of Talma, former auditor of Fulton county, died at the hospital here early Sunday morning, where he had recently undergone an operation. He had practically recovered from the effects of the operation when complications set in causing his death.
John Kesler was born in Ohio, where he resided with his parents until they moved on a farm in this county when he was 16 years of age. He has been a resident of Fulton county for 67 years.
He was twice married, both wives having preceded him. There survive five daughters, Mrs. James VANDORAN, of Mentone, Mrs. Oliver SEVERNS, of Mentone, Mrs. Robert EMMONS, of Warsaw and Mrs. Elmer RATHFON, of Talma, and two sons, John [KESLER], of Knox, and Milton [KESLER], of Talma.
Funeral at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the BEthlehem church, northeast of the city. Burial at Sycamore cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Sycamore Cemetery, Newcastle Twp.: John KESLER, 1836-1919; Mary J. KESLER, his wife, 1841-1890; Martha A. KESLER, his wife, 1850-1901]

Mrs. Ruth A. SWEET, 87, widow of Ira M. SWEET, for the past 48 years a resident of this city, died Saturday evening at her home on W. Ninth St., a victim of old age and complications. She had been ill for a period of five weeks.
There survive three sons, Beecher [SWEET], at home, Arthur [SWEET], of Copenish, Mich., and William [SWEET], of Long Beach, Calif., and two daughters, Mrs. B. M. HUSON, of Robinson, Ka., and Mrs. C. S. PAYNE, of Bird City, Ka. A son and daughter preceded her. She was a member of the Christian church and the W. R. C.
Funeral at the home Monday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. J. Herbert JONES in charge.Burial at Citizens cemetery.

Tuesday, August 12, 1919

Paul GUISE, 30, who lives near Teegarden, was accidently killed Monday when a gun he was using to kill rats went off and the charge penetrated his heart. A widow and several children survive.
Guise was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. GEISE, of the Bruce Lake neighborhood. He was born and raised on his parents' farm and was well known here. He was a farmer and school teacher.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Paul GUISE, 1890-1919; Eva L. GUISE, his wife, 1893- (no d.d.); Hal GUISE, baby, 1916 (one date only)]

Word has been received here of the death at five o'clock Monday evening at her home in Marion, of Mrs. J. R. BABCOCK, sister-in-law of A. E. BABCOCK, of this city, who was called there Monday. Four children survive, two daughters and two sons. Funeral at Marion Wednesday afternoon. Burial at Dunkirk.

The following people have returned to their homes after attending the funeral of Fred RANNELLS: Mr. and Mrs. Robert STEWART and children and Chas. ANDERSON, of Fort Wayne; Mr. and Mrs. Maurice RUPE, Cassopolis, Mich.; Mrs. E. R. FORST, Sullivan, Ind.; Mrs. Gus REETZ, Huntington, Ind.; Mrs. Ed YOUNSTORE, Chicago, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. Joe MEYERS, Knox, Ind.; Robert RANNELLS and son Edward [RANNELLS] of Bass Lake; Mr. and Mrs. Geo RUPE, Mr. and Mrs. Frank RUPE and Joe RUPE, of South Bend, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. Sam SHOBE and son, of Plymojth; Mr. and Mrs. Allya DAY, of Akron; Mr. and Mrs. Burton GREEN and daughter, of Perrysburg; Mr. and Mrs. Loy COOK and Mr. and Mrs. B. B. CAMPBELL, of Leiters Ford; Mr. and Mrs.Wm. COOK, of Monterey; and Mr. and Mrs. J. C. RUPE, Mr. and Mrs. Elda SISSEL, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. HOBBS, Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton MILLER, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert SHEELEY, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene DEMONT and daughter, Ed and Inez RUBE and Mrs. Jesse RHODES, of Argos.

Wednesday, August 13, 1919 to Thursday, August 14, 1919

[no obits]

Friday, August 15, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. BABCOCK returned Thursday evening from Marion, Ind., where they were called by the death of Mrs. J. R. BABCOCK. They were accompanied home by Miss Mary BABCOCK, who will spend several weeks with them.

Mrs. William CLAY, of this city, was called Wednesday to Plymouth by the death of her father, Frank FERTIG, 67, who died after an illness of two weeks duration. Besides Mrs. Clay, there survive the widow and four children, Floyd [FERTIG], of Plymouth, Harry [FERTIG] and Edward [FERTIG], of Grand Rapids, Mich., and Mrs. Frank McCANN, of Glendale, Calif. Funeral at the home in Plymouth, Friday morning.

Mrs. Melissa M. PARKER, 78, wife of Samuel PARKER, 1225 South Monroe St., died at her home Thursday evening at 6:30 o'clock. Death was the result of influenza contracted in April from which she never recovered. Mrs. Parker had been confined to her bed since May 1st, and with failing strength due to old age could not overcome the disease.
There survive her husband Samuel P. PARKER, and two daughters, Mrs. A. E. GOULD, Pacific Grove, Col., and Mrs. Will LOY, Rochester. One son, LeRoy [PARKER], died in infancy.
Funeral at the Parker home on Saturday at 2:30 p.m., Rev. J. Herbert JONES in charge, with

the ladies of the Relief Corps in charge at the cemetery.

Saturday, August 16, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, August 18, 1919

Mrs. Howard DuBOIS and Mrs. B. F. FRETZ went today to Auburn, Ind., to attend the funeral of Phillip SIBERT.

Tuesday, August 19, 1919

Crystal WRIGHT, seven, daughter of Mrs. Norah WRIGHT, of Argos, died at Woodlawn hospital early Tuesday morning. Death was the result of embolism. The body was taken to the Hoover morgue. Funeral at Hoover chapel 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Rev. Geo. CRANE in charge.

Wednesday, August 20, 1919

Malissa M. SHARP was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, July 18, 1842, and died Aug 14, 1919, age 77 years and 27 days.
In 1848 she moved with her parents to Indiana, near Columbus, and here grew to young womanhood. On Oct 14, 1862 she was married to Samuel PARKER and to this union three children were born, Theodosia [GOULD], wife of A. E. GOULD, of Pacific Grove, Calif, Leroy [PARKER], who died in infancy and Mrs. Wm. G. LOY, of this city.
Grandma Parker, as she was known to her friends, was a faithful member of the Christian church.
Besides the children, she leaves the husband and many relatives and friends.
The funeral service was conducted at the home on South Monroe St., Saturday afternoon, Aug 16th by her pastor, Rev. J. Herbert JONES. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The W.R.C., of which she was a member, had charge of the services.

Margaret WADE, nee SELBY, daughter of David and Julia SELBY, was born in Idaville, White Co., Ind., January 8, 1874 and died at her home in Logansport, August 13, 1919, aged 45 years, seven months and four days.
On June 26, 1902 she was united in marriage to Luther WADE and has since that time lived at Logansport. She was a member of the Wheatland Ave., M. E. church and of the Woodmen Circle.
She leaves to mourn her departure, the husband, her father, one brother, M. A. SELBY, of Royal Center, a sister, Mrs. E. E. HOBBS, of Indianapolis, and three step-daughters, Mrs. Jerry WHALON, of Logansport and Mrs. Arley GILLILAND and Mrs. Fred PERSCHBACHER, of Rochester. Mrs. Selby had been ill for several years.
The funeral service was held at the home on Aug 14th at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. C. McCLURE, of Royal Center, in charge.

Carrie Dell [BRUBAKER], daughter of S. F. and Samantha BRUBAKER, was born in Fulton county Aug. 27, 1821 and died at her home in Marion, Ind., Aug 11, 1919.
She was educated in the schools of Fulton county. On Nov. 9, 1892, she was united in marriage to James R. BABCOCK. At that time they removed to Grant county where they have since resided.
Mrs. Babcock was a member of the Methodist church and an honored member of the W.C.T.U.
Besides her aged parents, Mrs. Babcock leaves to mourn their loss, a sister, Mrs. L. O. HICKMAN, of Dunkirk, the husband and four children, Marvin [BABCOCK], of Muncie, Mrs. Vaughn BRAGG, of Sweetzer and James [BABCOCK] and Mary [BABCOCK] at home. Her youngest son, Robert [BABCOCK], preceded her in death. She was a dutiful daughter, a loving wife and mother and a faithful friend.

Among those from a distance who came for the funeral of Mrs. C. D. TOWN were, Mr. and Mrs. O. ANDREWS, of Tipton; Miss Florence PERSONETTE and Mr. and Mrs. Elmer LEMON, of Hammond, and James PERSONETTE, of Niles, Mich. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Elizabeth Jane TOWN, daughter of Isaac R. and Sarah PERSONETTE, passed away suddenly Thursday evening, Aug. 14.
Besides her husband, C. D. TOWN, she leaves five children, Dora ANDERSON, of Tipton; Lily FLETCHER, of Culver; Charles [TOWN] of Tiosa; William [TOWN] of Argos and Fred [TOWN] of Plymouth, 12 grandchiodren and two great-grandchildren. Two daughters, Eva [TOWN] and Mrs. Rhoda SPITLER preceded the mother in death.
Funeral services here conducted by Rev. A. L. VERMILLION Sunday at 10:30 a.m. at Richland Center. Burial in nearby cemetery. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Thursday, August 21, 1919

[no obits]

Friday, August 22, 1919

By International News Service
Indianapolis, Ind., Aug 22 -- James RYAN, aged about 45, foreman of an erecting gang for the ROCHESTER BRIDGE CO., which has the contract on a boilerhouse for the G. & J. Tire Co., on E. Georgia St., here, was fatally injured when a derrick fell about noon today, and died in an ambulance on the way to the hospital.
Ryan was superintending the removal of the derrick from the second story, when its base slipped and he was struck, crushing his right arm and leg and injuring him internally. His home is in Chicago, where a widow and daughter survive.
__________

Officials of the Bridge Co., here, who were advised of the accident, said Ryan was a Chicago man, not well known here, but long in their employ. This is the second fatal accident for the company in three weeks.

Saturday, August 23, 1919

L. M. SPOTTS, 77, Civil War and newspaper man, died of apoplexy, Friday evening at 6:30 p.m., in the home of Mrs. Martha Metcalf and Mrs. Alice Emrick, on North Main Street. Mr. Spotts, whose health had been declining for the past year, was seated at the table eating his supper, when the stroke came upon him. He died within five minutes, before aid could reach him.
Lewis M. SPOTTS was born at Rochester, July 16, 1842, the oldest of seven children. He entered the newspaper field at an early age and was partner with the late M. L. ESSICK in publishing the Rochester Union Spy, when the war came on. On hearing that war had been declared, Mr. Spotts, then 19 years of age, put down the stick of type he was setting, and walked out to enlist. He fought for the entire four years with Co. B, 87th infantry, and was honorably discharged. After the war, he resumed, with Mr. Essick, the publishing of the Spy, until 1888. He then moved his family to Roann, where for the next 26 years he was editor and publisher of the Roann Clarion. He retired in 1915 because of failing eyesight, moved to Rochester and lived with his children.
Mr. Spotts is survived by five brothers and sisters, Mrs. Martha METCALF, Mrs. Alice EMRICK, Mrs. O. P. OSGOOD, all of Rochester; Mrs. Chas. HAYNES, of Indianapolis, and Wm. E. SPOTTS, of Goshen. Two daughters are living, Mrs. T. F. BERRY and Mrs. Dwight DuBOIS, both of Rochester. His wife and infant son both preceded him in death.
Funeral at the residence of O. P. OSGOOD, West Sixth street, at three o'clock Sunday, Rev. H. E. BUTLER in charge. Burial at the Odd Fellows Cemetery with the local chapter of the G.A.R. in charge.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: Lewis M. SPOTTS, 1st Sgt Co D 87th Ind Inf (no dates); Frances W. SPOTTS, 1847-1903; Harry C. SPOTTS, 1870-1889]

Monday, August 25, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. John CESSNA and Mr. and Mrs. Frank RUSH went this morning to Chicago to attend the funeral of a relative.

Tuesday, August 26, 1919 to Wednesday, August 27, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, August 28, 1919

Mrs. Pearl CARR, 47, widow of the late Andy CARR, died early Thursday morning at the hospital where she had been undergoing treatment following an operation five weeks ago for the removal of a goitre. She had practically recovered and had been discharged from the hospital, when a relapse set in and she was forced to return.
Mrs. Carr, who had been a resident of Plymouth for the past two years, formerly lived in this city. There survive her mother, Mrs. Susan ZINN, of Plymouth, a son, Howard [CARR], and a brother, Roy SHANKS, of Plymouth.
Funeral Friday afternoon at two o'clock at the Hoover chapel, Rev. H. E. BUTLER in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, August 29, 1919 to Wednesday, September 3, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, September 4, 1919

Darwin A. POENIX, 62, west of Rochester, died very suddenly of heart failure Wednesday at 1:30 p.m., while inspecting a farm just north of Niles, Mich. He was in company with John and David WOLF, who were also looking over the farm, when he was first stricken. A doctor was summoned and he recovered. Later the physician and David Wolf left, and it was while walking about the place with John WOLF that he was again overcome. Before medical aid could reach him he had died. The body was brot to this city Thursday morning for burial.
A widow, Mrs. Lucile POENIX, two daughters, Mrs. Otie EMMONS, of Newcastle township, and Mrs. Peter COLEMAN, of South Bend, and a son, Russell POENIX, of Fulton, survive. Mr. Poenix had been a resident of this county for nearly 20 years.
Funeral arrangements later.

Miss Kate JOHNSON, 70, was born near Martinsburg, West Va., on Jan 9, 1849 and died Sept 3, 1919, at the I.O.O.F. home at Greensburg, Ind., where she had lived since January 1916. She was formerly a resident of this city where she was a charter member of the Christian church. One sister survives, a Mrs. SHOEMAKER, of Jeffersonville, Ind. Funeral services at the Christian church Friday morning at 10:00 o'clock, the Evergreen Rebekah lodge in charge.

Friday, September 5, 1919 to Saturday, September 6, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, September 8, 1919

Charles H. NORRIS, 63, one of the best known wholesale grocery salesmen in the state, and a citizen of this county for many years, died at his home, 1308 Madison street, Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. His death followed an illness of more than a year and was due to a complication of diseases.
After having led a strenuous life for more than 50 years, Mr. Norris suffered a break down in July 1918 at his home in this city and grew steadily worse. Last week his condition became alarming and attending physicians gave up hope for recovery.
Mr. Norris was born in Macy, Miami county, Indiana on May 3, 1866 and lived there for the first twenty-five years of his life. He was married on Jan 28, 1886, to Betty FARRAR, of Macy. Shortly after the birth of their only son, Harry NORRIS, they moved to Rochester, Mr. Norris becoming associated in the wholesale grocery business. He lived in Rochester for many years and later moved back here after having made his home in Lafayette and Logansport.
He is survived by his wife and son, Harry, of this city and a brother, William C. [NORRIS], also of Rochester.
Funeral at home Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. George F. CRAIG, of the Methodist church, officiating. Burial in the Macy cemetery.

Mrs. Emma BRYANT, 50, died Saturday evening at the county farm. She was insane and had been an invalid for years. Death was caused by tuberculosis. She was the daughter of Wm. BRYANT, formerly of this county and has only one relative living, a sister, Mrs. GASKILL, in California. Funeral service at the county farm Monday afternoon a four o'clock, with burial there.

Darwin Addison POENIX was born May 8th, 1857, near Moundsville, W. Virginia, and departed this life Sept 3rd, 1919, aged 62 years three months and 26 days.
He was left an orphan at an early age. In his early manood he moved to West Liberty, W. Virginia, and became a student of West Liberty academy. In 1885 he took a homestead in Western Kansas, later moving to Hoopeston, Illinois. In 1903 he moved west of Rochester where he resided at the time of his death.
He was united in marriage with Luella KIRKPATRICK, Nov. 11, 1888. To this union were born three children, Russell E. [POENIX], of Fulton, Mrs. Otis EMMONS, of near Rochester and Mrs. Clarence COLEMAN, of South Bend, Ind., all of whom together with the wife and two grandchildren survive.
In 1903 he was converted and became a lifelong member of the United Brethren church.

Tuesday, September 9, 1919 to Thursday, September 11, 1919

[no obits]

Friday, September 12, 1919

L. J. HURST, 60, a prominent citizen of Macy and better known as "Little Jim," died suddenly Thursday morning while preparing breakfast, supposedly of either heart trouble or apoplexy. He and his half-brother, Abe GEPHART, lived together about one-half mile south of Macy. It was his custom to prepare their breakfast and his brother heard him working in the kitchen. He then heard him fall.
Mr. Hurst was a partner of A. S. HOFFMAN in buying and shipping cattle. He leaves one son, Glen HURST, and two grandchildren, Bernard [HURST] and Harriet HURST. His wife, who was formerly Miss Victoria ENYART, preceded him in death about 25 years ago. Two children, Charles Glen [HURST] and Ivy [HURST], died in childhood.
He was an active member of the Christian church and a member of the Mason and Eastern Star lodges of this place.
Funeral in the Christian church Friday p.m., Masons and O.E.S. and Rev. J. Thomas W. LUCKEY in charge. Burial in Plainview cemetery.

Saturday, September 13, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, September 15, 1919

Relatives here received word Sunday of the death of R. W. JACKSON, of Bettsville, O. He was a brother of the late Geo. W. JACKSON, of this city.

Tuesday, September 16, 1919

Mrs. Henry STEININGER and Mrs. Bert FLETCHER attended Mrs. O'BLENNIS' funeral at Leiters Ford Monday afternoon. She was an old neighbor of Mrs. Steininger. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. cemetery: Elizabeth McGREW OBLENIS, mother, July 28, 1845 - Sep 13, 1919]

Wednesday, September 17, 1919

Gordon HALDEMAN, two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter HALDEMAN, of Akron, died Tuesday evenng after an illness of two days. Last winter the child had the influenza and had not been very strong since that time. The funeral service will be held in Akron Thursday afternoon.

Wm. SANDERS took a number of people to Peru Wednesday where they attended the funeral of a sister of Nick ROBBINS, formerly of this city.

Thursday, September 18, 1919

Mrs. J. POWNALL, 76, who lived west of Fulton and was one of the old settlers of the county, died Wednesday night from a stroke of paralysis. This was the third stroke Mrs. Pownall had suffered.
The old lady had made her home with her son, P. J. POWNALL, for years and was living here when the end came. Her husband preceded her. Funeral Friday afternoon at the P. J. Pownall residence.

Friday, September 19, 1919

Claude PUTMAN, 30, an ex-service man who lived with his father, Dave PUTMAN, a half mile west of Athens, was instantly killed about four o'clock Friday afternoon, when he drove his horse in front of the Erie fast train, number four, at the "Joe Putman" crossing west of Athens. Putman had halted his horse to allow an east bound freight train to pass on the south track. Just as soon as the caboose cleared the crossing, he started to cross, when before he knew it the express bore down upon him, hitting the horse and knocking the entire outfit fifteen feet down the track. Putman was carried thirty feet behond the horse and it is thot he never knew what struck him as his skull was crushed. The horse was killed and the buggy demolished.
The men of a section crew following the train were the first to reach the scene of the accident but found there was nothing to do as life had already passed from Putman's body. The next to appear on the scene was Folen Putman, brother of the dead man, who had been working in a nearby field, had seen the accident and had hurried to the crossing little suspecting that he would find his brother. It is said that the train was late and running exceedingly fast to make up lost time.
Coroner A. E. STINSON, of Athens, was notified, and on examining the body found a large gash in the frontal bone, the skull crushed, and the left collar bone broken. He stated that death must have been instantaneous.

Putman had been in the service for a year and had returned in July to work with his father on their farm. He is survived by his father, two brothers, Folen [PUTMAN] and Audrey [PUTMAN], and a married sister, Velda [PUTMAN], who lives at Peru. He was unmarried.
Funeral notice later.

Death took two people from the Akron neighborhood during the week.

Lloyd ENGLE, 31, died Tuesday night as the result of influenca from which he suffered last winter. Direct cause of the death was heart lesion. He leaves a wife.

Mrs. Una TUCKER, 31, passed away Wednesday morning as the result of cancers. She was operated upon last February for her affliction but at that time the physician said she could not live a month. She leaves her parents, a husband and two children.

Saturday, September 20, 1919 to Monday, September 22, 1919

[no obits]

Tuesday, September 23, 1919

William BUMBARGER, 74, a resident of Fulton county for many years, died at his home near the Burton church, west of the city, at 11 o'clock Monday night. Death was due to a complication of diseases. Mr. Bumbarger was born in 1845 in Canton, Ohio, and shortly afterwards his parents moved to Indiana and he later located in Fulton county. He is survived by two sons, John [BUMBARGER] and Charles [BUMBARGER] and a daughter whose home is in Illinois. The date for the funeral has not been set pending the arrival of the daughter.

Mrs. Jane SURGUY, 62, died Friday Sept. 1th [sic] at the home of her son, Harry [SURGUY], in South Bend after an illness of more than 10 years. Death was caused by a complication of diseases. Mrs. Surguy was a resident of this county, living near Sand Hill until about six years ago. Her husband preceded her in death. Two children survive, Harry [SURGUY] and George [SURGUY] of South Bend. The body was brought to Sand Hill Monday where the funeral service was conducted by Rev. BECK of South Bend, and burial was made in the Sand Hill cemetery.

Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Jane SURGUY, of South Bend, formerly of this place. - - - SAND HILL ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry STEININGER and Mr. and Mrs. Bert FLETCHER attended the funeral of their cousin, Claud PUTMAN, at Akron Sunday afternoon. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.

Wednesday, September 24, 1919

Despondent because his son, Don [HOOVER], with the A. E. F. in Germany, had not been returned home, Frank HOOVER, 67, a well known farmer living near Mt. Zion, committed suicide at 9 o'clock this morning by hanging himself by a rope suspended from rafters in the hayloft of his barn. His body was discovered a short time later by members of his family.

Mr. Hoover, whose actions had been watched carefully by his family owing to the fact that he had threatened to take his life, arose from the breakfast table this morning, apparently in good health and stated that he was going to the blacksmith shop of Frank Van DUYNE at Mr. Zion. He then went to the barn, put a rope around the rafters and his neck and then jumped from a pile of straw bales. When he was found he had been dead but a short time. The family stated that he had been disatisfied and worried all summer over the absence of his son, Don. Ernest, another son, had already returned from service in the army.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Catherine HOOVER, five sons, John [HOOVER], William [HOOVER], Earl [HOOVER], Don [HOOVER] and Ernest [HOOVER] and one daughter, Mrs. Hugh McMAHAN. A sister, Mrs. D. A. WALLER resides in this city.

Thursday, September 25, 1919

Funeral services for Chas. A. MOORE Friday at 1:30 o'clock from the residence, Rev. BUEHLER in charge. Burial in the Grass Creek cemetery.

Funeral services for F. P. HOOVER Friday morning at 10:00 o'clock from the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church, Rev. H. G. GAIGE in charge. Burial in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

Friday, September 26, 1919

[no obits]

Saturday, September 27, 1919

Mrs. Catherine WARNER, 88, sister of Phil ARTER, of Akron, and aunt of Sheriff Sam ARTER, died at the home of her son, Jacob WARNER, in Elkhart Friday. The body will be brot to Akron Sunday for burial.

Monday, September 29, 1919

After suffering but a few hours Sunday, the eighteen-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry BRINEY, of the Richland Center neighborhood, died shortly after ten o'clock Sunday evening.
Medical aid was summoned in the morning when the little girl showed symptoms of suffering pains in her stomach, and for a time it was believed her life would be saved but later in the day she became weaker and passed away without the real cause of her death having been established. However the attending physician gave it as his belief his patient suffered an attack of cholera infantum.

Mrs. E. R. HORTON, 63, a former resident of this city and widow of the late Dr. E. R. HORTON, died Sunday afternoon in Chicago, at her home. The cause of her death could not be learned, but she had been ill for some time. Funeral Wednesday at Bluffton.

Alonzo HOOVER, 61, died Sunday morning at his home in Kokomo, Ind., after a 10 weeks illness caused by a complication of diseases. Mr Hoover was a resident of Athens until the past sixteen years.

Besides the wife, he leaves seven children: Guy [HOOVER], of Toledo; Henry [HOOVER], Joe [HOOVER], Robert [HOOVER], Mary [HOOVER] and Ethel [HOOVER], of Kokomo and Mrs. Otheal BERRY, of Peru.
Funeral service Tuesday afternoon at the Saint's church at Athens, with burial in the cemetery there.

Tuesday, September 30, 1919

Miss Lou HOOVER and Jacob HOOVER have gone to Kokomo, where they were called on account of the death of Alonzo HOOVER.

Wednesday, October 1, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, October 2, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. M. F. JENKINS and Mrs. Robert [sic] and Mr. and Mrs. J. C. ASHBY attended the funeral of Grandma GRAHAM at Fletchers Lake Tuesday. Interment at Kewanna. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Friday, October 3, 1919

[no obits]

Saturday, October 4, 1919

Gene CLARK, aged 24, brother of Theodore OLSEN, living west of Rochester, was instantly killed at Plymouth shortly after two o'clock Friday morning, when he was crushed under the wheels of an east-bound Pennsylvania train at the eastern edge of that city. The body was not found until after five o'clock in the morning and it was after the authorities there had gotten into communication with relatives in Rochester, Minn., that the brother here was notified of the horrible accident late Friday afternoon.
The details of the terrible affair were learned by the dead man's brother, Sheriff ARTER and County Treasurer William BIDDINGER, who left on receipt of the news for Plymouth. According to the theory advanced by Plymouth officials, Clark must have been napping in the Pennsylvania depot and when the east-bound passenger pulled out the noise must have roused him sufficiently for him to realize a train was leaving. He must have then rushed out to board the train and finding it impossible to get on the other side of the train, where the doors were open he jumped on and clung to the side of a closed vestibule. After riding for about one-half mile Clark's hold gave way and as he fell his body was caught by the wheels which ground out his life instantly.
The body was cut in two at the abdomen, the left arm crushed above the elbow, the back of the head crushed, the right side of the head almost scalped and there was a hole in the left temple.
It has been established the accident occurred shortly after two o'clock in the morning and it was not until a freight crew from the east passed the spot after five o'clock that the dead man was reported at the station.

When the Marshall county coroner examined the body a card was found which gave the name and address of Gene Clark, Rochester, Minn., and a telegram to that city brought back the word that a brother of the dean man,Theodore Olsen, resided in this city.
When six years of age the parents of the Olsen children died and Gene was adopted by a family by the name of Clark, now of Rochester, Minn., with whom he has since made his home, Theodore Olsen being the only one of the seven brothers and two sisters residing in Indiana. The presence of the younger brother in such close proximity to Rocheser leads to the belief Clark was on his way here for a visit with his brother, although no such intentions were known to Mr. Olsen and when he became confused at the Plymouth station the young man took the chance which caused his death.
Speaking of the life of Clark, who was known to his many friends as "Steve," the Rochester, (Minn.) Post and Record says:
"Steve CLARK the well known newsboy who sells his wares going about on foot, feels that he can do better by having an established stand. Last night he appeared before the city council requesting that he be given permission to conduct a news stand at the curb south of the Knowlton block at Broadway and Second Street S.W. He told the aldermen that he had secured the privilege from the owner of the building. The matter was referred to the license committee.
"Mr. Clark is paralyzed on one side and the only way he has of making money is by selling papers. It is slow work for him to drag himself on foot and his income must necessarily remain small as long as he has to conduct his business in this manner."
Mr. Olsen went to Plymouth again Saturday, where he made arrangements to have the body brought to Rochester for burial Sunday.

Monday, October 6, 1919 to Tuesday, October 7, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, October 8, 1919

Thomas HIGGINS, 65, of near Akron Sunday afternoon died after a short illness caused by acute indigestion. He leaves a wife and eight children. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Thursday, October 9, 1919

Mrs. Frank SMITH, South Elm St., died about noon Thursday after a long illness from a complication of diseases. She has made this city her home for a number of years and the many friends join the bereaved husband in his sorrow.
Funeral arrangements later.

Peru, Ind., Oct 9 -- John A. McELWEE and his wife, Mariah McELWEE, each 86 years old, were found dead in bed at their home in this city Wednesday afternoon by their son, Frank McELWEE. When the son entered the house through a window he discovered the rooms filled with gas, which had escaped from a jet in the room adjoining where the aged couple had slept.
The belief prevails that one of the elderly persons had unconsciously left the jet open after extinguishing the light Monday night. It was believed Wednesday that Mr. and Mrs. McElwee had been taken to the country by some relatives, but today when no word had been received from them the son decided to break into the house.

Mr. and Mrs. John McELWEE were natives of Pennsylvania, where they were married sixty-four years ago. They moved to Indiana forty-four years ago and located in this county near Perrysburg. A few years ago they moved to Peru. Four children survive, Mrs. Clara BLACK, Frank McELWEE and George McELWEE of this city and Mrs. Fannie MOFFIT of Indianapolis.

Friday, October 10, 1919

The funeral of Mrs. Frank SMITH, of this city, was held Friday afternoon at two-thirty o'clock, at the residence on South Elm street, Rev. W. J. NIVEN having charge of the services. Burial was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

After an illness of but two days Thomas HIGGINS, aged 62, one of the best known residents of Henry township, passed away at his home at Akron Sunday afternoon from kidney trouble and acute indigestion. He is survived by his wife and nine children, Bennet [HIGGINS], who is working in N. Dakota; Mrs. Ella PRICE and Mrs. Pearl THOMAS of South Bend; Mrs. May HOUGHTON of Montana; Mrs. Arzena PAXTON, of Circle, Montana; Hazel [HIGGINS], Forrest [HIGGINS], Ethel [HIGGINS] and Willis [HIGGINS] at home.

Saturday, October 11, 1919

Mrs. Columbus MURPHY has received word of the death at his home in Los Angeles, Calif., Sunday, Oct. 6th, of her brother, Rev. U. A. COOK. Mr. Cook had been a minister in the U. B. pulpit for more than 50 years and often preached in this city while visiting his sister.

Monday, October 13, 1919

[no obits]

Tuesday, October 14, 1919

Mrs. Silas CLEMANS died at her home southeast of Macy, Monday evening, about 5 o'clock, after several weeks illness. She was about 40 years of age. Her husband, Silas CLEMANS, died suddenly last spring after recovering from influenza.
She leaves a daughter, Helen [CLEMANS], who is a senior in the Macy high school, a stepson, Marvin CLEMANS, several sisters, Mrs. Marvin CLEMANS, Mrs. Jonathan COVER, Mrs. SAYGERS, of Millark, and a sister and brother at Akron, besides a large number of friends. She was a member of the Macy Methodist church and was highly esteemed and beloved by all who knew her. The funeral arrangements have not been learned.

Wednesday, October 15, 1919

Charles CHESNUT, 60, a lifelong resident of Rochester and well known barber died Wednesday morning at 8:10 at Woodlawn hospital. His death was caused by cancer. Mr. Chesnut, who had never been ill before, was compelled to quit his work about August 10th. Three weeks ago he was removed to the hospital where he was operated upon, but from that time he sank gradually until the end.
Charles David CHESNUT was born near Gilead, August 29, 1858, and came to Rochester at an early age. Outside of a few months spent in Oklahoma and in neighboring towns he has lived in this city all of his life. He started in at the barber business when 21 years of age and has owned and been employed in various city shops. He has been a member of the Odd Fellows lodge for 38 years and always took an active part in that organization. He was well known thruout the city and was always a progressive citizen whose loss will be felt in the community.
He is survived by his wife, who was Minnie JOHNSON before her marriage, two daughters, Irene [CHESNUT] and Edith [CHESNUT] both of Oak Park, Ill., and two brothers, M. C. CHESNUT, of Oak Park and Alexander CHESNUT of Alabama. A son, Claud [CHESNUT], died about one year ago of influenza and two brothers Robert [CHESNUT] of Akron, and Wallace [CHESNUT] of Newton, Iowa, also preceded him.
The Odd Fellows will be in charge of the funeral. Other arrangements later.

E. H. PAGE, 74, of Racine, Wisconsin died Tuesday evening at Lukes hospital in that city after a three weeks illness of pneumonia. He leaves three sons, Archie [PAGE] of Racine, Harry [PAGE] of this city and Fred [PAGE] of Fort Wayne, Ind. Upon receiving word of his father's illness, Hary left Tuesday for Racine but he did not arrive until after death. Mrs. Page went Wednesday.

The funeral of Paris BIGGS, who died Monday evening at his home east of Athens, following a stroke of paralysis, was held at the Athens Mt. Hope church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, with burial in the Mt. Hope cemetery.
Mr. Biggs, who was seventy-three years of age, has been a resident of the Athens neighborhood during his entire lifetime and is known as one of the prominent citizens of that community. He was preceded in death a number of years ago by his wife and leaves two children, Mrs. William HARTER of Akron and Cusey BIGGS, of Detroit, Mich.

Thursday, October 16, 1919

The funeral of the late Charles CHESNUT will be held at his home 625 East 14th street at 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon. Rev. W. J. NIVEN will conduct the services with the I.O.O.F. in charge at the cemetery.

This community was shocked Sunday evening to hear of the death of Mrs. Elba T. ROBINSON who passed away during the night. Besides her husband she leaves four children, Clayton [ROBINSON], Harry [ROBINSON], Lola [ROBINSON] and a little daughter just a few days old. Her father Ezra HIBRAY, of Maxinkuuckee, a sister, Mrs. Walter FISHBURN, of Culver, three brothers, Charles [HIBRAY], Roy [HIBRAY] and Edgar [HIBRAY] also survive. Funeral services were held at Jordan Monday afternoon. Burial in adjacent cemetery. - - - GREEN TOWNSHIP ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Jordan Cemetery, Green Twp.: Elba T. ROBINSON, father, 1877-1950; Mary E. HIBRAY ROBINSON, his wife, mother, 1878-1919]

Henry THOMAS, who has been critically ill for two weeks, passed away Monday evening at seven o'clock. He leaves a son, David [THOMAS], of Wisconsin, two daughters, Mrs. Clark BOGARDUS, of Detroit, and Mrs. Lucy HARMON, at home, also three grandchildren. - - - GREEN TOWNSHIP ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Poplar Grove Cemetery, Union Twp.: Henry N. THOMAS, Feb 29, 1848 - Oct 13, 1919; Martha THOMAS, Aug 4, 1848 - Dec 27, 1910]

Friday, October 17, 1919

Lieut. Col. Harry McIVOR, aged 31, son of Mr. and Mrs. George A. McIVOR, of South Bend, died the first of the week in St. Joseph's hospital in South Bend, after a four weeks illness from typhoid fever.
For a number of years the McIvor family resided in Rochester, Mr. McIvor being the Standard Oil agent here and later they moved to South Bend, where he is in the same capacity. Harry McIvor graduated from the South Bend schools and afterward graduated from Purdue University, where he continued for some time as an instructor. In 1916 he served as captain in the National Guard, and was in command of the Purdue Battery that left for the Mexican border. At the first Ft. Benjamin Harrison Training Camp he was appointed a major in the artillery division and acted as an instructor in the second Training Camp there. After servng with his regiment at Louisville he took a course in the artillery school at Ft. Sill, Okla., where he was made an instructor and promoted to the rank of Lieut Col.
Lieut Col. McIvor was prominent in Masonic circles and the many friends extend their sympathy to the bereaved parents.

Miss Margaret HENRICK, aged 17, of Bruce Lake lost her life and her sister Miss Ethel HENRICK and Jacob EVANS, a Kewanna young man had narrow escapes from a like fate Thursday evening, about eleven o'clock, when a Ford touring car, driven by Evans went into a deep ditch on the Kewanna road, eight miles west of Rochester.
Following the accident calls were made to Rochester for medical aid but when the attending physician reached the scene he found death had been almost instantaneous for Miss Henrick, who had been pinned under the overturned car in about six inches of water and had been drowned.
The parties were on their way home from attending a Sunday school class party and when they reached that point of the Kewanna stone road, where a deep ditch parallels the road, at the Jacob EISENMAN farm the car's lights suddenly went out. The driver could not see the road and before he could stop, the machine plunged into the ditch. Evans and Miss Ethel Henrick were thrown clear of the car and Evans in calling to the girls to see if they were allright thought he received an affirmative answer and started at once to a nearby house to get help in righting the machine. Miss Ethel hurried back down the road to meet a hayrack party of young people who had been at the party and it was not until the car had been lifted the fate of her sister was learned.
When the car went into the ditch the unfortunate young lady was thrown face down in the shallow water and the weight of the car held her fast as she drowned. After the car had been removed from the girl's body it was at first hoped she might still be alive but all hopes fled when she was gotten out and it was apparent life had gone.
Miss Henrick was one of the well known young ladies of the Bruce Lake neighborhood and her terrible death has cast a gloom over the entire community, the many friends extending their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family.
Neither Mr. Evans nor Miss Ethel Henrick were injured other than suffering slight bruises but both are suffering from the severe nervous shock attending the accident.
The car was badly damaged, the radiator being smashed, the lights torn off and the top demolished.

Saturday, October 18, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. M. C. CHESNUT have returned to Oak Park, Ill., after attending the funeral of his brother in this city.

Mrs. Eugene WYAND, of Moore, Okla, sister of Mrs. Minnie CHESNUT, arrived Friday to attend the funeral of Chas. CHESNUT. She will visit in this city for some time.

Monday, October 20, 1919

Mrs. Andrew CARLSON, of Chicago Heights, Ill., died at Swedish Covenent Hospital in Chicago, following an operation. Mrs. Carlson was well known to many here, having lived for a number of years on the GREGSON farm, northeast of Rochester.

Tuesday, October 21, 1919

Miss Irene CHESNUT has returned to Oak Park, Ill., where she is employed, after being home for her father's funeral.

Wednesday, October 22, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, October 23, 1919

Alva COX, aged 48, of Newcastle township, died at Woodlawn hospital, in this city, Wednesday afteernoon, shortly after 3:30 o'clock, following an operation for relief from gall stones.
Mr. Cox is one of the well known and highly respected farmers of Newcastle township and his death has cast a gloom over the entire community, the many friends extending their sympathy to the bereaved family. Besides his wife he leaves seven children: Wilbur [COX], Omer [COX], Roy [COX], George [COX], Elsie [COX], Marion [COX] and Harold [COX].
Funeral services Saturday afternoon at 1:30 p.m., from Bethlehem Baptist church, Rev. SMITH of Gary in charge. Burial in the Palestine cemetery.

Death came suddenly for James COX, aged 62, of near Mentone, on Tuesday morning, when he was the victim of an attack of heart trouble, while at work on his farm.
Mr. Cox arose early Tuesday and went to his cornfield, in company with a hired man, ready to do a big day's work shucking corn. On the way to the field he remarked as to how good he was feeling and stated he expected to do a record day's work. However just as he took down a part of the first shock and prepared to shuck its contents he was taken ill and fell to the ground. His companion rushed to his side but death had already come and the sorrowful news was conveyed to the wife and family.
For many years Mr. Cox has been one of the well known and highly respected citizens of the Mentone neighborhood and during his entire lifetime has been one of the hard working republicans of the community. He was not affiliated with any church or lodge but numbered his friends by the number of his acquaintances. He leaves to mourn their loss his wife and one daughter.
The funeral was held at the Cox residence Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, with burial in the Mentone cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. Silas CLEMANS was held at the M.E. church Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. S. C. NORRIS, of Culver, assisted by Rev. Thomas DAVIES, of Macy. Interment was in Plainview cemetery, west of town. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Friday, October 24, 1919

In the death of Mrs. Martha A. DILSAVER, which occurred at the home of her daughter, Mrs. D. J. HARRISON, 2026 E. 73d street, Chicago, Ill., Friday, October 17, removes another of the pioneer residents of Akron. It was while on a visit to the above's home that she was stricken with apoplexy about 3 o'clock p.m. and died at 5 p.m.
Two sons and two daughters and three grandchildren survive her. J. W. DILSAVER of Akron; J. B. DILSAVER of Washington, D.C.; Mrs. A. C. MARSH of Mishawaka, Ind.; Mrs. D. J. HARRISON, of Chicago, Ill., and Amos BERRY, a brother, of St. Marys, Idaho, are the only surviving members of her immediate family and who were with her at the time of her death.
The remains arrived in Akron Monday evening from Chicago and were conveyed to the home where simple services were held, conducted by Rev. GODWIN of the M.E. church, after which she was laid to rest in the I.O.O.F. cemetry beside that of her husband, Austin DILSAVER, who died three years ago.

Saturday, October 25, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, October 27, 1919

[no paper available]

Tuesday, October 28, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Robert JENKINS attended the funeral Monday of Mailen CAMEL, a U. S. soldier, who had been seiously injured in France. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Wednesday October 29, 1919

Rev. R. F. SPOHN has received word of the death of Chas. B. McDONALD, of Shelbyville, Ind. He was well known here, having preached at the Mission. Death was caused by paralysis.

Thursday, October 30, 1919

[no obits]

Friday, October 31, 1919

Rochester lost two of her well known citizens in death Thursday night when George ZACHMAN and George BRAYDON passed away.
__________

Death came to George ZACHMAN, 87, at his home on the corner of Fulton avenue and Fourth street Thursday evening at 11:30 o'clock, several hours after he had retired in seemingly his usual health. For the last few days he has been gradually failing and while being quite feeble he has been able to be up and around the house each day. Thursday evening he went to bed at the usual hour and nothing was known of his being in a serious condition until his wife was awakened by the sound of peculiar breathing. Before she could summon medical aid death had come.
George Zachman was born in Germany and at the age of seven years he came with his parents to America. They later settled in Indiana and when a young man he bought a farm in Marshall county, living there for several years, then going to Culver. Forty years ago he moved to Rochester, where he has since resided, being retired for many years. He was married three times, his former two wives having preceded him in death and he leaves to mourn their loss his widow, three daughters, Mrs. Emanuel WAGONER, esst of Rochester, Mrs. Roy MYERS, the city, and Mrs. Ora PHILLIPS, of San Mateo, Calif., and one son, George ZACHMAN, also of San Mateo.
Since his boyhood he has been a faithful member of the Evangelical church and has always been known as one of the upright citizens of this community.
The funeral arrangements have not been made pending the receipt of word from the daughter and son in California.
__________

After having been ill from complications for a long time and being confined to his bed for the most part of the last month, George BRAYDON, 71, died Thursday evening at 10:15 at the home of C. E. HAYNE, Jefferson Street, this city.
Mr. Braydon was born in Albany, N.Y., and after attaining manhood took up residence in Chicago, following the live stock and commission business for many years, retiring several years ago. In April, 1918, he came here with C. E. Hayne and family and has since resided in this city. "Grandpa" Braydon as he was lovingly known by the family and familiarly recognized by his many friends was not a member of any church, but his big open heart and kind mannerisms won for him the friendship and respect of a wide circle wherever he was known.
He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Rosabelle HAYNE, this city, and one son, Thomas A. BRAYDON, of Chicago; two grandchildren, C. E. HAYNE and Miss Lillian HAYNE, this city, besides a number of other relatives.
The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the Hayne residence, Rev. H. G. GAIGE to have charge of the services. Burial will be made in the Odd Fellows cemetery, this city.

Saturday, November 1, 1919

The funeral of George ZACHMAN will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Evangelical church. Rev. L. F. FISHER, of South Bend, who formerly made his home with the Zachmans, will have charge of the services.

Mrs. Kate WOLFORD, of Fulton, died Saturday morning. She had been in poor health for some time. Several children survive. She is an aunt of Louis HUNT, of this city.

The seven-weeks-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Emmet PARKER, this city, died Friday night. Burial was made Saturday afternoon in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Influenza, which caused so much suffering and so many deaths last winter resulted fatally in the case of Mrs. Jacob CRABILL, who died shortly after nine o'clock Saturday morning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eric YSBERG, south of Rochester.
Mrs. Crabill, whose home is near Hamlet, came to the Ysberg home several weeks ago to be near her favorite physician and shortly afterward developed symptoms of influenza. Then two weeks ago she gave birth to twins and then came a relapse of the disease, which gradually grew worse until the end. Mrs. Crabill was formerly Miss Fannie WHITESIDE, of this city, and is remembered by a wide circle of friends who extend their heartfelt sympathies to the bereaved husband and other relatives.
The funeral arrangements have not been yet announced.

Daniel S. GOULD, a former resident of Rochester, died at his home in Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, according to word received here by his nephew, Dr. C. E. GOULD, Friday.
Daniel Gould is the last surviving member of the Goulds who settled in Fulton county in pioneer days and he will be remembered by many of the older citizens of this city, he having moved from here a number of years ago. Burial will be made at Kansas City.

Monday, November 3, 1919

The funeral of Mrs. Jacob CRABILL, 36, who died Saturday morning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eric YSBERG, south of Rochester, will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the United Brethren church in this city, Rev. George CRANE to have charge of the services. Burial will be made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey W. ZACHMAN and his sister, Mrs. S. F. SNYDER, of Marion, O., were here Monday to attend the funeral of George ZACHMAN.

Mrs. C. T. GRIBBEN has returned from Findley, Ohio where she was called by the death of her father.

Word has been received here that Phillip HINKLE, an uncle of Mrs. Dean L. BARNHART of Goshen, died last Friday at Greencastle.

Word was received Saturday of the death of George BOYER, formerly of this city, in Chicago October 29. Burial was made in that city.

Tuesday, November 4, 1919

Rochester and Fulton county lost two well known women residents Monday afternoon in the deaths of Mrs. O. E. BOOTHE, southwest of Rochester, and Mrs. Laura SMITH, this city.
__________

After a long illness and following an operation for relief Mrs. O. E. BOOTHE, 46, passed away at Woodlawn hospital, this city, Monday evening at 5:30 o'clock. Mrs. Boothe had been in poor health for several years and was bedfast since last August entering the hospital for an operation, which was performed Friday.
The Boothe family came to Fulton county several years ago from Illinois and settled in the Bearss neighborhood eight miles from this city, becoming identified with the business and social life of the county in which they soon became well and favorably known.
Besides her husband she leaves two children, Russell [BOOTHE] and Mabel [BOOTHE], both at home, and a number of other relatives.
The body was taken to Mansfield, Ill., their former home, Tuesday evening and the funeral will be held there Wednesday afternoon, with burial at that place.
__________

Mrs. Laura SMITH, 63, died at the home of her son, Bert Smith and family in Kokomo Monday morning at 10:30 o'clock, as the result of an attack of cancer of the stomach. Mrs. Smith went to Kokomo several weeks ago for a visit and took sick shortly afterward, growing steadily worse until the end.
She was born in Fulton county and made her home here all her life, moving to Rochester from the farm several years ago, her husband having preceded her in death six years. She leaves three children, Bert [SMITH] and Mrs. Ross NORMAN, both of Kokomo, and Miss Amy [SMITH], of Washington, D.C. The body was brought to Rochester Monday evening and the funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Methodist church, with burial in Shelton's cemetery, south of Rochester.

Wednesday, November 5, 1919

The one and one-half year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip MILLER, southeast of Rochester, died Tuesday evening at 10:45 o'clock. The funeral will be held Thursday at the residence.

Mrs. Adelaide TROUT was born in Lehi county, Pa., July 6, 1843 and died at the home of her daughter, near Rochester, Oct 28, 1919, at the age of 76 years 3 months and 22 days. In 1866 she was united in marriage to John W. TROUT and to this union were born eight children, five sons and three daughters, the husband and one son preceding her in death. She was a member of the Methodist church.

Clyde Jearldine PARKER, son of Mr. and Mrs. Emmet PARKER, was born Sept 12 and died Oct 21, 1919, leaves besides his parents, one brother and four sisters. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, November 6, 1919

Mrs. Margaret JENKINS, 50, of Macy, was instantly killed near her home Wednesday afternoon when a L. E. & W. wreck train engine backing slowly into the town knocked her down and cut her body in two. Mrs. Jenkins did not see the engine until it was too late and probably never knew what struck her.
According to an eye witness of the accident, Donald SEE, the lady was crossing the track from the coal yards going to her home. The engine and the wreck train, which was returning from the wreck north of Rochester to Peru, and as it was going slowly did not make much noise. Seeing that she was not aware of the approaching train See yelled to warn her of the danger. She glanced up at the approaching engine but seemed to pay no attention to it as she continued down the track. The back end of the tender knocked her down onto the tracks and the wheels severed her body. It is thot that she saw the tender but simply took it for a box car standing on the siding. The accident occurred about 3:30 p.m.
Mrs. Jenkins, who lived alone in Macy, is survived by one son, Darius [JENKINS], also of that town, and by a daughter who is married and lives at Wabash, but the name could not be learned.
Funeral arrangements are not yet completed.

Friday, November 7, 1919

Mrs. Laura V. SMITH, daughter of James and Mariah McCARTER, was born Jan 23, 1855, near Green Oak, Indiana, where she grew to womanhood. She passed to the spirit world Nov 3rd, 1919, at Kokomo, Ind., at the home of her son, J. H. SMITH, aged 64 years, 9 months and 10 days.
On September 14th, 1876, she was united in marriage with Edwin T. SMITH, to which union was born five children, three of whom survive, James H. [SMITH] of Kokomo, Ind.; Amy G. [SMITH] of Washington, D.C. and Elsie Ruth NORMAN, of Kokomo, Ind., husband and father, Bessie Alice [SMITH] and Fredrick Lee [SMITH] having preceded her several years ago. Besides the immediate family there remains to mourn their loss, three brothers, Isaac McCARTER, of Rochester, Ind.; Alfred McCARTER, of Harvey, Ill., and W. T. McCARTER, of Kingfisher, Okla.
Early in life she joined the Methodist church, of Green Oak, later changing her membership to Rochester, Ind. She was a kind hearted mother and neighbor and will be missed by a host of friends.

Saturday, November 8, 1919

Mrs. C. A. NICHOLS today received word from Mrs. Albert FALKNER, of Middletown, N.Y., stating that Mr. [Albert] FALKNER had died Thursday evening of tuberculosis. They were former residents of this city.

After suffering for a considerable period from Brights disease and dropsy as well as other complications, William R. ALEXANDER, 80, of the Grand View neighborhood, northwest of Rochester, died Friday evening at ten o'clock. While suffering from these ailments for a long time, Mr. Alexander was only bedfast for a few days, maintaining his wonderful vitality until near the end.
He was born in Henry county and about fifty years ago came to Fulton county, taking up his residence in the community where he has since made his home. Besides being one of the well known farmers of the county, he was a friend to all who knew him and his death has removed one of the prominent community builders of that section, the many friends joining the family in their sorrow. He leaves four daughters, Mrs. Sarah STENINGER, Mrs. Hattie RITTER and Clara FLETCHER, all of the Grand View neighborhood, and Mrs. Etta WALTERS, of South Bend. Also two sisters, Mrs. T. SELLERS, of Rochester and Mrs. Mary Ann COOPER, of Henry county
The funeral will be held at the Richland Center Methodist church Monday morning, the funeral party to leave the residence at ten o'clock. Burial at Richland Center.

Monday, November 10, 1919

Mrs. Ellen THRUSH, of this city, Sunday received word that her brother, George CLINGER, of Logansport, had died in Cincinnati. Mr. and Mrs. Clinger were en route to Florida to spend the winter.

Tuesday, November 11, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, November 12, 1919

Mrs. Maud SCHREYER and Mrs. Ellen THRUSH went today to Logansport to attend the funeral of the latter's brother, George CLINGER.

Thursday, November 13, 1919

Death called another of the well known pioneer citizens of the community Wednesday evening, at seven o'clock, when Mrs. William B. ZELLARS, 84, passed away at her home at the corner of Twelfth and Elm Sts., this city. Mrs. Zellars had been ill for the last three months due to complications incident to her advanced age.
She was born on June 15 1835, in Henry county, where she grew to womanhood coming to Fulton county fifty-five years ago and making this her home since that time. For many years she resided on the farm but came to Rochester several years ago to take up her residence. She was married three times, her first husband being H. A. ADAMSON, who died in 1879. In 1890 she was united in marriage with James CARR, he having died two years later, and in 1908 she married William ZELLARS, Sr.
The following children survive with the other relatives: T. D. ADAMSON, Hansford, Wash.; H. L. ADAMSON, Rochester; T. L. ADAMSON, Middletown, Ind., and Mrs. Charles CLINGER, Logansport.
The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the United Brethren church and burial will be made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Friday, November 14, 1919 to Saturday, November 15, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, November 17, 1919

When the engine of the Ford they were driving became stalled on the Marbaugh crossing over the Erie in the path of a passenger train, Saturday afternoon, death was dealt surely and quickly to three member of the family, of Albert FAULSTITCH, of southeast of Monterey. The dead are Mrs. Albert FAULSTITCH, 44, wife; Bertha [FAULSTITCH], 12, daughter; Fred [FAULSTITCH], 14, son. Daisy [FAULSTITCH], 6, is still unconscious at Woodlawn hospital where she was rushed by trainmen.
So far as learned there was but one eye witness to the awful tragedy, Peter LANGENBANN, and according to his story the Faulstitch auto was headed north as it approached the Erie right of way. After crossing the first track the machine started to ascend a grade to cross the second track, when the car stopped and slid back onto the first track just as the Erie passenger due in Rochester at 3:26 p.m thundered by. The Faulstitch auto was caught by the flyer and the wreckage and bodies were carried for several hundred feet down the tracks before the train could be stopped. None among those present at the scene of the accident could identify the car or the bodies, but when Dick BRUCE, of Rochester, who had been riding in the baggage car with Harry CHAMBERLAIN also of this city, had rushed to the side of the little girl, Daisy, and picked her up, he found she was breathing. It was then decided by the train crew that the dead and the girl should be brot on to Rochester, where the girl was placed in Woodlawn hospital and the dead taken to Val Zimmerman's morgue. All of the bodies were terribly mangled and death had been instantaneous in each instance.
Several hours after the bodies had been brought to Rochester Val ZIMMERMAN, who had telephoned the secretary of state's office to ascertain the owner of the auto, learned the car belonged to Albert Faulstitch of near Monterey, and at about the same time neighbors who had identified the machine were breaking the news of the awful affair to Faulstitch, who was then engaged in helping shred corn at the farm of a neighbor. Mr. Faulstitch at once rushed to this city and ordered that the bodies be returned to Monterey and then visited Woodlawn to be at the bedside of his little daughter. The girl is suffering from both legs being broken, a fractured skull and is still unconscious, never having regained her senses since being picked up. While she is in a precarious condition physicians hold out some hopes that she will recover and today a report from the hospital stated she was somewhat improved.
The Marbaugh crossing, where the accident occurred is the first crossing east of Monterey and the view of the Erie tracks when approaching from the south is unobstructed. The Faulstitch car was being driven with the side curtains on, and it is thought that the occupants did not see the approaching train until too late or evidently attempting to beat it across. But they were safely across the first track, on which the passenger was traveling, and then for some reason which will likely never be explained, the machine slipped back onto the first track.
On Sunday afternoon an Erie representative alighted from a passenger train at the scene of the accident and directed the taking of a number of photographs by L. L. MANNING of Rochester, who had been summoned for that purpose.
After the identification of the three victims at the Zimmerman morgue, Mr. Faulstitch ordered they be sent back to Monterey, where the funerals will be held. However, owing to the serious condition of the fourth member of th family at Woodlawn, no funeral arrangements have as yet been given out.
Besides the father, three sons and two daughters survive.

Mrs. Virgil McKEE, 60, passed away Sunday morning at nine o'clock at her home, near Bruce Lake, after a long illness from asthma and complications. While in poor health for a long time, Mrs. McKee did not become seriously ill until Wednesday of last week, after which she rapidly grew worse until the end.
Mrs. McKee was born on the farm where she died sixty years ago, and spent her entire life in that community, where she was known as one of the prominent women in the social life of the neighborhood.
Besides her husband, she leaves six children: Mrs. Ralph LIEBOLD, north of Kewanna and Mrs. Grover PAXTON, of Bruce Lake and four sons, Samuel [McKEE], Bruce Lake, Albert [McKEE], California, Harvey [McKEE], southwest of Rochester and Reed [McKEE], Richland Center. She also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Daniel HENDRICKS and Mrs. Judith HENDRICKS, both of Bruce Lake.
The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the bruce Lake Reformed church, with burial at Bruce Lake.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Bruce Lake Cemetery, Union Twp.: Virgil J. McKEE, 1860-1957; Lydia McKEE, 1856-1919]

Word has been received here of the death of Rev. Peter FISHER of near Mexico who died yesterday after an attack of apoplexy. Rev. Fisher was just pronouncing the wedding rites for a young couple when his speech suddenly failed him and he sank to the floor. He lived for several hours afterward, but passed away without gaining full use of his senses. Several years ago an uncle of his died of the same disease. The deceased is a cousin of Henry A. BARNHART of this city, and a brother of the late Lee FISHER, who was well known here. Funeral arrangements are not known.

Charles CLINGER and Clarence BRINER, of Logansport, were in this city Sunday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Wm. ZELLARS, Sr.

Tuesday, November 18, 1919

Mrs. Retta SPOHN, 64, wife of Richard SPOHN, passed away Monday afternoon at 3:45 o'clock at her home on south Jefferson street, this city, after a long illness from a concerous affliction. Mrs. Spohn had suffered for many months but was only bedfast the last eighteen weeks.
For many years Mrs. Spohn has been a resident of this city and for the last several years has been engaged with her husband in church work at the Open Door Mission here and elsewhere.
She leaves besides her husband three sons, George F. ROGERS, Detroit, Mich.; J. L. ROGERS, Mishawaka and Arthur V. ROGERS, of Indianapolis, and one daughter, Mrs. Dora WERDER, of Rochester.
The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the United Brethren church, Rev. George CRANE to have charge of the services. Burial will be made in the Citizens cemetery.

Fred THOMMEN died at his home Saturday evening at 8 o'clock, funeral Monday at 1 o'clock at Fulton, and burial at Rochester. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Roy FAULSTITCH and family of Oak Park, Ill., and Chas. FAULSTITCH, of Evansville, Wis., were called home by the serious accident causing the death of their mother, and brother, Fred [FAULTSITCH], and sister Bertha [FAULSTITCH]. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

The funeral of Mrs. A. FAULSTITCH and two children who were killed on the Erie crossing west of Delong Saturday afternoon, was held at the Reform church, Wednesday at one p.m., conducted by Rev. NICKELS of Freeport, Ind. Intrment at Leiters Ford cemetery. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Martin SHIVELY and children have returned to their home in Niles, Mich., after attending the funeral of Fred THOMMEN.

Wednesday, November 19, 1919

Benjamin Franklin AULT, 65, died suddenly at six o'clock Wednesday morning at his home five miles northeast of Akron following an attack of heart trouble.
Mr. Ault had been in good health and for the first time in a long period complained Wednesday morning, when called for breakfast not getting up telling the family he was not feeling well. Not realizing his serious condition the family called a physician and continued with their morning meal and Mr. Ault died before the physician arrived. Heart trouble was at once assigned as the cause of death.
Mr. Ault has been a reident of Henry township for the last twenty-five years and was always known as one of the prominent citizens of that community, the many friends now joining the sorrowing family in their grief. Besides his wife he leaves three children and two step-children.
The funeral will be held Saturday morning at the Beaver Dam church and burial will be made in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Akron.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed KNEPPER went Saturday to Warsaw, called by the death of a relative. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Thursday, November 20, 1919 to Saturday, November 22, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, November 24, 1919

Word was received by Rochester relatives and friends Monday morning of the death of Mrs. Ed BAIR, 62, of Tiosa, which occurred at four o'clock Monday morning at Pasadena, Calif. Death resulted from tuberculosis.
About five weeks ago Mrs. Bair and daughter, Miss Hattie [BAIR], accompanied by nurse Mrs. Al MEYERS, of this city, left for New Mexico in the hopes of benefiting Mrs. Bair's health. However, about two weeks ago Mrs. Meyers returned home and the Bairs went on to Pasadena, where the elder woman's health continued to fall rapidly until the end.

Mrs. Bair, who has resided in the Tiosa neighborhood for many years is well known in Rochester and has a wide circle of friends who extend their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved ones. Besides her husband, she leaves one daughter Hattie [BAIR], and one son, Mahlon BAIR, who reside on the home farm. She also leaves four sisters, Mrs. C. D. SHOBE and Mrs. Wylie BONINE, of Rochester, Mrs. Anna KILER, of Tiosa, and Mrs. Obe HAIMBAUGH, of Mentone and one brother, Miles PERSCHBACHER, of near Tiosa.
No funeral arrangements made as yet but it is expected the body will be brought tack to Tiosa for burial.

Mrs. A. WHITMER, 83, died at her home in South Bend Saturday afternoon after an illness of six weeks from complications incident to old age. She leaves one son, Prof. A. L. WHITMER, of this city, and two daughters, besides two grandchildren. Mr. and Mrs. Whitmer of this city have been with his mother for the last 10 days and their son, Orville [WHITMER], was called to South Bend from Purdue Sunday. The funeral was held at the residence Monday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Burial was made at North Liberty.

Tuesday, November 25, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. ASHBY returned home Tuesday from Butler, Ind., where they attended the funeral of Mrs. William ASHBY. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Miss Metta REED has gone to the Ed BAIR farm, near Tiosa, to spend several days. Mrs. BAIR, who died in California, will be brought home the latter part of the week.

Wednesday, November 26, 1919

[no obits]

Thursday, November 27, 1919

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, November 28, 1919

Artis WORTHINGTON, 42, died at Woodlawn hospital Wednesday afternoon following a major operation Monday. Mr. Worthington rallied from the effects of the operation but complications which followed proved too much for his weakened condition.
For a number of years he resided in Akron and last summer he and his wife broke up housekeeping afterward making their home with his sister, Mrs. Charles FLAGG, of this city. He leaves, besides his wife and sister named, a number of other relatives and friends.
The funeral will be held Saturday morning at ten o'clock at the Flagg residence on East Ninth St., Rev. GODWIN, of Akron, to have charge of the services. Burial will be made at Plymouth.

Mrs. John WHEATLEY, 86, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel WASHINGTON, on the Michigan road, north of Rochester, Thanksgiving morning at 6:30 o'clock. Mrs. Wheatley had been an invalid for the last year suffering from complications incident to her advanced age.

For a number of years the Wheatleys resided in this city and after the death of Mr. Wheatley several years ago, Mrs. Wheatley went to live with her brother, Mr. Washington and wife.
The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the residence, Rev. H. E. EBERHARDT, of the Rochester Evangelical church, having charge of the services. Burial will be made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.
She was born in Warren county, Inciana, October 2, 1833. On October 29 of 1867 she married Mr. John H. WHEATLEY, at Macy, Indiana, who preceded her in death on September 18, 1916 at Rochester.
Twenty years of her life were lived here in Rochester, and from childhood she was a member of the Christian church. At the age of 86 years, 1 month and 24 days she fell asleep, leaving her brother, Mr. J. S. WASHINGTON the only remaining child of the father's family.

Saturday, November 29, 1919

Word was received here this morning from A. E. SHEETS, of Chicago, that his brother, James C. SHEETS, had died in Sedalie,Mo. The body will be brought to this city Sunday with funeral and burial at Omega Monday. Mr. Sheets was well known in this city where he spent the early part of his life.

Word has been received by Mrs. W. H. GREEN, of this city, of the death of her niece, Miss Georgia SMITH, who is known here. The funeral will be held Sunday at 2:00 p.m. at Royal Center.

Funeral services for Mrs. Ed BAIR, who died in California, Monday afternoon at the Luthern church, east of Tiosa.

Word was received here this afternoon that Guy THOMSON, formerly of this city, had been killed at Urbana, Ill., some time today. He is a brother of the THOMSON sisters who live in East Rochester. No further particulars regarding the death could be learned at press time as the relatives were unable to get into communication with people in Urbana.

Ellen L. PERSCHBACHER, daughter of George and Jane PERSCHBACHER, was born in Fulton Co., Ind., Jan 9th, 1858 and died Nov 24th, 1919, at the home of her sisters, Misses Maude [MOORE] and Bessie MOORE, in Pasadena, California, where she had gone with her daughter, Harriette, with the hopes of benefitting her health. She had been ill for some time with tubercular trouble.
Ellen L. Perschbacher was united in marriage with Edward S. BAIR, Jan 7th, 1883. To this union three children were born, Frederick A. [BAIR], who passed away in June 1890, Harriette [BAIR] and Mahlon [BAIR], who are at home. Besides the husband and children, she leaves four sisters, Mrs. Annie KILER, of near Tiosa, Mrs. Obe HAIMBAUGH, of near Mentone, Mrs. Cyrus SHOBE and Mrs. Wylie BONINE, of Rochester and one brother, Miles PERSCHBACHER of near Tiosa, and many relatives and friends.
The deceased was a faithful member of the Lutheran church having been baptized in infancy and later confirmed by Rev. A. E. GIFT. She was a loving and tender mother and wife and kind to everyone and loved by all who knew her, and that love is so entwined to the hearts of those she leaves weeping at her bier, that it is hard to say the final faltering farewell.
The funeral services were held in the Lutheran church, near her home Monday afternoon atm two o'clock and layed to rest in the Reichter cemetery, Rev. KECK, of South Bend, in charge.

Monday, December 1, 1919

Sleeping sickness caused the death of Mrs. Forrest A. CALVERT, 27, at Woodlawn hospital, in this city Saturday, after she had suffered from the disease during the last ten days of November.
Mrs. Calvert had been suffering poor health for some time and the physician called on Nov 20 discovered at that time she was suffering from symptoms of Encephalitis, which is a condition of an inflammation of the brain causing what is commonly known as sleeping sickness. However, she was only drowsy at that time and had difficulty in opening her eyes but her condition soon became more alarming and last week she was brought to Woodlawn where treatment was started. During her stay at the hosptal she gave birth to a child, who, it is thought, will survive. Notwithstanding all efforts of the hospital force were directed toward effecting a cure, Mrs. Calvert gardually grew worse until the end came Saturday, succumbing to this disease which but rarely occurs in this section of the country.
Susan May CALVERT was born in Marshall county and several years ago was united in marriage with Forrest A. CALVERT, who survives with the infant child and two other children. The Calvert home is 4 miles south of Rochester, in Green Oak vicinity.
The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, at the Methodist church, Rev. George CRAIG to have charge of the services. Burial will be made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

The body of James C. SHEETS, who died at Sedalia, Mo., arrived in this city Sunday. The funeral was held at the Hoover Chapel Monday afternoon at two o'clock, and burial was made in the Omega cemetery, at Sugar Grove.

Tuesday, December 2, 1919

The funeral of Garnette BEATTIE, 9 year old daughter of D. O. BEATTIE, was held at the home of S. E. MARSH. Burial at Fletchers Lake Tuesday at 10 o'clock. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Mrs. E. E. BORDEN attended the funeral of Mrs. Ed BAIR Monday at Tiosa.

Wednesday, December 3, 1919

John JACKSON received word Thursday afternoon of the death of his aunt, Mrs. WHEATLEY at Rochester. - - - MT. OLIVE ITEMS.

Thursday, December 4, 1919

Since writing the SENTINEL, the death of Mrs. Sarah SLIFER occurred, the malady being heart trouble. She was past 80 years of age and was the mother of Charles [SLIFER] and Urmy SLIFER of this place. For many years she was a member of the Methodist church at Five Corners. She was the widow of Ezra SLIFER and for years lived on their farm west of town in Fulton county, but several years ago moved to Macy and at the time of her death was living in the CARL property next to the M.E. church. Besides leaving a number of sons and daughters, having been the mother of fifteen children, nine living to be grown, she also left a large number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. The funeral was held from the Methodist church, conducted by Rev. DAVIES and interment in Plainview cemetery. - - - MACY ITEMS.

I. W. ELURIB was another to be suddenly called to his last reward, having died of heart trouble at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Will FARRAR, Nov 22. His wife was Miss Olive BAILEY, who died 33 years ago. Just one daughter, Eulalia [ELURIB], was born. Besides the daughter, he leaves one granddaughter, Rosanna FARRAR, and one sister, Mrs. Wm. BOOKWALTER. The funeral was held at the M.E. church the following Tuesday morning, conducted by Rev. E. H. KENNEDY, of Amboy. Interment was made in the Bethlehem cemetery at Twelve Mile. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mrs. Melissa EVERED died at the home of her nephew, Dorsey BELT, at Elkhart, and her body was brought to the home of her niece, Mrs. Ben MULLICAN, Saturday afternoon, and funeral was held from that home Sunday afternoon, preached by Rev. Thos. DAVIES. Interment was in Plainview cemetery. Mrs. Evered was the widow of John EVERED and years ago lived a mile west of Macy. She leaves one brother, Raymond BELT. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Friday, December 5, 1919 to Saturday, December 6, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, December 8, 1919

After an illness of short duration from complication incident to advanced age, Mrs. Julia STOCKBERGER, 76, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles ROE, in Hammond Saturday.
Julia TAYLOR, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. P. TAYLOR, was born in Fulton county on July 23, 1830. She was united in marriage with G. E. STOCKBERGER in 1864, he having preceded her in death thirty-one years ago. To this union were born six children, four of whom survive: Mrs. Mary BRIGGS, Mrs. Peter AUSTGEN and Mrs. Charles SEE, of Hammond and Myron J. STOCKBERGER of Rannells, Ill. She also leaves five step-children, Mrs. Lavina COCHRAN, Mrs. Tillie BROWN, Pasadena, Calif.; Dr. M. STOCKBERGER, Milford, Ind.; Mrs. L. N. BAIR, Fulton county and Joel STOCKBERGER, Rochester.
Mrs. Stockberger has been a faithful member of the Lutheran church for many years and during her long residence in this county won scores of friends, who join the children in their sorrow.
The funeral service will be held in the Lutheran church, near Tiosa, Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock with interment in the Tiosa cemetery. The body will be brought to the Joel Stockberger home in this city Tuesday afternoon.

Tuesday, December 9, 1919

Mrs. John LOCKRIDGE, 50, of near Mentone, passed away at her home Monday evening after a long illness from gall stones. Mrs. Lockridge underwent an operation for relief at Woodlawn hospital in this city several weeks ago and for a time it was thought she was improving, she being removed to her home. However, complications arose and she gradually grew worse until the end.
She is survived by her husband and eight children, five of whom reside at home. She also leaves three sisters, Mrs. Frank LOWMAN, Mrs. William RICE and Mrs. Hiram MORGAN, all residing in or near Rochester, and three brothers, George [HOLLOWAY], David [HOLLOWAY] and Henry HOLLOWAY, all of Fulton county.
The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Lockridge home, near Mentone and burial will be made in the Nichols cemetery, northeast of Rochester.

Wednesday, December 10, 1919 to Monday, December 15, 1919

[no obits]

Tuesday, December 16, 1919

Mrs. Joseph WILHOIT, 22, of Akron passed away at her home in that town Monday morning at two o'clock after a week's illness from pneumonia, making the third death in the Wilhoit family within a week, William WILHOIT, her husband's father having been buried a week ago Sunday and the Wilhoit's infant child, who died last week.
Following the funeral of Mr. Wilhoit on Sunday a week ago the younger Wilhoit's wife took sick and rapidly developed a case of double pneumonia. During the latter part of the week it was thought her condition was changing for the better but a sudden change brought about her death.
Mrs. Wilhoit, who is one of Akron's well known young women, leaves besides her husband, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles SMITH and one brother, Cleotis SMITH, all of Akron.
The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Wilhoit residence with burial in the Akron cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Mildred SMITH WILHOIT, wife of Joseph, March 8, 1897 - Dec 15, 1919; Joseph WILHOIT, inf son (no dates); Joseph H. WILHOIT, 1896-1949; Grace J. WILHOIT, 1904-1947]

Mrs. Joseph WILHOIT passed away early Monday morning after a short illness of Pluro-Pneumonia. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Wednesday, December 17, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. DENISTON and Mr. and Mrs. A. L. DENISTON went today to Peru where they attended the funeral of the elder Mrs. Deniston's sister, Mrs. M. J. MOORE. Mrs. Moore was well known in this city where she often visited.

Thursday, December 18, 1919 to Saturday, December 20, 1919

[no obits]

Monday, December 22, 1919

Death visited two families in Fulton county over the week end claiming Henry MOORE, of this city and Mrs. Nancy DICKERSON, of Hoopston, Ill.
__________

After a long illness from complications incident to advanced age, Henry MOORE, 73, died at his home at 421 Ohio St., in East RochestrSunday evening.
Mr. Moore resided in the Leiters neighhborhood for many years where he was known as one of the progressive farmers. Nine years ago he moved to Rochester in retirement making this city his home since. He leaves two children, Mrs. Walter BUNN, of Peru and Ralph MOORE, of Piniele, Mont., besides a number of other relatives and friends.
The funeral will be held at the residence Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock and burial will be made in the Moon cemetery.
__________

Mrs. Nancy DICKERSON, 75, of Hoopston, Ill., died suddenly Saturday evening at the home of her son, Wilbur DICKERSON, near Loyal from an attack of apoplexy. Mrs. Dickerson came a short time ago to the home of her son for a holiday visit and the sudden death has cast a gloom over the entire Loyal neighborhood.
Mrs. Dickerson is the widow of John E. DICKERSON, who died last January and besides the one son, Wilbur, leaves a number of other relatives and friends.
A short funeral service was held at the home of the son Monday afternoon at three o'clock and Tuesday the body will be taken to Hoopston for further services and burial.

Tuesday, December 23, 1919

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 24 , 1919

Word was received in Rochester Tuesday evening bringing the news of the death of Mrs. Eugene COPLEN, 27, of this city, who passed away at Canon City, Colorado, Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock. Mrs. Coplen, who has been ill from a complication of diseases, a diagnosis of which has baffled a number of specialists, left Rochester with her family two months ago hoping to better her health in Colorado country. However, since going there she has failed to receive any benefit, although for a time she was able to hold her own against the advancement of her affliction.
Blanch HARDIN, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William HARDIN was born at Livonia, Ind., on June 17, 1882, where she grew to young womanhood. After attaining a business education, Miss Hardin came to Rochester, where she acted as cashier for Beyer Bros., in their downtown offices for several years, later going to the Rochester Telephone Co., where she acted in a similar capacity until her marriage with C. Eugene COPLEN of this city on May 13, 1912. To this union was born three children, James William [COPLEN], Maurice Eugene [COPLEN] and Louis Stewart

[COPLEN], the latter dying in infancy. Besides her parents and husband she leaves four sisters, Mrs. F. S. WILLOUGHBY and Mrs. Harry GARMAN, of Kewanna, Mrs. Levi P. MOORE, of this city and Miss Olive HARDIN, who has been with her sister for the last two months, and two brothers, Max [HARDIN] and Herbert [HARDIN], both of this city.
Mrs. Coplen, who for a number of years was identified with the business life of Rochester and for twenty-three years has been a faithful member of the Methodist church, leaves a host of friends, who now join with the sorrowing family in their great grief.
It is known the body will be brought back to Rochester for burial, but as the SENTINEL goes to press no definite arrangements have been made pending further word from Canon City.

Mr. and Mrs. Bert CRAIG have returned from Bloomfield, Ohio, after attending the funeral of her aunt, Mrs. Paul MILLER. They also spent several days with their sons, Albert [CRAIG] and Hubert [CRAIG], at Cleveland, Ohio.

Thursday, December 25, 1919

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, December 26, 1919

James A. ROSE, 53, a former resident of this city, passed away at his home in Elkhart on Monday of this week, after an illness from appendicitis. Mr. Rose has been in poor health for some time and an acute attack of the disease ended in his death.
After leaving this city, Mr. Rose and family removed to Elkhart, where they have made their home since. Besides his wife, he leaves a number of other relatives to mourn their loss.
The body was brought to Rochester Friday noon over the Lake Erie and burial was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery: James R. ROSE, 1866-1919]

Daniel H. HUTCHISON, 66, brother-in-law of Silas HOFFMAN of Akron, died last week at the General hospital in Elkhart. He is survived by a wife and daughter. He was born in Virginia and on March 24, 1894, he married Miss Carrie HOFFMAN, daughter of Jacob HOFFMAN.

Saturday, December 27, 1919

Miss Belle BEEBER has received word that her cousin, Mrs. F. E. NEELY, of Washington, D.D., had died on December 25th. She will be remembered here as Fay BEEBER, daughter of the late James M. BEEBER.

Monday, December 29, 1919

Dea BRILES, 16, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. G. BRILES, died Monday morning at the home of his parents, as the result of inflamatory fever, which affected his brain. The young man had been ill for some time and his fever grew gradually worse, reaching 106 degrees in temperature before his death. His parents live about two miles north of Fulton.

Tuesday, December 30, 1919

The funeral service of Mrs. Jerome BURCH was held Monday evening at the Pleasant Hill church, with burial in the Mt. Zion cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Mt. Zion Cemetery, Rochester, Twp.: Jerome BURCH, 1850-1914; Elizabeth BURCH, 1856-1919]

Mrs. Nancy COPLEN of Talma has received word of the death of her only brother, George B. HILL, at Lamar, Mo., on Sunday morning. He was also a brother of the late Wilson HILL of this city, who died several years ago.

Mrs. Wm. WOOD has received word that her brother, Wm. B. TRIMBLE, died December 24th at his home in Lancaster, Ohio. He was 89 years of age.

The funeral of Edward NEWCOMER was held at the Delong Methodist church Monday at 10 a.m. The body was brought from Indianapolis where he had passed away Friday night, having been sick about ten days with apoplexy. The service was in charge of Rev. ROUSH. Interment in the Moon cemetery. - - - DELONG ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Moon Cemetery, Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Edward NEWCOMER, July 1, 1842 - Dec 26, 1919, also G.A.R. emblem; Mary NEWCOMER, his wife, March 3, 1847 - March 5, 1906; Emeline NEWCOMER, wife of Edward, d. Sept 17, 1870, ae 22y-3m-29d. Edward NEWCOMER m. Emeline BAILEY, Dec 3, 1868; married next, Mary REICHARD, April 3, 1877]

Mrs. Earl SNYDER, of Warsaw, and Mrs. Ed BAILEY, of Elkhart, were in Rochester Monday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Gene COPLEN. They are spending several days with Mr. and Mrs. Henry ENTSMINGER.

Wednesday, December 31, 1919

The funeral of the baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. I. HOBBS, of this city, was held this afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the residence, Rev. GAIGE having charge of the services. Burial was made in the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Henry A. BARNHART went to Mexico this afternoon to attend the funeral of the last of his aunts, the widow of Elder Noah FISHER, deceased, who died Monday of paralysis at the age of 81.
Elder Fisher was for many years a traveling evangelist for the Brethren church and was widely known among his church people. He died a year ago also of paralysis.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Greenlawn Cemetery, Jefferson Twp.: Rev. Noah FISHER, 1839-1918; Hannah FISHER, 1840-1919]

D. BRILES, the fifteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. BRILES, passed away Monday morning at six o'clock at the home of his parents, after a brief illness, a victim of rheumatic fever.
The news of his death came as a great shock to his friends and neighbors, many of whom had not learned of his illness.

He was a pupil of the Fulton school and a member of the Fulton U. B. church and a regular attendant at Sunday school. He was well liked by those who knew him and numbered his friends by the number of his acquaintances. The friends and neighbors extend their heart felt sympathy to the family in this their sad hour of bereavement. - - - MT. OLIVE ITEMS.

Mrs. Elizabeth EDWARDS, aged 91 years, 8 months and 22 days, died at her home in Washington township, Miami county, Monday morning following an illness of some days duration. The funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock, Rev. H. C. BECKETT officiating.
Mrs. Edwards was born April 7, 1828 in Clark county Indiana. She is survived by three children, Mrs. Anna STITT, of Peru, Charles E. EDWARDS, who lives on the home place, and Mrs. Jane MORRISSEY of Deedsville. A number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren also survive.