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FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1920

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1998

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 

 


Rochester Sentinel

1920

Thursday, January 1, 1920

After having been ill for a length of time Jesse W. EMMONS, 58, one of the well known residents of Talma, passed away on New Year's eve, at his home. Mr. Emmons has not been in good health for some time and an attack of neuralgia of the heart brot about his death.
He was the son of William and Maria EMMONS, and was born in Fulton county in 1862, making his home here ever since. For years he has engaged in farming and for a number of years has been known as one of the leading threshermen of Newcastle township.
Besides his wife he leaves one daughter, Mrs. John WAGONER, of near Talma and a number of other relatives and friends. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Oliver F. COOL, 72, died at his home on West Sixth street this city Thursday morning, after a fourteen weeks illness from cancer of the stomach and liver.
Mr. Cool came to Rochester a year ago to take up his residence after being a citizen of Liberty township for many years, he being very well known here as well as in his former home surroundings.
Besides his wife he leaves three sons, John [COOL], of Argos, Harry [COOL], of Alton N. D., and Leonard [COOL], of Perrysburg. The funeral arrangements have not been made, pending word from the son in North Dakota.

Friday, January 2, 1920

The funeral of Oliver COOL will be held Saturday at the Perrysburg Church, a short service will be held at the home. Burial in the Weasaw cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Weasaw Cemetery, Union Twp.: Oliver F. COOL, son of Rev. Leonard and Mariah COOL, Nov 25, 1847 - Jan 1, 1920; Lydia B. WOLF COOL, his wife, Oct 5, 1847 - Mar 29, 1906]

John GERARD of Akron, died at his home on West Main St., Tuesday evening a victim of a cancer on his face from which he had suffered for several years. He leaves a wife and seven children, Bert GERARD of Warsaw, Will [GERARD], Ross [GERARD] and Fred [GERARD] of Akron, Mrs. Alvin ESHELMAN of Akron, Mrs. Marion BAHNEY of Larwill, and Mrs. Zenis FANNING of Ohio.

Saturday, January 3, 1920

Word has been received of the death in Ohio of Mrs. Louis REITER. She was an aunt of H. A. [REITER] and Marion REITER of this city, and has often visited here.

Monday, January 5, 1920

Mrs. James N. BEEBER, 82, died at home in Washington, D. C. on New Years day, after a long illness from complications, incident to advanced age.
Mrs. Beeber, who was formerly a resident of Argos for a number of years, has been making her home in Washington for several years, and her death has brought sorrow to the homes of her many friends in this community.
The body was brought to Argos Sunday and the funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. D. S. PARKER of that place. Burial will be made in the Odd Fellows cemetery in this city.

After an illness covering a long time, Roman GINTHER, 89, passed away Sunday at the home of his son, Joseph GINTHER, of Delong, where he had been making his home.
Roman Ginther is a former well known Rochester resident and for a number of years has resided in this county where he was recognized as one of the foremost farmers. He leaves besides the son Joseph, of Delong, one daughter, Mrs. Mary LEEDY, of Marion, and two other sons, John [GINTHER] of Rochester and Adam [GINTHER], of Leiters.
The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock at Leiters.

Harry B. THOMSON, brother of THOMSON sisters of this city, passed away Saturday evening in Indianapolis after a few days illness. Funeral services Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. from his residence at Beech Grove and burial in Crown Hill cemetery, Indianapolis.

H. O. [BLACKBURN] and Wm. BLACKBURN and daughter, Lucy [BLACKBURN], went today to Plymouth to attend the funeral of a relative.

Tuesday, January 6, 1920

Mrs. John RANK, 74, died at her home on South Main Street Monday night of apoplexy, after a long illness.
Sarah Ann GOSS was a daughter of George and Elizabeth GOSS and was born in this county on April 14, 1845. She is survived by four sisters, Mrs. John McMAHAN, Mrs. Sylvester ALSPACH, Mrs. Angeline BURTON and Mrs. Frank MARSH, all of this city. Two brothers, Hiram [GOSS] and Silas [GOSS] and a sister, Mrs. Robert MARSH, preceded her.
Funeral arrangements later.

Nathaniel PERRY, 70, a well known citizen of Akron, died Monday night at the Marion Soldiers' Home of gangrene. He was the father of Mrs. Lon SHEETS. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Herbert GINTHER was called home Saturday from Columbia City on account of the serious illness of his grandfather, Roman GINTHER, who passed away Sunday evening at the age of 89 ? years. The funeral was held at the Methodist church Wednesday afternoon; Rev. ROUGH in charge. Interment at Leiters Ford. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam BEEBER went today to Argos to attend the funeral of Mrs. James N. BEEBER, who died in Washington, D. C.

Wednesday, January 7, 1920

Isaac BROOKER, 76, well known Union township farmer, died Monday evening at his home after a short illness. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1844 and has been a resident of Union township for 43 years. He was a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge. Besides a wife he leaves four children, David [BROOKER], Walter [BROOKER] and Rudolph [BROOKER] of Rochester and Mrs. Ellen TROUTMAN of Plymouth.
Funeral at the home Thursday afternoon at 1:30, Rev. ROUSCH of Leiters Ford in charge. Burial at the Moon cemetery, I.O.O.F. lodge in charge.

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph BRILES and son returned today to their home in Grand Rapids, Mich., after being here to attend the funeral of his brother, Dee BRILES, of Fulton.

Funeral services for Mrs. John RANK Thursday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. from the residence on South Main Street, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Mary Ann RANK, 1846-1920]

Edward NEWCOMER, a pioneer farmer of Fulton county, died of cerebral hemorrhage at the Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Dec. 26, 1919, aged 77 years, 5 months and 23 days.
Mr. Newcomer was born in Sandusky Co., Ohio July 1, 1842 and came with his parents to Aubbeenaubbee township, Fulton county, Indiana, when only eight years of age. The rest of his life was spent in Fulton county, except for the last thirteen months which were spent with his sons in Logansport and Indianapolis.
He was twice married. His first marriage was to Emaline BAILEY who died within a year. To this union was born one child, a daughter Nora [NEWCOMER].
He was married April 3, 1877 to Mary REICHARD, who departed this life March 15, 1906. To this union were born five sons, John [NEWCOMER], Freddie [NEWCOMER], Rolly [NEWCOMER], Frank [NEWCOMER] and Ralph [NEWCOMER].
He is survived by two sons, Frank of Indianapolis, and Ralph of Logansport, by three grandchildren, Guy [HUNTER] and Fred HUNTER of Fulton county and Claude NEWCOMER of Indianapolis, by one sister, Mrs. Sarah FIKE of Lavalle, Wisconsin and by numerous other relatives and friends.
During the Civil War he served with Co. D, 42nd Regiment Indiana Volunteers from Nov 22, 1864 to July 21, 1865. He was a member of Leiters Ford lodge No. 618 I.O.O.F. and of Monterey Post G.A.R. For many years he has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and has always endeavored to live an honest upright life. Funeral services were held at Delong M.E. church Monday, Dec. 29, 1919 at 10:30 a.m., and interment was in Moon cemetery.

Thursday, January 8, 1920 to Friday, January 9, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, January 10, 1920

Mrs. Margarette TRUE, 78, died Saturday morning at the home of her son, Melvin TRUE, on Park St., following several days' illness due to erysipelas. She has long been a resident of this county, where most of her life was spent and was the widow of Jasper TRUE, who preceded her in death 24 years ago.
She was a member of the Evangelical church and took an active part in church work for many years.
There survive three sons and one daughter who are Charles [TRUE] and Melvin TRUE and Mrs. Carrie B. SHAW, of Montana, and Fred E. TRUE, of Chicago, an infant child and two daughters, Rosa [TRUE] and Blanch [TRUE] having died some years ago.
Funeral services Monday at 1:00 p.m. from the home of Melvin True on 548 Park St., Rev. H. E. EBERHARDT in charge. Burial in Mt. Zion cemetery.

Harvey EYTCHESON, age 35, died this afternoon at his home on E. 4th St., of tuberculosis. Obituary later.

Monday, January 12, 1920

City Attorney Edward E. MURPHY, aged 40, died at 2:30 Monday noon at his home on South Madison street of meningitis. Murphy had complained of earache and had consulted local doctors Saturday night but Sunday morning he grew worse. The attending physician was unable to check the disease.
Edward Murphy was born in this city February 26, 1879 the son of John and Samantha MURPHY. He had one half-brother, Harry CAPP, who is deceased. He attended the Rochester public schools and graduated from the Rochester high school with the class of 1895.
He was united in marriage October 16, 1900 to Miss Clara MONTGOMERY who preceded him. Two sons, Robert [MURPHY] and Hugh [MURPHY] were born to this marriage who survive. In December 1918 he was united in marriage with Mrs. Lillian MOHLER, who survives.
He started to study law, under Peter BUCHANAN, when he graduated from high school and was in his office for three years. He served one term as city clerk. He then accepted a position as deputy county clerk under Wm. WRIGHT and served one term. He then made the race for county clerk in 1906 and was elected. After filling his term he opened a law office.
He also was prominently identified with Republican politics having served as county chairman in 1911 and district chairman in 1916 and was on the state central committee with Will HAYS who is now National Chairman. He also served as city chairman when Wm. BRINKMAN was elected mayor.
Mr. Murphy was a prominent K. of P. and had passed through all of the chairs in the Rochester lodge and was elected to the grand lodge where he served as deputy Grand Chancellor.
Funeral arrangements later.

The infant child of Walter and Nellie WILSON which died in Hannibal, Missouri, was shipped to Kewanna. The funeral will be held Tuesday.

Tuesday, January 13, 1920

Word has been received by Will HOWARD that his sister, Mrs. Della HILDEBRAND, had died at eight o'clock Monday night, at Los Angeles. Mrs. Hildebrand was well known here having visited her brother, Mr. Howard, often during the last twenty years. Her home was in Los Angeles, and she will be buried in that city.

Butler I. GIBBONS was born in Marshall County Indiana, April 17, 1849 and departed this life Saturday 10:40 p.m., January 10, 1920, at the age of 70 years, 8 months and 23 days. Mr. Gibbons' death was the result of apoplexy contracted more than 17 months before death came to relieve his great suffering.
In 1869 he was united in marriage with Amanda CRIST, who passed to the great beyond May 28, 1911. To this union 8 children were born, three of whom are living, Daniel A. [GIBBONS] of Knox, Ind., Jay R. [GIBBONS], of Mishawaka, and Mrs. Cora M. BLOOMER of Grand Rapids, Mich.
Three brothers, O. C. [GIBBONS] of Inwood, Ind., John [GIBBONS] of Watseka, Ill., Frank [GIBBONS] of Culver, Ind.; and three sisters, Mrs. Frank WHITE of Argos, Mrs. S. A. SHAW and Mary GIBBONS of Culver, Ind., survive.
Mr. Gibbons lived in Rochester for about 20 years and was well known here. His funeral service will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1:00 p.m. at the Evangelical Church, Rev. H. E. EBERHARDT in charge. Mr. Gibbons had been a member of the Methodist and Evangelical churches.

Mrs. S. TRUE arrived today from Chicago to attend the E. E. MURPHY funeral on Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. A. C. TRUE, also of Chicago, will arrive late this afternoon.

Wednesday, January 14, 1920

Susan HERBSTER SHOBE, 79, daughter of Jacob and Sarah HERBSTER, died at her residence on Fulton Ave. and Third street, Tuesday morning.
Mrs. Shobe was born in West Carrol, Ohio in 1851, where she spent her childhood days. She married Augustus RATHBUN and to this union fourteen children were born, five preceded her. Those surviving are Mrs. J. H. DAVIDSON, Ainsworth, Neb.; Mrs. A. M. CHURCH, Burke, S.D.; Mrs. R. M. HERRE, Ainsworth, Neb.; Mrs. Wm. B. MILLER, Cainar, Iowa; Mrs. Van BUSKIRK, West Carrol, Ohio; Goldie [RATHBUN], of Calnar, Iowa; Fred [RATHBUN] of Custer, Mich., and Henry [RATHBUN], of San Francisco, Calif., and Frank [RATHBUN], Mammouth, Iowa.
Twelve years ago she married Samuel SHOBE. To this union no children were born. The body will be taken to Ainsworth, Iowa, Thursday. Funeral services Sunday.

Alfred Harvey EYTCHESON was born at Rochester, Indiana, on April 7, 1881. Departed this life January 19th, 1920, a victim of tuberculosis, contracted from influenza. Age 38 years, 9 months and 3 days. On September 7th, 1867 he was married to Pearl HUDNELL. To this union were born five children, 4 of whom are living. The eldest died in infancy. Besides the wife and four children he leaves the following brothers and sisters: Thomas [EYTCHESON], of this city, Isaac [EYTCHESON] and Levi [EYTCHESON] of Fulton, Ind., Mrs. Mary MASTIN, Mrs. Harry KNAPP, Mrs. Charles SOMES, all of Chicago, together with a host of friends to mourn the loss of a dear one.

Thursday, January 15, 1920

The funeral of the late Edward MURPHY was held this afternoon at the Baptist church, Rev. W. J. NIVEN officiating, while the services were in charge of the K. of P. lodge. A short prayer service was held at the house for the members of the immediate family. The church was crowded, showing the esteem in which the late lawyer was held in this county. The Fulton county bar association with members of the Marshall and Miami county associations were present as was also the city council. Adolph BICCARD represented the Grand lodge of the K. of P. Many beautiful flower pieces were sent and many telegrams from men high in the state were received. Those present from other cities to attend the funeral were Mrs. S. A. TRUE, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. TRUE, Mr. and Mrs. F. E. TRUE and Mrs. J. L. MITCHELL, of Chicago, Ill; Miss Glenn HULING, Akron, Mr. and Mrs. P. WORKING, of Kewanna and Mr. and Mrs. FERGUSON, of Peru.

Friday, January 16, 1920

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. Ezra CLARK of Rensselaer. Mr. and Mrs. Clark were well known here, he having served as deputy auditor here when John BARRETT was auditor about 20 years ago. Mr. Clark died several years ago.

Three deaths have occurred in the last 24 hours in this county, they being Mrs. Frank GREGORY, of Fulton, Wm. ADAMS, of Macy and Mrs. John COLEMAN from scarlet fever. [sic]
[Rochester Sentinel, Friday, January 16, 1920]

Mrs. Henry FOGLESONG received word this morning of the death of her uncle Wm. T. ADAMS, of Macy, aged 81, which occurred Thursday morning at the home of Mrs. Amanza PALMER with whom he was residing. Mr. Adams was born in Wabash county, Jan. 9, 1839. He had four children, Charles [ADAMS], who lives in Wabash county, Mrs. Rene CLOUD, of Avilla and William [ADAMS] and Adrian [ADAMS], of Kansas City, Missouri, all who survive. Mr. Adams was a veteran of the Civil war having received wounds which compelled him to have part of his leg taken off. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon. Burial at Mt. Zion.

Mrs. John COLEMAN, who lives near Fulton, died Thursday morning about 11 o'clock from scarlet fever, which she contracted while nursing her son, Donald [COLEMAN], who is in a very precarious condition. She had one other child, Edna [COLEMAN]. The funeral will be held Saturday morning. Burial in the Fulton cemetery.

Mrs. Frank GREGORY, age 75, died Thursday morning at her home in Fulton. She is survived by her husband and one daughter, Mrs. Otto CALLOWAY. Mrs. Gregory was one of the pioneers of the county and leaves a great number of friends. The funeral will be held Saturday from the house at 2 o'clock. Burial in Fulton.

Saturday, January 17, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, January 19, 1920

Mrs. Lucy BROWN, 83, died Saturday night at her home on east 5th street, after a week's illness with bronchitis. She retired as usual about 10 o'clock Saturday night and an hour and a half later quietly passed away. She was the daughter of Chichester and Lucy CHINN, who came to this state from Kentucky, and was born in Shelby county, Oct. 24, 1836 and is the last of eight children. When very young her parents moved to this county and settled on ground where the J. HAIMBAUGH farm now stands.
Mrs. Brown remembered well when the Indians were here and often told how they would come to their cabin and bake their Johnny cakes in their fire. She also could tell how the soldiers took the Indians away south down the Michigan road ultimately to the Indian Territory.
She was married to Nelson G. SCHAFFER, to which two children were born, Thomas A. [SCHAFFER] and Mrs. Mary H. SEIGFRIED, of this city. Mr. Schaffer died and she married Dr. Angus BROWN, who also preceded her. To this union four children were born, William [BROWN], Dr. Archibald [BROWN], of this city, John [BROWN] of Pontiac, Mich., and Mrs. Edna WALTER, of Kokomo. Mrs. Brown was a member of the Christian church of this city.
The funeral will be held from the house, 117 West 5th street, Tuesday afternoon.

Miss Myrtle HENDERSON received a telephone message from her sister, Mrs. Harry TAYLOR, late Sunday evening, telling her the sad news of the death of her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth HENDERSON, caused by a hemmorhage. Mrs. Henderson was the last of a family of fifteen children. Her maiden name was Elizabeth J. THOMAS, and she was born in Picqua county, Ohio, February 7, 1844, the daughter of William and Betsy THOMAS. She was married in December 25, 1865 to James Caton HENDERSON, to which union six children were born. They are Sherman [HENDERSON], Elmer E. [HENDERSON] and Myrtle [HENDERSON] of this city, Mrs. Armeda TAYLOR, of Toledo, Ohio, and George [HENDERSON] and Ida [HENDERSON] who preceded her. On December 25, 1914 Mr. and Mrs. Henderson celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. Her husband, James HENDERSON, died in February, 1916. Mrs. Henderson was a member of the Methodist church and of the Relief Corps.
Funeral arrangements later.

Tuesday, January 20, 1920

Mrs. Emily E. QUICK, age 76, died at her home two and one-half miles southwest of Green Oak Monday evening after a long illness.
Mrs. Quick was born in Columbiano, Ohio, April 6, 1843, and moved to this county with her husband, Cyrus QUICK, who preceded her in 1873.
Three children survive her. They are Austin [QUICK] and Ollie [QUICK], who live at home, and Mrs. Wm. BAKER. Mrs. Quick was one of the foremost ladies of the county. Early in her life she united with the Christian church. The funeral will be held in the Christian church at Macy Wednesday.

The body of the late Mrs. James HENDERSON arrived this afternoon on the 3:33 from the south from Toledo, Ohio. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Henry SHADEL was born near Leiters Ford, Indiana October 19th, 1849, died January 13th, 1920, aged 70 years, 2 months and 24 days. He was the youngest child of Jacob and Sarah SHADEL, pioneer residents of Fulton Co., Indiana. On January 15th, 1874, he was united in marriage to Martha A. [MILLER], daughter of Solomon and Mary MILLER. To this union were born six children, three sons and three daughters: Mary E. BALL, of Rochester, Ind., Hattie C. BIXEL, of Culver, Indiana, Solomon J. SHADEL, of Morley, Colo., Nellie C. ANDERSON, of South Bend, Indiana, B. Frank SHADEL, of Elkhart, Indiana and Guy A. SHADEL, of Leiters Ford, Indiana.
In March, 1890, he was converted and united with the M. E. Church, remaining faithful during his life and triumphantly passing through the dark shadow in an absolute confidence of soon being home.
He was often heard to say in the latter months of his life that his Hope would soon come and that he was ready. In his home life he was the ideal husband and father. Wholly unselfish, his life's ambition was only to make his loved ones comfortable and happy.
In bringing up his sons and daughters to manhood and womanhood, he constantly reminded them that the ideals of life were clean hearts and minds and an abiding faith in Jesus Christ. Among his many lifelong friends he has always been known for his unfailing optimism, his kindness of heart, and his readiness to lend the helping hand wherever needed. Since all the sons and daughters have been seen away the old home has ever been the Mecca of their hearts and thoughts, and Henry Shadel was never so happy as when some or all of his children or grandchildren were at home.
About 25 years ago he united with the Leiters Ford Lodge, No. 618 I.O.O.F and during all that time has served as either Warden or Host. In this capacity he was always at his post of duty unless prevented by sickness. And he was the true Host, welcoming the brothers with his ready smile and good cheer.
Besides the immediate family, he leaves a half-brother, Jacob SHADEL, of Alexandria, Kansas, and an only sister, Mrs. Caroline WELLS, of Bristol, Indiana, 21 grandchildren, besides a host of neighbors, friends and relatives.
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. E. McCLOUD, of Williamsport, Indiana, a former pastor of the M. E. Church of Leiters Ford, Indiana, on Friday afternoon, Jan. 18th. Burial was made in the Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. cemetery. All the children were present at the funeral except Mrs. Nellie Anderson, of South Bend, Indiana.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence CASTLEMAN and Alvin HIATT attended the funeral of Henry SHADEL at Leiters Ford last Friday. - - - BETHEL ITEMS.

Wednesday, January 21, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, January 22, 1920

Henry BIBLER, 61, county attorney and well known prominent Republican and lawyer and a life long resident of Rochester, died at his home at 1115 South Madison street at 7:45 o'clock Wednesday evening after an illness of about two months.
His illness came upon him suddenly and his physicians gave him little hope from the first when he was confined to his bed. When told last Sunday, by his son, Joseph [BIBLER], that he could not live much longer, the attorney turned to him and calmly asked for a cigar, which was on the mantle and said that he was ready to die as his conscience was clear. He then proceeded to make his will and told Joseph who he wanted to act as witnesses. He then made his own funeral arrangements, requesting that Rev. CRAIG make a few remarks, that a male quartet sing several songs and that Frank BRYANT organize the quartet, and that the funeral to be held in the court room at the court house. His request will be followed as closely as possible.
The body may be viewed at the residence between the hours of 2 and 4 Friday afternoon.
Because of divergent opinions of different doctors who were called in to examine Henry Bibler, a post mortem was held Thursday by Doctors TAYLOR and OVERMYER, and it was found that his death was caused by cancer of the liver.
Henry Bibler was born in Ohio December 2, 1858 and came to this county when he was 6 years old, where he lived on a farm near Kewanna with his parents, Joseph and Susan BIBLER.
When sixteen years old Mr. Bibler moved to this city and started to study law in the office of M. L. ESSICK and G. W. HOLMAN. When 21 he opened an office for himself and soon won a large practice. He was well known as a criminal lawyer being noted all over the state of Indiana. he was one of the counsel for defense in the HIZER murder trial. He had served a number of terms as town attorney before Rochester became a city and then served as city Attorney. At the present time he was county Attorney.
In 1881 he was married to Mary Lola HOWARD and to this union nine children were born.
The widow survives him as do his daughters, Mrs. Sam KIME, Mrs. Dale BRILES, Mrs. Russell PARKER and Mrs. Alta WERT, Arthur [BIBLER] and Robert [BIBLER], all of this city, and Joseph [BIBLER], of Logansport. Two sisters, Mrs. M. M. BITTERS, of Kokomo, and Mrs. Sarah MUSSER also survive. A brother, Ed [BIBLER] and two sons, Luther [BIBLER] and James [BIBLER], preceded him. Early in life Mr. Bibler joined the Methodist church.

Word was received this morning from Mrs. James McCLURE of Natches, Mississippi, telling of the death of her mother, Mrs. Percy TERRY, at her home in that city. The body will be brought to this city for burial.

The remains of Oliver SMITH, of Culver, were taken to Moon cemetery Saturday for interment. Deceased was a life time resident of Fulton Co. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Friday, January 23, 1920

The members of the Fulton county Bar Association met Thursday afternoon and completed arrangements to attend the funeral of their late brother, Henry BIBLER Saturday afteronnon at 2:00 o'clock from the court house. The association appointed Frank BRYANT, B. F. FRETZ and Selden BROWN a committee to purchase flowers. The following lawyers were then selected as pallbearers: Frank TERRY, B. F. FRETZ, Chas. EMMONS, Frank BRYANT, Selden BROWN and Martin IVEY. All of the members were requested to attend the funeral. The secretary of the association was instructed to notify the officers of the bar associationa of neighborhing counties of the death.

Elizabeth J. THOMAS, born Feb. 7th, 1845 at Holland, O., died Jan. 18th, 1920, at Toledo, O. Was married to Jas. C. HENDERSON on Dec 25th, 1864. Mr. Henderson passed away on Feb. 18th, 1916.
Mr. and Mrs. Henderson celebrated their Golden Wedding on Dec. 25th, 1914, at their country home two miles east of Rochester, at which all the living children and grandchildren attended.
Of this marriage were born six children, William S. [HENDERSON], Elmer E. [HENDERSON], Armeda [HENDERSON], Myrtle L. [HENDERSON], Geo. W. [HENDERSON] and Ida May [HENDERSON]. Geo W. and Ida May are deceased.
There is also living three grandchildren, Edith May [HENDERSON] and Howard [HENDERSON], son and daughter of Elmer HENDERSON, of Rochester, and Everett E. TAYLOR, son of H. E. and Armeda TAYLOR, of Toledo, Ohio.
Originally from Ohio, they came to Indiana in 1882, locating in Jay Co., near Portland. Then moving to Fulton Co., in 1901, where they have continually made their home.
Mrs. Henderson has been a life long member of the Methodist church, having united with that denomination at the age of fifteen.

Funeral services for Atty. Henry BIBLER, Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the court room. Rev. G. P. CRAIG in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, January 24, 1920

Mrs. William McMAHAN, aged 30, died Saturday afternoon of influenza. Mrs. McMahan and her entire family have been sick for the past two weeks but she had sufficiently recovered, the doctor thought, to be out of danger. Saturday morning at three o'clock she suffered a relapse and gradually grew worse, dying this afternoon at 1:30.
Mrs. McMahan was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. WAGONER of Jersey City, N.J., who survive her as do her brothers, Phillip [WAGONER] and Frank [WAGONER], and a sister, Mrs. Richard KNAPP of the same city. Besides her husband two children also survive. They are Katherine Bernice [McMAHAN], age 4, and John William [McMAHAN], 20 months. Her mother, Mrs. Wagoner, is on her way here. Funeral arrangements later.

Word was received in this city Friday of the demise of Benjamin NORTON, which occurred Thursday night in Yarnell, Wisconsin, of influenza. Mr. Norton had been living in South Bend but had gone to Yarnell where he had purchased a farm. He was taken sick Wednesday afternoon and died Thursday. The body arrived in this city Saturday afternoon and the funeral will be held at the Christian church Sunday afternoon. The I.O.O.F. lodge will be in charge.
Mr. Norton was 54 years old and was the son of Rev. and Mrs. Charles NORTON and was born in Howard county. When quite young they moved to this county and lived on the old Levi MERCER farm south of this city. He was married when quite young and had two sons, Paul [NORTON], of Louisville, Ky., and Joseph [NORTON], of Cincinnati, Ohio. His wife died and he married Mrs. Vera McCLAIN, in 1907. Two children, Ruth [NORTON] and Marie [NORTON], were born who besides the widow survive. Four brothers also survive. They are Schuyler [NORTON], South Bend, John [NORTON] and Perry [NORTON], of Kokomo, and Otis [NORTON], whose present address is unknown, and a sister, Mrs. Eunice CHATAN, of Lima, Ohio.

The funeral of the late Henry BIBLER was held Saturday afternoon in the court room, which was crowded as was his request. A quartet composed of Frank BRYANT, Roy MEYERS, Will HOFFMAN and Bruce SHERBONDY sang, "Lead Kindly Light" and "No night There." Rev. CRAIG of the Methodist church used the 23 psalm and followed this with a sermon. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Many beautiful flowers were sent which show the esteem in which he was held by his friends. Several very beautiful floral pieces were sent. Those of the Futon county bar association, the various officers and assistants in the court house, and one from the children with the word "Father," were exceedingly wonderful.
All of the offices in the court house were closed during the funeral. The following lawyers, who were chosen by the bar association, served as pall bearers, Frank TERRY, B. F. FRETZ, Chas. EMMONS, Frank BRYANT, Selden BROWN and Martin IVEY. Elijah MARTINDALE and Harley LOGAN, of the Marshall county bar were present as was a representative of the Miami assiciation.

Graham EARLE, 76, widely known actor, who in 1885 located in Rochester and built a summer home at Lake Manitou, recently died in California, where he was acting with a motion picture company. His former common law wife, Agatha SINGLETON, whom he deserted to marry another after he left Rochester, is living in retirement at Grand Rapids, Mich., and his daughter, who was known here and elsewhere in the long ago as Little Fern [EARLE], is the wife of a Chicago broker. Earle was very popular when a resident of this city and was quite active in public affairs and lodge work.

B. F. MUSSER, of Indianapolis, is in this city to attend the funeral of his uncle, Atty. Henry BIBLER.

Monday, January 26, 1920

The following persons were in this city Sunday attending the funeral of the late Ben NORTON: Joe NORTON, Cincinnati, O., Mr. and Mrs. Perry NORTON, Peru, Ind., Hugh [NORTON] and Hector NORTON, all of South Bend, Wm. NORTON and Harry NORTON of Kokomo, Mr. and Mrs. Dor McSEDIN and John NORTON of Wisconsin and Schuyler NORTON of Peru. Paul NORTON of Louisville, Ky., arrived too late for the funeral.

Word was received in this city Monday morning of the death of Mrs. Mary NORTON, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. L. J. CHATTEN, in Lima, Ohio. Her husband was a former assessor in this county and the family was well known. Besides the daughter, she leaves one son, Perry NORTON. The body will be brought to Kewanna and burial will be at that place Thursday.

Mrs. Henry F. MOW received a telegram from Albuquerque, New Mexico on Monday morning, announcing the death of her grandson, Glee ALSPACH, formerly of Peru. The body will be brot to Peru for burial.

Paul NORTON, of Camp Knox, Ky., is here called by the death of his father, Ben NORTON.

Tuesday, January 27, 1920

Funeral services for Mrs. Wm. McMAHAN Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. from the Methodist church. Remains viewed from 12:00 m. until 2:00 p.m. Rev. Geo. F. CRAIG in charge.Burial in the Mausoleum.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. WAGONER came Monday evening from Jersey City, N.J., to attend the funeral of their daughter, Mrs. Wm. McMAHAN.

Wednesday, January 28, 1920

Willis D. HART, age 13, son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer HART, who live on the KOEFFEL farm, east of the lake, died Tuesday evening of pneumonia.The entire Hart family were taken down last Friday with the flu.
Willis was born in Fulton county, Indiana, and was a student at the Sprinkleberg school.
Surviving him besides the parents are a sister, Mildred [HART] and brother Donald [HART]. Burial will be made in Mt. Hope cemetery Thursday.

Mrs. Benjamain EDDINGTON, age 66, died Tuesday evening of tuberculosis. She had been sick for the past three years and has never been out of her home but three times during this period.
Mrs. Eddington's maiden name was Olive FIELDS, the daughter of John and Mary FIELDS, and was born in Vermillion county, Indiana, Dec. 1, 1853. On October 25, 1896, she was united in marriage to Benjamin EDDINGTON. No children were born to this union.
She has one brother, Jason FIELDS, of Sebetha, Kansas who survives her.
The funeral will be held in Hoover's Chapel, Friday afternoon, Rev. CRANE of the United Brethren church in charge.Burial will be made in the Citizens cemetery.

Thursday, January 29, 1920

A message from Seattle brings the information that Charles PETERSON recently died there, that his body was cremated and forwarded to his sister, Mrs. John J. HILL of this city.
Charles Peterson was a son of Fred PETERSON, deceased, formerly a prominent citizen of this city and county, and was a very popular young man here thirty years ago.
He went West and was very prosperous in the fruit bueiness for many years, but rcently, it is said, he met reverses in Alaskan investments and lost much of his estate. In addition to Mrs. Hill he leaves two other sisters, Mrs. Carrie MUSSON and Mrs. Sophia PETERSON, of Grand Rapids, Mich., and a wife and son in Seattle. He was about 56 years old.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence CASTLEMAN, Mr. and Mrs. Walter MYERS and Miss Helen VANKIRK, of Leiters Ford, were in this city Wednesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Wm. McMAHAN.

Friday, January 30, 1920

Clara Marjorie SIBERT, aged two years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kent SIBERT who live on the east side of the lake, died Friday morning of pneumonia, following the flu. The child has two brothers, Albert [SIBERT] and Porter [SIBERT] and a sister, Frances [SIBERT] who with the parents have been ill with the flu. The child was born March 22, 1917. The funeral will be held from the home Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. NIVEN, in charge.

Saturday, January 31, 1920

Wm. DILLON, aged 69, died very suddenly at his home on Fulton avenue Friday of asthma. Mr. Dillon was the son of Mr. and Mrs. O. P. DILLON who preceded him and was born March 24, 1850 in this county. He had four brothers, Thomas [DILLON] and Charles [DILLON], who preceded him, and Andrew J. [DILLON], of this city, and L. C. [DILLON], of Culver, and one sister, Mrs. Ira BABCOCK, also of this city, who survive him.
Early in his life he was married to Miss M. MADDOCK, who died three years ago. To this union four children were born, they are G. A. DILLON, of Leiters Ford, T. O. DILLON, Winona, Minn., C. A. [DILLON] and Grace [DILLON], of this city.
He was a member of the Methodist church and was active in all church affairs. The funeral will be in charge of Rev. CRAIG and will be held Sunday afternoon at 230 from the home.

Thomas Jefferson BRADY, aged 76, died at his home on South Monroe street Friday night from paralysis. He was born on Sept. 20, 1844. Mr. Brady served in the Civil war with Co. G 48th and Co. A 152 Indiana Infantry.
He married Miss Emma GORDY of Syracuse, January 26, 1868 and to this union 8 children were born. Two died in infancy, Norman [BRADY] of Waukegan, Ill., John [BRADY] of Mishawaka, Mrs. Frank KUMLER, Mrs. Earle MILLER, and Miss Faye BRADY, of this city, and Mrs. Paul EMRICK, of Lafayette, survive him.
The funeral services will be held at the home Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock in charge of McClung post. Burial will be made Monday at Syracuse.
The members of the McClung post and the W.R.C. will attend the funeral in a body.

Mrs. Lot BABCOCK and son, Luther [BABCOCK], of Amherst, S. D., will come to this city to attend the funeral of Clara Marjorie SIBERT.

Monday, February 2, 1920

Elmer HART, age 38, died at his home east of this city Sunday of the flu. His son, Willis [HART], died last Tuesday. His wife and sister-in-law, Mrs. Dave KELLER, have both been very ill but are reported some better today.
Mr. Hart was born in Kosciusko county, March 22, 1882 and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Freemont HART. When about 25 years old he married Miss Ida KOEFFEL. Two children besides the wife survive him. They are Mildred [HART] and John [HART]. Two sisters, Mrs. John DAVIS and Mrs. Joe DICKERHOFF, of Akron, also survive.
The funeral will be held in the Mt. Hope U.B. church Tuesday at 2:00 o'clock, with burial in the Mt. Hope cemetery.

Abram CRAMMER, age 74, died at the home of his son, L. A. CRAMMER, south of this city, on the Otto McMAHAN farm near the Antioch church, Sunday of erysipelas. Mr. Carmmer had been visiting with his son for the past two months when he was taken sick. Mr. Crammer was born in Circleville, O., in 1845 and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin CRAMMER.
Early in life he moved to White county near Chalmers. He has three sons who survive him,

M. L. CRAMMER, of Chicago, Ed [CRAMMER] of Chalmers and L. A. CRAMMER of this county. He also has one brother, James [CRAMMER], in Kansas. His body will be taken back to Chalmers for burial.

Charles MYERS 55, and his son Clarence MYERS, 25, who formerly lived at Kewanna, are both dead of pneumonia within three days in South Bend. The elder Myers who has lived in South Bend for some time was recently taken ill and was confined to his bed with influenza.
His son [Clarence] [MYERS], came to see him a week ago Sunday and also to start work but shortly after his visit to his father he contracted the same disease and died Friday evening at the Epworth hospital. Meanwhhile the father continued to grow worse and he passed away on Sunday morning.
Clarence MYERS was buried Monday afternoon at Kewanna with the I.O.O.F. lodge in charge. He was born and raised near Kewanna and leaves besides his wife one daughter, Katherine [MYERS], and six brothers. No funeral arrangements have been made for the funeral of Charles MYERS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Bruce Lake Cemetery, Union Twp.: Charles L. MYERS, 1870-1920; Clara B. MYERS, 1873-1944; ALSO SEE: ibid, Kewanna I.O.O.F. cemetery, Union Twp.: Clarence E. MYERS, Apr 28, 1892 - Jan 30, 1920; Bertha E. MYERS, his wife, May 15, 1893 - Feb 10, 1920]

Tuesday, February 3, 1920

Hugh BROWN, 60, a former resident of Battle Creek, Mich., died Tuesday evening at five o'clock at the home of his brother, Dr. Archibald BROWN, on south Jefferson street, after suffering for several months with cancer of the stomach. He had been ill since early in November and some time ago was brot to this city by his brother and had been confined ever since.
He is survived by four sisters, Mrs. Walter LEE, of Trinidad, Col.; Mrs. Katherine FLOYD, Gallup, N.M.; Mrs. W. P. SELLERS, Los Angeles, Calif., and Mrs. Edna WALTER, Kokomo. Four brothers also survive, John [BROWN] and Dougal [BROWN], Pontiac, Mich., William [BROWN] and Archibald [BROWN], Rochester.
The burial will be at Rochester but no formal arrangements have as yet been made.

Charles Robert BICK, age one year, died Tuesday morning of the flu at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde BICK, east of the lake. All of the family have been down with the disease. The funeral will be held Wednesday at 1:30 from the residence, Rev. NIVEN in charge. Burial will be made in the Mt. Hope cemetery.

Word was received here this morning by Mrs. Julius ROWLEY of the death in Indianapolis Monday of her nephew, George GYER. Mr. Gyer was a Superintendent of the L. E. & W. railroad and was well known in this city where he often visited.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank KUMLER have returned from Syracuse, Ind., where her father, T. J. BRADY, was buried.

Mrs. Lot BABCOCK and son, Luther [BABCOCK] of Amherst, S.D., who came to attend the funeral of Clara Marjorie SIBERT, expect to spend three weeks with relatives.

Mrs. O. LETHERMAN and Mrs. Ralph BRADY, sisters of Kent SIBERT, returned today to their homes in Indianapolis, after attending the funeral of Clara Marjorie SIBERT.

Wednesday, February 4, 1920

Three deaths occurred in this county Tuesday, while one body was shipped into this city from Peru. They were Mrs. Schuyler RHODES of near Athens, Roscoe THOMAS, of this city and Mrs. Frank PENROD, of Kewanna. The body of Mrs. Mary Ann DOWNS, who died Tuesday and who made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Rex DUNN, of Peru, was brought to this city Wednesday.

Roscoe THOMAS, 15, was born in Kokomo June 1, 1904 and died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. THOMAS, 117 West 4th street, Tuesday noon of heart disease. He has been sick for over a year and during this time was unable to go to school. He leaves six brothers, Omer [THOMAS], of Kokomo, Robert [THOMAS], William [THOMAS], Floyd [THOMAS], Clarence [THOMAS] and James [THOMAS], and one sister, Rethal Mae [THOMAS], who besides the parents survive. The funeral services will be held from the residence at 1 o'clock Thursday, Rev. EBERHARDT in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Schuyler RHODES, 59, died at her home near Athens, Wednesday morning, from cancer of the stomach. She was born March 30, 1860 in Marion county, Indiana, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. HARTER. Early in life she moved to this county. While yet a young girl she [Mary A. HARTER] married Schuyler RHODES. Eight children were born to this marriage. They are Courtney [RHODES], Ray [RHODES], Sumner [RHODES], Mrs. O. P. SHAW, Mrs. Agnes URBAN, Victoria [RHODES], Gladys [RHODES] and Colfax [RHODES], who with the husband mourn her departure. Four brothers also survive. They are John [HARTER], of Lafayette, Jasper [HARTER], of Topeka, Kans., George [HARTER], of Anderson, and William [HARTER], of Elwood.
No funeral arrangements have been made.

Mrs. Mary Ann DOWNS, 63, died Tuesday evening at the home of her daughter Mrs. Rex DUNN, of East 2nd street, Peru. The body was brought to this city from Peru Wednesday morning. Mrs. Downs was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John MATHIAS, and was born in Pennsylvania, Ohio, April 15, 1856. She was married to Charles DOWNS in 1878 and to this union seven children were born, two dying in infancy. They are Edd [DOWNS] of Washington, Mo., Elmer [DOWNS], of Elkhart, Mrs. Grace CLAY, of Bunker Hill, Mrs. Anson DAVIS of this city and Mrs. Rex DUNN, of Peru. She also leaves one sister, Mrs. Elmer APT and three brothers, John [MATHIAS], Jacob [MATHIAS] and Charles MATHIAS. She was a member of the Evangelical church. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 at the Evangelical church, with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Frank PENROD, of near Kewanna died late Wednesday afternoon of the influenza. No particulars of her life or the funeral arrangements could be procured in time for the paper today.

Elizah W. SAGE, who lives near Loyal, a civil war veteran, age 70, may in the near future receive a share of the $100,000,000 estate left by the late Mrs. Russell SAGE, who willed it from her husband. The will was recently probated in the East but the list of beneficiaries has not been given out as yet.
Mr. Sage, who has only been a resident of this county for the past three years, is a direct descendant of the late Russell Sage, being a nephew of the man who held the reputation of being the wizard of Wall street, because of his almost uncanny knowledge of stocks and bonds.
When Russell Sage died he left Elizah Sage a neat little remembrance. At that time the family were living in Illinois. After that they moved to Rensselaer and from that place to this county. Sage has one son named in honor of his late uncle, who lives in the Burton neighborhood.
The Sages are anxiously awaiting word from the East to hear if they are included in the list of heirs, which seems highly probable. It is not known as yet whether the late Mrs. Russell Sage left the money to the people on her side of the family or whether she distributed it on both sides.

Jess BAHNEY, 26, east of Akron, died Monday morning, a victim of influenza. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence CASTLEMAN of this place attended the funeral of Mrs. Wm. McMAHAN of Rochester. - - - BETHEL ITEMS.

Thursday, February 5, 1920

Edd DAVIS of Washington, Mo., is here to attend the funeral of his mother.

Adam WALTER, of Kokomo, is in this city. He came to attend the funeral of his uncle, Hugh BROWN.

Friday, February 6, 1920

A telegram was received Thursday afternoon by Mrs. Wm. KING announcing the death of her daughter, Mrs. Glen DICE, at Miles City, Mont., Thursday morning at three o'clock following an operation about two weeks ago. Her father who was there when the operation was performed is now sick in bed in that city. Mrs. Dice's maiden name was Myrtle KING, and she was born December 25, 1887, on a farm near Kewanna. She attended the common schools and was a graduate of Rochester college.
She was married to Glen DICE and to this union three children were born. They are Paul [DICE], Kittie [DICE] and Viola [DICE]. Besides the parents she leaves three brothers, Howard [KING], Lester [KING] and Harold [KING] of this county. Mrs. Dice was a member of the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church. It is not known whether the body will be brought back to this city for burial or not.
__________

Word was received here late Friday afternoon that the body would be brought to this city Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. KING, together with the husband, are accompanying the body.

Mrs. J. F. PENROD died at her home in Kewanna Wednesday morning at 2:30 aged 39 years. She was sick seven days with "flu" and pneumonia. Surviving are the husband and two brothers [sic], A. G. PENROD, of Kewanna and O. E. PENROD of Dayton, Ohio.
Mrs. Penrod was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. LAMBERT and her maiden name was Sarah [LAMBERT]. She was graduated from the Plymouth high school in 1901, and was married ten years ago. The funeral was held at her home at noon Friday. Burial was made at Oak Hill cemetery, Plymouth.

The Plymouth Democrat contains the following notice of the death of Wm. CLARK who formerly lived here and was a brother of J. C. CLARK of this city.
William CLARK, aged 53 years, died at his home in South Bend Tuesday evening of Bright's disease. He is survived by his wife, Hattie [CLARK], two children, Harry [CLARK] and Velma CLARK of South Bend, and three brothers, Charles [CLARK], of Glide, Ore., J. C. [CLARK] of Rochester, and Thomas [CLARK], of LaPorte. Mr. Clark was born in Marshall county and later went to Fulton county whence he moved to South Bend 14 years ago.

Saturday, February 7, 1920

Two deaths occurred in the county within the past 24 hours from the influenza, when Mrs. David MOORE, 34, who lived three miles south of Athens, passed away Friday evening and Mrs. Ernest ZARTMAN, 25, who resided three miles west of Rochester on the Cessna road, succumbed Saturday morning.

Friday evening Miss Isabelle CARLTON, county nurse, received a call to come to the Moore home and bring a nurse with her if she could possibly get one, as the whole family was down. She secured Mrs. Dal BLACK. Before they arrived Mrs. [Ada Elizabeth] MOORE had died. The rest of the family are still bedfast but none in a serious condition.
Mrs. Moore, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David SHRIVER, was born Oct. 5, 1885. Her maiden name was Ada Elizabeth SHRIVER. She leaves besides her husband three children, Ruth Isabelle [MOORE], Mary Bernice [MOORE] and Henry [MOORE] and two brothers, Harley [SHRIVER], of Kokomo, and Charles [SHRIVER], of Akron, and two sisters, Mrs. Roy RHODES and Miss Esta SHRIVER, both of Akron. No funeral arrangements as yet.

Mrs. Ernest ZARTMAN, age 25, died Saturday morning after a week's illness of the flu. She was born Dec. 6, 1895 near Athens and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Esly NYE. Her mother, Mrs. Esly NYE, died in the office of Dr. M. O. KING just eight months ago to the day. She leaves besides her husband to mourn her departure four children, Wayne [ZARTMAN], Mary [ZARTMAN], Alice [ZARTMAN] and Dean [ZARTMAN]. Three brothers also survive. They are Joe [NYE], of Chicago, and Otha [NYE] and Chancy [NYE], of Rochester.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mr. and Mrs. Ebert ROBBINS, Mrs. Chas. CASTLE, Mrs. C. O. EDMISTER, of Peru, attended the funeral of their aunt, Mrs. Mary DOWNS.

Monday, February 9, 1920

Residentys of the community were shocked Monday to learn of the deaths of six residents and former residents of Fulton county all coming during the week end, most of them being well known. The passing away of so many within such a short time has increased the total of deaths this winter above the average.
The third death occurred at the HART residence east of the lake, since the influenza epidemic started when Mrs. David KELLER who had gone there to help nurse the stricken family, succumbed to the disease. Thomas LOVETT, well known former county commissioner passed away in Peru, from apoplexy, while Ed OSBORN former well known and popular young man of this city died in california of pneumonia. Mrs. B. O. WEST, wife of the Erie Agent, Mrs. George COOK and Miss Anna BURTON were the others to die.

Mrs. David KELLER, age about 84, died Sunday night at the home of her sister, Mrs. Elmer HART, east of the lake. Mrs. Keller received a call, just two weeks ago Sunday, from her sister, telling of the sickness of her family with the flu and she immediately came from her home, 2-1/2 miles northwest of Akron, to nurse them. She contracted the disease but was considered very much better when suddenly she became worse and died about 12:30 Sunday night. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James KOEFFEL and leaves one sister, Mrs. Elmer HART. She was married about five years ago but has no children.
No funeral arrangements.

Mrs. Benjamin O. WEST died at her home on North Jefferson street in this city Saturday evening at 7:40. Mrs. West was born in Petersburg, Virginia, July 29, 1858 and ws 62 years old. Her maiden name was Virginia HELVIN. She was married to Benjamin WEST to which union three children were born. They are Oden [WEST] and Charles [WEST], deceased, and Mrs. Irene O. WEST BARGER. Also two grandchildren, Virginia [BARGER] and Oden BARGER with the husband mourn her departure. She also leaves three brothers, J. A. HELVIN, of Boston, Mass., J. F. HELVIN of Washington, D.C., and George W. HELVIN, of Norfolk, Va. Funeral at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2:30, Rev. GAIGE in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. George COOK, about 60 years of age, who was a life long resident of Fulton, died Monday morning at her home in Fulton. Mrs. Cook had been suffering from dropsy for the past few years but it was thought that she was much better. This morning she appeared especially cheerful and had just completed building the fire and had seated herself by the stove in a rocking chair. Her husband called to her but after he had repeated this several times without an answer he walked to the chair and discovered that she had died. Mr. Cook has been in the grocery business for a number of years in Fulton. She leaves besides her husband, eight children. They are, Mrs. Flo ZOOK, Mrs. Otha EYTCHESON, and Mrs. Howard FRAIN, all of Fulton, and Mrs. Bert ABBOTT, of Rochester, Elmer [COOK] and Henry [COOK], of Royal Center, and Ray [COOK] and Lee [COOK], of Detroit.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. John DeVORE, who lives west of this city, received a telegram this morning announcing the death of her nephew, Ed. OSBORN, which occurred Sunday at Valijo, California, of pneumonia. Ed Osborn moved with his family to the Sunset state about ten years ago. He finished common school in this city, then went to high school and from there to Rochester College, where

he completed a commercial course. After that he accepted a position with BEYER BROS., wher he stayed until going to California. He had been working until recently at Mare Island, a government naval station on the West Coast. He leaves his mother, Mrs. Schuyler OSBORN, who was with him when he died, one sister, Mae [OSBORN], and a brother Mart [OSBORN]. Burial in Los Angeles.

Word was received in this city Monday morning from Peru announcing the death of Thomas LOVETT, Sunday afternoon of apoplexy. Lovett was at one time a resident of this county and lived on the what is now known as the McKINNEY farm. He was a commissioner of this county when the court house was built. He married Mrs. HACKLEY, of Peru. No children were born to this union. The funeral at the home, 74 East Franklin street, Tuesday afternoon. Burial in Peru.

Miss Anna BUNTON, 78, died Saturday evening at the county farm. She had no near relatives and was never married. She had been a life long resident of this county and was born and reared near Fulton. She had been an inmate of the county farm for 24 years. She was a member of the Baptist church. Burial was made Monday in Shelton cemetery, south of Rochester.

The body of Mrs. Glen DICE arrived in this city Sunday evening from Miles City, Montana. Funeral services from the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church Tuesday morning at 10:00 o'clock, Rev. H. G. GAIGE in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, February 10, 1920

Mrs. Clarence MYERS, about 27, died at her home in Kewanna this morning of double pneumonia, following the flu. This is the third death in the Myers family within the past two weeks of the flu. Her husband had been called to South Bend to take care of his father, the late Charles MYERS, about three weeks ago, and contracted the flu. They both died, one on the 24th, and the other on the 26th of January in the Ep[worth hospital in South Bend. While her husband was ill, Mrs. Clarence MYERS, went to South Bend to nurse him, where she contracted the disease which turned into pneumonia.
Mrs. Myers was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert SMITH, but had made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Harry MOON of Kewanna after her parents had separated. Her father lives in Logansport and her mother in Walkerton. She leaves a daughter about one and one-half years old. She was a member of the Baptist church of Kewanna.
No funeral arrangements have been made.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F. cemetery, Union Twp.: Clarence E. MYERS, Apr 28, 1892 - Jan 30, 1920; Bertha E. MYERS, his wife, May 15, 1893 - Feb 10, 1920]

James M. WILHELM, aged 68, died Monday evening at his home 1117 Franklin street of arteriorsclerosis. Mr. Wilhelm was born in Miami county April 5, 1851, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander WILHELM. When quite young he was married and to this union four children were born, who survive him as does the wife. They are William [WILHELM], of Chicago, Walter [WILHELM] and Charles [WILHELM], of Wabash, and Miss Della [WILHELM], of this city. He also has four brothers living. They are Barney [WILHELM], of Hammond, Frank [WILHELM] and Oliver [WILHELM], of South Bend, and Jack [WILHELM]. The funeral will be held

Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home, Rev. H. E. EBERHARDT in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The third death in the HELSER family of Silver Lake from the flu within two weeks occurred Saturday when Miss Fern HELSER died. Mr. Helser, her father, and her brother died about a week before, of the flu, within a minute of each other.

Joe MURTHA came from California Tuesday to attend the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Julia MURTHA. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Calder ALSPACH, Chas. PIPER and Wm. BLACKBURN went today to Plymouth, where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Daisy THOMAS.

Wednesday, February 11, 1920

John V. REED, 83, a well known resident of Fulton, died early Wednesday morning from old age. He was the son of Richard and Elizabeth REED and was born and raised in this county and lived here all of his life with the exception of the time that he spent in the army during the Civil war. He was taken as a captive by the Confederate troops and spent three months in Libby prison. When he returned from the war he married Ella IZZARD. To this union one child, James [REED] was born. Mr. Reed was a well known Republican and for a number of years was postmaster at Fulton. He was a member of the G.A.R. and W.R.C. and was a charter member of the Olive Branch U.B. church, Fulton. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the U.B. church, with burial in the Fulton cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: John V. REED, 1836-1920; Ella E. REED, 1843-1930; also military marker: John V. REED, Co E 29 Ind Inf]

Mrs. Minnie SECRIST, whose home was in Mentone, died at the home of her brother, Lawson HARPER, 1519 S. Jefferson street Tuesday evening. She was born March 11, 1871 at Louden county, Virginia, and was 48 years old. The funeral will be held from the Harper residence Thursday afternoon at 1:30 with burial in the Akron I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Eliza KEESLING, aged 87, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. C. CISSELL, 1331 South Madison street, Tuesday evening, caused by old age. Mrs. Keesling was born in Virginia, December 22, 1832, and was the daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Norman STEPHENS. Rev. Stephens was circuit rider preacher for the Methodist church. He with his family emigrated to this state and settled near Middletown. When but twenty years old she married Milbern KEESLING. To this union seven children were born. They are Peter [KEESLING] and James [KEESLING] of Middletown, Stephen [KEESLING], of Lebanon and Mrs. C. C. CISSELL, of this city, and Elizabeth [KEESLING], Jacob [KEESLING] and Calvin [KEESLING] who preceded her. She is the last of a family of 15 children. Mrs. Keesling was a member of the New Light church. The body will be shipped to Middletown for burial.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence MOW, Mr. and Mrs Clayton MOW and Clyde MOW and Cad CLARK went to South Bend Friday to attend the funeral of the latter's brother, Wm. CLARK, of that place, and Saturday Clayton MOW and wife, Mrs. Clarence MOW and Clyde MOW attended the funeral of Mrs. Ella O'BLENIS of Kokomo. - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS

Mr. and Mrs. Callie ALSPACH and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. PIPER motored to Plymouth Sunday on account of the death of Mrs. Daisy ROBERTS. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, February 12, 1920

Mrs. Bertha SCOTT, age 28 years, residing west of Silver Lake, who was quite well known in this city, died at the Wabash hospital at Warsaw [sic] Tuesday night at 6 o'clock, as the result of drinking a quantity of muratic acid several days ago.
The condition of the woman was noticed soon after she drank the acid and physicians were hurried to the home. For a time her condition showed some improvement, but she was later removed to the Wabash hosptal when she began to show signs of sinking. Her doncition has been serious for some time.
It is alleged that the woman drank the acid with suicidal intent as she had been despondent for some time.
The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 1 p.m. at the home of her father, Daniel HOMMAN, near Yellow Creek Lake.

The death of Mrs. Glen DICE occurred at Miles City, Montana, early Thursday morning, Feb. 5th, 1920. This news came as a shock to Mt. Zion friends and relatives, as they were of the opinion that Mrs. Dice was rapidly recovering from the surgical operation.
Myrtle Neottie Belle KING DICE was the eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H. KING. She was born at the King homestead on Christmas Day, 1887. When the time came she entered the common school, finishing the course there. Then she graduated in Music from the Rochester College.
During these years of girlhood and young womanhood, she became an active member of the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church. Until her marriage and removal to a different part of the country she was the faithful organist and enthusiastic worker of her church here.
On July 24th, 1909, Myrtle KING was united in marriage to Glen L. DICE and six years later went with her husband to make their home in the state of Montana. The union was made happy by three children, Paul [DICE], Katherine [DICE] and Marjorie [DICE].
Things went well with Myrtle until a painful malady attacked her body. She fought bravely with it but finally decided that a surgical operation was the only chance for relief. So calling her father and mother to be with her she fought bravely with it but finally medical skill and nurse attention of the best to be had were brought to her bedside, but in spite of all, she was denied the privilege and joy of further earthly life. She died at the age of 32 years 1 month, 11 days.
Mrs. Dice leaves on this side of The Great Divide the one man of her choice, Glen L. DICE, the three treasures of her heart, Paul, Katherine and Marjorie, her loving parents, Mr. and Mrs. King, three brothers, Howard [KING] and family, Lester [KING], Harold [KING], and one foster-sister, Mrs. Verne SMILEY and family. Besides there immediate relatives, she leaves a host of loyal friends and acquaintances who mourn her departure.
She has gone onward, not dead, but living, loving, caring for her own and the way from Here to There is more pleasant pathway because she has gone over it.

Friday, February 13, 1920

Frank BIGGS is dead, as a result of the flu, which has been rather prevalent at the county farm where Mrs. BYBEE, her daughter and a number of the inmates have had it. He was born November 11, 1854 in Miami county. When quite young he moved to this county where he married.
He was the father of nine children. They are Earle [BIGGS], of Oxford, Ohio, Roy [BIGGS], of Akron, Ohio, Reuben [BIGGS], of Culver, and Charles [BIGGS], Arch [BIGGS] and Dee [BIGGS], of this city, Mrs. George DUSCH, of Culver and Mrs. Albert WOLFE and Mrs. Delbert CALHOUN.
He was a member of the Christian church. The funeral will be held at the Mt. Zion church Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock with burial in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

A telegram was received in this city this morning announcing the death of Harvey GOOD, which occurred at Cornell, Wisconsin, Thursday morning. He was the son of Willard GOOD and had moved with his family to Wisconsin about four years ago. He was born in this county about 35 years ago and lived here all of the time up till his departure for Wisconsin. He was a member of the Church of God.
He leaves besides his father, two brothers, Charles [GOOD] and John [GOOD] and one sister, Edith [GOOD], with the wife who formerly was Miss Annie KESLER, and four children, who all live in Wisconsin.
The body will arrive in this city Saturday afternoon on the Erie train from the west at 3:53 p.m. with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery following immediately.

Saturday, February 14, 1920

The funeral of the late Frank BIGGS will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 at Hoover's Chapel, Rev. Geo. CRANE in charge, with burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.

Monday, February 16, 1920

Clark REED, 37, son of Mr. and Mrs. John REED of Akron, died Sunday night at Huntington of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. Reed, who was employed at a clothing store in Huntington, was well known in the vicinity of Akron having been a prominent church worker and singer there for many years. He leaves a wife, father and mother, three brothers and four sisters to mourn their loss. Funeral at one o'clock Tuesday at the parents' home in Akron.

Mrs. Lee CHILSON, wife of Dr. Lee CHILSON, died Monday morning at their home at Bradentown, Fla., from pneumonia. This was learned from a telegram sent by Dr. M. WILSON, of this city who has been visiting the Chilsons for some time. Dr. and Mrs. Chilson have spent several summers at the lake and she was well known in this city. Dr. Chilson formerly practiced dentistry here with Dr. Wilson.

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elza SANDERS, 1106 Elm Street, which was born late Saturday night, died Sunday afternoon, living only 19 hours. The child had been named Sarah Ann [SANDERS]. They have one other child, Golda Ellen [SANDERS]. The burial will be made in the Citizens cemetery.

Tuesday, February 17, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 18, 1920

Mrs. Mercie C. YOUNG, wife of Clarence E. YOUNG, who live on the DAWSON farm in Richland township, died Wednesday morning of the influenza. She was the daughter of Loren and Katherine COFFIN, and was born in Fulton county in 1892. She leaves besides her husband to mourn her departure two small children. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 11:00 o'clock at the Silver Creek church five miles northeast of Akron and burial in the Silver Creek cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank PENDLETON who came last week with the body of the latter's father, C. STANLEY, returned home to town Sunday evening. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Gilead Cemetery, Green Twp.: Lucrecious G. STANLEY, 1847-1920; Mary M. STANLEY, mother, wife of L. G. STANLEY, 1851-1890]

Thursday, February 19, 1920

A telegram was received Wednesday afternoon by William WHITESIDES of Peru, who in turn phoned it to John SWARTWOOD of this city, announcing the death of Chauncey ELLIOTT, of Ladysmith, Wis., Tuesday afternoon of influenza. He formerly was a resident of this county. He was a son of the late James ELLIOTT and a brother of George ELLIOTT, deceased, and Mrs. Sam SWARTWOOD of this city. Mrs. WHITESIDES of Peru, Mrs. Elizabeth EMERY and Charles ELLIOTT, of Ladysmith, survive him. The body will be shipped to this city for burial.

Mrs. BUSHON, 78, of Fulton, died Thursday morning from the infirmities of old age and will be taken to Lafayette for burial. She had made her home with her son, George BUSHON, of Fulton. She is survived by three daughters besides her son, George. They are Mrs. C. C. MOOREHOUSE of Lafayette and Mrs. Thomas DURBEN and Mrs. George BRADLEY, both of Fulton.

Little Miss Frances Louise MASTERSON, only child of Harold and Ruth MASTERSON, died Thursday morning of flu which later developed into pneumonia. She was born December 23, 1916. She was taken sick last Saturday and was given up by the attending doctors on Sunday but rallied. It was thought that she would pull through but early this morning she grew worse and died. She was known as one of the most beautiful children in the city. Her parents have also been very ill with the flu but are both able to be up. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Friday, February 20, 1920

Chauncey ELLIOTT, who recently died in Ladysmith, Wis., was known as a man of silence because he was never known to utter a word for 35 years to anybody with the exception of his brother, Charles ELLIOTT, with whom he rsided for 35 years, even though he was not a mute. When a young boy he suffered an accident which made his speech defective and when he talked it rather slurred his words.
A stranger laughed at him when he was 17 years old and he would never talk after that. He and his brother were proving up a claim in Wisconsin and his sister came to live with them following her husband's death, but he would never speak directly to her but would tell his brother what he wanted to say to her, and he would tell her.

Funeral services for Frances [MASTERSON], little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold MASTERSON, Saturday afternoon at 2:30 p.m., from the residence on S. Franklin Ave, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Minta HOLEMAN received a telegram Friday morning from Battle Creek, Mich., announcing the death of Mrs. Horace LONG, aged 83, Thursday afternoon at 5:15 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Wm. FARLEY, due to old age.
Mrs. Long was born December 2, 1836 near what is now Lansing, Mich. Her maiden name was Adalaide BARNUM. Following the death of her father, her mother moved to this county, settling in what is now Liberty township. Her mother married Elihu LONG and moved to this city.
Miss BARNUM married Horace C. LONG, a son of Elihu Long in May, 1856. Her husband volunteered for the army during the Civil war and rose from a private to a captaincy. As the result of this marriage two children were born. They are Mrs. Wm. FARLEY of Battle Creek, Mich., and Elihu Horace [LONG], of this city. She had one brother, Boliver [BARNUM] and a sister Mary [BARNUM] who preceded her.
The body will be brought to this city with the funeral at the Baptist church Sunday afternoon.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester, I.O.O.F.: Horace C. LONG, Co F 87 Ind Vol, 1837-1908; M. Adalaide LONG, 1836-1920; Horace E. LONG, 1857-1923]

Mrs. Elza SANDERS, 24, died Thursday at her home at 1105 Elm Street, of blood poisoning, the result of child birth. The child who had been named Sarah Ann [SANDERS] died after living but nineteen hours.
Eva Irene SANDERS, born January 9, 1896, was the daughter of Joseph and Sarah HOUSE. She was married to Elza SANDERS of near Fulton on May 13, 1915, where she lived until they recently moved to this city. She was a member of the Olive Branch U. B. church, west of Fulton.
She is survived by her parents, husband, and one child, Goldie Ellen [SANDERS], and one brother, Walter [HOUSE]. Three brothers and one sister preceded her. Funeral private, at the home Sunday, with Rev. George R. CRANE officiating. The body will lay in state Sunday from 10 until one o'clock. Burial at Fulton cemetery.

Eva Irene HOUSE, daughter of Joseph and Sarah HOUSE, was born on January 9, 1896, near Fulton, and departed this life at her home 1105 Elm street, Rochester, at 1:15 p.m. on Thursday, February 19th. Her family and parents were at the bedside when the end came. Death was caused by blood poisoning, the result of child birth. The child who had been named Sarah Ann [SANDERS], lived only 19 hours.
On May 15, 1915, she was married to Elza SANDERS of near Fulton, where the couple lived until they moved to this city. To this union one child was born, Goldie Ellen [SANDERS]. Mrs. Sanders was a member of Olive Branch U. B. church and an earnest worker in the church, being a teacher in the Sunday school and was loved by all who knew her.
Her early departure in life is mourned by her loving husband, her sorrowing father and mother, her brother Walter [HOUSE] and her daughter, Goldie. Three brothers and one sister preceded her, all of whom excepting one died in infancy.
The funeral will be private and will be held at the home at 1:30 p.m., on Sunday. The Rev. George H. CRANE of the U. B. church will officiate. The body will lie in state and may be viewed between the hours of ten and one Sunday. Burial will be at the Fulton Grave Yard.

Saturday, February 21, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, February 23, 1920

Noah SAVAGE, well known and prominent citizen of Allen township, Miami County, died at his home near Macy, Saturday morning at 7:15 o'clock. His death was due to pneumonia. About eight days ago Mr. Savage became ill with influenza which disease terminated into pneumonia on Thursday. The funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock an the interment was made in the Macy cemetery.

Tuesday, February 24, 1920

Mrs. Clint PENDLETON, 56, died at six o'clock last evening at her home on College avenue as the result of dropsy and a complication of diseases. She had been a life long resident of this county and was well known in the vicinity.
Ida DUMBAULD, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon DUMBAULD, was born in Fulton county where she has always made her home. In 1891 she was married to Clint PENDLETON in this city. To this couple one child was born, Arthur PENDLETON, of Rochester, who survives.
Besides her son, Mrs. Pendleton is survived by three sisters, Mrs. LEBO, of Kewanna, Mrs. Cy DAVIS and Mrs. Mina MEYERS of Rochester, and one brother, D M. DUMBAULD of Niles, Michigan. Her parents both preceded her.
The funeral will be private at the home Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. GAGE officiating.

Wednesday, February 25, 1920

John CLAYTON, living near Leiters Ford, died at his home Monday morning after an illness of only two hours with paralysis.
John Clayton, son of George and Anna CLAYTON, was born in Fulton county, Indiana, east of Lake Manitou on February 17, 1843. He spent his boyhood in this vicinity and attended the district schools. In 1878, he was married to Miss Mary HARTMAN, and to this union was born one daughter, Mrs. William BAKER, of near Leiters Ford. Besides the wife and daughter, he leaves two brothers and one sister to mourn their loss, George [CLAYTON] and Sam CLAYTON of this city and Mrs. John ROUCH of Newcastle township. He was a life long member of the Baptist church.
Funeral at one o'clock Thursday afternoon at the Leiters Ford church, with burial in the Moon cemetery.

L. LUCKENBILL was called to Macy on account of the death of his brother-in-law, Mr. SAVAGE. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Noah W. SAVAGE, one of Allen township's most esteemed citizens and of the pillars of the Macy Methodist church, died at his home three miles east of Macy Saturday morning at 7 o'clock of pneumonia, a result of the influenza.
He was the son of John and Elizabeth SAVAGE, his father having died many years ago and his mother preceded him a little over a year ago. The latter made her home with her son, Noah, for many years, he and his family living on the old homestead. He was united in marriage to Miss Anna LUCKENBILL, and to this union were born five children, they being John [SAVAGE], at home, George [SAVAGE], of Macy, Marie [SAVAGE], now Mrs. John ALSPACH, of Ebenezer, and Scott [SAVAGE] and Margaret [SAVAGE] at home. Besides the wife and five children he leaves three little grandchildren, two sisters, Mrs. Charlotte WOODRING and Mrs. Rose GRIMES of Peru, and one brother, James SAVAGE, of Ft. Benton, Montana.
Mr. Savage's home was known far and wide to be one where happiness and good will always reigned and hospitality extended to all. His place will not only be missed in the home, but also in the Sunday School and church and wherever he was known. He was about 55 years of age.
His funeral was held in the home Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock conducted by Rev. Thomas DAVIS of Macy, and he was laid to rest in Plainview cemetery. Mr. Savage realized that death was approaching and made all his arrangements and business planned and committed his wife into the care of their son John, expressing the wish that she might go with him. At the time of his death his son, Scott, lay very ill with influenza, his daughter, Mrs. Alspach, and George Savage and family just convalescing from the flu. This is the first blow the disease has dealt here this winter and it struck one of the best families in the community. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, February 26, 1920

Arthur WICKLANDER, 33, of Bismark, N. D., died in Akron Saturday of pneumonia which followed the flu. He was visiting at the home of Hollis TUCKER, of Akron, whose wife was an aunt of Wicklander's wife. The body was shipped Monday to Bismark for burial.

Albert TREADWAY, 20, of Logansport, a nephew of Mrs. Enoch MYERS, of this city, who was operated upon for appendicitis Sunday night, died Thursday morning in a Logansport hospital. Mrs. Myers was at the bedside. Mr. Treadway was well known in this city where he had visited a number of times.

Friday, February 27, 1920

City Treasurer Elmer Elsworth BORDEN, age 54, died early Friday morning of erysipelas at his home, 627 Madison street, after being ill but ten days. He was born June 18, 1865 in Miami county and was the son of Joseph and Susan BORDEN. He is survived by five brothers. He is the second member of the city official family to die within the past six weeks, the other being the late Edward MURPHY, city attorney.
When a young man he moved to this city where he started a harness shop which he ran for a number of years. He disposed of his store and then worked for Newton GOOD as a harness maker until about 11 years ago when he purchased the candy kitchen on Main street which was operated by Jake CRIM and continued to run the store until his death.
Mr. Borden was married to Miss Emma LEAVELL in this city October 2, 1890 and to this union one son was born, who died in infancy. Mr. Borden was one of the most prominent of Pythias in northern Indiana. He had filled all of the chairs in the Fredonia lodge, which is the local chapter, and had been district deputy of the 13th district. At the present time he was the keeper of records and seals of the local lodge and was secretary of the Fulton county Knights of Pythias Insurance fund, being one of the organizers of this branch. He was also a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge.
He was a prominent Republican and had always worked in the interests of his party. In the fall of 1914 he was elected treasurer of the city and served during the Brinkman administration, and because of faithful service was again chosen by his party as their nominee in 1918 and was reelected.
The funeral will be held Sunday aftrnoon at 2:30 from the Methodist church, Rev. CRAIG officiating. The K. of P. lodge will have charge of the services. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Word has been received in this city of the death of Mrs. Herman GUTHLER, age 26, of Huntington, which occurred early Friday morning in the Huntington Hospital, of pneumonia following flu. She had undergone a major operation at the hospital February 14 and had taken the flu while convalescing. Mrs. Guthler was the daughter of Mrs. Versa METZ, who owns the American restaurant, and who was at the bedside when death occurred. Mrs. Guthler was born and reared in this city and was first married to a Mr. COOMBS to which union one son, Donald [COOMBS], was born. She was divorced from Mr. Coombs and on September 30, 1915 married Herman GUTHLER, who with her son Donald, survive her. She also has one sister, Mrs. Ida MORRIS, of Huntington, and two brothers, Marvin [METZ], of Chicago, and Jack [METZ], who is with the United States army in China, who mourn her departure. The body will be brought to this city Sunday morning and the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 at the home of Newton IZZARD, Rev. NIVEN in charge.

Clem MILLER, county surveyor, and others have phoned this paper concerning parents of Alva SCHRADER who will receive a French memorial, which was held by Hugh A. BARNHART, commander of the local American Legion post. Information concerning Schrader has thus been obtained. His parents live over the Fulton County line in Pulaski county and receive

mail from Winamac. Schrader was a member of the 42nd division and was wounded by shrapnel which hit him in his head. He was returned to this country and was at Camp Taylor and was then sent to West Baden for treatment. He improved and returned home where he was married. After a short time be became worse and returned to West Baden for treatment. After being there several months the doctors in charge deemed it necessary to perform an operation upon his head. He was unable to stand the operation and died. The certificate has been mailed to his next of kin.

Saturday, February 28, 1920

Mrs. Edith FETACH, about 30, died Thursday evening at six o'clock of influenza, at Lakeview, Oregon. She was formerly Edith CARTER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. A. CARTER, formerly of this city. She is a niece of Mrs. Minta HOLEMAN and Albert McKEE. The body will be brought to Hammond, if arrangements can be made. Her husband, Ernest FETACH, is very ill with the flu.

The members of the Knights of Pythias lodge and the Pythian Sisters will attend the funeral of the late Elmer BORDEN in a body. It is expected that the entire membership will be present owing to the popularity of the former officer. They will gather at the lodge hall at 1:30 p.m.

Monday, March 1, 1920

The funeral of the late City Treasurer Elmer BORDEN was held Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church, Rev. CRAIG preaching the sermon, and the services being in charge of Fredonia lodge, Knights of Pythias. The services at the church were preceded by a short one at the home for the immediate family.
The funeral was one of the largest ones ever held in this city in the number of attendance, which showed the esteem in which he was held by his fellow townsmen and lodge brothers and sisters. The casket was literally covered with flowers of all kinds. Several beautiful floral pieces were sent, among them being a broken wheel by the city officials, which was very symbolic, a K. of P. emblem in roses from the local lodge, a floral piece from the Fulton lodge and another from the Pythian Sisters of this city.
Knights of Pythis from Fulton, Akron, Argos and Plymouth were present, as was also nearly the entire membership of Fredonia lodge, of which he was a member, and the Pythion Sisters of Rochester. The Citizens band also played several hymns and led the funeral procession to the Odd Fellows cemetery. The following men were chosen as pall-bearers: Wm. HOWARD, George BLACK, Ralph RAVENCROFT, Wm. BIDDINGER and Otto [SHERBONDY] and Bruce SHERBONDY.

Tuesday, March 2, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, March 3, 1920

Daniel MELVIN, 81, died Tuesday evening at seven o'clock at the county farm of old age. He formerly lived near Akron and had been an inmate of the infirmary for eight years. He had no immediate relatives with the exception of two nephews, Albert [BOWEN] and Milo BOWEN, who live in Henry township. His body was brought to this city and an undertaker from Akron came for it. Burial will be made in Akron. No funeral arangements have been made.

Grace Evelyn [POWELL], daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rinaldo POWELL, who live two and one-half miles northeast of Macy, died in Indianapolis Friday morning of last week of blood poison. Grace was born Aug. 30, 1900 and was therefore in her twentieth year. At the age of 9 years she united with the Methodist church at Macy and has always taken an active interest in church work. She was a graduate of the 1919 class of the macy high school and after her graduation attended business college at Indianapolis from which she graduated about Christmas time. Since that time she filled a responsible position as stenographer and typewriter for the Wagoner Electric Works in Indianapolis. Never of robust health, Grace's constitution could not overcome the infection of blood poison, which was caused by the trimming of a corn on one of her feet, according to report . She possessed a lovable disposition and was a favorite among the young people. Besides her parents, she leaves an older brother, Harold [POWELL]. Her remains were brought to Macy Saturday morning and taken from the train to the Methodist church, where her funeral was held that afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. DAVIES. She was laid to rest in Plainview cemetery.

Thursday, March 4, 1920

Word was received in this city Thursday of the death of Wm. CURTIS, 85, which occurred Wednesday night at the home of his son, Sidney in Hammond. Mr. Curtis was familiarly known as "Uncle Billy" and was a broom maker. He operated a shop on East 9th street. Early in life he was united in marriage with Katherine Anderson and to this union four children were born. They are Sidney [CURTIS], of Hammond, Mrs. Maude CARTWRIGHT, Mrs. Elsie PETERSON and Mrs. Eva MAKESON all of Chicago who survive him. The body will be brought to this city and the funeral will be held Saturday morning at the Christian church at 10:00 a.m. with burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Friday, March 5, 1920

Rochester relatives today received a message from Holyok, Mass., carrying the sad news of the death of Mrs. Emma DENISTON WHEELER, well known here, as the result of pneumonia. Mrs. Wheeler was a sister of Wm. H. DENISTON and Mrs. Joel BRUBAKER, of this city, and was for many years a resident of Detroit, where her husband died several years ago. She was about 60 years of age and leaves two daughters, two brothers and a sister as immediate relatives. Funeral services will be held in Holyoke and burial in Detroit.

Saturday, March 6, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, March 8, 1920

County Surveyor, Clem MILLER, received a telephone message Sunday morning announcing the death of Claude SOMMER, aged 12, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles SOMMER of Peru, which occurred Saturday evening in the county hospital in that city from a fractured skull after being run down by an automobile driven by Sylvester FOUTS, a farmer living near that city.
Young Sommer was out roller skating with a number of other boys on East Main street. For sport the young fellows would take a hold of trolley cars and then hold on. It seems that Sommer tried to make a flying catch of a car and missed it and glided directly in front of the auto driven by Fouts which ran over him. The driver stopped his car and carried him into a nearby house and summoned an ambulance which rushed him to the hospital where he died a short time later. The driver was held blameless by the police and was released after witnesses had testified that he was driving very slowly at the time the accident occurred.
The boy's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles SOMMER, are very well known in this city and Mrs. Lawson HARPER of South Jefferson street is a sister of Mrs. Sommer. Mr. Sommer is a teacher of manual training in the Peru High School and owned a farm near Akron where he spent the summers. The dead boy was their only child. The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock in Gilead.

David HARTER, age 76, died at his home on a farm near Mt. Zion of old age. He was sick but two weeks. He was a pioneer citizen of this county. He was born March 24, 1843 at Columbiana, Ohio, which is near Youngstown, and was the youngest of seven children, all of whom have preceded him with the exception of one sister, Mrs. Mary STRONG of Akron. He was a brother of the late Dr. HARTER of Akron. He came to this city about 50 years ago and was employed in the business of Robbins and Harter, and then purchased the farm on which he lived, 43 years ago last August. Harter was married to Miss Iona LAHMAN in 1874 and four children were born, three of whom survive him as does the widow. They are Trella [HARTER] and Otis [HARTER] who live at home and Earl [HARTER] of Rawlins, Wyoming, who is coming to the funeral. Mr. Harter was a member of the Green Oak Methodist church. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Mrs. Sadie TAYLOR, age 55, of Thorntown, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Robert MILLER, on south Pontiac street at 4 o'clock Sunday morning from pneumonia following the flu. Mrs. Taylor came to this city two weeks ago last Thursday after receiving a call from her daughter that she was ill with the flu, she came to nurse her. A week later she contracted the disease which terminated in pneumonia which caused her death. She was the wife of Henry TAYLOR, who was at her bedside when death called her, as was also her daughter, Mrs. Robert MILLER and Mrs. Harley TAYLOR, of this city. She leaves besides these, three sisters, Mrs. Grace SIPE and Mrs. Bertha GRAY of Thorntown and Mrs. Rose ALEXANDER, who lives in Florida, and three brothers, Howard BURCKHALTER, of Greencastle, who formerly lived here, Brant [BURCKHALTER], of Lafayette, and Abraham [BURCKHALTER], of Glendive, Montana. She was a niece of General Anson MILLS, who formerly was chief of staff of the United States Army and returned just three weeks ago from visiting with him at his home in Washington, D.C. The body was taken to Thorntown Monday morning and the funeral will be held Tuesday afternooon from her late residence with burial in the Cox cemetery.

Homer KERCHER, aged 33, died at his home at Akron Saturday morning. Mr. Kercher was formerly a resident of Peru, two years ago on a farm near Akron. [sic]
His death followed an illness of two weeks duration and was caused from an attack of pneumonia.
Besides his widow, one sister, Mrs. Harvey COOPER, of Peru, and one brother, Roy KERCHER, of Georgetown, Canada, survive him.

A Mrs. BENNETT from near Grass Creek, died Saturday morning at the Woodlawn hospital following a major operation. The body was taken to her home. No further particulars could be learned.

Tuesday, March 9, 1920

Mrs. O. P. STEWART came Sunday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Bertha BENNET, which was held Monday at 2:00 o'clock. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Wednesday, March 10, 1920

Mrs. Matilda BOYER, wife of the late Jacob BOYER who lived for a number of years near Leiters Ford, died Monday evening at the home of her son, Frank [BOYER], at Marion. Besides her son Frank, she has two other children who survive her. They are Emmanuel [BOYER] of Chicago and Mrs. NELSON of Fulton. The funeral was held in Marion Wednesday.

Royle ALER attended his aunt's funeral at Mentone Sunday. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. D. W. TRANBARGER received word Saturday of the death of the former's sister, Mrs. Clarence METZKER, at Louisville, Kentucky. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, March 11, 1920

Mrs. Ora CLARK, 50, wife of J. C. CLARK, of north of the Pendleton bridge in Richland township, died Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock the result of a complication of diseases. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ira BABCOCK of this city and was well known over the county having made her home here all of her life. She lived in her present home during the last fifteen years of her life.
Ora E. BABCOCK was born January 10, 1869 in Richland township. At the age of 21 she married J. C. CLARK and to this union one child was born who died in infancy. During her life Mrs. Clark took three children and raised them, one a boy whose name could not be learned, Kenneth CLARK and Mrs. Eva MOORE. She was a member of the Grand View church.
Besides her father and mother, her husband and the three children she raised, she is survived by one sister, Mrs. A. E. MILLER, of Rochester, two brothers, Ray BABCOCK of Rochester and Perry BABCOCK, of Michigan.
Funeral Saturday at two o'clock.

Joseph C. YEAZEL, 68, long a resident of Rochester, died at his home at 1007 Elm street Wednesday evening at 6:30 after a short illness of pneumonia. His family was at his bedside when the end came. Mr. Yeazel had been bedfast only two days and the end was unexpected.
He was born in Allen county, O., in 1852 the exact date being unknown. At an early age he moved to this state and where he has since made his home. He was united in marriage to Jessie A. MITCHELL of Kosciusko county.
Besides his wife he is survived by four children all residing in this city. They are Mrs. Frank MOLLENCOPP, Rebecca J. [YEAZEL], Fred W. [YEAZEL] and Clinton YEAZEL. One sister and three brothers also survive.
Funeral at the home Friday at two o'clock, Rev. NIVEN officiating. Burial at Citizens cemetery.

Friday, March 12, 1920

Omer D. BEARSS, 75, long a resident of Fulton county but recently of Peru, died at his home at the family residence at Ridgeview at 3:40 o'clock Wednesday morning. Mr. Bearss died the result of a complication of diseases brot on by old age. He has been ill for several months.
Mr. Bearss owned at one time considerable land in this county most of it being in prairie region west of Rochester. Several years ago he moved to Peru and continued to make his home there with his family until his death.
Omer Daniel BEARSS was the fifth son of Daniel R. and Emma A. BEARSS and was born February 5, 1844. Practically his entire life was spent in this community. He received his education in the Peru schools and in Wabash College at Crawfordsville. On June 5, 1865, he was united in marriage to Mary C. MANN and to this union four children were born, two of whom died in infancy, the surviving children being Edwin C. BEARSS of Huntington, West Virginia, and Mrs. John CRUME of Peru.

Myron METZ, of Chicago, is visiting his mother, Mrs. Versa METZ. Thru a misunderstanding of his address, news of the death of his sister, Reba, did not reach him until Thursday night. He came home immediately.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Citizens Cemetery, Rochester Twp.: Reba METZ GUTHIER, wife of H. S. GUTHIER, Aug 22, 1893 - Feb 27, 1920]

Saturday, March 13, 1920

T. W. CIRCLE, 87, a resident of this city for the last few weeks, died at his home here Saturday morning at 7:30 o'clock the result of a complication of diseases. His family was at the bedside when the end came.
Mr. Circle originally came from Marion, Indiana, and moved to the F. C. MOON farm southeast of Rochester. He resided there during the last five years. During the month of February just past, he moved his family to this city and took up his residence.
He is survived by his wife, two daughters, Mrs. Asa BARRETT, of Newcastle, Mrs. Mary FOGLESONG, of Danville, Ill., and one son, Fred [CIRCLE], of this city. Funeral arrangements have not been made as yet.

Lloyd GOHN, 29, son of Mrs. J. C. GOHN west of this city, died Friday night at 11:45 at Bloomington, Illinois, the result of blood poisoning. Gohn was the principal of the Mansfield, Ill., school. On becoming ill was removed to the hospital at Bloomington where he died.
Lloyd Gohn was born in Fulton county the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. GOHN, where he lived with his parents on a farm. He graduated from Rochester College and later from Illinois University. After that he took up teaching as his profession. He married a girl from Illinois.
He is survived by his wife, mother, two brothers and his grandfather. His father died about two years ago. Funeral at Mansfield Monday with burial at Homer, Ill.

Monday, March 15, 1920 to Tuesday, March 16, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, March 17, 1920

Captain Peter S. TROUTMAN, age 87, died in the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. A. TREADWAY, near Logansport late Tuesday evening. Mr. Troutman was long a resident of Kewanna and is well known in this county, having many friends who will be grieved to hear of his death. The death was caused by senility and complications.
Mr. Troutman was born in Kentucky in the year 1833 and after spending his younger days in the southern state moved to Indiana where he has resided ever since.
When the Civl War broke out Mr. Troutman was made captain of Company "E" of the 87th regiment of Indiana volunteers and served thru the entire war. At the close of the war he returned to his farm near Ketanna, where he lived until he was made postmaster at Kewanna later, when he moved to the town. He served as postmaster for four years.
He is survived by three children, Mrs. Enoch MYERS of this city, Mrs. J. A. TREADWAY of Logansport and George TROUTMAN of Kewanna. He is also survived by one great-grandchild, Curtner HEATH, of this city and several grandchildren.
The burial will be in the Kewanna Cemetery Thursday.

Mrs. Alta E. ROSS, age 43, the wife of Ed ROSS of Franklin Ave., died at her home at six o'clock Wednesday morning, following a stroke of paralysis. Mrs. Ross has been a resident of this county all her life, having been born near Akron on May 17, 1876. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John SLAYBAUGH.
Mrs. Ross had no children, but is survived by a foster daughter, Mrs. Henrietta PENDLETON. She is also survived by her husband and three brothers, John SLAYBAUGH, of Rochester, Joseph SLAYBAUGH, of Akron, and Carl SLAYBAUGH, also of Akron.
No funeral arrangements have been made.

John H. SCHALL died early Wednesday morning at his home, 530 Clay street. He was the son of Elias and Elizabeth SCHALL and was born near Montpelier, Ohio, October 18, 1847 and was 72 years old. He had one sister, Mrs. Rebecca SIMPSON, of Montpelier, Ohio, who preceded him.
Early in life he married Miss Margaret ROTE and to this union eight children were born, two dying in infancy.
The surviving children are Albert [SCHALL] of Monterey, Lewis [SCHALL] of South Bend, William [SCHALL] of Decatur, Mrs. Emma KLINE of Peru, Mrs. Edna LEWIS of near Leiters

Ford and Emerson [SCHALL] north of this city.
Twenty-nine years ago he moved to this county and retired from the farm three years ago. He was member of the Christian church.
Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, March 18, 1920

[no obits]

Friday, March 19, 1920

St. Clair WILDERMUTH, 74, who has been a resident of this county for 56 years died Friday morning at five o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. O. ENYART, of Fulton, after a lingering illness due to old age.
Mr. Wildermuth was born August 31, 1845 in Fairfield county, Ohio, and was the son of Solomon and Emily WILDERMUTH. He had three brothers and six sisters, five of whom survive. They are Daniel [WILDERMUTH] of Macy, Joseph [WILDERMUTH] of South Bend, Mrs. Rebecca ROUGH, of Fulton, Mrs. Alice FERREE of Hammond, and Mrs. Oscar MARTIN, of California.
When but 18 years old he came to this county and settled on a farm in the Salem neighborhood, which farm he lived on all his life until a short time ago when he removed to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Enyart. Early in life he married Miss Sarah ZABST, of near Fulton, and to this union three children were born who survive him. They are Mrs. M. O. ENYART of Fulton, Mrs. W. V. LANE, southwest of this city, and Lloyd WILDERMUTH of near Fulton.
Mr. Wildermuth was a member of the Evangelical church of this city having joined that church when he was 17 years old. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. O. Enyart.

Saturday, March 20, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, March 22, 1920

Henry FOGLESONG went today to Logansport where he attended the funeral of an aunt.

Tuesday, March 23, 1920

Guy WAKELY, age 35, formerly of Akron, died at the home of his father-in-law, west of Akron, Monday morning. The death was caused by neuritis from which Mr. Wakely had been suffering for some time.
He had been employed at the Hosman Drug Store as a clerk for a number of years and has many friends in Akron and also in this city. Some time ago he married Miss Lola MOORE of near Akron, and it was at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John MOORE, that he died.
He is survived by his wife, his parents, one brother, Howard WAKELY, of Roann, and two sisters, Miss Florence WAKELY, of Akron, and Mrs. Earl MISHLER, of Plymouth.

Wednesday, March 24, 1920

Mrs. Sylvia REA and daughter, Miss Lucretia REA, went today to Plymouth attended the funeral of Mrs. Wm. LOVE.

Mrs. W. B. SMITH and daughter and Mrs. Enoch MOWE went this morning to Plymouth, where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Wm. LOVE.

Thursday, March 25, 1920

Samuel PARKER, age 85, a veteran of the Civil War, and long a resident of this city, died at the soldier's home in Marion, Wednesday night from a complication of diseases and old age. The body will be brought here for burial.
Mr. Parker was born in Bartholomew county in 1835 and he made his home there until the Civil War broke out in 1861, when he enlisted and served thru the entire conflict. He had worked himself up in the rank of a sergeant when the war closed and he was discharged. During the conflict, he made a great record for himself and on several instances was mentioned in official dispatches for exceptional bravery.
On August 31, 1862, he was captured by the Rebel forces near Richmond, Ky., and held a prisoner until September 2, of the same year, when he was paroled and returned to his home in Bartholomew county. While home he married Miss Melissa SHARP of Bartholomew county.
On November 19, 1862 he was exchanged and was sent to join the 14th Div. of the Army of Tennessee. He took part in the seige of Vicksburg, was with Sherman in the famous march from "Atlanta to the Sea," fought at Missionary Ridge, Lookout Mountain and the battle of Chattanooga. It was in the battle of Missionary Ridge that Mr. Parker's regiment had 110 men killed and a great number of prisoners.
Shortly after the close of the war in 1870, Mr. Parker and his wife moved to Rochester where they made their home. His wife died last August and it was soon after her death that Mr. Parker removed to the soldier's home.
He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Wm. LOY, of this city, and Mrs. Theodore A. GOULD of Pacific Grove, Calif. One son is dead.
The funeral arrangements will be announced later.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County, Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Sam'l PARKER, Sergt Co H, 12 Ind Inf. (no dates)]

Joe BIBLER, of Wabash, is in this city to attend the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Lola BIBLER.

Friday, March 26, 1920

The funeral of the late Samuel P. PARKER will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Hoover chapel. Burial at Odd Fellows cemetery.

Lloyd Elias GOHN was born on a farm near Fairmount, Illinois on July 21, 1890 and departed this life March 12, 1920 at Brokaw hospital, Bloomington, Illinois
He was the eldest child of Charles and Kizzie GOHN. When he was seven years old he moved with his parents to Rochester, Indiana, where he continued to live until he left to attend the University of Illinois at Urbana. He graduated with honor from the Rochester high school and entered the University in the fall of 1908, choosing the course of civil engineering, but decided later to take literature and arts. He left school at the end of his junior year to help in the management of his father's farm. After a few months he resumed his studies and in 1912 received his A.B. degree. He put one semesters work on his Masters degree. While a student at the university he met Miss Mattie Leona DAVIS, to whom he was married September 13, 1913 at her home near Fairmount, Illinois, and it is rather a peculiar coincidence that it was eleven years to the day when he died that he met his wife, and as an expression of affection the day was celebrated each year.
Mr. Gohn's first position as superintendent of schools was in Metcalf, Illinois, where he remained for two years. In 1915 he accepted the superintendency of the Mansfield public schools and held that position until his death. About three weeks ago he was taken ill but continued to teach for one week. Septicaenes developed from an abscess in his throat. He was taken to Brokaw hospital on Monday March 8th and underwent an operation. Faithful hands attended to his needs. All that human skill could do was done, but to no avail. His work was done. His life was lived, and he went home to God to receive the reward of his faithfulness to the trust imposed upon him.
He manifested a beautiful disposition in the midst of his sufferings. He was uncomplaining and tried in every way to conceal his sufferings from wife and friends. In his delirium his thoughts were on home and school. Mr. Gohn was a remarkable example for grit and will power; afflicted in youth, he never allowed his afflictions to interfere with his aspiration. He arose superior to the handicap of physical ailment and the master of his spirit is the greatest achievement of his life.
Loved by all who knew him, he has made a large place for himself in the affections of his school and community and leaves a memory made sacred by devotion to duty and loyalty to friends. He is survived by his wife, mother, one sister and two brothers and a host of friends wherever he has lived, who sincerely mourn his loss.
Funeral services were held Monday morning at 8:15 in the M.E. church attended by one of the largest gathering of people every assembled in Mansfield to pay respects to the departure of one of its citizens. Schools were dismissed and attended in a body. Rev. AITKIN, pastor of the First M.E. church in Urbana, an intimate friend of the Gohn family, preached the sermon and Rev. THARP, pastor of church assisted in the funeral service. The large display of flowers from friends and societies in which he belonged, with their fragrant odor was only a token of the high esteem in which he was held by all.
The remains accompanied by more than fifty persons to Homer for interment. The funeral party was taken from Champaign on a private I. T. S. car. The body was consigned to the grave in G. A. R. cemetery with Masonic service, of which he was member, conducted by D. M. BRUFFETT of Urbana.
Mr. Gohn was a lover of athletic sports, even with physical disabilities keeping him from participating in the events himself and was a great help in the promotion of pure and clean athletics in the schools.
The sermon by Rev. AITKIN was a master sermon, and plainly showed it was not riches or great possessions that make a man rich, but a name and a place in the hearts and minds of his fellow men such as Mr. Gohn was leaving were things that made a man rich.
Mrs. Gohn has the sympathy of a host of friends in her sad bereavement.
The following relatives attended the funeral: Mrs. J. C. GOHN his mother, Miss Eva [GOHN], his sister, and two brothers, Ernest [GOHN] and Raymond [GOHN], his uncle Warren GOHN and wife and three daughters and son of Rochester, Indiana; Mr. and Mrs. George DAVIS and son, Chester [DAVIS], of Urbana; Miss Nellie GLICK of Urbana; Everett GLICK of

Morrisville, James SIMPSON of Fairmount, Illinois, S. S. DAVIS of Kentland, Indiana, Mr. and Mrs. Henry DAVIS and Mr. and Mrs. Palmer DAVIS of Fairmount, Illinois.
- - - - - - Taken from the Mansfield Express.

Saturday, March 27, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, March 29, 1920

Allen LOUDERBACK, 77, who lived all of his life south of Fulton just at the Fulton-Cass county line on the Michigan road, died Sunday at Woodlawn hospital. Mr. Louderback recently underwent two operations and because of his age was not able to withstand them.
Mr. Louderback was the son of Andrew and Nancy LOUDERBACK and was born near Fulton, September 24, 1844. He had seven brothers and one sister, one brother and one sister survive. They are Tipton [LOUDERBACK] of Valparaiso and Mrs. Amanda HANSON of near Fulton.
When war was declared with the southern states, Mr. Louderback answered Lincoln's call and served with the Union troops in the 29th Indiana Infantry, Co. E. He received a furlough and married Miss Mary CONN, December 22, 1864. To this union four children were born, two, Robert [LOUDERBACK] and Bertha [LOUDERBACK] dying in infancy and two survive him, Andrew [LOUDERBACK] and Mrs. NICKOLS who also live near Fulton.
Mr. Louderback was a member of the United Brethren church. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Fairview church.

Tuesday, March 30, 1920

Mrs. John C. O'NEAL, 44, wife of John O'NEAL, trustee of Aubbeenaubbee township, died at her home Saturday night of appendicitis. Besides her husband she leaves four children at home to mourn her departure. They are Hazel [O'NEAL], Clyde [O'NEAL], Ralph [O'NEAL] and Robert [O'NEAL]. Mrs. O'Neal was a member of the Rebekah lodge. Funeral at Richland Center Wednesday at one o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Richland Center Cemetery, Richland Twp.: Clyde C. ONEAL, son of J. H. and N. C. ONEAL, 1902-1921; Nannie C. ONEAL, wife of John ONEAL, 1876-1920. (no stone for John)]

Wednesday, March 31, 1920

John A. NEHER, age 61, of Madison street, dropped dead at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Neher had been engaged in tearing down a barn in the rear of the home of Mrs. Mary ROUSCH, North Fulton Ave. He is said to have suffered from an attack of heart trouble.
He was born near Delphi, Ind., on August 25, 1858 and was married to Miss Lizzie MOORE, of Delphi, when he was 20 years of age. He has lived in this city for the past 12 years, moving here from Delphi after retiring from active life on a farm.
The deceased is survived by nine children, six boys and three girls and his wife. The children are Levi NEHER, of Chicago; Earl NEHER, of Rochester; Guy NEHER, of Galveston, Ind.; Russell NEHER, of South Bend; Herman NEHER, of Rochester; Truman NEHER, of Rochester;

Mrs. Emma FENSTERMACHER, of Mulberry, Ind.; Mrs. Mary DAGGY, of Chicago and Mrs. Pearl BRUBAKER, of this city.
The funeral will be held from the residence, 1017 Madison Avenue, Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery and Rev. W. J. NIVEN of the Baptist church will be in charge of the services.

A. B. MILLER today received a telegram stating that Mrs. John FELDER, of Bethel, Alaska, had died March 30, at 11:30 o'clock, of influenza, which she contracted on board a ship enroute to the States. The Felders were on their way to California and expected to come to this city to visit.
The Felders have made their home in Alaska for several years, where he operates a trading post. They have visited here a number of times.
Besides her husband she is survived by an infant daughter, Margaret [MILLER], a mother, Mrs. Elizabeth EBER, of this city; five sisters, Mrs. Archie MILLER and Mrs. Leola HAGAN, of this city, Mrs. Joseph HOFFMAN, of Akron, Mrs. Lottie PONTIUS, of Kalkaska, Mich., and Mrs. Phil HANA, of Oakland, Calif.; and two brothers, Frank EBER, of Macy, and Charles A. [EBER], of near Rochester.
The body will be brought to this city within the next two weeks for burial.

County Coroner, A. E. STINSON, of Athens, recently filed his report with county clerk Charles FLAGG in the death of Mrs. Amanda COOK of Fulton. He inserted in the report the testimony of her husband, George COOK, in which he stated that the last time he saw his wife alive she was sitting in a chair and that when he returned a little while later she was dead. He said that she had suffered with kidney trouble for a number of years. After hearing the testimony of several others who had cared for Mrs. Cook at various times the coroner decided that her death had been caused by organic heart trouble associated with kidney trouble

Mrs. Ella JAMESON went today to Tiosa where she attended the funeral of Mrs. John O'NEAL.

Thursday, April 1, 1920

David CLEVENGER, age 48, died Thursday morning at 4 o'clock in a hospital at Adrian, Mich., from apoplexy. Mr. Clevenger was taken off a Michigan Central train in that city, Thursday afternoon, after he had suffered a stroke of apoplexy. Mr. Clevenger had been on a business trip to Detroit, where he had gone to purchase some trucks to be used in work on road contracts this summer.
He was a son of David and Mary CLEVENGER, and was born December 5, 1871 in Henry township. He was one of a family of five children. The others are Mrs. Jane WOOLPERT, Mrs. Lidy CLEMENS, Mrs. Ella NYE and Frank CLEVENGER, all of Athens.
Mr. Clevenger married Miss Lida SAYGER in February of 1894. Following the marriage they resided on a farm one mile north and east of Athens. The following children survive, Edith [CLEVENGER], William [CLEVENGER], Mrs. Mary BRADWAY, Lucy [CLEVENGER] and Walter [CLEVENGER]. Mrs. Clevenger died four years ago.
Mr. Clevenger about 10 years ago entered the road contracting business. He has built a number of cement, gravel and brick roads in this and adjoining counties. One of his last contracts was the road around the west side of Lake Manitou. Even after he had entered the contracting

business he continued to live on his farm near Athens.
The deceased was a prominent lodge man belonging to five different orders. They were the Masonic, Odd Fellows, Moose, Eagles and Woodmen. No funeral arrangements have been made.

According to word received from the East, the body of the late Mrs. Emma WHEELER has been cremated. The ashes are now being kept in the East and will be sent to Detroit, her former home some time in April for burial.

Friday, April 2, 1920 to Tuesday, April 6, 1920
[no obits]

Wednesday, April 7, 1920

Relatives here have received word of the death of Mrs. James KEEL, of Aztec, N. M. Mr. and Mrs. Keel were former residents of this city.

Mrs. Clarence GARNER died WEdnesday morning about five o'clock from blood poisoning at her home on west 5th street. Mrs. Garners maiden name was Hazel Naomi MO - - - - . She was born in Brown county November 11, 1898. Her parents died while she was quite young.
Mrs. Garner has two sisters who survive her. They are Geneva, who lived with Mr. and Mrs. Garner, and Elizabeth, at Plymouth.
Mr. Garner was drafted into the army during the month of October, 1917, from this county. On January 21, 1918 Mr. and Mrs. Garner were married at Jeffersonville, and almost immediately after their marriage Garner was sent overseas. To this union one child was born, who was named Naomi Elaine [GARNER] who with the husband survive her.
Mrs. Garner was a member of the Rebekah lodge at Argos. The funeral at the U.B. church Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. CRANE in charge.
The burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Jonas ROMIG was at Rochester Sunday, called by the serious illness of Mrs. Clarence GARNER. She brought Mrs. Garner's little girl home with her. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Word has been received in this city of the death of Harry McWILLIAMS, 17, at Middletown, Ohio, March 6th, caused from burns as the result of a kerosene can exploding. He was employed as a helper in the millwright department of the Miami cycle company of that city and had stepped into the welding department for a few minutes while he was idle from his duties.
Young McWilliams is a grandson of Mrs. O. C. MINER and lived in this city about six years ago when his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. O. C. MINER, ran the old COTTAGE HOTEL at the corner of Eighth and Madison. Mr. Miner while in this city was employed as a cigar maker.

Thursday, April 8, 1920

Mrs. Carrie HARTER TEMPLETON, of Huntington, was in this city Wednesday afternoon completing arrangements for the burial of her niece Miss Marion HARTER, who died at Gary Wednesday morning. Miss Harter contracted influenza about three weeks ago and it terminated in sleeping sickness. Miss Harter was quite well known in Rochester, having visited here a number of times.
Miss Marion Harter was born in Akron, September 29, 1897 and was the daughter of D. W. HARTER. She was also a granddaughter of the late Dr. HARTER, who was a pioneer resident of this county. While she was quite young her mother died and she moved to Huntington where she made her home with her aunt, Mrs. Templeton, who was the head of the mathematics department of the Huntington high school
Miss Harter attended the common schools at Huntington and was graduated from the Huntington High School with the class of 1915. She was editress of the high school annual in her senior year. After completing her high school course Miss Harter went to Terre Haute where she entered the State Normal and was graduated from that college in 1918. Miss Harter taught one year at Muncie and was completing her second year at Gary. Because of her excellent work as a student her Alma Mater had requested her to become a member of the faculty in the department of public speaking. She had accepted the invitation and would have assumed her duties this fall.
Miss Harter leaves besides her father to mourn her departure, one sister, Mildred [HARTER], her stepmother and her aunt. Miss Harter was a member of the Presbyterian church. The funeral party went through Rochester Thursday afternoon going to Huntington where the services will be held Friday morning after which the body will be brought to this city and burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. W. H. STACY has been called to Indianapolis by the death of her sister, Mrs. Missouri DWIGGENS, which occurred there this morning.

Friday, April 9, 1920

William GLOSSER, 63, a farmer who lived east of Disko, was found dead in a corn field Tuesday morning by his neighbor, George LUKENS. Death was caused by apoplexy. Mr. Glosser had been hauling fodder. It is evident that he was in the seat when the attack came and pitched forward between the horses. He was found with his face buried in the mud. The horses wandered off and Mr. Lukens saw them about an hour later, which led him to make an investigation. Mr. Glosser leaves a wife. The funeral was held Thursday morning.

Mrs. Charles MOORE died early Friday morning at her home at the corner of Fulton avenue and 11th streets. Mrs. Moore has been ill for about two years but has gradually grown worse and has been confined to her bed since the sixth day of December. The immediate cause of her death was heart trouble.
Mrs. Moore's maiden name was Belle Hoff HECTOR. She was the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Cornelius HECTOR and was born February 18, 1852 in Spartansburg, Ind. Mrs. Moore had two brothers, Doctor Frank HECTOR, deceased, Dr. William HECTOR, of Chicago, and a twin sister, Mrs. HORTON, of Bluffton, who died last fall.
She married Charles MOORE, December 14, 1881, and they have lived in the same home since their marriage. Two children survive. They are Lewis [MOORE] of South Bend and Mrs.

Wert BLUE of Huntington, who with the husband and three grandchildren, Charles [MOORE], Josephine [MOORE] and Lillian MOORE, mourn her departure. No funeral arrangements have been made pending word from some relatives.

The body of the late Miss Marion HARTER of Huntington will be brought to this city Saturday afternoon. The funeral will be held in that city Saturday morning at the Presbyterian church. The original plans were to hold the funeral Friday.

Saturday, April 10, 1920

Funeral service for Mrs. Charles MOORE Monday morning at 10:30 o'clock from the residence on W. 11th street, Rev. G. F. CRAIG in charge. Friends who wish to view the remains may call at the home Sunday afternoon.

Monday, April 12, 1920

Mrs. Wilbur YOUNG, formerly Miss Gladys WARNER, of Rochester, died Friday in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. She was a daughter of Henry WARNER. No funeral arrangements will be made until her brother arrives from the West.

J. J. KUMLER of Grass Creek was in this city to attend the funeral of Mrs. C. B. MOORE.

Mrs. Wm. STACY was called to Indianapolis Friday on account of the death of her sister.

Tuesday, April 13, 1920

A good many around here attended the funeral of Mrs. Clarence GARNER last Friday. - - - LOYAL ITEMS.

Wednesday, April 14, 1920

Mrs. Charles LUDWIG, 73, of LaPorte, who is well known here and was a cousin of Mrs. John J. HILL, died in Chicago last Sunday morning at 3:30 o'clock of pneumonia and pleurisy. Mrs. Hill and Miss Lucy KRAUSE, daughter of the deceased with other relatives were at the bedside when the end came. The body was brot to Logansport where the burial took place Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Ludwig visited here many times during her life time and both she and her daughter, Miss Krause, have many friends in the community.

Thursday, April 15, 1920

Marcellus C. NICHOLS, age 70, died Wednesday evening at 8:00 o'clock at his home on 140 North Jefferson St., following a stroke of apoplexy. He had suffered with paralysis some time ago. The deceased had long been a retired farmer.
Mr. Nichols was born Nov. 30, 1847, and was the son of David and Charlotte NICHOLS. Besides his wife, Susan M. NICHOLS, he is survived by two sons, Charles [NICHOLS] of this city and William L. [NICHOLS], who lives four and one-half miles from town. Funeral services Saturday. Burial in the Nichols cemetery.

[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Nichols Cemetery, Franklin Twp.: Marcellus NICHOLS, Nov. 30, 1849 - Apr 14, 1920; Susan M. NICHOLS, his wife, Oct 23, 1853 - May 9, 1929]

Friday, April 16, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, April 17, 1920

The funeral of the late Mrs. John FELDER, of Bethel, Alaska, will be held at the Presbyterian church Sunday afternoon at 2:30. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Mrs. Felder was formerly Miss Margaret EBER of this city and was a sister of Mrs. Archie MILLER.
Friends may review the remains at the church from two until 2:30.

Monday, April 19, 1920

[no obits]

Tuesday, April 20, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. HEETER, Mr. Charles SHADLE and Mr. John DEMOTT attended the funeral of Mrs. Heeter's brother near Ora Saturday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Curg WILTSHIRE, of Whiting, Mrs. Lydia FRIEND of Huntington and Max WILTSHIRE and family of Peru, attended the funeral of Mrs. Cory GRUNER at this place Sunday. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. STUBBS and John L. BYBEE attended the funeral of Mrs. G. P. TALBOTT Monday at Kewanna.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F., Union Twp.: Gideon P. TALBOTT, 1853-1934; Sarah MARTENY TALBOTT, wife of G.P., 1850-1920]

Wednesday, April 21, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, April 22, 1920

Bert VAWTER received a telegram, Thursday morning, announcing the death in Williamsport, Pa. Wednesday night, of Mr. William PAULSON, aged 65. The death was caused from kidney trouble following an operation which had been performed some time ago and from which he had never recovered.
Mr. Paulson was born in Germany and came to this country with his parents when he was ten years old, settled in Pennsylvania. After a few years they moved to this county and lived on a farm near Leiters Ford. Both of his parents are buried in the Leiters Ford Cemetery.

When about twenty-three years old he married Martha NEFF. After the death of his wife, he remarried and moved to Pennsylvania.
When a young man, Mr. Paulson was a farmer but sold his land and moved to this city where he clerked for Shore and Wilson, and Talbert Shore. He also was janitor at the Court House and the new High School building.
Mr. Paulson leaves one sister and one brother, who live in South Chicago. He was a member of the Evangelical church of this city. The body will be brought to this city for burial which will occur sometime Saturday.

Friday, April 23, 1920

The funeral of the late William PAULSON will be held at the Presbyterian church, Sunday afternoon at 2:30. Burial in Mausoleum. Friends may view the remains from 2 until 2:30.

Saturday, April 24, 1920

Charles FIELDS received a telephone message late Friday afternoon, telling of the death of his six year old nephew, Aaron FLITCRAFT, at the Dukes hospital of lockjaw. The death occurred at three o'clock Friday. The Flitcraft youth was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John FLITCRAFT, 118 South Tippecanoe Street. Mrs. Flitcraft is a sister of Fields. No funeral arrangements have been made.
Young Flitcraft was playing with his brother a week ago last Sunday when he hurled a stick at him which struck him in the forehead. A small splinter was left in the head. There was also a slight scratch which did not bleed. The splinter was removed.
Wednesday when the child came in from play, his mother noticed his face was swollen as if he had the mumps. A short time later he had a spasm. A doctor was called who diagnosed the disease as tetanus. He was removed to the Dukes hospital where serum was used to no avail.

When the will case of the late Sarah MANN was called for hearing in the circuit court Saturday morning the present address of a woman, who was formerly Miss Lucy KILLEN, was disclosed. Her present name is Mrs. John WYLIE, and she lives in New York City. She was thot to be dead by her grandmother, the late Mrs. Sarah Mann, to whom she had not written for ten years previous to her death.
Mrs. Mann in her will, made a provision for her granddaughter and when the case was called in court A. P. COPELAND, the administrator of the estate, reported he did not know the present address of the former Miss Killen. Judge STEVENS ordered a notice published in the different papers of the county, which was copied by other papers, eventually in some New York city paper.
When she read the article she communicated with her brother, Mark KILLEN, in Chicago. She then had to make out an affidavit as to her present residence and to get witness to swear to her identity. This was returned to this city and when the case was called this morning the judge ordered she receive the amount specified in the will of her late grandmother, which will amount to about $2,000.
It is said Mrs. Wylie's husband is a very rich man. No reason was given by Mrs. Wylie in any of her correspondence concerning the estate, as to the reason she did not correspond with her grandmother.

Monday, April 26, 1920

Dr. Seth WICKS, 41, died Saturday morning at the Lake View Hospital, Chicago, after undergoing an operation for appendicitis. He was the son of Mark WICKS, of this city, who was at his bedside when he succumbed. Dr. Wicks was born in Hartford, Kansas. He lived at Akron. He was a graduate from the Chicago Physicians and Surgeons training school in 1903, and had a large practice on the north side of Chicago. During the late war he served as an army captain and was stationed at Camp Custer, Michigan. The funeral was held Monday afternoon from his residence at 1207 Wilson Avenue with interment at Rosehill cemetery, Chicago.

John MOORE, who lived west of this city near the Pendleton bridge, died Monday morning from blood poisoning. He was born in Fulton county near Akron 61 years ago.
He lived on a farm near Pulaski County for 25 years. About a year ago he purchased a farm on the river road north of Loyal. Mr. Moore is survived by his wife, Mrs. Flora MOORE, several children and grandchildren. No funeral arrangements have been made.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: John A. MOORE, father, 1859-1920; Flaura MOORE, mother, 1865-1950. Also see Rochester News-Sentinel, - - -, - -, 1950, obit, Mrs. Flaura MOORE - - - daughter of Benjamin and Nancy MOORE, she was born Feb. 13, 1865, near Athens. She was married Aug. 12, 1882, in Fulton county to John A. MOORE, who preceded her in death. She was a member of the Progressive Brethren church.
Survivors are six children: Harley [MOORE], Winamac; Arthur [MOORE], Huntington; Benjamin [MOORE], South Bend; Daniel [MOORE], Peru; Mrs. Gertrude McGEE, Athens; Mrs. Reatha McDOWELL, Fort Wayne; and Mrs. Jennie RHINEHOLD, Winamac; 24 grandchildren, several great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren. A son and a daughter precerded her in death. - - - -]

Roger Hamilton McDOWELL, 68, died Sunday afternoon at 5:15 o'clock at his home near the Van Dien crossing, of cancer of the stomach, with which he had suffered for some time. He was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, July 18, 1851, and was the son of Wm. and Mary McDOWELL. He had three brothers and two sisters only one of whom is living; he is George McDOWELL of this county.
He was married and has two daughters who survive him: Mrs. Ruby LOWELL and Sadie McDOWELL who live at home.
The funeral will be held at the U. B. church Tuesday at 2 o'clock, Rev. CRANE officiating. Burial will be made in the Fulton cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles FIELDS and children, Jeanette [FIELDS], Lois [FIELDS], Grace [FIELDS], and Guy [FIELDS] went today to Macy to attend the funeral of Aaron FLITCRAFT.

Tuesday, April 27, 1920

Mrs. Glen ROUCH died at the home on North Madison Street, shortly before seven o'clock Monday evening, suffering an illness of several weeks duration of uremic poisoning and complications. She was well known in Rochester and the vicinity having spent most of her life here. Her husband is the city editor of the Fulton County Sun.
Mrs. Rouch has been in ill health at various times for several years but her condition did not

become serious until a short time ago. At one time she was given up by the physicians but rallied and the family hoped that she would recover, but she suddenly grew worse Monday.
Zoa SHRYOCK was born in Rochester, December 6, 1883, daughter of Frank and Morna SHRYOCK. She was married to Glen ROUCH Nov. 12, 1909 in this city and resided here since with the exception of a short residence at Marion, Ind., and Miami, Florida. Besides the husband she leaves her mother, Mrs. Morna THOMPSON, two sisters, Mrs. Marian SARON, of Chicago, and Mrs. Jessie MARK, of Sweetzer, and one niece Miss Geraldine MARK, of Sweetzer. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and a faithful worker in its activities. She was also a member of the Pythian Sisters order.
Funeral at the Presbyterian church Wednesday afternoon, at 2:30, Rev. GAIGE officiating. Burial at Mausoleum. The body will lie in state at the church from 2:00 to 2:30.

Wednesday, April 28, 1920

Alonzo WALLICK, for forty-seven years a telegraph operator at New Waverly, a little town west of Peru, on the Wabash, died Tuesday. He was said to be the oldest operator in point of service on the Wabash railroad.

Mrs. Roy RIGGLE of South Bend and Floyd MOW and family of Detroit were here to attend the funeral of Mrs. Omer MOW. - - - WHIPPOORWILL ITEMS.

Thursday, April 29, 1920

[no obits]

Friday, April 30, 1920

Lyman COPLEN, age 84, who was a resident of this county for a number of years, died at the Old Soldiers home in Marion Tuesday evening. He had never been married. He was the son of Asa and Lucretia COPLEN.
He has one brother, Chauncey COPLEN, of Talma, and a sister, Mrs. Anna WOLFE, of Delong, who survive him. The funeral will be held at the Christian church at Talma, Friday with burial in the cemetery at that place.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Reichter Cemetery, Newcastle Twp.: Lyman COPLEN, Co A 26 Ind Inf, 1837-1920]

Saturday, May 1, 1920

Kinsman BOWEN, age 18, a well known young man and former student in the Akron High School, died at Akron last Sunday. He was a victim of tuberculosis. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. S. BOWEN, died of the same disease in 1910. In token of esteem the Akron High School students took part in the services. Burial was made in the Omega cemetery.

Monday, May 3, 1920 to Wednesday, May 5, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, May 6, 1920

Superintendent John BYBEE of the Fulton county infirmary, Wednesday, received a telegram from the superintendent of the state epileptic home at Newcastle, asking him the whereabouts of any relatives of Emmet FISHER, who formerly was an inmate of the county farm. Bybee, after calling the home in Newcastle, found out that they had received word that Fisher, who had escaped from the home about ten months ago, had fellen out of a boat while fishing on a lake near Kokomo, and drowned. His identification was made by the Kokomo police.
Bybee then called the Frank ROGERS home where he had worked before being sent to the infirmary and they told him that they had got him from a man by the name of John CLAREY. The Clarey home was then called and they said that they had taken him from the Julia Work home at Plymouth but knew nothing further about the boy, or whether he had any other relatives. It is presumed that the Newcastle authorities will get into communication with the Plymouth institution.

Friday, May 7, 1920

The Rochester Sentinel Friday morning received a letter from Ludington, Michigan, in which they requested information concerning Blanche SPURLOCK and her father, Wm. PAXTON or anything known about her family.
It seemed that Mrs. Spurlock, after leaving this city, went to Fountain, Michigan where she married Amel MOTTL. This was three years ago last Saturday. Recently Mottl died under mysterious circumstances and the coroner there is now trying to ascertain the cause of his death. The attending physician attributed his death to ptomaine poisoning. Since then it has been established that Mottl had considerable arsenic in his stomach at the time he passed away. The coroner is trying to find out if death was due to arsenic. If it was he will try to learn how the arsenic got into Mottl's stomach.
At the Fulton county clerk's office after some search it was found out that Mrs. Spurlock had filed suit for divorce from her husband, Calvin SPURLOCK, in which she charged him with cruel and inhuman treatment, association with other women. The divorce was filed in September of 1916 and the divorce was granted by Judge STEVENS in the circuit court on January of 1917.
Mr. Spurlock did not fight the case when it was up for trial only an answer in denial. Previous to the divorce the Spurlocks lived at Loyal where he ran a blacksmith shop. After this he moved to Rochester and built a home on the corner of fourth and Madison streets. He operated a pop shop and after disposing of his interest in this Spurlock worked at the Louderback garage. Following the divorce he moved to Peru where he is now employed.
Mrs. Spurlock during the time between which she filed the suit for divorce and the calling of the same resided in Michigan with her parents and then came back to this city to appear in the suit when it was called. After this she moved to Michigan where she married Mottl. Her fahter, Wm. Paxton, has lived in Michigan near Fountain for the past eight years. Mrs. Mottl, who was born in Burket, this county [sic], has two brothers who live here. They are Morris PAXTON, who is the Erie agent at Loyal, and Grover PAXTON, who lives near Bruce Lake.

Saturday, May 8, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, May 10, 1920

The clutches of the Michigan state law is slowly closing in on Mrs. Amel MOTTL, formerly Estelle Blanch SPURLOCK, of this city, according to the latest developments. In order that her past life may be brought into the case, C. P. O'BRIEN, assistant states attorney from Ludington, Michigan, was in Rochester Saturday afternoon making a careful investigation of the record and character of the woman who is now suspected of causing the death of her husband recently, at their country home near Fountain, Michigan.
Mottl, who married Mrs. Spurlock after she moved to Fountain from Rochester, according to Mr. O'Brien, recently died under mysterious circumstances, after an illness of a few days which was diagnosed to be ptomaine poisoning. Relatives thot the circumstances rather peculiar and after discovering burns about the mouth of the dead man had a post mortem held over the protests of Mrs. Mottl, and it was then that chemists discovered a large quantity of arsenic in the stomach. Mrs. Mottl was immediately suspected of putting arsenic in her husband's food and the state started an investigation. Mrs. Mottl is at present under no charge and is still living at her home, as there has been no evidence brot out that would justify her arrest, it is said.
Mr. O'Brien made a careful study of the divorce records of Mrs. Spurlock from her first husband in the clerk's office at the court house Saturday afternoon. It is understood that he interviewed several of Mrs. Mottl's former friends here. This investigation is being made, he said, so as to show that her past life was such that the act of which she is now suspected would not be an impossibility. Mr. O'Brien later in the day left for Peru, where he saw Calvin SPURLOCK, her former husband, and then went to Logansport, where he made further inquiries into her past life.
The following story of the death of Mr. Mottl was told by Mr. O'Brien to a representative of the Sentinel. According to the information he had so far obtained in the case Mr. Mottl, a well to do farmer, living near Fountain, had married Mrs. Spurlock shortly after she had moved there with her father and the couple had lived on the farm with Mr. Mottl's mother. Investigation has brot out that ther was no quarreling between the two and that they seemed congenial, but that Mrs. Mottl was known for her "city ways," and several times she had left home alone and been away in neighboring towns where she registered under an assumed name at hotels.
On the particular night Mr. Mottl ate a supper of potato cakes, of which there were several. His mother also ate two of them. When the head of the house went to town to a meeting his wife put out one of the cakes which was left and some pie for him to eat. Mr. Mottl returned and ate the lunch before retiring. About midnight he awakened his wife and mother by his groans and they found him seriously ill. A physician was called, who pronounced it ptomaine poisoning and treated his patient accordingly. However Mr. Mottl continued to grow steadily worse, and three nights later in the middle of the night his wife found him dead.
According to the states attorney however, she failed to notify the mother until the next morning and thru all the ordeal took the death very calmly and showed little emotion.
Shortly before the burial one of the relatives happened to notice two burns about the dead man's mouth. Mrs. Mottl seemed anxious to have the undertaker remove these. Meanwhile the relatives had become suspicious and requested a post mortem be held. Mrs. Mottl objected very strongly to this but a post mortem was held and the physicians stated that death was due to potasium poisoning. However the relatives were not satisfied and demanded that the stomach be examined, but Mrs. Mottl objected to this so strongly that it was necessary to bring the matter to the attention of the states attorney, at Ludington, and he ordered the examination over Mrs. Mottl's protest.
The stomach was then removed and sent to Lansing where it was examined by chemists and a large amount of arsenic was found. Meanwhile an investigation made at Fountain brot out the fact that at three different times, previous to the death, Mrs. Mottl had purchased arsenic and other poisons at a local drug store. Each time she bought she claimed it was for killing rats, and the reason she bought so much was that the first quantity she purchased had been lost from the buggy on her return home.
After the discovery of the poison in the stomach, the states attorney ordered the body of Mottl disinterred and all vital organs removed. These are now in the hands of chemists and a report is now being awaited. As the case now stands there is no conclusive evidence against the woman but the states attorney intends to investigate the entire affair very carefully and will undoubtedly file charges in a few days, it is understood.
However the lawyers so far have been unable to find any motive for the crime. According to witnesses, while Mrs. Mottl's actions at times were questionable, there never was any quarreling between the husband and wife. At the same time Mrs. Mottl knew that in case of the death of her husband his large farm would revert to his mother by the will now in existence. But the fact that Mr. Mottl grew so very ill after eating of the potato cakes and his mother was not in the least affected and the peculiar actions of Mrs. Mottl has lead the states attorney's office and the neighbors about their home, to believe that the former Blanche Spurlock is guilty of murder.

Monday, May 10, 1920

Walter WALLACE, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. James WALLACE, died at his home in Fulton, Sunday evening of scarlet fever. Mr. Wallace was working with his father in a harness shop at Converse and was taken ill last Tuesday. He returned to his home at Fulton, where doctors pronounced the illness scarlet fever. Despite all efforts to check the same he died. He was born in this city 21 years ago and moved with his parents to Fulton about nine years ago. He leaves besides his parents, three sisters, Sylvia [WALLACE], Thelma [WALLACE] and Clara [WALLACE]. The deceased was a member of the Baptist church and Odd Fellow lodge at Fulton. The funeral will be held in the yard in front of his residence. The burial will be made in the Fulton cemetery.

Word has been received in this city Monday of the death of Mrs. Malinda ENYART at San Diego, Calif., last Friday, of paralysis. Mrs. Enyart was the mother of Mrs. Ed MOHLER of this city, who was at her bedside when she died.
Mrs. Enyart was a life long resident of this city and moved to California about a year and a half ago, where she made her home with her son, Edward REED. She had been an invalid for some time, having broker her hip in a fall.
Mrs. Enyart was born in Dayton, Ohio, July 12, 1853. She had been married three times. Six children survive her. They are Ed REED, of San Diego, Calif., Harry REED, of Moline, Ill., Glen BAKER, of Rock Island, Ill., Geo. REED, of Springfield, O., Marcus WRIGHT, of Houston, Texas, and Mrs. Ed MOHLER of this city. One son, Omar REED, died in May of 1900. Mrs. Enyart was buried at San Diego last Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. MOHLER have returned from San Diego, Calif. Mrs. Mohler has been there for six weeks and Mr. Mohler went there about three weeks ago. They were there during the illness and death of her mother, Mrs. Malinda ENYART.

Tuesday, May 11, 1920

Mrs. Charles REPLOGLE, age 27, of South Bend, died at Woodlawn hospital Sunday morning following an operation which was performed Sunday, May 1st. The body was taken to South Bend Monday.

Wednesday, May 12, 1920 to Thursday, May 13, 1920

[no obits]

Friday, May 14, 1920

Mrs. Philip ARTER, age 79, mother of County Sheriff Samuel ARTER, died at 11:45 o'clock Thursday night at her home in Akron. The death was caused by gall stones from which Mrs. Arter has been suffering for some time. For the last few months she has been in poor health but it was not until about three or four weeks ago that her condition became critical.
Mrs. Arter was born in Stark county, Ohio, in 1841. She has lived in this county for the greater part of her life, moving here when quite a small girl.
Since her marriage to Philip ARTER, the couple have lived near Akron.
She is survived by eight children, Samuel ARTER, of this city; John ARTER, Will ARTER and Ed ARTER, all of Akron; Mrs. A. C. TROUTMAN, of Lima, Ohio; Mrs. Richard PERSONNETT, of near Akron, and Mrs. Ben WILTSHIRE, of Macy.
The funeral at the Pleasant View church near Akron, Sunday morning at ten o'clock and burial in the Odd Fellows cemetery at Akron. The Rev. SPANGLER, of Peru, in charge of the services.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Philip ARTER, 1844-1934; Pheobe ARTER, 1841-1920]

Saturday, May 15, 1920

Roy FLENNAR, formerly of Akron, who will be remembered as the man who was in the local courts recently as the result of trying to sell some mortgaged property, has been reported dead in Michigan, where he is supposed to have gone. The report, however, has not been verified so far.

Relatives of Charles BARNHISEL, who has been missing for more than a year, have about given up hope that he will ever be heard from again, according to the Akron News.
Marshal WOOLPERT, at the request of the man's father, John BARNHISEL, who lives near Akron, went to South Bend and LaPorte last week in an effort to find some trace of the missing man. Workmen in the Oliver Co., at South Bend said that Barnhisel left there in March, 1919, without drawing all of the pay which was coming to him. He did not leave any word with his landlady and left some clothes in his room. No one has seen or heard from him since.

He has a wife and two children living in Akron. He also owns a small farm south of Akron. The missing man was a clean living citizen and no reason can be found by relatives why he should act in this manner. Several asserted that he may have been a victim of foul play.
John BARNHISEL and Jacob SNEARLY went to South Bend Wednesday to see if they could find some trace of Mr. Barnhisel. There is no truth to the report that the body of the missing man had been found in the St. Joe river.

Monday, May 17, 1920

Lewis K. BROWER, age 65, died at his home on West Third street Sunday morning of a complication of diseases which were superinduced by an accident which he had last fall when he was hit by an automobile.
Mr. Brower, with his son Walter, had operated a grocery store on West Third Street for the past eleven years. Previous to this he had been interested in fruit tree raising and planting. Mr. Brower was also a very prominent Presbyterian and at the time of his death was an elder of the church.
Lewis K. Brower was born May 24, 1854 at Fox Lake, Wis., and was the son of John and Maria BROWER. On November 30, 1876 Mr. Brower was married to Miss Kate ENGLISH. He is survived by Walter [BROWER], Harry [BROWER] and George BROWER, of this city, and his wife. The children who are dead are Fred [BROWER], Edith [BROWER] and Frank BROWER. The funeral at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon from the residence, Rev. GAIGE in charge, and burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

- - - - So passed to the life beyond Pheobe [MAUL], daughter of John and Marilla MAUL, born at Canal Fulton, Stark County, Ohio, May 4, 1841.
She was united in marriage to Philip ARTER, Jan. 18, 1866, departed this life May 13, 1920, aged 79 years, 13 days. To this union were born nine children, six sons and three daughters; one son preceded her in death.
In the year of 1869 she with her husband came to Indiana and located near Akron, where she helped to hew out of the forest the present home that they now own. Through her integrity and honest upright living she proved that she was a great factor in the upbuilding of the community in which she lived. Her exemplary life bore testimony of her faith in things eternal and while her last moments was accompanied with great agony, she prayed that she might go. She leaves her husband and eight children, eighteen grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and a host of friends who hold her in sacred memory. - - - -

Tuesday, May 18, 1920

William JOHNSON, age 73, pioneer resident of this county, died at his home near Leiters Ford Monday evening. He had been in ill health for the past several years. He leaves besides his wife, four children, Mrs. William WILSON, of this city, Loren JOHNSON, of Leiters Ford, Mrs. Charles WALTERS of North Manchester, and Mrs. Nate O'BLENIS of near Leiters Ford. Funeral Thursday afternoon with burial in the cemetery at Leiters Ford.

Wednesday, May 19, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, May 20, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Alvah WALTERS, of Indianapolis, were in Rochester today to attend the funeral of Wm. JOHNSON.

Malcolm [WILSON] and Lester WILSON, of Wabash, were here today to attend the funeral of their grandfather, Wm. JOHNSON, of Leiters Ford.

Mrs. Louisa O. EMERICK, age 65, of Peru, was instantly killed in Indianapolis Wednesday when the car in which she was riding was struck by a Union Traction company freight car at 59th street and College Ave., according to a story carried in the Indianapolis Star Thursday. Mrs. Emerick was riding in the rear seat of an automobile with her daughter, Mrs. Edward MYERS, of Toledo, Ohio, the car being driven by her son, Frank EMERICK.
Mr. Emerick was driving his car west on 59th street and according to witnesses the motorman had sounded two warnings with his whistle but Emerick evidently did not hear the warnings. Mrs. Emerick was seriously cut about the right temple and it is believed she died of a fractured scull.
Mrs. Emerick was quite well known in this city, where she had spent her summers at the lake. Mrs. Emerick with her son, Frank, who was a traveling salesman for an Eastern firm, owned a cottage which is three doors south of the Fairview hotel, which was named Emerick. Mrs. Emerick had been living with her son in Indianapolis during the past winter.

Friday, May 21, 1920

Guy SCHULTZ, a young farmer living near Claypool, died at the McDonald hospital in Warsaw, Wednesday, from gun shot wounds which he suffered about a week ago. Young Schultz had the gun with him, ready to shoot groundhogs and had it laying on the seat of the riding plow. The plow struck a stone which caused the gun to explode.

Saturday, May 22, 1920

Frank GELBAUGH, age 46, died early Saturday morning at Woodlawn hospital, as the result of being kicked in the head by a horse. Mr. Gelbaugh lived with his nephew on his farm four miles north of this city, near Glazes hill. Last Wednesday his nephew returned home from school and not finding his uncle in the home went to the barn and found him lying behind a horse. When he could not arouse him, the nephew ran to a neighbor and brought help. A doctor was summoned and he ordered him removed to Woodlawn hospital. Gelbaugh suffered the loss of his left arm in a corn shredder about twelve years ago.
Frank Gelbaugh was the son of Levi and Molly GELBAUGH, deceased, and was born in Kewanna in September 1873. He had two brothers, Roy [GELBAUGH], deceased, and Leslie [GELBAUGH]. Mr. Gelbaugh had never been married. He lived on the farm north of this city for the past 18 years, moving there from Kewanna. Funeral at Sand Hill Church Monday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, burial at Richland Center.

Mrs. Rebecca A. BUEHLER, age 64, wife of George BUEHLER, of this city, died at Longcliff, Friday evening at 4:30 o'clock. Mrs. Beuhler was tasken to Longcliff about a month ago but her condition failed to improve and she sank gradually until the end.
She was born February 28, 1855 in Cole county, Illinois. She was married to William JAMES

on December 7, 1872, at Rushville, Indiana, and to this union one daughter was born, Ina M. [JAMES], who has preceded her parents in death. Mrs. James lived with her first husband in the Burton neighborhood until his death.
She was married to George BUEHLER of this city, on November 27, 1912, and has lived in Rochester ever since until she was taken to Longcliff. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Monday, May 24, 1920

(Special to the Sentinel)
Ludington, Mich., May 24. -- Mrs. Blanche MOTTL, divorced wife of Calvin SPURLOCK, of Rochester, Indiana, today occupies a cell in the Mason county jail. She was arrested Saturday afternoon, charged with the murder of her second husband, Amel MOTTL, by administering arsenic to him.
Mottl, a young farmer whom she married May 1, 1917, died April 28, after an illness of six days, attributed by his physician to be due to ptomaine poisoning. Arsenic sufficient to have killed thirty men was found in his viscera when analyzed by the state chemist.
Mrs. Mottl's arrest came dramatically. Prosecutor K. H. Matthews was attempting to interview her sister, Miss Bessie PAXTON, relative to the death of her brother-in-law. She refused to answer his questions.
"There is but one way to settle this matter," she defiantly snapped.
"Serve the warrant, George," said the prosecutor to Sheriff Colyer.
The Sheriff read the warrant to the widow. She was in the home of her father, William E. PAXTON.
"When do you want me to go with you?" she asked quietly.
"You must come with me now," said the officer.
"Just wait a moment until I change my dress," was her rejoinder.
Presently she appeared for her journey to the county seat. She was as composed as though going for a pleasure ride instead of one whose destinies was the jail.
During her arraignment, when her attorney sought to have her released on bail, she assumed the attitude of a mildly interested and slightly bored spectator, wearied by a tiresome delay.
Not until seven hours after her arrest did she occupy the room prepared for her at the jail, her attorney exhausting every possibility of securing her release. Mrs. Mottl's hearing has been set for Wednesday, May 26. Prosecutor Matthews says it will be exhaustive.

Funeral services for Mrs. George BUEHLER were held Monday afternoon at the Evangelical church, Rev. J. H. RIGGLE in charge. Burial in Shaffer cemetery.

Tuesday, May 25, 1920

Cleo WHITTENBERGER, age 16, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel WHITTENBERGER, who live 1-1/2 miles southwest of Akron, died Tuesday morning about 10:00 o'clock. He was born near Akron, July 27, 1903. Young Whittenberger had been sick all of his life, and had never been able to attend school regularly. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Wednesday, May 26, 1920

Frank KIME, age 49, of southwest of Akron, went to the barn in the rear of his brother;'s home late Wednesday afternoon and opening his mouth shot himself thru the head. Death was instantaneous, it is said.
Kime, who it is said, has been slightly demented for some time, had been contemplating the act, according to reports, and his brother's children, who heard the report, were afraid to go to the barn immediately. Finally, with their mother, they went to the barn and found Kime lying dead in a pool of blood.
Kime was single, having lived with his brother, until his brother died some time ago; since then he continued to make his home with his brother's family. The coroner was summoned from Peru.

Cleo M. WHITTENBERGER, age 16, died Tuesday at his home, 1-1/2 miles southwest of Akron, of tuberculosis. He was the son of Samuel and Daisy WHITTENBERGER, and was born near Akron, July 27, 1903, and had been in poor health since childhood. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from his late residence.

Thursday, May 27, 1920

In the Wednesday evening's edition of this paper it was erroneously stated that the man who committed suicide was Frank KIME, and that he killed himself by shooting himself thru the roof of his mouth. Investigation showed the man's name to be Robert KIME, and he shot himself thru the right temple.

Friday, May 28, 1920

N. J. FAIRCHILD, of Kewanna, was killed Thursday afternoon when he drove the truck in which he was riding in front of a fast Erie train at Monterey.
The accident occurred on the main street of monterey, and it is believed that Fairchild, who was watching for an east bound train, which he knew was due in Monterey at that time, did not notice the west bound train, which was late, until it was too late to avoid the accident.
Witnesses of the accident state that Fairchild evidently saw his danger just before the train struck him, as he attempted to turn his truck to avoid the train. The time, however, was too short and the engine struck the truck just behind the driver's seat completely demolishing it.
Fairchild, who was about to leap at the time, was struck by the engine and hurled against a string of box cars which were standing on a siding some thirty feet distant.
Monterey citizens who rushed to the aid of the stricken man found him breathing his last and death came just five minutes after the accident. A watch, which was in Fairchild's pocket, stopped at 2:48 o'clock.
While the body was considerably bruised there were no disfiguring marks left on the face. The right shoulder was braised and the right leg crushed to a pulp just below the knee, altho the skin was not broken. There was also a long gash on the back of the head.
There was no one with Fairchild at the time of the accident. His son, Paul [FAIRCHILD], who is a partner in the monument business which his father conducted at Kewanna, had planned to make the trip, but because of a vaccination of his left arm remained at home because of the pain the jarring of the truck would have caused.
It is understood that at the time of the accident, Fairchild was returning from San Pierre where he had delivered a monument.
Mr. Fairchild is survived by his wife, and two children, Jessie FAIRCHILD, a stenographer of South Bend, and Paul FAIRCHILD, who lives at home.
Funeral Sunday morning at the Methodist church in Kewanna, with the Rev. REEDY aofficiating. Burial in the Washington cemetery east of Maxinkuckee.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Washington-Lawson Cemetery, Union Twp.: Newton J. FAIRCHILD, 1869-1920; Dora FAIRCHILD, 1877-1937]

Mrs. Levi LEITER, 45, well known resident of near Loyal, died Friday morning at the Robert Long hospital at Indianapolis of uremic poisoning and high blood pressure after long illness. Mrs. Leiter had been in poor health for some time. Three weeks ago she was taken to the hospital at Indianapolis in hope that it would improve her health. However she failed to get better and gradually sank to the end. Her husband and one daughter, Gladys, were at the bedside when the end came.
Maud TANNER was born in Decatur county on April 5, 1875 and was married in Rochester to Levi LEITER on March 30, 1895. She was a member of the Rebekah lodge and the Methodist church at Leiters Ford.
She is survived by her husband, three children Mrs. Claude WOLFRAM, of Rochester, Gladys LEITER of Washington, D.C., and Robert LEITER who lives with his parents. One sister, Mrs. S. A. BUEHLER, Battle Creek, Michigan, and one brother, James TANNER, of Indianapolis, also survive.
The body will arrive in Rochester at 10:30 Saturday morning and be taken to the home. Funeral at Leiters Ford M. E. church at 10:30 Sunday morning, Rev. ROUCH officiating.

Saturday, May 29, 1920

[Article, Special to the Sentinel, concerning Estelle Blanch SPURLOCK]

Monday, May 31, 1920

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, June 1, 1920

Mrs. Harry YOUNG Monday received word of the death of her father, Daniel LUTZ, of Wabash. Mr. Lutz was struck by an automobile crossing a street in Wabash about two weeks ago and was fatally injured.
Mr. and Mrs. Young went to Wabash Tuesday.

Mrs. Josephine FAIRCHILD, 82, of Kewanna, died Sunday night of old age at the home of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Newton FAIRCHILD. Mrs. Fairchild's son was the late Newton FAIRCHILD, who was killed last Thursday when his automobile was hit by an Erie passenger train near Monterey. His funeral occurred Sunday afternoon and Mrs. Fairchild died Sunday night about eleven o'clock.
Mrs. Fairchild moved to this county about seventy years ago with her parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin FOUDRAY, from Flemingsburg, Kentucky, in which place she was born January 11, 1837. They came to and settled near Talma. Her father was postmaster at that place for better than thirty years.
When she was about twenty years old she was united in marriage with Fairchild. To this union seven children were born, Nathan [FAIRCHILD], Francis [FAIRCHILD], Mary [FAIRCHILD], Ellen [FAIRCHILD], Perry [FAIRCHILD], Newton [FAIRCHILD] and Sam [FAIRCHILD]. Only one child survives her, Samuel, of Duluth, Minn.
Mrs. Fairchild was a member of the Methodist church since she was a very young girl. She was also a member of the Rebekah lodge at Kewanna.
The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from the home of the late Newton Fairchild at Kewanna with burial in the cemetery in that town.

Alfred Benson RUSH, 50, died Sunday evening at his home on Manitou street in east Rochester of pulmonary tuberculosis. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin RUSH and was born in this county on January 1, 1870. When he was 21 years old he was united in marriage with Miss Magdaline REEBER. No children were born to this union. Mr. Rush is survived by his wife and two brothers and four sisters. The two brothers are Frank [RUSH] and Ed [RUSH] of this city. The sisters are Mrs. Lena WRIGHT, Tiosa, Mrs. Laura BENDER and Mrs. Nora ANDREWS of Culver and Mrs. Della SMITH of near Rochester. Two sisters and a twin brother died in infancy.

John Daniel SMITH, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest SMITH, died Sunday at the home of his parents in Richland township. He was five days old. The child was buried Monday.

Mrs. Harry YOUNG received word Monday of the death of her father, Dan LUTZ, of Wabash, caused by a blood clot. Mr. Lutz was run over by a car driven by a man by the name of Ford who is connected with the Ford meter box company, the same firm which installed the boxes in this city about two weeks ago. Mr. Lutz was thought to be getting along very well. Besides the widow, Mrs. Dan LUTZ, he is survived by three children, Mrs. Harry YOUNG of this city, Mrs. Albert GOOD of Chicago and Richard LUTZ of Wabash.

Wednesday, June 2, 1920

John N. HENDERSON, West Second street, died Wednesday morning at Woodlawn hospital following an operation for acute appendicitis which was performed about a week ago. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Timothy HENDERSON and was born January 1, 1881. Mr. Henderson was employed for a number of years at the Clary and Onstott livery stable in this city but for the past six years had been working for the Rochester Bridge Company where he had risen to the rank of steel inspector.
Mr. Henderson was married on December 25, 1903 to Miss Carrie BRINEY. Besides his wife, two children and parents, he is survived by one brother, William HENDERSON, of Elkhart, and four sisters, Mrs. Joseph KING, of Stockton, Cal., Mrs. Lou COOPER, of this city, Mrs. Bertha CLARK, of Columbia City, and Mrs. Lou THAYER, of Cleveland, Ohio.
Mr. Henderson was a member of the Moose Lodge of this city. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the Evangelical church. Rev. EBERHARDT will have charge and the services will be in charge of the Moose lodge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Miss Bessie SANDERS, age 39, died early Wednesday morning at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph SANDERS, near Wagoners, of tuberculosis. Miss Sanders was born in Miami county, July 7, 1881. She was educated in the schools near her home and then took a nurse's course at the Dukes hospital at Peru from which institution she was graduated.
Miss Sanders was a member of the Christian church.
Besides her parents, Miss Sanders is survived by two brothers, Thomas [SANDERS] and William [SANDERS].
Funeral Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the home of her parents, Rev. Thomas LUCKEY, of Macy, in charge, with burial in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

Thursday, June 3, 1920

Charles WEIRICK, age 38, formerly of this city but now of Cray, N.D., died early Thursday morning with tuberculosis after an illness of over one year. Word of the death was received by his sister, Miss Lillian WEIRICK.
Mr. Weirick was well known in this city having lived here until 15 years ago when he went to North Dakota to take up farming. Since leaving this city Mr. Weirick has done well with his farm. He was married, leaving a wife and five children to survive him.
The death of Mr. Weirick comes as a distinct shock to his many friends in this city, for while it was known that he has been in poor health for over a year, it has been only in the last few months that his condition has been considered serious.
Mr. Weirick's two sisters, Lillian and Maude WEIRICK left for North Dakota Thursday night to attend the funeral.

Friday, June 4, 1920

[Special to the Sentinel - account of court proceedings against Blanche S. MOTTL]

Frank THOMPSON, age 32, member of the medical corps of the United States Army, died at Ashville, N.C., of tuberculosis of the bone, contracted when nursing influenza patients, June 1. A short time ago his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel THOMPSON, of near Akron, received word that their son was in a critical condition, and asking that they come to the southern camp.
They went at once to North Carolina, but after being there a few days the health of Mr. Thompson made it imperative that they return home. They reached Rochester Saturday morning and Wednesday received a message telling of their son's death. A wire was at once sent to the commanding officer of the camp asking the body be sent here for burial.
When Thompson enlisted in 1917, he is said to have remarked to friends that he could never come back alive. He said, according to friends, "If I start across I will never reach the other side, and if I stay in this country I will never get back alive."
Thompson enlisted in the medical corps of the army late in the fall of 1917 and served in southern camps where he had charge of influenza patients returned to this country from France. It was while engaged in this service, army men say, he contracted the disease which caused his death.
The young veteran was born and raised in this county and until the war resided with his parents near Akron. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel THOMPSON, one brother, Elzie THOMPSON, and one sister, Mrs. Fred BATZ.
The body will arrive in this city Saturday evening and will be taken to the home of his

parents. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the residence near Akron. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery in this city.

Bruce DAY, age 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. DAY, of Macy, was instantly killed when he came in contact with a high voltage wire in a factory where he was employed at Niagara Falls, Tuesday forenoon according to a message received Tuesday night. Only meagre details were in the telegram simply stating that he had been electrocuted. The body will be shipped to Macy for burial. Day is an ex-service man. He has been working in an electrical supply works in Niagara Falls since his discharge. Day was quite well known in this city.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Lionel B. DAY, Co C 56 Engineers, USA (military marker - no dates)]

Maude TANNER LEITER, daughter of Elza and Lydia TANNER, was born April 5th, 1875, at Greensburg, Ind., and departed this life May 28, 1920, at the age of 45 years, 1 month and 23 days.
On the 30th of March, 1895, she was united in holy wedlock to Levi LEITER, and to them were born three children, Mrs. Claude WOLFRAM, of Rochester, Ind., Gladys [LEITER], of Washington, D.C., and Robert [LEITER], who still resides at home.
When 13 years old she was baptized and united with the Mt. Arie Baptist church at Tott's Corner, Ind. At the time of her marriage she united with the Methodist Episcopal church of Leiters Ford and was a faithful member of that church until her death. Her life was not only consistent with her faith in God, but an example of Christian loyalty and fidelity to her family and friends. Her sickness was such that she knew the end of life was near, and like a good mother and wife she sought to set her house in order before she took her long journey.
She made every possible arrangement for the funeral services; selected the songs, singers, text for the sermon and in so doing died as she lived, ready to meet her God. - - -
She was a member of the Rebekah Lodge of Leiters Ford, Ind., and enjoyed the fraternal friendship of that body.
In addition to her own family and many friends she leaves one brother, James TANNER, of Indianapolis, and one sister, Mrs. S. A. BEUHLER, of Battle Creek, Mich. - - -

Saturday, June 5, 1920

The funeral of J. Frank THOMPSON which was to have been held Sunday afternoon at one o'clock has been postponed until Monday afternoon at one o'clock. The funeral will be held at the home of his parents near Akron. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery in this city.

Monday, June 7, 1920

Wm. SNYDER, of Mt. Zion, recently received word of the death of his sister, Mrs. Elizabeth MARMONT, of Devils Lake, N.D., which occurred about two weeks ago.

Tuesday, June 8, 1920 to Wednesday, June 9, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, June 10, 1920

Capt. V. B. FULLER, of the Red Wing, received a telegram Wednesday, announcing the death of his aunt, Mrs. Gussie LAW, aged 70, at Louisville, Kentucky. Mr. Fuller left immediately for the Kentucky city to attend the funeral.

Dewey LEAVELL, age 22, son of County Commissioner John T. LEAVELL, died early this morning of typhoid fever at his home one mile south of Fulton. Mr. Leavell was employed at the General Electric Company, at Ft. Wayne, and had come home to visit with his father when he was taken ill. His mother is dead.
He is survived by four sisters, Mrs. Jack OLIVER, Mrs. Clarence McDOUGLE, Mrs. Lloyd SHOWLEY, all of Fulton, and Mrs. Ascher WILLIAMSON, who lives in the West, and one brother, Clyde [LEAVELL], of Fulton.
Dewey Leavell was a graduate of Fulton high school in the class of 1916. He also was a member of the Baptist church in that town. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Friday, June 11, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, June 12, 1920

Mrs. Ida B. TUTTLE died Friday afternoon at her home three miles west of Claypool, of brights disease following influenza. Ida Tuttle, wife of Henry E. TUTTLE, was born in this county April 11, 1867, and was the daughter of William and Mary MOORE.
Only one brother from a large family survives and that is George MOORE, near Athens.
Besides her husband, Mrs. Tuttle leaves two children, Clinton TUTTLE, of Logansport, and Mrs. Roy McFARLAND, of Mentone. The funeral from her late home at Claypool Sunday at one o'clock, Rev. PENCE in charge. The body will be brought to the I.O.O.F. cemetery for burial. The funeral party will arrive here about three o'clock.

Bertha Beatrice TEETER, daughter of French and Cleo TEETER, died Friday of whooping cough. Her parents live in Newcastle township. She was born December 14, 1919. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 with burial in Sycamore cemetery.

Thelma Lucile KEITH, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Stewart KEITH, of Macy, died 20 days after birth. The child was the second of a pair of twin girls, who were born on May 14, Velma [KEITH], the other twin, having died fifteen days following her birth.
Neither of the children have been well since their birth. They are survived by an older sister, Esther Bernice KEITH.

Monday, June 14, 1920

Word has been received in this city announcing the death of Ora GREEN of Rossville, Illinois, in a hospital at Indianapolis, following an operation. Mr. Green for many years had occupied the Shady Oaks cottage on Koeffels point and spent his summers here. He was taken back to Rossville for burial.

Barney PERSCHBACHER, Howard DuBOIS, Lon SHEETS and Dave SWIHART went today to Fulton to attend the funeral of Dewey LEAVELL.

Tuesday, June 15, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 16, 1920

Alva GOOD, Tuesday received a telegram from John GOOD, of Cornell, Wisconsin, announcing the death of his father, Willard GOOD, which occurred in an insane asylum Monday. The body will arrive in this city Wednesday afternoon over the Erie from the west.
Ashbel Willard GOOD, was born in Rochester in the year of 1855. He was the son of Isaac and Mary GOOD, and was one of twelve children, of which three remain, they are: Alva GOOD, of Rochester, Sue THOMPSON, of South Bend and Mrs. Nellie HOLLEY of Plymouth. Early in life he was married and settled on a farm east of this city where he lived until last fall when he, with his three children, moved to Wisconsin.
Three children besides the widow survive him, they are John [GOOD] and Charles GOOD and Mrs. Edith BRYANT, all of whom live in Cornell, Wisconsin. Mr. Good was a member of the Church of God. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 from the Evangelical church. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Lowell Irwin [LONG], eleven week old son of Mr. and Mrs. Truman LONG, who had been seriously ill for several days, passed away Monday. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.

Thursday, June 17, 1920

[no obits]

Friday, June 18, 1920

Miss Gussie KEPLER, 21, died at her home on east 14th street at 4:20 Friday morning of scarlet fever. Miss Kepler was taken ill a week ago last Sunday with what was thought to be tonsilitis. She rapidly grew worse and doctors who were called diagnosed the case as scarlet fever. Every means known to medical science was used to check the malady but to no avail.
Gussie Kepler was the daughter of James and Julia KEPLER and was born in the southern part of this county in the community known as Lucetta, January 23, 1899. When she was nine months old her parents moved to this city where she attended common school and high school for a short time.
After she left school Miss Kepler accepted a position at Armour's where she worked for several years. She was employed at the Dawson and Coplen drug store. It was here that she won a wide circle of friends by her always pleasing manner.
Miss Kepler is survived by her parents and three sisters, Edna [KEPLER], Vera [KEPLER] and Ada [KEPLER], and one brother, Orland [KEPLER]. The funeral in the front yard of their home at 117 East 14th street at 2 o'clock. Rev. EBERHARDT of the Evangelical church of which denomination she was a member, will conduct the funeral. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Otto GRONINGER, age 59, a well known farmer of near Disko, was found dead in a gravel pit on the Charles FLOHR farm Tuesday morning by children who had been working in a garden nearby. The lines of the team which Groninger had been driving were found clutched in his hands.
A physician who was called said the death was caused by heart trouble, from which Groninger had been suffering for some time, altho his condition had not been considered serious.
Groninger is survived by one son, Roy GRONINGER, who lives at home. Mrs. Groninger has been dead for five years.
No funeral arrangements have been made.

Mrs. Nellie HALLY, of Plymouth, and sister, Mrs. Sue THOMPSON, of South Bend, came home Thursday to attend the funeral of their brother, Willard GOOD.

Saturday, June 19, 1920

After men with grab hooks and dynamite had been working at Long Lake, near Laketon, to recover the body of Paul ROONEY since Wednesday, when he drowned when he fell out of a boat while looking for an oar, the body came to the surface of its own accord Friday afternoon.

Thru a typographical error the Sentinel did not state the day on which the late Gussie KEPLER's funeral will be held. The services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock in the front yard of the Kepler home at 117 East Fourteenth street, Rev. EBERHARDT in charge, with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, June 21, 1920

Mrs. J. D. BLACKETOR received a telephone call Sunday afternoon announcing the death of her niece, Mrs. Catherine GRAFFIS, of Peru. She was the daughter of Ben HIGHT, of the same city. The funeral will be held Tuesday at 2:30 from the home in Peru. Mrs. Graffis was born and reared in this county and had a number of relatives and friends in this city and Fulton county.

Mrs. Frank KIRCHER died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles TATMAN in Akron last Thursday evening at nine o'clock. Mrs. Kircher has been ill for some time from a cancer.
She was born in Ohio, August, 1861, to Philip and Elizabeth SHINE. The family later moved to Indiana and lived near Winamac, Indiana. In 1883 she was married to Frank KIRCHER and they made their home near Gilead, Indiana.
Mrs. Kircher leaves her husband, two daughters and one sister. They are Mrs. Charles TATMAN and Mrs. William McKINNEY of near Gilead, and Mrs. Rosa DAVENPORT of Disko, Indiana.
The funeral services were held at Gilead, Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983: Franklin KIRCHER m. Lucy SHINE, December 8, 1883]

George DEMONT, a pioneer citizen of this county, passed away at the home of his son, Earl DEMONT, southwest of this city Friday night from the effects of a stroke of paralysis which he suffered about two weeks ago. He was 71 years old. Mr. Demont was born Jan. 21, 1839. In 1876 he was united in marriage with Susan GREY to which union six children were born, four of whom died in infancy. One son, Earl DEMONT and daughter, Nellie SNODGRASS, both of this city, survive him as do two sisters, Miss Alice DEMONT, of Buffalo, New York, Mrs. Rosie HEETER, of Delong, and six brothers, Phillip [DEMONT] and Charles DEMONT of Michigan City, Ed DEMONT of Monterey, John [DEMONT] and Peter DEMONT of Kalamazoo, Mich., and William DEMONT, of Rochester. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon with burial at Culver.

Albert Lafayette WILHOIT, 68, a pioneer resident of this county, died late Saturday night at his home three miles southwest of Akron, of hardening of the arteries. Mr. Wilhoit was born April 20, 1851 in Henry county, Indiana, and was the son of Joseph and Amanda WILHOIT. When a young man Wilhoit moved to this county and settled near Akron. For many [years] he drove a stage between here and Akron before the Erie railroad was built. When he was a young man Mr. Wilhoit married Sarah KITCHEN and to this union three children were born, who survive him, as does his widow. They are Clifford [WILHOIT] and Albert [WILHOIT] at home and Mrs. R. L. MAPEL, of Columbus Grove, Ohio. The funeral Tuesday at 2 o'clock from the Akron M.E. church, Rev. TODD in charge, and burial in the Akron cemetery.

Tuesday, June 22, 1920

Mrs. Catherine GRIFFITH, aged 25 years, wife of John GRIFFITH, died Saturday afternoon at the family residence 68 East Franklin street, Peru. Mrs. Griffith had been in ill health for some time but the immediate cause of her death was peritonitis. The funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock from her late home, Rev. NYCE in charge of the services and baurial in the Mt. Hope cemetery. Mrs. Griffith was a niece of Mrs. J. D. BLACKETOR, who lives south of this city. She had a number of other relatives in this city.
Catherine HIGHT was born in Peru, May 4, 1896 and she was the daughter of Benjamin HIGHT, now of Denver, Indiana. She lived in this city practically all of her life. On October 28, 1911, she was united in marriage to John (Jack) GRIFFITH, of Peru. Besides her husband, she is survived by one child, Catherine Wanda GRIFFITH, aged 6 years, and her father, one brother and one half-sister. The brother is James HIGHT of Denver and the sister is Mrs. Elizabeth KOTTERMAN who resides in the state of Florida.

Wednesday, June 23, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, June 24, 1920

Mrs. Harriett NEFF, age 75, died at her home west of this city Wednesday night, following an illness of several months. For the past six weeks, however, her suffering has been intense, it is said.
She was born on July 29, 1844, in Snyder county, Pennsylvania. On October 15, 1862, she married Jacob NEFF, and five years later, in 1867, moved to this county with her husband and

settled on the Burton farm, four miles west of Rochester, where she made her home until her death.
Her husband and three of her eleven children have preceded her in death.
Mrs. Neff is survived by the following children: Floyd NEFF, of Fort Wayne; Frank NEFF, of Indianapolis; Henry NEFF, of Rochester; William NEFF, of Washington State; Mrs. Mary BARNHISEL, of Akron; Mrs. J. B. HAIMBAUGH and Mrs. Charles HUNNESHAGEN, of Rochester.
Mrs. Neff has been a life long member of the Evangelical Association and her life has been one of long service to others, according to her many friends.
Funeral from the home west of the city, Friday afternoon, at two o'clock, Rev. F. L. SNYDER in charge of the services and burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Faye O. BRADY, age 36, died of neuritis at her home on Monroe street early Thursday morning, following an illness of several months. She has been in failing health for several years, however, and has made repeated efforts to regain her health, having been at the Battle Creek (Mich) Sanitarium, and having had two operations performed upon her at the Methodist hospital in Indianapolis, but to no avail.
Miss Brady, who was one of the most popular women in Rochester, was born in Syracuse, Ind., on July 26, 1883 and moved, with her parents, to Fulton county in 1887, where she has lived ever since.
She was a prominent member of the Evangelical church, having sung in the choir, and being a member of the Sunday school class of that church ever since her residence in this city.
She was employed by Dr. WILSON for 17 years, and had also worked for Val RAUSCH for some time, being forced to quit her employment because of failing health.
Miss Brady was a member of a family of eight children, three of whom died in infancy. Her mother and father are also dead.
She is survived by two brothers, Norman BRADY, of Waukegan, Ill., and John BRADY, of Mishawaka, Ind., and three sisters, Mrs. Paul EMRICK, of Lafayette, Mrs. Frank KUMLER, of Rochester, and Mrs. Earle MILLER, also of this city.
Funeral arrangements will be made later.

Mrs. A. M. BALL, formerly of this city, who moved to Coffeyville, Kansas, nine years ago, died Tuesday following an operation which was performed at that place, according to information received here Thursday.
The burial took place at Coffeyville Thursday.
Mrs. Ball is survived by her husband and two daughters, Minnie [BALL] and Blanche BALL, who live at home.
Three brothers also survive her, Frank WALTERS, of Macy; Wesley WALTERS, of South Bend, and Samuel WALTERS, of Indianapolis.

Friday, June 25, 1920

Elizer SAGE, age 78, of Loyal, died in a hospital at Rensselaer, Ind., at 7:30 Wednesday morning, following an operation which had been performed Monday. Mr. Sage, who was a veteran of the civil war, has been afflicted with liver trouble for some time, but it was only in the past few weeks that his condition became critical, and it was necessary to take him to the hospital where the operation was performed in a vain attempt to save his life.
Following the operation, Mr. Sage rallied somewhat, and high hopes were held for his

recovery, but Tuesday night he suffered a relapse and died the following morning.
The deceased has been a resident of this county for the past three years, moving here from Minnesota, where he had resided for one year, having moved there from Rensselaer.
Mr. Sage was an uncle of the late Russell SAGE, of New York. He is reported to have received about $100,000 of the Sage estate.
He is survived by his wife and three children, Russell [SAGE] and Kermit SAGE, who reside in this county and one daughter who lives at Rensselaer, Ind.
The body will be taken to Joliet, Ill., for burial.

The funeral of Miss Faye BRADY, who died at her home on Monroe street, Thursday morning, will be held from the residence at three o'clock Saturday afternoon. Burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery, with Rev. E. Q. LAUDERMAN in charge of the services.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Ransom DULL, South Pontiac street, which only lived about an hour, died Thursday afternoon. The child was buried Friday morning at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, June 26, 1920

The body of William REECE, who died in Liverpool, England, September 4, 1918 while a member of the American Expeditionary Forces, will be shipped to Winamac for burial, according to letters received from his mother, Mrs. Eva T. REECE, of Danville, Ill., and formerly a resident of this county. William Reece was the youngest son of Isaac N. and Eva REECE and died of bronchial pneumonia while serving his country in the world war. The body will be buried in the Bugbee cemetery, beside that of his father, with full military honors. This is the young man, who when he enlisted, gave his residence as Kewanna and who was included in the gold star list from this county. At the time of his enlistment he was working on a farm near Kewanna. The American Legion post in this city when distributing the French honor certificates had considerable trouble in finding his mother but sent a certificate to her, at her Danville, Illinois, address.

Monday, June 28, 1920

[no obits]

Tuesday, June 29, 1920

John Thomas KEEL, age 75, life long resident of Fulton county, died at his home on East Fourteenth St., at 10:25 o'clock Monday night following an illness of several months. The immediate cause of his death is given as hardening of the spinal column and hardening of the arteries, with complications from rheumatism from which he had been suffering for many years.
Mr. Keel was born on a farm in this county on June 25, 1845. In 1868 he was married, his wife surviving. There are also five children who survive. They are Stella [KEEL] and Bertha Elizabeth KEEL who live at home; Chas. KEEL, of this city; Omar KEEL, of Fulton county and Solomon KEEL, of Rochester.
After his marriage in 1868 Mr. Keel and his wife lived on the farm until 12 years ago, when they moved to their home on East Fourteenth street where they have made their home ever since.

No arrangements have been made for the funeral.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983: John T. KEEL m. Sarah A. COLLINS, May 10, 1868]

John DAY, age 70, who has been an inmate of the County farm for the past five years, died at 8:25 Monday night from a complication of diseases. Mr. Day has been in failing health for some years but his condition had not been regarded serious until only a week ago when he took a turn for the worse.
Mr. Day has no relatives, with the exception of several nephews and nieces. Nell McCARTY, of Macy, a niece, has been notified and will take charge of the body. Burial at the Green Oak cemetery Wednesday.
The body will be layed at rest beside those of his wife and one child.
The deceased was well known in this city having lived in Fulton county all his life. For several years he ran a grocery store at Green Oak, later moving to this city, where he operated a saloon. At one time he also owned a meat marked in the north part of Rochester.

Wednesday, June 30, 1920

Jacob FOGLE, age 79, died Tuesday afternoon at his residence, 502 Jefferson street, of complications which terminated in brights disease. He was a pioneer citizen of this county, coming here in 1876.
Mr. Fogle was born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, December 7, 1840 and was one of nine children born to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey FOGLE. When the Civil war broke out he enlisted with Company I of the 13th Pennsylvania cavalry and served for three years with this unit.
When he returned from war, Mr. Fogle was united in marriage with Mary FOSNER, and moved to this county in 1876 settling on a farm a half a mile north of this city, where they lived for ten years. They then moved to Rochester, where he entered the lumber business, which he followed for a number of years. He then moved to North Manchester, where he entered the furniture business with Mr. Charles WALTERS. He disposed of this about ten years ago and returned to this city.
Eighteen years ago Mr. Fogle's wife died and he married Mrs. Anna DUNKLE. No children were born to either union, but Mr. Fogle raised two children, Olive FOSNER and Madeline LAMB. Mrs. Anna DUNKLE FOGLE survives him as does three brothers, Mathias [FOGLE], of Montoursville, Pa., Sam [FOGLE] of Plattesville, Mich., and Charles [FOGLE], of Williamsport, Pa.
Early in his life Mr. Fogle united with the Methodist church and was also a member of the McClung Post G.A.R. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon from his late residence on Jefferson street with Rev. CRAIG of the Methodist church in charge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thusday, July 1, 1920

Mrs. Frank MOLLENCUPP, age 30, died late Wednesday night as the result of child birth. The Mollencupps live on West 13th street. Mrs. Mollencupp was born in this city June 15, 1890 and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph YEAZEL. Her maiden name was Eliza Emaline YEAZEL. Her parents are both dead. Mrs. Mollencupp, besides her husband, is survived by two

brothers, Fred [YEAZEL] and Clint YEAZEL of this city. Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, July 2, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Charles WALTERS, of North Manchester, were in this city Thursday to attend the funeral of Jacob FOGLE.

Saturday, July 3, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Ross MOORE, of Pinicle, Montana, have advised Harrison and Lamborn, undertakers of Kewanna, that they have received notice from the government that the body of their son, Don [MOORE], who was killed in the late world war in France had been shipped to this country. The notified the undertakers to take care of the same when it arrives and notify them.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F., Union Twp.: Donald J. MOORE, Montana Pvt 362 Inf 91 Div, Oct 4, 1918; Also see, Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Births, 1882-1920: Donald J. MOORE born to Roscoe (Milton R.?) MOORE and May BLAUSSER (Lillie N. BLASSER?) MOORE, May 24, 1897]

Monday, July 5, 1920

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, July 6, 1920 to Friday, July 9, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, July 10, 1920

Rochester and the community was shocked Saturday morning when the news of the death of A. J. DILLON, 62, prominent citizen and well known insurance man, from apoplexy was announced. Mr. Dillon died suddenly about 4 o'clock Saturday morning while in bed at his home on South Main Street.
Mr. Dillon had been in his usual health during the day and had spent the evening at the lake at the picnic of the Country Club. On arriving at his home he complained of a pain in his chest. He seemed unable to get to sleep but according to Mrs. Dillon who was with him he finally dropped off to sleep. Shortly afterwards she noticed that he had difficulty in breathing and when a short time later she became alarmed at his being so quiet she turned on the light. Finding she could not arouse him she immediately called Dr. LORING from next door. However, it is evident that Mr. Dillon had already passed away as Dr. Loring pronounced him dead when he arrived. Mrs. Dillon's mother, Mrs. Eliza EDWARDS, was sleeping in the next room at the time.
Mr. Dillon had not been in the best of health for the last several years and at various times had trouble with his heart. He had taken treatments at Battle Creek and several sanitariums and several years ago he and Mrs. Dillon traveled to Alaska to benefit his health. Recently however he had seemingly been feeling much better and his death came as a great shock to his family and friends.
Mr. Dillon was one of the leading citizens of Rochester and was well known over the state, he being the State Agent of the Continental Insurance Company. He was a director in the First National Bank and had several other business interests here. He was a member of the local chapters of the I.O.O.F., the Knights of Pythias and the Maccabees, and one of the prime movers in the Rochester Country Club. He was also a member of the Columbia Club at Indianapolis and the Northwestern Insurance Association. While never taking a prominent part in politics he was a staunch republican.
Andrew J. DILLON was born at Maxinkuckee, May 16, 1859, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver P. DILLON. He was one of ten children all but two of whom have passed on before him. He attended the local grammar school and then went to Franklin College and later to Indiana University at Bloomington, where he graduated. He was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. On July 5, 1893, he was united in marriage with Miss Arwilda EDWARDS of this city.
After leaving college he was elected County Superintendent, which office he held for four years. He then became engaged in the hardware business for the next three years at which time he became the agent for the Continental Insurance Company. In 1891 he was appointed Special Agent and shortly afterwards became State Agent, which position he held until his death. His success as an insurance man was marked from the beginning and he rose rapidly from an agent to the highest position in the state.
He is survived by his wife, one sister, Mrs. Ira BABCOCK of this city, and one brother, Cass DILLON.
The funeral will be held at the home at 2:30 Monday afternoon, Rev. W. J. NIVEN officiating. Burial will be at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Belle V. CARROLL, age 34, the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. THOMPSON, died at the home of her parents in this city at 8:20 o'clock Friday nite, following an illness of over a year. The death was caused by complications of diseases.
Mrs. Carroll was born at Tiosa on March 24, 1886. She graduated from the common schools of Rochester and then went to Indianapolis where she took a course at the Business University in that city, where she graduated.
Following her graduation from the Business University, she accepted a position as assistant matron at the Boy's Reform School, at Plainfield, Indiana. She held this position for more than three years, resigning it to accept a position as stenographer and clerk in the Crane Plumbing Company at Indianapolis. She was connected with this firm for over nine years, resigning in 1913 when she was married.
On January 23, 1913 she was married to C. J. CARROLL, of Indianapolis. Her husband died on June 6, 1917. Following the death of her husband, Mrs. Carroll returned to the home of her parents here to remain until seven months ago when she went to Colorado.
While in Colorado her condition became critical and she was forced to return to her home here arriving on June 30.
Persons who have been with Mrs. Carroll during her illness say that she was patient until the last. She was a life long member of the Methodist church of this city, and it is said she gained great comfort from her faith during the last days of her life when it is said she realized fully that she could never regain her strength.
She is survived by her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Henry THOMPSON, three brothers, W. I. THOMPSON, of Jackson, Michigan, Charles THOMPSON, of Waterman, Ill., and Ancel

THOMPSON, of Indianapolis; and two sisters, Mrs. Ora NEWHOUSE, of Argos, and Stella THOMPSON, who lives at home.
Funeral at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon from the residence. Rev. G. F. CRAIG of the Methodist church in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, July 12, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Cass DILLON of Chicago and Mr. and Mrs. Charles EDWARDS of Indianapolis were among the relatives here today to attend the funeral of A. J. DILLON.

Tuesday, July 13, 1920 to Wednesday, July 14, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, July 15, 1920

Silas FISHER, age 66, a prominent resident of Newcastle township, died Thursday at his home one and one-half mile north of Talma, after a lingering illness extending over two years. Mr. Fisher was born in this county April 11, 1854, his parents being Willis and Malinda FISHER. He had several brothers and sisters. While quite a young man he married Miss Lamanda LOVE, to which union seven children were born. Five of these, with the widow survive. They are James [FISHER] and William [FISHER], Mrs. John MILLER, Mrs. Charles FIELDS and Mrs. Isaac BURKETT, all of whom live in Fulton county. Mr. Fisher was a life long democrat and also a member of the Christian church. Funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Talma Christian church with burial in the cemetery at that place.

Word was received in this city Thursday morning of the death of George RIDINGER. Mr. Ridinger was born in Marshall county August 17, 1865 and died at his home in Franklin township, Kosciusko county early Thursday morning after a short illness. The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery at Akron.

Mrs. J. Y. CAMPBELL, wife of Dr. J. Y. CAMPBELL, of Chicago, died Wednesday in that city. The funeral will be held at Bourbon on Friday at two o'clock. Mrs. Campbell was formerly from Rochester.

Mrs. Lee ARNSBERGER went Wednesday to Peru to attend the funeral of Mrs. S. S. WRIGHT, of Indianapolis.

Mr. and Mrs. Otto CARLSON, Mrs. Wylie BONINE and Mrs. C. D. SHOBE went today to Peru to attend the funeral of their aunt, Mrs. S. M. WRIGHT, who died at her home in Indianapolis Tuesday.

Friday, July 16, 1920

An account of the death of George RIDINGER, prominent farmer of near Akron, was carried in the Sentinel Thursday evening. Since that time additional facts have been learned. Mr. Ridinger had just returned from meeting an Erie train on which his daughter was returning from Chicago

with her husband, they having been married last Saturday. After placing his team in the barn, Mr. Ridinger walked into the house and sat down in a chair to rest and died within a few minutes. The coroner pronouced his death caused by heart trouble.

Saturday, July 17, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, July 19, 1920

John Jacob CUNNINGHAM, age 30, died Saturday afternoon at his home 556 East 8th street, of dropsy and leakage of the heart. Mr. Cunningham was born February 2, 1890, in Logansport, and was the son of James and Harriet CUNNINGHAM.
When seventeen years of age he came to this city to live. He was a laborer and was last employed by Clay SHEETS, at his factory north of this city. Mr. Cunningham was a member of the United Brethren church. He was never married. He is survived by his father, five brothers and sisters, Mrs. Ella EYTCHESON, Mrs. Della SWANGO, Mae [CUNNINGHAM], Joseph CUNNINGHAM and John CUNNINGHAM, all of this city. The funeral was held Monday afternoon at the Baptist church, Rev. NIVEN in charge, with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, July 20, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 21, 1920

Mrs. Julius ROWLEY, 54, died at her home on south Madison street at 5:30 Wednesday morning as the result of cancer of the stomach. Mrs. Rowley was taken to Woodlawn about ten days ago for an operation but when the serious nature of her affliction was discovered physicians announced that nothing could be done. She was taken to her home where she gradually grew weaker and sank quietly to the end. She had been ill for the last four years, and at one time went to the Mayo brothers for treatment. Mrs. Rowley was well known in the city and country.
Nettie Bell BROWN, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John B. BROWN, was born near Delphi. She was one of eight children. When five years of age her parents moved to this county and resided on a farm at the north of the lake and she has made her home in this community ever since.
She was united in marriage to Julius ROWLEY, at Louisville, Kentucky about nine years ago and since that time she lived at the Rowley home on Madison street.
She is survived by two sisters, Elizabeth CULLER, of Indianapolis, Nell THURBER, of New York, and one brother, William BROWN, of Rochester. Mrs. Rowley was a sister of the late Isaac Washington BROWN, the famous bird and bee man.
The funeral will be held at three o'clock at the home on Madison street Thursday afternoon. Rev. G. F. CRAIG will officiate. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Ella KERN, 73, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ora FISHER, in Warsaw. She was the mother of William KERN, of Athens, and had often visited in this city. Her death was due to old age and complication of diseases, which followed an illness of many months. She is survived by five children, Mrs. Ora FISHER, of Warsaw; Mrs. William ZIMMER, of near Warsaw; Mrs. Lillie BLACK, of New York City; Mrs. W. R. ENGARD, of Philadelphia, and William KERN, of Athens. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon with interment in the Warsaw cemetery.

Thursday, July 22, 1920 to Friday, July 23, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, July 24, 1920

[Special to The Sentinel re: Mrs. Blanche MOTTL murder trial]

Monday, July 26, 1920

Nancy CURTIS, age 84, died at the home of her grandson, Vine CURTIS, on East Ninth street, Monday morning at 10:00 o'clock, following an illness of over a year. Death was due to senility.
Mrs. Curtis was born in Stark county, Ohio in 1836, but has been a resident of this county for more than fifty years, moving here when she was 34 years of age.
While Mrs. Curtis has been in failing health for over a year the news of her death was a distinct shock to her many friends.
She is survived by one son, Edwin CURTIS, of Akron; 3 grandchildren, Mark [CURTIS] and Vine CURTIS, of this city, and Mrs. Buelah FOUST, and four great-grandchildren.
Funeral Wednesday afternoon from the residence at 2:30, with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Noah CURTIS, Jan 14, 1827 - Feb. 12, 1909; Nancy CURTIS, Aug 27, 1837 - Aug 20, 1920]

Mrs. Mary Jane HIATT, 69, died Saturday afternoon at Woodlawn hospital following an operation for the removal of a tumor.
Mrs. Hiatt [Mary Jane WALES] was the only daughter of George and Mary WALES and was born in this county in Richland township, March 13, 1851. She had one brother, James WALES, who died about three years ago.
In 1874 she married Charles HIATT. To this union one son was born, Chauncey HIATT, who lives in Richland township.
Mrs. Hiatt was a member of the Evangelical church and an active worker. Funeral Tuesday with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, July 27, 1920

Mrs. Susan BLACKBURN, age 85, a life long resident of this county, died at her home south of this city at five o'clock Tuesday morning of a complication of diseases and senility.
Mrs. Blackburn was born July 10, 1835 south of this city. She obtained her early education in

the public schools of Fulton County. She has a host of friends in the county who were greatly shocked to hear of her death, altho her condition has been regarded as critical for the past two months.
She is survived by two sons, Henry O. BLACKBURN and William BLACKBURN, and two daughters, Mrs. Letha SHELTON and Mrs. Mollie ROBINSON.
Funeral services from the home south of this city Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock with burial in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

Wednesday, July 28, 1920

John SHAW, of Williamsport, who is well known in this city as a reesult of having camped in this neighborhood for many years, died Tuesday at his home, according to word reaching this city. It is said that Mr. Shaw was over 75 years of age.
Few particulars of his life could be learned, altho it was ascertained that he had been a soldier in the Union armies during the Civil War and spent his winters at the soldier's home at Marion, Ind.
According to Leo ZIMMERMAN, Shaw has one son, but his whereabouts cannot be learned. It is understood, however, that the son is living somewhere in the state of Michigan, but goes under an assumed name. Efforts to locate the son have proved futile, so far as could be learned.

Mrs. Lillian LEAVENS, of Milwaukee, well known in Rochester, where she had visited every year since she left here, died suddenly at Green Bay, Wisconsin, according to word received Wednesday by Mrs. Frank HOFFMAN, her cousin. Mrs. Leavens was born and reared in this city and was the daughter of Frank B. ERNSPERGER, leading merchant of Rochester many years ago.

Mrs. Susan BLACKBURN, widow of the late Isaac BLACKBURN, was born at Canal Winchester, Ohio, July 12, 1835. Departed this life at her home near Mt. Zion, July 27, 1920. She was 85 years and 15 days of age.
She [Susan ALSPACH] was the daughter of Henry and Deborah ALSPACH both deceased.
Death was caused by complications due to old age.
She leaves four children to mourn her departure, Mrs. Aletha SHELTON, of near Mt. Zion, Mrs. Mary E. ROBINSON, of Rochester, and Henry O. [BLACKBURN] and William BLACKBURN, living near her home. She leaves 13 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren and two brothers and two sisters living, Mrs. Louisa MILLER, of Macy; Mrs. Sarah MILLER, of Lincoln, Neb., and Sylvester [ALSPACH] and Ezra ALSPACH, of Rochester and two brothers, and one sister deceased. She was a faithful member of the Methodist church. A good and loving mother and neighbor to all who knew her.
Funeral Thursday afternoon, at 2 o'clock, Rev. F. V. NORRIS of Culver in charge. Burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.

Thursday, July 29, 1920

Eli ALSPACH, of Peru, came Thursday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Susan BLACKBURN.

Friday, July 30, 1920

The body of Clifford K. BENNETT, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. D. BENNETT, formerly of this city, but now of Los Angeles, California, has been shipped from France, where the young man died while a member of the American Expeditionary Forces. This is the first case from this city, where the body of a boy killed in France has been shipped here for burial.
Bennett, who was 25 years of age, died of pneumonia while serving with the American Forces in France during the World War. The body will be buried in the I.O.O.F. cemetery in this city.
As soon as the body arrived in this country Alex RUH, who was a close friend of the family, will be notified by the government officials and will have charge of the funeral arrangements.
Val Zimmerman has offered to conduct the funeral free of cost. It is understood that he has offered to conduct the funeral of any young man killed in France and brot back to this country without charge.
Bennett is survived by his wife, Mrs. C. K. BENNETT, who resides at Stella, Miss., and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. D. BENNETT, of Los Angeles, California.

Mrs. Sidney S. CURTIS and Mrs. Lafe MOONSHOWER of Hammond, who were here to attend the funeral of Grandma CURTIS have returned to their home. Mrs. J. McPHERIN of South Bend who was also here for the funeral has returned to her home.

Mrs. Thomas SAVAGE, 52, of Macy, died Friday morning at 7:30 o'clock at Woodlawn hospital of pernicious anemia. She was well known in this vicinity having been born and reared in Fulton county. She had been ill for some time and her death had been expected.
Ella A. BABCOCK was born in Fulton county south of Rochester 52 years ago, the daughter of George H. and Susanna BABCOCK, both of whom have preceded her in death. She was married to Thomas SAVAGE and since then has lived with her husband in Macy.
She is survived by her husband, three children, Mrs. Marjorie ELLIS, Sidney SAVAGE and William SAVAGE. Two sisters, Mrs. Rettie SMITH of Amherst, S.D. and Mrs. Lilly HATCH of Whiting, and two brothers, Lot M. BABCOCK of Amherst, S.D., and A. E. BABCOCK of this city also survive.
The funeral will be held at the home in Macy but no time has yet been set.

Word was received Thursday of the death of Mrs. John WARREN, formerly of this city, at the home of her son in South Bend on July 26. Her husband died early in June.
Sarah E. THOMPSON, daughter of John and Rachael THOMPSON, was born in Dayton, Ohio, May 5, 1859. She then moved with her parents to Plymouth and was married to Jonathan WARREN in this city in 1876. To this union was born twelve children, one of whom died in infancy. Those remaining are John [WARREN], Wilbur [WARREN], George [WARREN], Arthur [WARREN] and Frank [WARREN], Mrs. Grace MOHLER, Mrs. Nellie FREAR, Mrs. Almedea HUDSON, Mrs. Prudence COPP, Mrs. Sarminta PERSONETT and Mrs. Estelle HAMMAN.
Mrs. Warren succumbed after an illness of about four years. She was a member of the Church of the Brethren at Salem, Indiana, and many friends remain to mourn her loss.
The body was brought to Rochester Thursday afternoon, where the funeral was held, the Rev. APPLEMAN of Plymouth officiating. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, July 31, 1920 to Monday, August 2, 1920

[no obits]

Tuesday, August 3, 1920

Word was received in this city Tuesday telling of the death of Paul HETZNER, age 90, thot to be one of the oldest citizens in this county, at the home of his half-sister in Lansing, Mich., Sunday night.
While Charles HETZNER, son of the deceased, has known his father has been in ill health for some time, was greatly shocked when he received a telegram telling of the death of his father at Lansing, where the aged man was being cared for by his sister.
Mr. Hetzner was born in Germany in the year 1830, moving to the United States when quite a young man. At first his family settled in New York, but later moved to Miami county where they stayed for a few years, then moving to Fulton county where Mr. Hetzner has made his home for about 50 years.
The death, according to the telegram, was caused by senility. Mr. Hetzner has always been an active worker despite his advanced age. The following eight children survive him: Albert HETZNER, George HETZNER, Charles HETZNER, Benjamin HETZNER, William HETZNER, Frank HETZNER, Nettie HETZNER and Clara HETZNER.
The body will be brought to this city from Lansing Tuesday. Funeral arrangements will not be announced until after the arrival of the body.

Mrs. J. WALTZ, 29, of near Fulton, died at the Woodlawn hospital Monday evening following an operation for goiter. Mrs. Waltz had been ill for some time but her death was very unexpected. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dave HART, who live south of the city, and is survived by a husband, three small children, father and mother, and several brothers and sisters. The funeral will be held at the home north of Fulton, Wednesday afternoon, at two-thirty o'clock.
[NOTE: See Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: I. Jay WALTZ, father, 1887-1954; Nellie HART WALTZ, mother, 1889-1921]

Mrs. Olive BLACKBURN, 68, wife of the late John G. BLACKBURN a former resident of Fulton county, died at the home of Chester HALL in Peru at 1:30 Monday morning of - - -
- - - - -. She had been ill for about three months.
Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn lived east of Rochester most of their lives and left here about fifteen years ago. She will be remembered by her many neighbors in that vicinity.
She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Mary MOTE, and two sons, William BLACKBURN, of Peru, and Perry BLACKBURN, of Huntington. Her husband and one son, Ed [BLACKBURN], preceded her in death.
Funeral Wednesday afternoon at the Evangelical church.

Charles Edward MOORE, aged 69 years, former Rochester and Miami county citizen, died at the Good Samaritan hospital at Kokomo, Friday. Death was due to paralysis from which he was stricken last Thursday afternoon near the Martin Hotel on South Main street, Kokomo. He fell, striking his head on the steps leading to the second story of the building, cutting a deep gash in the back of his head. He was taken to the hospital at once but never regained consciousness. The

funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the home of the brother, Otto MOORE, 1601 South Buckeye street, Kokomo. The burial was in Crown Point cemetery.
Mr. Moore was born in Miami county, October 5th, 1850, later moving to Rochester. He moved to Kokomo several years ago. During the past few months his health had failed rapidly. Besides the brother, Otto MOORE, of Kokomo, a sister, Mrs. Ida HOEL, of Colorado, survives.

Wednesday, August 4, 1920

The funeral of Mrs. T. Y. SAVAGE was held at the home Sunday morning. Interment in Plainview cemetery, west of town. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, August 5, 1920 to Saturday, August 7, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, August 9, 1920

Mrs. Nancy DAVIS, 48, wife of Levi DAVIS, who lives about four miles north of Leiters Ford, is dead as the result of an accident which happened on the road near their home Saturday night, when a loose horse plunged through the windshield of their automobile and so injured her that she died within a half hour.
Mr. Davis and his wife were driving west in their automobile about eight o'clock Saturday evening just as it was growing dark. At the same time coming east on the road was O. C. HARTLE, the son of Walter HARTLE, of that neighborhood, driving several loose horses ahead of his automobile. The horses were running before the machine at a brisk rate. Davis, who saw them approaching thru the dusk, drove his car to one side of the road and proceeded slowly. As far as he and Mrs. Davis were able to see, all of the horses were passing them, when, suddenly without warning, one of the animals which neither of them had seen plunged into their car. Hartle unaware of the accident did not stop.
While it occurred so quickly that neither of the occupants knew just how it happened, it is thought that the horse hit the radiator of the car and plunged on thru the windshield.
The horse was out and gone in a moment. Mrs. Davis at once complained that something had struck her in the stomach but she talked for several minutes and did not seem to be in great pain. The only mark to be found on her was a bruise on the forehead where the glass had struck. However, she suddenly became worse and soon became unconscious. Ira COWEN was passing in his pony cart and the injured lady was placed in this and hurried towards town. Just as they neared the Tippecanoe river bridge she expired. She was taken on to Dr. OVERMYER's office, where death was pronounced due to a hemorrhage of the stomach.
One of the horses that Hartle was driving was blind and it is thought that this is the one which struck the automobile.
Besides her husband, Mrs. Davis is survived by four sons, Guy [DAVIS], Norman [DAVIS], Emery [DAVIS] and Dale [DAVIS], by one sister, Mrs. Ora O'BLENIS, of Rochester, and brothers Joe COWEN, of Mishawaka, William [COWEN] and George COWEN, of Leiters Ford, Alf [COWEN] and Frank COWEN, of Argos.
Funeral at the Mt. Hope church Tuesday afternoon with burial at Leiters Ford, Rev. VERMILLION officiating.

Rudy BRYANT, 73, died very suddenly at 12:00 o'clock Monday at his home, 1121 South Pontiac street. Mr. Bryant was taken ill Monday morning about 10:00 o'clock while doing work for the city on the street and his son was called and he was taken to his home.
Later a physician was summoned and it was not until after the doctor had left that Mr. Bryant passed away. He had been in poor health for several years but was always able to work. The Bryant family moved to this city two years ago last March and until this time lived on a farm northeast of Rochester.
Besides his wife, Mrs. Harriet BRYANT, there survive three children, Wilbert A. [BRYANT] and Evelyn [BRYANT], of this city, and Mrs. Harry B. LONG, of Indiana Harbor, Ind., and one sister, Mrs. Simon BYBEE, of North Judson.
Funeral arrangements will be made later.

Tuesday, August 10, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, August 11, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. James KOFFEL and the BRYANT sisters attended a funeral at Leiters Ford Monday.

Thursday, August 12, 1920 to Monday, August 16, 1920

[no obits]

Tuesday, August 17, 1920 to Wednesday, August 18, 1920

The body of Howared C. STAHL, the first soldier from Kosciusko county who gave his life in the world war, arrived in New York from France Sunday. The body will be shipped to Warsaw and buried at the Ryerson cemetery at Pierceton. Stahl was one of the youngest volunteers in the Rainbow division.

Thursday, August 19, 1920

Thomas Atwell SHAFFER, age 61, of this city, died at the Northern Hospital for the Insane at Logansport Wednesday afternoon, following a stroke of apoplexy. Mr. Shaffer was well known in this city, having been born and raised in Fulton county, and was engaged in the clothing business in this city the greater part of his life. He was last employed at the Racket Clothing store, working there until his health failed several months ago.
Mr. Shaffer was born on September 2, 1859, and was the son of Nelson and Lucile SHAFFER. After attending the public schools in this city he entered the clothing business.
On September 2, 1898 he married Letitia JONES, of Richland Center, Wisconsin.
He is survived by his widow, one daughter, by a former marriage, one half-sister, Dolly SIEGFRED, of this city, and three half-brothers, William BROWN, of Pontiac, Michigan, William BROWN [sic] and Dr. Archie BROWN, of this city.
The funeral will be held Friday afternoon from the home of Dr. Archie Brown on Jefferson street at 2 o'clock. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery and Rev. ASCHENHORT will be in charge of the services.

Friday, August 20, 1920

Ernest BROWN, age 40, a druggist of Lafayette, met death in the lake early Friday afternoon by drowning. It is thot that Brown, who it is said, was an excellent swimmer, was seized with cramps, which caused his death. According to witnesses of the accident, Brown died with hardly a struggle.
According to Elizabeth DEGRIEF, who lives in the cottage next to the Brown's, and who is also from Lafayette, the dead man had just finished eating a hearty dinner, and went at once from the house to the lake, running to the end of the pier, jumped into a boat and pulled out beyond the line of weeds and plunged into the water.
It is thot that he was seized by cramps, for he made a futile effort to reach his boat, which was blown beyond his grasp by a heavy puff of wind. When he found that he could not reach the boat, Brown made an attempt to float until aid could reach him, but sank, almost without a struggle.
F. J. DEGRIEF, who seeing the plight of his friend, went to the end of the pier and jumped into a boat, swiftly pulling out to where his friend was, but before he could reach him Brown sank, and never came to the surface.
It was learned that Brown and his wife, who was also at the lake, were intending to motor to Culver Friday afternoon, and it is thot that the dead man went into the lake to cool off before starting on the trip.
Mr. Brown came to the lake last Sunday and was occupying the Fatima cottage.
At the time this paper went to press, efforts to locate the body of the drowned man had proved unavailing altho nearly 50 persons were engaged in dragging the lake, and diving for the body.

Saturday, August 21, 1920

The body of Ernest BROWN, of Lafayette, who met death by drowning on the east side of Lake Manitou, was recovered at nine o'clock last nite, after nearly nine hours of futile search. The body was located in five feet of water, about 15 feet from where he was supposed to have sunk.
The body was located by Dick STEIN, Walter HOUSE, Omar WAGONER, Mac DRAFT and Ray COOK. The men were aided in their search by a Delco light furnished by Grove Brothers. Stein was the first to see the body, catching a glimpse of the hand as the light was lowered into the water.
According to persons who viewed the body after it was raised from the water, Brown did not meet his death as a result of cramps, but evidently from heart failure, as no water was found in his lungs, and his expression was natural. It is said that Brown's arms were folded across his breast and his legs were not cramped in the least.
It is said the widow is in danger of having a nervous breakdown as a result of the accident, altho she was reported to be somewhat better early Saturday morning.
The body was taken from the Zimmerman funeral parlors to Lafayette Saturday morning and it is thot the burial will be Monday.

Charles TRENT, 14 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert TRENT, of Rich Valley, was drowned Wednesday afternoon while attending the Rich Valley United Brethren Church Picnic at Lukens Lake. The boy, it is thot, stepped into a deep hole in the lake and was overcome by cramps, for his body sank at once and did not rise.

Monday, August 23, 1920

George W. KESSLER, age 80, well known citizen of Fulton county, died at the home of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Etta KESSLER, on south Monroe street, Sunday evening, after a long illness. Death was caused by senility and complication of diseases.
The deceased was born in Henry county, Ind., on November 9, 1839, and was the son of Ulrich and Mary KESSLER. He was one of a large family. He resided in the county of his birth until the Civil War broke out in 1861, at which time he enlisted, and served one year with the army in Tennessee. At the end of his first year's service he was overcome with ill health, and after spending some time in a hospital, was discharged from the army, unfit for further military service.
On October 31, 1861, he married Sarah MARTINDALE, of Hancock county, Ind. Of the ten children of Mr. Kessler, only two are now alive. Shortly after his marriage, Mr. Kessler and his family moved to Miami county, where they resided for several years. From Miami county they moved to Fulton county, where they have resided ever since. Upon the death of his wife six years ago, he moved to the home of his son, Dell KESSLER, where he was living at the time of his death.
Mr. Kessler has been a lifelong democrat and for the past 30 years has been an active member of the Baptist church.
He is survived by one son, M. C. KESSLER, of Detroit, Mich., one daughter, Mrs. Chas. JACKSON, northwest of this city, one half-sister, Mrs. Lawson BYBEE, northeast of Rochester and a number of grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held from the residence of Mrs. Etta Kessler, 1130 Monroe street, Thursday afternoon, burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, August 24, 1920

The burial of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. H. W. SHERRARD, of Culver, took place at Corinth cemetery, near Twelve Mile, on Aug. 18.

Wednesday, August 25, 1920

Private funeral services of Gabriel R. SUMMERS, owner of the South Bend News-Times and former state senator, who died here Saturday morning from heart failure, were held Monday afternoon at his residence. Bishop John Hazen WHITE, assisted by Robert J. LONG, pastor of the St. James Episcopal church, officiated. Burial was in the mausoleum in Highland cemetery. Many messages of condolence have been received by members of the Summers family from many parts of the state from associates of the deceased during his long period of public life. Mr. Summers, who was one of the leading citizens of South Bend, was the father-in-law of Joe STEPHENSON, formerly of this city. Mr. Stephenson is the publisher of the News-Times, which was owned by Mr. Summers.

Thursday, August 26, 1920

Minnie CONGER spent the day in Macy, where she went to attend the funeral of a relative.

Friday, August 27, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, August 28, 1920

George HICKLE, 71, prominent Kewanna citizen, well known throughout this section, and former president of the Kewanna Town Council, died at his home on West Main St., Monday afternoon, after a long illness from rectal cancer.

Monday, August 30, 1920

John SANDERS, age 20, formerly employed at the Sentinel, and Mabel McINTIRE, were killed late Saturday nite when the machine in which they were riding collided with one driven by A. C. HAMMERSBAUGH, of near Kokomo, on the Barrett road, near the CARRITHERS farm. In the car with Miss McIntire and Sanders was Geo. McKEE, who is employed at the Sentinel, and Sarah BURNS. The car in which the two met death was owned by McKee and Vern SANDERS, a brother of the dead man.
The two cars, both being driven at a speed of about 20 miles an hour, as testified to by all survivors, locked left front wheels. The Sanders car's left front wheel was smashed down, causing the car to stand on the left front corner, at which time all occupants were thrown out. McKee and the Burns girl, in the rear seat probably given greater impetus, were thrown between 15 and 20 feet, but Sanders and the McIntire girl, in the front seat, were thrown just to the edge of the stone road and as the car turned on over, in what must have been a somersault, it struck them and they rolled on down into the 10 foot ditch, where it rested with all wheels in the air.
Hammersbaugh, whose car was badly smashed about the front end -- the front wheel and axle driven under the chassis and the radiator and fender broken -- hurried out to the other machine and asked McKee, who was by that time standing up, if everybody was allright. McKee told Hammersbaugh the Burns girl, with him, was not hurt and he had seen Sanders, who lay on the edge of the road, roll over once and start to roll over a second time. They then both stepped over to the McIntire girl, who was lying still and unconsciious a few feet away from Sanders.
They picked her up, and a crowd having gathered in the meantime, placed her in a machine, which started for the hospital in this city. Upon arrival at the hospital she was found to be dead, but was living when placed in the car. Sanders was put in another machine and Dr. King was called, but he died just a few minutes after the doctor reached the hospital. Both bodies were taken to the Hoover morgue from the hospital and the parents of the two dead young people summoned.
McKee and the Burns girl were also taken into town but they were able to walk by themselves altho suffering badly from shock. The Burns girl was skinned about the knees and suffered a number of cuts and bruises about the body. McKee was also bruised and has a wrenched or sprained right arm. Sanders' death was due to a fractured skull, the left side having been caved in, practically flattened out. According to Coroner Archie STINSON, of Athens, the girl's death was due to an accident and a spinal fracture at the base of her skull. He did not return a finding in the case of Sanders because Dr. King had been in attendance at the time of death. Hammersbaugh and the young lady with wim were uninjured.
No blame was placed by the coroner. The McIntire girl is the daughter of Clarence and Nora

McINTIRE, of the Mt. Zion neighborhood. She was born April 24, 1902, three miles east of Athens, where she lived with her parents, receiving a common school education and later moving to the present home of her parents. She is survived by a brother, Lee [McINTIRE], and a sister, Etta [McINTIRE]. For the past year, she and the Burns girl had been employed at the Arlington hotel.
In a statement to the coroner, McKee said that both Sanders and Hammersbaugh were driving at about 20 miles an hour; this statement was corroborated by Hammersbaugh. McKee said the lights on the Ford were rather bright but not necessarily attribute the accident to that. The lights on the Sanders car were Presto Lights and not very bright. The car was a right hand drive, which McKee said he believes caused Sanders to misjudge the distance between the two machines.
The funeral service for Miss McIntire will be held at the Mt. Hope church, in Athens, Tuesday morning at ten o'clock, and the burial will be in the Mt. Hope cemetery.
The Sanders funeral will be held Tuesday afternooon from the home, at 2 o'clock with Rev. GAIGE, of the Presbyterian church in charge and the burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, August 31, 1920

Manford E. RALSTON, age 68, of north of this city died Monday nite of injuries sustained when he fell down the stairs of a rooming house in Mishawaka last Wednesday nite. At the time of his fall the injuries to Mr. Ralston were not considered serious and he did not return to his home north of this city until Saturday afternoon.
Shortly after his arrival here his condition became critical and Dr. M. O. KING was summoned. However, Mr. Ralston grew steadily worse until his death last nite. The immediate cause of his death, it is said, was congestion of the lungs, altho it is thot that he also sustained other internal injuries when he fell.
The deceased was born in Fulton county on August 3, 1852, and was the son of David and Harriet RALSTON. Mr. Ralston attended the schools of Fulton county, and after his graduation he married, he and his wife having made their home in this county ever since.
Besides his widow, Mr. Ralston is survived by one son, Earl [RALSTON], and his mother, Mrs. Harriet WHALEY, of Pennsylvania.
The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 from the residence north of the city, and burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Estil McINTIRE, of Elkhart, were here to visit their parents and to attend the funeral of Miss Mabel McINTIRE.

Wednesday, September 1, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Ed MOORE, of Elkhart, were here today to attend the funeral of his mother, Mrs. George MOORE, of Athens.

Thursday, September 2, 1920

Ezra NEES, age 70 years, died at his home in Liberty township, Wednesday nite, following sickness of more than three years. In the three years that he has been sick Mr. Nees had been confined to his bed.

Mr. Nees was born in Liberty township of this county on October married [sic] and is survived by four children, Dallas NEES, of Rochester, Mrs. Joanna DAUGHERTY, of Rochester, Mark NEES, of Rochester, and William NEES, of South Peru.
The funeral services will be held from the Mud Lake Chapel at 2 o'clock Friday and the burial will be in the Mud Lake cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages 1836-1983: Ezra NEES married Julia BLACKBURN May 8, 1877. Also see Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Horton/Mud Lake Chapel, Liberty Twp.: NEES [- - - -], 1849-1919; NEES [- - - -], 1853-1929 (these are concrete surface markers with no names and lie side by side)]

Mr. and Mrs. James COPLEN left this morning for Blue Island, Ill., where they were called by the death of the cousin, Amel POLSON.

Friday, September 3, 1920

William H. J. FLAGG, age 78, a veteran of the Civil War and member of the Argos Post, G.A.R., passed away at the home of his son, County Clerk Charles E. FLAGG, East Ninth street, Thursday evening. Death was caused by a complication of diseases.
Funeral services will be held from the Christian church, Argos, Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Burial in Washington cemetery, Maxinkuckee Lake.
The deceased, the son of Alwin and Milo FLAGG, was born in Miami county, Indiana, Jan. 28, 1852. At the age of six, he removed with his parents to Marshall county, the family settling near what is now the town of Culver. When the war of the Rebellion came in 1861, he enlisted with Co. I, 151 Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served with honor until the close of the war.
Settling on the old homestead, he continued to reside there until a few years ago, when he entered the hotel business at Argos, where he continued to reside until infirmities interceded after which he retired from active business.
On June 17, 1871 he was united in marriage with Julia A. FLAGG, who preceded him in death only a few months. To this union three children were born, George A. [FLAGG], deceased, Charles E. [FLAGG], of Rochester, and Omer E. [FLAGG], of Argos, the latter two of whom survive.

John Lawrence SANDERS, son of Mr. and Mrs. William SANDERS, was born May 21, 1901, four and one-half miles southeast of Rochester, in the Mt. Zion neighborhood, where he lived with his parents until September, 1914, when the family moved to the city of Rochester, where they have made their home since. He met death in an automobile accident on the Barret road, one and one-half miles east of Rochester, on Saturday evening, August 28, 1920, age 19 years, 2 months and 28 days. The deceased leaves besides the father and mother, three brothers, Delbert [SANDERS], of Peru, Indiana, Verne [SANDERS] and Marion [SANDERS], of this city, and three sisters, Mrs. O. W. ZIMMERMAN of Kokomo, Indiana, Mrs. Guy BRYANT and Maud SANDERS, of this city.
Jake, as he was known among his friends and companions, was of a likable disposition and held in high regard by those who know him best.

Saturday, September 4, 1920

Mrs. John WAGONER, of Leiters Ford, age 61, died at her home late Friday evening. Mrs. Wagoner was born in Summer [sic] county, Pa., on July 29, 1859, moving to this state shortly after with her parents.
On June 1, 1876 she was married to John WAGONER, and to this union were born six children, five of whom have preceded their mother in death. Mrs. Wagoner was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph COUGHENOUR.
Besides her husband she is survived by one child, Mrs. Ray BABCOCK, of this city.
Mrs. Wagoner was a life long member of the Methodist church and her many friends remember her a devoted Christian and one who was always willing to help a friend.
The funeral will be held from the Leiters Ford Methodist church Sunday afternoon at three o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F., Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: John J. WAGONER, 1850-1925; Mary A. WAGONER, 1859-1920]

Monday, September 6, 1920

The funeral of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Dewey ZOLMAN, of the Mt. Hope neighborhood, was held from the residence Monday. The burial was made in the Mount Hope cemetery. The child was eight days old.

J. A. HERRING, age 86, one of the best known residents of Fulton county, died suddenly at his home on South Monroe street sometime Sunday morning between three and seven o'clock. The death was caused by heart failure, from which Mr. Herring has been suffering for some time, it was stated.
At three o'clock Sunday morning, Charles HERRING, a son of the deceased, went into his father's bedroom to wait on him, and found him apparently resting well. At seven o'clock when he went into the bedroom again, his father was found to be dead.
Mr. Herring was born in Allen county, Ohio, on June 20, 1834. He made his home in Ohio until 1856 when he moved to Fulton county where he has resided ever since.
The deceased has been a carpenter all his life and practiced his trade until a year ago when his health forced his retirement from actual business. A little over a week ago he was taken seriously ill, but Saturday he appeared to be somewhat better and his friends believed the danger was past.
He is survived by his son, Charles HERRING, who lives at home, and one daughter, Mrs. Lyda CZAPANSKY, of Lamont, Oklahoma.
No funeral arrangements will be made until Mrs. Czapansky arrives. She is expected to arrive in this city at 3:52 Tuesday afternoon. It is probable, according to Charles Herring, that the funeral will be held Thursday, but the definite arrangements will be announced thru the columns of this paper.

Tuesday, September 7, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, September 8, 1920

Frank L. OVERMYER, 62, a life long resident of Fulton county, died at his farm in the Burton neighborhood at noon Tuesday, a victim of paralysis. He suffered from a stroke four years ago and had been an invalid from that time until death came. A second stroke came last Saturday and he sank gradually from that time until Tuesday.
Frank L. Overmyer was born in Fulton county, October 7, 1858 a son of William and Lucy Ann OVERMYER, deceased. He had resided for the past 33 years in the Burton neighborhood.
He was married April 4, 1886 to Rosannah ZINK, of Fulton county. To this union four children were born, three of whom survive, Glen OVERMYER, Mrs. Will HUDKINS and Mrs. Ross MOORE, all of this county. A daughter, May [OVERMYER], died at the age of nine. He is also survived by the widow, a sister, Mrs. A. E. BABCOCK, of Rochester, and two brothers, Amos OVERMYER, of Leiters, and Chauncy D. OVERMYER, of Tiosa.
Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at one o'clock from the Burton church. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery in Rochester.

Morris FLYNN, aged 102 years, four months and 27 days, passed away at the home of his son-in-law, Levi SARBER, of Perrysburg, Saturday evening following a fall four hours previous in which he bruised his ear. Poison set in the injured member immediately after the accident and resulted in the rapid demise of the old man.
Mr. Flynn was born in Cork County, Ireland and came to this country when he was 20 years of age. His mother had passed away when he was but four years of age. His wife died 15 years ago. He was active up to the time of his death and during his life had accumulated a small fortune. He was a butcher and owned a farm at Twelve Mile. He is survived by a daughter and three grendchildren. A. C. SARBER, of this city attended the funeral services at Perrysburg.

Several from this place attended the funeral of Julius WALTERS Tuesday which was held at Marion. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Ira MOORE, of Adamsfox, returned to their home Sunday, after attending the funeral of his mother Wednesday and spending the rest of the week with his father. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Thursday, September 9, 1920

Mrs. Melissa CRABILL, a resident of the Whippoorwill neighborhood, died Wednesday at the home of her son, Charles BURNS, of Elkhart, according to word received here today.
Mrs. Crabill, who was a former resident of this city, was the widow of Jesse BURNS. After her husband's death she lived in this city for some time and then later moved to Akron. She was then married to J. W. CRABILL, who with the son survives.
Funeral services at Elkhart, Friday at 9:00 a.am. Burial at the Nichols cemetery in Kosciusko county.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages 1836-1983: Jesse D. BURNS married Melissa J. MODLIN, May 20, 1882]

Friday, September 10, 1920

Mrs. Ella BRUGH, wife of A. M. BRUGH, died Wednesday at their home south of Ober, according to word received here by her niece, Mrs. Harry BRUGH, of this city.
Mrs. Brugh was a former resident of Fulton county, having spent a number of years at Leiters Ford and Richland Center neighborhood. She is survived by the father, Levi BRUGH, of Ohio, two sisters, a foster son and the husband. Funeral services Saturday at 12:30 o'clock at Ober. Burial at Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Albert M. BRUGH, Feb 21, 1861 - Jan 27, 1936; Sarah E. BRUGH, his wife, Nov 23, 1862 - Sep 8, 1920]

Charles W. HOOVER, 62, died Thursday at his home at 1209 63rd street, Chicago, a victim of hardening of the arteries from which he had been suffering for some time. Mr. Hoover was a former resident of this city where for a number of years he had conducted a grocery store on North Main street. He is survived by a son, Harry HOOVER, also a former resident, who now lives in Arkansas, and a daughter, Mrs. Elva JOHNSON, of this city. The body arrived here Thursday evening for burial at Mt. Hope cemetery. Funeral services Saturday afternoon at the Athens church at 2:30 o'clock.

Saturday, September 11, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, September 13, 1920

The body of George E. DENNIS, who died about a year ago at Grand Rapids, Mich., larrived in this city Saturday morning for burial at the Citizen's cemetery Saturday aftenoon. Mrs. Dennis, the widow, formerly Miss Kathreen HUGHSTON, of this city, and Mrs. Victor DANIELS, accompanied the body to Rochester.

Thomas DURBIN, aged about 70, died at Woodlawn hospital here shortly after noon following an accident near his home about a mile west of Fulton at nine o'clock this morning in which he was struck by an automobile driven by Frank POWNELL of Marshtown.
Durbin had transacted business in Fulton earlier in the day and was riding home in an automobile driven by William H. GRAY, a neighbor. Gray, who lived beyond the Durbin home, stopped his car on the right side of the road to let Durbin out.
Durbin then walked around the rear of the car and as he stepped out from behind it into the road, was struck by the other machine, which was moving at about 15 miles an hour.
Gray himself did not see Durbin as he was hit, but another witness said that Durbin was hurled to one side and not run over. He was taken into Fulton, where first aid was administered and later brot to the hospital at Rochester, where he died.
The injury which caused his death was a fracture of the skull. At the time of the accident, Gray said it appeared that the entire left side of his head had been scalped. He suffered from a number of minor abrasions and bruises about the body.
Durbin, who came to this county from White county about 10 years ago, had recently sold his farm here and had purchased on in Minnesota. he is survived by a widow, Mrs. Martha DURBIN, a brother, Amos [DURBIN], of Marshtown, and another brother, George [DURBIN], in Minnesota. No funeral arrangements had been made at press time.

In a letter to Alex RUH, of this city, Charles R. DICKERSON, of Chicago, says that he is every day expecting to receive word of the shipment of the body of Clifford BENNETT, who died in France, to this country for burial. The body will be sent to this city for burial at the Bennett lot at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Clifford Bennett was a son of Mr. and Mrs. P. D. BENNETT, of Los Angeles, California, who formerly resided in Rochester.
Bennett, who died of penumonia, while overseas, leaves besides his parents, a widow, who lives in Missouri. Neither will come to Rochester when the body arrives here, but the funeral services will be in charge of Mr. and Mrs. Alex RUH, who were friends of the Bennett family. The uncle, Chas. DICKERSON, and another uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. John BROWN, of Monticello, will be here. The body will be buried with military honors by the Shelton Post American Legion.

Tuesday, September 14, 1920 to Wednesday, September 15, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, September 16, 1920

John R. MILLER, 76, a former resident of Argos, died Saturday at his home in South Bend, according to word received here. A stroke of paralysis caused his demise. Funeral services were held Monday.

Friday, September 17, 1920

E. V. HUDKINS, 83, familiarly known as "Uncle Van" well known resident of Kewanna, died at his home north of Kewanna, Thursday evening at six o'clock, from complications resulting from old age. Mr. Hudkins was not ill and a few weeks ago was about as usual, but his health seemed to fail him and he sank rapidly to the end.
"Uncle Van" was one of the best known men in the Kewanna neighborhood, having lived in that vicinity most of his life. In early life he was a farmer but for many years he had retired and lived with his son, Frank [HUDKINS], who survives him. He was a member of the Kewanna I.O.O.F. lodge for 51 years and was also a member of the G.A.R.
Funeral services Saturday afternoon at the Baptist church at Kewanna. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery there with the G.A.R. and members of the Odd Fellows lodge in charge.

Saturday, September 18, 1920

Mrs. Mary Ellen CRIMMINS, 59, died early Saturday morning at the home of her sister, Mrs. Sadie BAUM, 418 Jefferson street, after an illness extending over a period of over nine months. Death was due to dropsy and heart failure.
Mrs. Crimmins, who was a widow, had made her home in Rochester for the past three or four years, coming here from her former home in Sidell, Illinois. She is survived by three brothers, James [STUNKARD], of Gilead, and Joseph [STUNKARD] and Bock STUNKARD, of Frankfort, and two sisters, Mrs. BAUM and Mrs. Hannah LYONS, of Sidell.
The body will be shipped to Sidell Sunday for burial there Monday morning.

Mrs. Cordelia Alice HOWARD, 84 , of Anstead, Michigan, who has been spending the summer at Lake Manitou for the past five years, died at six o'clock Friday evening at the summer cottage of her daughter, Mrs. John WHITE, on the east side of the lake. Death was caused by old age and complications. Mrs. Howard, who was a widow, is survived by only one daughter. Funeral services at the lake home Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Interment at Mausoleum.

Monday, September 20, 1920

Ira MILLS has received word that his aunt, Mrs. Mallisa MILLS, died Saturday in Hamilton, Ind., of pneumonia.

Tuesday, September 21, 1920

Mrs. John KRATHWOLD, 73, died Monday at her home in Peru. She was a former resident of this city. She is a sister of John HAGAN and Mrs. Tressa SMITH, of Rochester. Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at Peru.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages 1836-1983: John KRATHWOLD married Sophia HAGAN January 18, 1866]

Mrs. William GILCHRIST, 40, died very suddenly Sunday at her home two miles west of Berthaville, a victim of apoplexy. She had been in failing health for some time, but just previous to her death had been feeling considerably improved.
She is survived by the husband, two sons, Virgil [GILCHRIST] and Byron [GILCHRIST], three brothers, Carlton [MOW], Omer [MOW] and Floyd MOW, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. David MOW, and two sisters, Mrs. May STICKLER and Mrs. Gladys BIGGS. Funeral services at Whippoorwill church, Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Burial at Richland Center.

Mrs. Will GILCHRIST passed away Sunday morning after a short illness. Funeral was held at Grand View Church at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon. - - - SOUTH ZION ITEMS.

Wednesday, September 22, 1920

Robert Ralph COX, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer E. COX, College avenue and 14th street, died at the hospital at four o'clock Tuesday evening as the result of a fall Sunday evening in which he sustained a fracture at the base of his skull and a broken collar bone. Cox died without ever having regained consciousness.
Cox, together with Claude STEFFY, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank STEFFY, had entered the new Robbins, Kepler and Montgomery garage building on Main street Sunday evening at about nine o'clock. They stepped from the alley on the north side of the building thru a door where there was an immediate drop of about 12 feet into the concrete basement.
Cox fell to the bottom, evidently alighting on his left shoulder and the left side of his head, where the fractures were sustained. Steffy managed to catch himself on an iron beam and merely suffered a few minor cuts and bruises.
He called to his companion at the bottom of the basement and received no answer, hurried for help. The Cox youth, unconscious, was taken from the basement and rushed to the Woodlawn hospital, where he was given medical attention.

He lay for over two days in a stupor and died without ever knowing in all probability what had happened to him.
Robert Ralph COX had moved to this city with his parents about three years ago from their former home in Athens. He was born September 1, 1901 at Twelve Mile and had lived all his life in Cass, Miami and Fulton counties. He is survived by the parents, a half-brother, Guy MOORE, of Peru, and four sisters, Mrs. Clarence HISEY, of Whiting and Ruth [COX], Pearl [COX] and Maude COX, at home.
Funeral services at the Baptist church Thursday afternoon, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Amos DURBIN attended the funeral of his brother at Fulton Wednesday, who was killed in an auto accident. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Thursday, September 23, 1920 to Friday, September 24, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, September 25, 1920

George Orlando [GOTTSCHALK], eight-year-old son of George and Emma GOTTSCHALK, died early Saturday morning a victim of diphtheria from which he had suffered only a week. Death occurred at the home of the lad's parents, one-half mile east of Green Oak. It was stated authoritatively that there are no other cases of diphtheria in the Green Oak neighborhood. The boy is survived by the parents, two sisters, Mabel [GOTTSCHALK] and Gertrude [GOTTSCHALK], and four brothers, John [GOTTSCHALK], Lyman [GOTTSCHALK], Cecil [GOTTSCHALK] and Noah GOTTSCHALK. Funeral services from the residence Sunday afternoon. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery in Rochester.

Monday, September 27, 1920

Mrs. Mary CARUTHERS, 78, widow of William CARUTHERS, who died in Missouri several years ago, died Sunday morning at the Soldiers' Home in Lafayette, according to word received by J. J. ESTABROOK, south of Rochester.
Mrs. Caruthers, who had been a resident of the Lafayette home for a little over a year, had formerly resided three miles south of Rochester on the Peru road near the Estabrook farm. She is survived by two brothers, Cyrus BELT, of this city, and Raymond BELT, of Macy. The body was shipped to Rochester for burial. Funeral services at the Caruthers home, south of this city, Tuesday afternoon. Burial at Shelton's cemetery.

Tuesday, September 28, 1920 to Thursday, September 30, 1920

[no obits]

Friday, October 1, 1920

Tobias GUSHARD, 78, father of Mrs. P. L. FERRY, of Akron, died Saturday evening at his home in Laketon after a long illness caused by hardening of the arteries. He was a former resident of near Disko and was very well known in Akron.

Saturday, October 2, 1920

Isaac Franklin THOMPSON, five year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac THOMPSON, died early Friday evening at the home of his parents in East Rochester, a victim of diphtheria. The parents and two other children survive. The Thompson lad had been ill for more than a week. The other children of the family had suffered with the same disease, but had recovered. Funeral services from the residence Saturday afternoon at four o'clock. Rev. George R. CRANE in charge. Burial at Citizen's cemetery.

Marion MILLER, 69, a life long resident of Fulton county, committed suicide at about 10 o'clock Saturday morning by hanging himself in a shed at the rear of his nephew, Artie MILLER's summer cottage on the north shore of the lake.
The body was discovered by Arthur THOMPSON, son of Mr. and Mrs. George THOMPSON, who live in the cottage next to the Miller family, not more than five minutes after the elderly man had taken his life.
The Thompson lad told his mother that he had seen the old man hanging from a rope in the shed, and Mrs. Thompson, after a brief glance into the shed, informed the occupants of the Miller cottage, Mrs. Miller and Mrs. Lon ZIMMERMAN of what had occurred.
Sheriff Sam ARTER was summoned to the scene at once, arriving there at about 10:25. He in turn called Dr. Archie STINSON, of Athens, county coroner, who after a brief examination of the body and questioning those about the scene, promptly returned a verdict of suicide.
Miller who had lived the greater portion of his life on a farm 10 miles northwest of the city, of recent years had been in poor health and as a result visited about with his nephews, Artie MILLER, Orville MILLER, and Clem R. MILLER, recently elected county surveyor.
He would spend several weeks at a time with each of the Miller families. At the time he took his life he was living with Artie Miller at the lake. Lon ZIMMERMAN, who occupied the same cottage, The Tango, with the Miller family, had just left the cottage at 10 o'clock, when he said the elderly man was playing with the children at the rear door of the house.
Mr. Zimmerman had hardly reached the city when he was recalled by news of the suicide. Death evidently was instantaeous as Mr. Miller's neck was broken. The body was hanging from a light rope such as is used to tie up packages. Miller had evidently constructed a little platform with a plank and two trestles, probably kicking them out from under him.
While they knew Mr. Miller had been in ill health for some time, his friends and relatives had no intimation whatever of his act. Mrs. Miller said that her uncle had recently visited a specialist in LaPorte while visiting a niece, Mrs. Mattie COOK, who cured to a great extent the man's deafness.
Recently he had taken a cold which evidently settled in his head and hearing, which has always been poor, grew much worse. He wanted to return to LaPorte to again visit the specialist who had helped him and Mrs. Miller had planned taking him there Sunday.
Mrs. Miller declared that he complained of noises in his head and intense pain. He was in a very depressed mood, she said, but she had no idea of what was evidently running in his mind. Despondency at his continued illness was undoubtedly the cause of the act, according to members of the family.
There survive three nephews and a niece. Mr. Miller had never married and his other relatives preceed him. Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, October 4, 1920

Funeral services for Marion MILLER, who committed suicide Saturday afternoon, were held Monday afternoon at Richland Center.

Tuesday, October 5, 1920

Isaac Franklin THOMPSON was born April 9, 1915 and departed this life October 1, 1920, age 5 years, 5 mo. 22 days. He leaves to mourn his loss, his father, mother, two sisters, a brother and many friends.

Wednesday, October 6, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, October 7, 1920

Special to the Sentinel.
Ludington, Mich., Oct 7 -- "Before God I am innocent. I forgive those who framed this up on me."
This was the statement made by Mrs. Stella Blanche MOTTL to Judge Hall Cutler in circuit court at five o'clock Wednesday afternoon. She spoke these words as she stood before the court for sentence. Two hours previous the jury, after deliberating for 22 hours, had brought in its verdict, announced by the foreman as "Guilty as charged."
Judge Cutler sentenced Mrs. Mottl to solitary confinement at hard labor for life in the Detroit, Mich., house of correction. Mrs. Mottl collapsed when the verdict of guilty was rendered. Her brother, Monroe [PAXTON], supported her as her body shook with the sobs that echoed through the court room. Standing before the judge for sentence, which occupied at least 10 minutes, she had scarcely shed a tear.
Amel MOTTL of whose death she has been held responsible was a young farmer who fell sick April 15 after eating a salmon patty, which his wife had prepared for him as a mid night lunch when he returned from a milk producers meeting. Five days later he was dead. - - - - - -

Friday, October 8, 1920

Charles H. HISSONG, 80, died at his home in Argos Thursday morning. He leaves a wife and several children, all married. Funeral services Saturday afternoon in the Christian church in Argos with burial in Burr Oak Cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Burr Oak Cemetery, Union Twp.: Charles H. HISSONG, March 22, 1840 - (no d.d.); Mary J. HISSONG, his wife, November 11, 1857 - September 2, 1902]

Saturday, October 9, 1920

Mrs. F. B. TUTTLE, formerly of Kewanna and well known here, died at her home at Anderson on Sept. 23rd after an illness of only five days. The funeral was at her old home at Saybrook, Ill., on Sept. 26.

After a long illness caused by tuberculosis, John HERENDEEN, a farmer who lived east of Akron, died last Friday afternoon at 1:30.

Mrs. John KNEBEL died at her home five miles west and north of Kewanna on Friday, after an illness of two weeks.

Monday, October 11, 1920

John PHILLIPS, 59, died early Monday morning at his home on east Ninth street, a victim of tetanus, which set in just a week prior to his death.
Just two weeks ago, Mr. Phillips had been enjoying his usual good health when his milch cow, swinging her head at a fly, struck him and knocked him down. He was bruised about the head and suffered a severe gash in his right arm in which 12 stitches were necessary.
Just one week later tetanus set in and from that time until his death, Mr. Phillips' jaws were locked. Serum was administered and he was fed thru a tube, but to no avail.
Mr. Phillips, who had been a resident of Rochester for the past 52 years, was a member of the United Brethren church and the Maccabee and Fraternal Aid lodges. He is survived by the widow, a brother, James PHILLIPS, of Bensonia, Mich., and a half-sister, Mrs. Clara PORTER, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio.
Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the United Brethren church. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: John PHILLIPS, 1861-1920; Ida B. PHILLIPS, 1865-1921; Catharine PHILLIPS, 1836-1918]

Tuesday, October 12, 1920 to Wednesday, October 13, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, October 14, 1920

James KLINE, aged about 40, a former resident of Rochester, died Wednesday at his home in Kokomo, according to word received here by the Rochester Moose Lodge, of which he was a member. Mr. Kline died as the result of an accident in which he fell and was injured internally, according to the information reaching this city. He is survived by a widow and six children.

Friday, October 15, 1920

Mrs. Nancy Maria McMILLEN, 72, widow of the late Henry McMILLEN, of Green Oak, died Thursday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Robert WILEY, of this city, after an illness of a year's duration. Her death was caused by paralysis and diabetes. She suffered a stroke of paralysis about a year ago and has been declining since that time. Last June she moved from her home at Green Oak to Rochester, where she has since resided with Mrs. Wiley.
Mrs. McMillen, who was a life long resident of Fulton county, is survived by three daughters, Mrs. WILEY, Mrs. Elmer OLIVER, of Rochester, and Mrs. Mary BACON, of Perrysburg, four sons, Harry D. [McMILLEN], of Washington, Charles W. [McMILLEN], of DePauw, Illinois, and

Guy [McMILLEN] and George McMILLEN, of Rochester, a brother, Schuyler SMITH, of Chicago, and two sisters, Mrs. Manda EWER, of Red Falls, Minn., and Mrs. Bert ALFRED, of Wisconsin.
Funeral services from the farm home at Green Oak Saturday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. George F. CRAIG in charge. Burial in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

J. C. ASHBY and Lee ASHBY and Charles WILLIAMS went to Butler, Ind., Wednesday to attend the funeral of William ASHBY, a brother of the former. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Saturday, October 16, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, October 18, 1920

While waiting upon a customer in his restaurant at Mentone, B. Y. BABER suddenly dropped dead.

Martha May SHRIVER, 42, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. H. WHITTENBERGER of Akron, died Saturday at the hospital here where she had been taking treatments. The body was removed to Akron for funeral services and burial.

Double funeral services were held at Laketon for Oliver SHAFER and Howard BAILEY, who were killed at the same time.

Tuesday, October 19, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, October 20, 1920

Nancy Maria FENNIMORE was born Feb. 22, 1848 near Five Corners, Miami County, Ind., the daughter of Cyrus and Mary FENNIMORE. May 25th, 1868, she was united in marriage to Henry McMILLEN and about one year later settled on the farm near Green Oak, which was their home until about seven months ago, when on account of sickness she made her home with her daughter.
She is survived by one sister, Mrs. C. W. EWER, of Redwood Falls, Minn.; one half-sister, Mrs. Bert ALFRED, of Wisconsin; one half-brother, Schuyler E. SMITH, of Chicago; four sons, Charles W. [McMILLEN], of Paw Paw, Ill., Harry D. [McMILLEN], Ephrata, Wash., George [McMILLEN] and Guy [McMILLEN], of Rochester. There are three daughters, Mrs. Mary BACON, of Perrysburg, Mrs. Elmer OLIVER, Mrs. Robert WYLIE, of Rochester. One daughter, Laura B. [McMILLEN] preceded her in death. There are also 16 grandchildren.
She has been a life long member of the Green Oak Methodist church, where she was known as a firm believer and a big-hearted woman.
She was a loving wife and mother, always assisting her children in sickness, even when she herself was not well.

Mr. Chas. McMILLEN, of DePaw [Pawpaw?], Ill., was called here on account of the death of his mother, Mrs. Henry McMILLEN. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, October 21, 1920

Mrs. Charles STAHL was in Macy Wednesday, where she attended the funeral of a relative.

Friday, October 22, 1920 to Saturday, October 23, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, October 25, 1920

Mrs. U. S. KROFT, of Akron, died suddenly in Dakota where she was visiting relatives, according to word received here. The body was shipped to Akron for burial.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Ulysses S. KROFT, January 1, 1871 - (no d.d.); Bertha E. KROFT, May 19, 1872 - Oct 21, 1920]

Tuesday, October 26, 1920 to Wednesday, October 27, 1920

[no obits]

Thursday, October 28, 1920

The body of Holmes HUNTER, son of Judge N. G. HUNTER, of Wabash, who died in a hospital in Luxemburg while on overseas duty, will be sent to Wabash for burial, according to word received there.

Elmer S. COOK, 46, died Thursday morning at the Northern Hospital for the Insane at Logansport, a victim of a mental disease from which he had suffered for some time. He had been an inmate of the asylum a number of years ago, was released and later sent back, the last time, about two months ago. He was a former resident of Rochester, but had been employed by the Erie railroad in the East. He is survived by a sister, Mrs. William NEWCOMB, of this city and two brothers, Howard [COOK] and Avery COOK, both of Rochester. The body was brot to this city Thursday for burial. Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, October 29, 1920 to Saturday, October 30, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, November 1, 1920

Frank STEPHENSON, 60, for 23 years a member of the Indianapolis police force, who was born and reared in Rochester and was a brother of Rome C. STEPHENSON of South Bend, died Sunday morning following an attack of acute indigestion. He is survived by one son and one daughter. The body was taken to Lebanon for burial.

Mr. and Mrs. O. W. STENGEL went today to Bunker Hill to attend the funeral of his uncle Frank RADEL.

Tuesday, November 2, 1920 to Thursday, November 4, 1920

[no obits]

Friday, November 5, 1920

C. E. FEIGHTNER, of near Roann, was struck and instantly killed Wednesday afternoon by an Erie train south of Laketon. He was driving an automobile and failed to see the train. He was thrown for a distance of six rods.

Saturday, November 6, 1920

Mrs. Charles G. HORTON, aged about 55, died Saturday morning at her home five miles south of Rochester on the Peru road, a victim of diabetes and complications from which she had suffered for some time. Mrs. Horton is survived by the husband, two daughters, Mrs. Phil MILLER, Mrs. Ed MATHIAS and two sons, Glen HORTON, at home. Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Mary E. SHIPLEY, 85, died Friday at her home in Disko. Funeral was held at the home of her sister, Mrs. Martha OLIVER, in Akron Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Shipley leaves three children, Mrs. Minta WAGONER of Peru, Mrs. Joanna MARTIN of Manchester and Mrs. Laura HALDEMAN of Roann. Mrs. Shipley has a sister in Wisconsin aged 92.

Monday, November 8, 1920

Ephriam LEWIS, aged about 70, for more than 24 years a resident of this county, was found dead on the floor of his home near the east side of the lake Monday morning by John BRUNSON, a neighbor, who, suspecting that something was wrong, entered the home to investigate.
Mr. Lewis was all alone in the home as Mrs. Lewis had gone to Lafayette Sunday for a visit with her daughter, Mrs. J. H. WALDRON. Mr. Lewis was to have followed her in a week. The Lewis' had just recently moved into the home they now occupy and Mr. Branson, knowing that Mrs. Lewis was leaving urged Mr. Lewis to stay with him.
When he saw no signs of life about the place Monday morning he went into the house and there found Mr. Lewis lying dead in the dining room with both hands clutching his breast.
Dr. Archie STINSON, who had waited on Mr. Lewis for some time, was called and pronounced death due to heart failure. Mr. Lewis had had considerable trouble with his heart, but of recent months had been in good health.
He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Emily LEWIS, a brother, James [LEWIS], of Bourbon, four sons, John [LEWIS], Lee [LEWIS] and Charles LEWIS, of Rochester, and Bert LEWIS, of South Bend and three daughters, Mrs. Wallace WAGONER of this city. Mrs. Olive BUTLER, of South Bend and Mrs. J. H. WALDRON of Lafayette.
No funeral arrangements have been made pending arrival of the widow from Lafayette. The body was taken to the Zimmerman morgue.

Timothy H. B. HENDERSON, 76, a resident of Rochester for the past 31 years, died Saturday afternoon at his home in East Rochester a victim of pneumonia from which he had suffered for but four days. Mr. Henderson had been engaged as a flag man at the Erie crossing for the past seven years and was well known in this city. He was a member of the McClung Post, G.A.R. He had served in the 16th Ohio Infantry, enlisting in 1861. Later he was transferred to the 120th Ohio Infantry and served three years. He is survived by a brother, Samuel W. HENDERSON, of Central Lake, Mich., a sister, Mrs. Mary SECOR, of Enid, Okla., and five children, Mrs. Carrie KING, of Tracy, Calif., Mrs. Louis CHARE, of Cleveland, O., Mrs. Bertha CLARK, of Columbia City, Ind., William E. HENDERSON, of Elkhart and Mrs. Stella COOPER, of this city. Funeral services Monday afternoon at the Christian church. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The body of Holmes HUNTER, former service man whose death occurred in France, arrived in Wabash Friday morning. The funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Wabash Presbyterian church. The Rev. Charles LITTLE, D.D., officiating. Holmes Hunter was a son of Judge Nelson HUNTER and he was very well known in Rochester.

Niel WARRICK, 25, son of Mr. and Mrs. Miller WARRICK, of Kewanna, who died Friday at his home in Huntington, was buried Sunday afternoon at North Manchester. He is survived by the widow and two children. Among those from Kewanna who attended the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. W. T. CANNON, Mr. and Mrs. O. E. COOK and Mr. and Mrs. Charles MEREDITH.

A. C. MANWARING, 64, who served two terms in the Indiana legislature, one as joint senator for Kosciusko and Marshall counties, and one as representative for Kisciusko county, died of heart disease at his home near Mentone Friday. He was the owner of the White City egg farm, one of the biggest poultry farms in Indiana. Surviving are a widow, two sons and a daughter and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elliot MANWARING, of Mentone.

The body of Carl HORTON, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. HORTON, of Macy, believed to be the first Miami county boy to make the supreme sacrifice during the world war, arrived in Macy from New York city SAturday morning. Funeral services were held at the Christian church at Macy Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock and the burial was in the Macy cemetery. The services were largely attended, the church being filled to its capacity.

Tuesday, November 9, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, November 10, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Phil MILLER of LaPorte, Mr. and Mrs. Glen HORTON, of Tippecanoe, were called home on account of the death of Mrs. Chas. HORTON. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, November 11, 1920 to Friday, November 12, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, November 13, 1920

Cleanthes M. BORTON, 63, prominent farmer near Mentone, died Tuesday evening at his home. Death followed an illness of about a year which was due to heart trouble and hardening of the arteries. Mr. Borton was a well known man of Mentone and this vicinity, having made his home on a farm near Mentone since childhood. He is survived by his wife, two sons, Charles [BORTON] and Allen BORTON of Mentone and three brothers.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Mentone Cemetery, Franklin Twp.: Cleanthes M. BORTON, April 13, 1857 - November 9, 1920; Alice L. GARWOOD BORTON, his wife, mother, August 17, 1862 - October 8, 1945]

Mrs. B. J. SISSON, mother of Charles D. SISSON, of this city, died Friday at her home in Erie, Pennsylvania at the age of 85 years. She has visited in Rochester several times.

Monday, November 15, 1920

[no obits]

Tuesday, November 16, 1920

The body of Rex NELSON, former Rochester boy, who died in France, will arrive soon at Kokomo and will be given a full military burial by the members of the American Legion in that city. Nelson's body will be the first of the overseas dead to arrive in Kokomo and the Legion has secured a caisson from the state and will have a mounted and dismounted guard and all the service that goes to make a military funeral. Nelson will be remembered by many Rochester people as he was born and grew to manhood here. His parents moved to Kokomo some time ago.

Mrs. Enoch MYERS has received word of the death of Sam BRANTHOFFER at Greenville, Texas on November 9. He spent much time here a number of years ago and is very well known. He went to Texas later where he became a prominent railroad man.

Relatives here received word Tuesday morning of the death of Jacob ROSENBERG in Hamilton, Ohio. He is well known in this city, where he resided a number of years ago. He is a brother of Mrs. Amelia WILE, S. Main street. Miss Rose WILE went to Hamilton several days ago to assist in caring for her uncle.

Rev. G. F. CRAIG is in LaPorte where he will attend the funeral of Mrs. Mary PRESTON.

Wednesday, November 17, 1920

Walter LATZ, 28 years of age, residing a few miles north of Disko, just across the line in Wabash county, was instantly killed Sunday afternoon while duck hunting on a small lake north of Disko. He was accompanied by his brother, William LATZ, at the time. The death occurred from a shot gun discharge which struck him in the temple.

Mrs. Nannie J. BABCOCK, 94, died Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock at the county farm, where she had made her home for the past 15 months. Mrs. Babcock was the widow of George BABCOCK, a former resident of this city, who died about two years ago. The Babcocks had not lived very long in this community, having moved here several years ago from Converse. Mrs. Babcock, after the death of her husband, moved to the county farm. She had been ill for about two weeks, gradually sinking until death came peacefuly. There are no brothers or sisters or children surviving. She was a half sister-in-law of Dr. I. L. BABCOCK, of this city and a full sister-in-law of A. O. BABCOCK.

Mrs. Ed ROGERS and Mrs. Ad LARGE attended the funeral of a friend at Chicago. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Thursday, November 18, 1920

Funeral services for Mrs. Nannie J. BABCOCK, who died at the county farm, were held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock at the Hoover chapel, Rev. J. W. NIVEN in charge. Burial was made at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, November 19, 1920

Mrs. Mary M. NEFF, 56, wife of Hiram NEFF, died at nine o'clock this morning at her farm home just east of Rochester near the lake, a victim of paralysis. She had suffered a stroke of paralysis about five years ago and a second stroke recently. Mrs. Neff was born in Williamsport, Pa., and had lived in this community during all of her 34 years of married life. She is survived by the husband and two daughters, Miss Florence NEFF, of South Bend and Miss Cletus NEFF of this city. Funeral services from the residence Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Rev. H. E. EBERHARDT in charge The body will be sent to Williamsport, Pa., for burial.

Mrs. Sarah BUTLER KANE, 66, a life long resident of Marshall county, passed away at her home near Culver, November 10.

Saturday, November 20, 1920

Mrs. Arthur HOFFMAN, 35, of Argos, died Friday afternoon at the hospital shortly after an operation for appendicitis. She had been taken suddenly ill. She is survived by the husband and two children, one an infant three months old. Mrs. Hoffman was a cousin of Mrs. John PYLE, of this city. The body has been removed to Argos for funeral services and burial.

Monday, November 22, 1920

The body of Mrs. Mary LOOMIS, 83, widow of Noah LOOMIS, who died Saturday night at her home in Wellston, Mich., has been shipped to Rochester for funeral services and burial. Mrs. Loomis was formerly Miss Mary MACKEY and her sole survivor is Horace MACKEY, a brother. Funeral services Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock from the residence of James WILDER, south Main street.

Tuesday, November 23, 1920

Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth ESSICK, 66, died early Tuesday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ellsworth WAGONER on Jay street, a victim of a complication of diseases from which she had suffered for several years.
Sarah Elizabeth BLACKBURN was born at Inwood, Marshall county, August 16, 1864, a daughter of Hiram and Martha BLACKBURN. She moved with her parents to this community early in life, where she has since resided. She was married October 19 1887 to Vivian ESSICK, who with the two children, Mrs. WAGONER and Miss Zoe ESSICK, three sisters, Mrs. William DELP, of this city, Mrs. E. P. KELLEY, of El Reno, Okla., and Mrs. Samuel VanBLARICOM and two brothers, George BLACKBURN, of Kokomo, and Charles BLACKBURN, of Atwood, survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

Kenneth L. HOLLOWAY, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Elden C. HOLLOWAY, died Monday afternoon at the home of the parents in Richland township. Burial was made Tuesday afternoon in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. R. W. WAECHTER and Mrs. H. R. HOWARD attended the funeral of Mrs. Hiram NEFF near Rochester Saturday afternoon. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Wednesday, November 24, 1920

Funeral services for Mrs. Ellen N. HASSENPLUG, who died Sunday evening at her home in Richland township, were held Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock at the South Zion church.

Funeral services for Mrs. Vivian ESSICK, who died early Tuesday morning, Thursday afternoon at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Ellsworth WAGONER, Jay Street, at two o'clock. Rev. G. R. CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. L. H. BEELER, of Chicago, was here to attend the funeral of her aunt, Mary LOOMIS. She returned this morning.

Mrs. F. A. DAVIS has returned to her home in Michigan City, after attending the funeral of her aunt, Mrs. Mary LOOMIS.

The funeral service of Mary LOOMIS was held at the residence of James WILDER, Nov. 23 at 2 o'clock.
She came to Fulton county in 1847 with her parents and had lived here continuously except the last few years were spent with Mrs. L. H. BEELER, a niece in Chicago, another son in Willston, Michigan, when he died November 20, 1920, age 83 years, 7 months and 9 days.
She had been a member of the Presbyterian church at Rochester since its existence and a faithful worker when possible. The services were conducted by Rev. H. G. GAIGE and in lieu of a Text, wove the passages of scripture when Mary's finger prints appeared in her Bible into a lesson of her life. A former pastor's daughter, Edna ROTH, sang the old hymns the deceased loved best.
Horace MACKEY, a brother, and W. M. LOOMIS, her son, are all that remain of the near relatives.

Thursday, November 25, 1920

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, November 26, 1920

Mrs. Martha Jane BIDDINGER, 76, practically a life long resident of Fulton county, died at 4:50 o'clock Thursday afternoon at her residence on W. Eighth street a victim of a complication of diseases from which she had suffered since last July. Her illness started from a goitre and she was not confined to her bed until eight weeks ago.
Samantha Jane TRIBBETT was born at Alamo, Indiana, June 19, 1844, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William TRIBBETT, deceased. She moved to this locality with her parents at the age of six years and has made her home here ever since. Just 55 years ago she was married to Peter BIDDINGER, who with a son, William BIDDINGER, former county treasurer, survives. A daughter preceded her.
Funeral services from the Evangelical church Saturday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. E. H. EBERHARDT in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The body of Mrs. Vivian ESSICK was buried Friday morning. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon, but owing to the failure of a sister, Mrs. E. P. KELLEY, of El Reno, Ohio, to arrive, the burial was postponed.

Saturday, November 27, 1920

Mac M. FROST, a well known Mentone business man died last week.

Monday, November 29, 1920

Mrs. Jake POLAY, of this city, is in receipt of a photoghraph of the grave in France in which her brother, Jacob GOLUB, a former resident of this city, is buried. Golub was one of the first young men of Rochester to enlist in the great war. He was killed in action in the battle of Chateau Thierry in 1918.

Moses ROSENBERG, pioneer merchant of Monterey, who died at his home there Thursday, was buried Sunday at the I.O.O.F. cemetery here. Mr. Rosenberg, who is survived by a widow and two children, was the brother of Mrs. Amelia WILE, of Rochester. Another brother, Jacob ROSENBERG, died very recently at Hamilton, O.

Miss Margaret KEELY, a life-long resident of this city, for many years prominent in literary and club circles of Rochester, died Sunday afternoon at the home of her mother, Mrs. M. E. KEELY, 512 N. Pontiac street. Miss Keely had been ill for fully two years. Death was caused by heart trouble and a complication of diseases. The mother and two sisters, Mrs. H. A. REITER, of this city, and Mrs. D. T. POWERS, of Baton Rouge, La., survive. Funeral arrangements have been withheld pending the arrival of Mrs. Powers.

Lyman M. STARKE has been called to Indianapolis on account of the death of his sister.

Tuesday, November 30, 1920

Funeral services for Miss Margaret KEELY Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the residence, Rev. H. G. CRAIG in charge.

Wednesday, December 1, 1920

Relatives here have received word of the death in Towner, N.D., of Mrs. Olin CASTLEMAN. She was well known in this community. Her body will be brought back for burial.

Thursday, December 2, 1920

The funeral of Mrs. Olin CASTLEMAN, who died in Towner, N.D., lwas held there Thursday afternoon. Relatives are bringing the body to Washington, near Culver for burial, which will be in the Poplar Grove cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Minnie A. CASTLEMAN, 1883-1970; Olin W. CASTLEMAN, 1877-1966; Daisy M. CASTLEMAN, 1880-1920.

William SNIDER and wife and son, William [SNIDER], motored to Logansport this morning to attend the funeral of a relative. - - - MT. ZION ITEMS.

Friday, December 3, 1920

Mrs. E. H. KELLY has departed for her home in El Reno, Okla., after being here to attend the funeral of her sister, Mrs. Vivian ESSICK.

Saturday, December 4, 1920

Lewis C. KISTLER, 80, died at one o'clock Saturday morning at his residence on south Main street, a victim of old age and complications. Mr. Kislter had retired from business about two years ago on account of failing health, but had not become seriously ill until a year or so ago. He was confined to his bed for the last four months.

Lewis Kistler was born May 25, 1840, a son of Mr. and Mrs. John KISTLER, pioneer settlers of Cass county. He lived near Logansport for the major portion of his life, moving to Rochester 27 years ago where he had been engaged in stock buying and conducting butcher shops.
He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Lucy KISTLER, and one son, Harry J. KISTLER, of Indianapolis, who is now in the city, and several half-brothers, who moved to the West early in life.
Funeral services Monday afternoon at the residence at two o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Sheriff Sam ARTER has received word of the death earlier in the week of Irvine BROWN, of Twelve Mile, who had been jailed here not long ago on a charge of contempt of court.

Monday, December 6, 1920

[no obits]

Tuesday, December 7, 1920

B. L. BIGGS, 55, a former resident of Fulton county, where he was born and reared, died suddenly Monday afternoon at three o'clock of heart failure at the Phillip MIKESELL farm east of Athens where he was transacting some business. Biggs had been visiting his brother-in-law, Samuel JOHNSON, for some time when death came. He is survived by a widow, Mrs. Ida BIGGS, a daughter, Lydia BIGGS, of Peru, a son, Allen [BIGGS], of Kokomo, and a nephew, Dora JOHNSON, of this city. Burial at Omega church, near Athens, Wendesday afternoon at one o'clock. Burial at Akron. [sic]

Those from out-of-town who were here Monday to attend the funeral of Lewis KISTLER, were Mr. and Mrs. Mark MORROW, Mr. and Mrs. Mel MORROW and daughter, James SHOUT and Mrs. Dave FARLEY, Mr. and Mrs. Lora EARLY and daughter Jane [EARLY], of Logansport, Mr. and Mrs. M. C. CLOUSE, Mishawaka, Russel CROUGEN, of South Bend, Mr. and Mrs. Harry KISTLER and Mr. and Mrs. A. W. MILLER.

(Special to the Sentinel)
Joliet, Ill., Dec. 7 -- Dead since Saturday, the body of Albert J. THURSTON was found yesterday morning hanging from a rafter in the corn crip on the farm owned by W. L. WAINWRIGHT, near Morris, Illinois, by a neighbor who ente5red the building to borrow some tools.
His identity was learned thru a draft registration card dated September, 1918, which was made out at Rochester, Indiana. He was about 40 years of age, five feet 10 inches in height, had brown eyes, black hair and was slightly bald at the back of his head.
There was no message of any kind in the dead man's pockets or near the body to explain a motive for the suicide, which was the verdict returned by the coroner.
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The Sentinel has been unable to secure any information about the man. The draft papers have long since been forwarded to Washington and none of the members of the board recalls the name.

Mrs. Mabel MILLER, of Indianapolis, is here being called on account of the death of her uncle, L. C. KISTLER.

Wednesday, December 8, 1920

Mrs. Harriett E. EMMONS, 65, died at four o'clock Tuesday afternoon at her home just east of Rochester on the Ft. Wayne road, a victim of acute Bright's disease from which she had suffered six months. Mrs. Emmons had been slightly ill previous to this time, but did not become seriously ill until six months ago. She was bedfast for about three months.
Harriett E. HAYES was born in Hancock county, Ohio, July 27, 1855, a daughter of John and Elizabeth HAYES. She came to Fulton county in 1873 and was married on April 2, 1877 to Orlando EMMONS. To this union were born five children, Miss Etta [EMMONS], Charles E. [EMMONS] and Obra EMMONS, of this city, Harley EMMONS, of South Bend and Mrs. Naomi TRIMBLE of Milliken, Michigan, all of whom with the husband survive. Three grandchildren also survive.
She was united with the Methodist church in 1900 at Richland Center and was active in church work until the time of her illness.
Funeral at the residence Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. G. F. CRAIG in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

After keeping the wires hot between this city and Morris and Joliet, Illinois, the mystery surrounding the identity of Albert J. THURSTON, who was found hanged in a corn crib at Morris, dead since last Saturday.
Inquiries from the Sentinel led Mrs. Sarah POFFENBERGER to believe that the dead man was a half-brother of hers. She wired to the coroner at Morris, who had been holding the body pending identification giving a description of her half-brother who had tattoo marks on both arms and the forefinger of his right hand amputated at the knuckle.
A reply Wednesday morning from the coroner stated that the description corresponded to the man held there and asked what disposition should be made of the body. They have not yet decided whether to have the burial there or in Rochester.
Albert J. THURSTON was born in Shelby county, June 13, 1882, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Josh THURSTON. The father is dead and the mother, Mrs. Hattie SWANGO, had re-married. There are three half-sisters, Mrs. POFFENBARGER, Mrs. Charles HAGAN, and Mrs. May SOSBE, and three half-brothers, Isaac [SWANGO], Frank [SWANGO] and Eddie SWANGO, all of this community.
Thurston had spent most of his life in the West. He was in the regular army at one time serving five years in the Philippines. He had registered for the draft in Rochester and was single.

Mr. and Mrs. Loyd CASTLEMAN and children and Mr. and Mrs. Vernon CASTLEMAN attended the funeral of their sister-in-law, Mrs. Olin CASTLEMAN, Sunday at Washington, near Culver. - - - LOYAL ITEMS.

Thursday, December 9, 1920

Mrs. Mary Jane MOORE, 74, widow of the late Harvey M. MOORE, died early Thursday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Genevieve BUNN in east Rochester, a victim of Bright's disease. Mrs. Moore was born in Fulton county August 7, 1846 and had lived here all her

life. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David LOUGH and is survived by two children, Mrs. BUNN and Roscoe MOORE, of Miles City, Mont. Funeral services at the Evangelical church Sunday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Moon cemetery.

Mrs. Emmaline MOORE, 82, widow of the late Thomas MOORE, succumbed Tuesday to old age and complications at the home of her brother, Samuel WAGONER, east of Rochester. She was born in Fulton county November 13, 1838, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William WAGONER, deceased. She is survived by the brother, and one son, Bruce MOORE. Funeral services at the Mt. Hope church, Rev. VanVACTOR, of Argos, in charge. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Friday, December 10, 1920

[no obits]

Saturday, December 11, 1920

Funeral services for Albert J. THURSTON, who hanged himself last week at Morris, Illinois, will be held at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Allen SOSBE, north Main street, Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The body arrived here Friday from Morris, where it had been held pending identification. Mrs. Sarah POFFENBERGER and Mrs. Sosbe went to Morris and returned with the body.

Henry M. MILLER, 63, a former resident of this community, died Friday evening at Havana, Illinois, a victim of heart trouble. The body has been shipped here for burial. Mr. Miller had formerly lived south of Atlanta. He was born in Ohio, June 9, 1857 and moved to Fulton county with his parents at the age of 15 years. About 13 years ago he left his wife and family of nine children, all of whom survive and now live on the old home place near Athens, and went to Havana, where he has been working as a boat carpenter.

Thomas Edwin STONE, aged 55 years, of near Sidney, died at the McDonald hospital in Warsaw of injuries received. While attempting to aid a fallen horse in regaining its feet his head was caught between the trunk of a tree and the hips of the animal and was so badly crushed that he became unconscious at once, in which condition he remained until the end.

Mrs. Blanche ARMSTRONG has gone to Plymouth, where she was called by the death of Harry SHAW.

Monday, December 13, 1920

Funeral services for Henry M. MILLER, who died in Havana, Ill., Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock from the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church, Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE, of Rochester, in charge. Burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.

William HETZNER, 59, a former resident of Rochester where he was well known, died Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at his home east of Leiters Ford, a victim of cancer, from which he had suffered for some time. He was born at Peru, May 21, 1861, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul HETZNER.

He was married to Clara PIESTER, who with five brothers, Charley [HETZNER], of Leiters, Frank [HETZNER], of Ohio, George [HETZNER], of Chicago, Albert [HETZNER], of Chicago and Ben [HETZNER], of Chicago, and two sisters, Mrs. Freddie DRAZIE, of Lansing, Mich., and Miss Clara HETZNER, of Michigan, and three children, Earl [HETZNER] and Tessie HETZNER, at home, and Mrs. Edith KISSINGER, survive. Funeral announcements later.

Tuesday, December 14, 1920

Mrs. Josephine ANGLEMYER, 63, died at noon Monday at her home at Mt. Zion, a victim of a complication of diseases from which she had suffered for several years. She was stricken with paralysis about five months ago and had partially recovered, but suffered a relapse a few weeks ago and gradually sank until the end came.
Josephine CLINGENPEEL was born in Cass county near Walton, November 21, 1857, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel CLINGENPEEL. She was married three times, her first two husbands preceding her. Surviving are the husband, Jerry ANGLEMYER, a son, C. O. MUMERT, of Kokomo, three sisters, Mrs. Caroline RHINEHART, of Denver, Colo., Mrs. Mary SMITH, of Walton and Mrs. Elizabeth PACKER of Onward and two brothers, Henry CLINGENPEEL, of Johnstown, Colo., and Samuel CLINGENPEEL, of near Logansport.
Funeral services from the Mt. Zion church Thursday morning, at 10 o'clock, Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE and Rev. George CRANE, of Rochester, in charge. Burial at Denver.

John RANZ, 51, died at his home west of Rochester early Tuesday morning following a long illness due to diabetes. Mr. Ranz had lived in this locality only a few years, having moved here from Illinois. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Edith RANZ, a son, Albert [RANZ], at home, a daughter, Mrs. John CONDIT, of Illinois, a sister, Miss Ann RANZ and four brothers, Charles [RANZ], Henry [RANZ], Samuel [RANZ] and Herman RANZ, all of Lincoln, Neb. Funeral services from the United Brethren church here Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Ray GATSEL and Mrs. David CASTLEMAN attended the funeral of a relative in Plymouth Sunday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Wednesday, December 15, 1920

Henry J. THOMPSON, 69, prominent farmer and business man who has lived in this community for the past 26 years, died at 11:45 o'clock Wednesday morning at his home on south Jefferson street, following an attack of apoplexy and paralysis on November 13.
Henry Thompson was born in Ohio, March 11, 1851. He moved to Indiana early in life and was married in Kosciusko county where he made his home for some time, to Susanna P. IRVIN, June 4, 1876.
During earlier years of his life he was an active farmer, spending many years of his life on a farm in Richland township. He was well known over the state, however, for he traveled in Indiana, for the Advance Threshing Machine Company for 17 years. He also at one time did threshing himself, but he retired from active business after selling his farm and moved to Rochester six years ago where he built a home just north of the library.
He had been in excellent health all his life and had not been ill until he suffered the double stroke. From the day upon which he was stricken he failed rapidly until death ended his suffering.

Surviving are the widow, two daughters, Miss Estella THOMPSON, at home, and Mrs. Ora NEWHOUSE, of Argos, three sons, W. J. THOMPSON, of Jackson, Mich., Charles H. [THOMPSON], of Waterman, Illinois and Ancil [THOMPSON], of Indianapolis, three sisters, Mrs. C. J. LORING of this city, Mrs. Jacob WEIMER, of Milford and Mrs. Chris KRINTZEL, of Atwood, and two brothers, Geo. B. THOMPSON, of Manitoba, Canada, and Eli THOMPSON of Leesburg.
Funeral services from the home Friday morning at 10:30 o'clock, Rev. George CRAIG officiating and the Rochester I.O.O.F. lodge in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body may be seen at the house Friday morning between the hours of nine and 10.

James Hubert CLAYBURN, 25, son of William and Elizabeth CLAYBURN, one of Fulton county's most prominent young farmers, died at 9:25 Tuesday evening at the home of his parents, six miles west of Rochester, a victim of pneumonia. Clayburn had been in good health until a week ago when he was taken ill with a cold. He was able to be about until a very short time before death came.
James Clayburn was born in Cass county in May 1896, youngest of a family of eight children, four sons and two sisters and the parents surviving. He had lived the greater portion of his life in Fulton county where he received his education.
He left home March 28, 1918 with a contingent of Fulton county boys where after a month's training at Camp Taylor, he was sent with 12 other lads from Fulton county to Camp Upton, New York, where they were enlisted in A Company, 111th Infantry, 28th Division, taking ship for France May 5, 1918.
He landed in Calais, where he remained with his outfit for a brief period, later going into action against the Germans in the Chateau Thierry offensive about July 1st, 1918. He was one of a company selected from the several companies of his detachment and was wounded when he first went into battle at Belleau Wood.
His injury was in the leg from shrapnel. After a period of convalescence at a base hospital, he was transferred to the Quartermaster Corps and later sent home to the United States for disenrollment.
Funeral announcement later.

Thursday, December 16, 1920

Funeral services for John RANZ were held Thursday afternoon at the residence west of Rochester. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, December 17, 1920

Oliver UTTER, 36, prominent Henry township farmer, died late Thursday afternoon at his farm home near Akron, a victim of cancer of the stomach. Utter is one of the men that organized the Henry Township Farmers' Co-operative Shipping Association and had always taken an active interest in his community's welfare. He is survived by the widow and two children, a son and daughter. Funeral services at the Saint' church at Akron Sunday afternoon.

Word was received here today of the arrival in New York on Tuesday on the steamer bringing back American war heroes, of the body of Oren SEELEY, a former resident of Fulton county, who died from the effects of being gassed in the last great offensive just prior to the signing of the Armistice.
The body, the first of any Fulton county men that made the supreme sacrifice in France in the war is expected to arrive here for burial in the very near future and the mother, Mrs. L. E. SEELEY, of Spokane, Washington, is now at Leiters Ford awaiting the return. Funeral arrangements have not been made, pending word of shipment from New York but a funeral with full military honors accorded by the members of the Leroy C. Shelton Post American Legion, is being planned.
Oren Seeley was born January 4, 1896, at Woodhall, Ill., a son of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. SEELEY. He removed with his parents to Iowa at the age of five and later moved with his family to Aubbeenaubbee township, Fulton county, when 12 years of age.
He resided on the farm attending school at Leiters, where he graduated from the high school. When he reached the age of 21, he joined the U. S. army.
He served in the army for two years in Company M, 141st Infantry, 36th division. During this period he was on the Mexican border and was later sent to France where he served for seven months before dying from the effects of being gassed. Death occurred March 30, 1919, at Aube Banlay, France.
He is survived by the parents, a brother, and three sisters, Mrs. D. R ROBINSON, of Boston, Ind., who is here with her mother, and Mabel [SEELEY] and Gertrude SEELEY, of Spokane, Wash.

Funeral services for James H. CLAYBURN were held Friday afternoon from the Baptist church here, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial was made at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Judge Frances BOWERS, of Warsaw, was in the city today to attend the funeral of Henry C. THOMPSON. He also visited with Mrs. J. C. LORING, who is a relative of his.

Saturday, December 18, 1920

[no obits]

Monday, December 20, 1920

Mrs. Eliza E. SMITH, 76, a resident of Rochester for 65 years, and one of the city's most prominent women, died at 12:45 o'clock Sunday afternoon at her home on north Main street. Mrs. Smith had been in excellent health until within 10 days of her death. She was confined to her bed but four days. Death was due to complications.
Eliza E. LYON was born in West Liberty, Ohio, December 24, 1844, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. LYON. She moved to Rochester with her parents in 1854, when she was 11 years of age. She was educated in the common schools of Rochester and spent two years at the Western Female Seminary at Oxford, Ohio.
On March 26, 1863 she was united in marriage to Milo SMITH, who died in June, 1911. Since that time she has resided in her home on north Main street where she has lived for 55 years. There were no children and deceased is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Marion REITER and Mrs. Frank TERRY, both of this city.
Mrs. Smith had been a charter member of the University Extension Society, a literary club

disbanded for many years, and was also a charter member of the Woman's Club, organizations in which she took a large interest. She was a member of the Spiritualist church.
Funeral services at the residence Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Mary BISHER, 87, widow of the late Joseph BISHER, died Sunday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. C. DAVIS, of this city, a victim of old age and complications.
Mrs. Bisher was born in Ohio, February 21, 1833. She had lived for many years in Rochester and is survived by a son, Joseph BISHER, west of Rochester, and a daughter, Mrs. DAVIS.
Funeral services from the Davis residence on College avenue, Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Burial at Moon cemetery.

Tuesday, December 21, 1920

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 22, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Dee REITER came from their home in Connersville, Ind., to attend the funeral of his aunt, Mrs. Milo SMITH.

The death of Mrs. Mary J. MILLER occurred at the home, 318 West 10th street, Wednesday, at 11:30 p.m. The deceased was the widow of the late Samuel MILLER, whose death occurred four years ago.
Mary Jane WAKEFIELD was born in Michigan, October 18, 1848 and was 72 years, 2 months and 4 days of age at the time of her death.
She was united in marriage with Samuel MILLER, at Fulton, Dec. 31, 1868, and was a member of the United Brethren church at Antioch. Three children survive, Archie D. [MILLER] and Milton MILLER, of Rochester and Dot H. HOLLAND, of Phelps, Wis. Besides these there are six grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Two half-brothers, Ed S. [MARTIN] and Frank MARTIN of Fulton, and two half-sisters, Mrs. Kate MILLER, Ft. Wayne, and Mrs. Anna POLING of Alexandria also survive.
Funeral at the residence Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock.

Thursday, December 23, 1920

Lorwin Meredith [ARVEN], three months of age, died Thursday morning at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer ARVEN, north of Rochester. Funeral services at the home Saturday afternoon. Burial at Citizen's cemetery.

Friday, December 24, 1920

Mrs. Simon BAILEY was called Friday to Indianapolis on account of the death of her sister, Mrs. Oscar MANSFIELD. Mrs. Mansfield is very well known in Rochester as she and her husband owned and built several lake cottages near Fairview Hotel and have spent a part of each summer at the lake for a number of years. Mrs. Mansfield has been a buyer for the New York department store in Indianapolis for several years.

Saturday, December 25, 1920

[no paper - holiday]

Monday, December 27, 1920

Mrs. L. W. HATFIELD, of Talma, Mrs. Omer ROSS, O. D. ROSS and Harold ROSS have returned from Elwood, where they attended the funeral of Miss Agnes BOGARDUS. Miss Bogardus was well known in this city.

Tuesday, December 28, 1920

Benjamin BOZE, colored, who died at two o'clock Monday afternoon at the county farm, had been an inmate of that institution for the past eight years. He was 80 years of age at the time of his death, but nothing whatever is known of his antecedents. The body will probably be shipped to Bloomington for medical dissection.

Wednesday, December 29, 1920

Abe [SHUMAN] and Hiram SHUMAN left this morning for Troy, Ohio, where they will attend the funeral services of their brother, A. M. SHUMAN.

Thursday, December 30, 1920

Mrs. L. W. HATFIELD returned home Saturday evening from Elwood, where she went to attend the funeral of her niece, Miss Agnes BOGARDUS, Friday afternoon. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Several families of the neighborhood attended the funeral of Mrs. Sam MILLER at Rochester Friday. - - - ANTIOCH ITEMS.

Friday, December 31, 1920

Dallas A. ANDERSON, son of Mrs. Jesse FINNEY, north of Rochester, has been murdered in South Bend, according to word received by the mother. Mack ALEYO is being held for the crime.

Word has been received of the arrival at Leiters Ford, Thursday, of the body of Oren SEELEY, the first Fulton county war hero to be buried here. Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 1:30 at Leiters Ford with full military honors accorded by the members of the local post of the American Legion. Rev. ROUCH will have charge of the funeral services.