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FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1921

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1998

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 


Rochester Sentinel

1921

Monday, January 3, 1921

Mrs. Alice SAYGER died at 8:30 o'clock Monday morning at her home at 1209 Elm street of cancer from which she had suffered for the past year. She was married 20 years ago to John SAYGER and had been in Rochester for the past 10 years. She is survived by the husband and six sisters, Mrs. Althea WARE, of Medary, Calif., Mrs. Mell DOWNS, Mrs. Gus RICHTER, Mrs. Joseph HUNTER and Mrs. Tom WILSON, all of Rochester, and Mrs. Clara FARRY, of Cincinnati. Funeral arrangements later.

Abraham PFEIFER, 74, died Saturday evening at his home just south of Rochester near the Van Dien crossing, a victim of complications. Funeral services from the residence Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. Burial at Fulton.

Tuesday, January 4, 1921

Fulton County's first military funeral was held Monday at Leiters Ford when the body of Orin SEELEY, who died in France as the result of wounds and being gassed, was laid away in the cemetery at that place.
The rifle squad of the Leroy C. Shelton Post of the American Legion participated in the ceremony and fired the customary three volley over the grave and Bugler Arch TIMBERS blew taps. The full American Legion ritual was carried out both in the church and at the grave. About 25 ex-service men were present in uniforms.
Rev. ROUSCH, of the Leiters Ford church, and who is also Chaplin the the local post, preached the sermon. The funeral was largely attended, the church being unable to hold all of the mourners who paid a last tribute to the fallen hero.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F., Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Orin S. SEELEY, 141 Inf., 1896-1919.]

Michael HETZNER, 81, a resident of Rochester for nearly half a century, died Monday night at his home at 212 north Main street after a short illness. Mr. Hetzner had been failing in health for about a year, but was not bedfast until a week ago, when he gradually grew worse until death came. His demise was caused by old age and complications.
Michael Hetzner was born in Dittenheim, Germany, September 21, 1839. He moved to the United States at the age of 12 years, settling with his parents at Peru, Indiana.
In 1861 he moved to Columbus, Indiana, where he was united in marriage to Rebecca E. BAILEY, who survives. After residing for a short time in Columbus, he returned to Peru, where he was employed as a stationary engineer by the I. P. and C. (now Lake Erie and Western) railroad, moving to Fulton county more than 45 years ago.
For a period of 25 years he conducted a restaurant and bake shop in Rochester. In 1912 he celebrated his 50 wedding anniversary.

Surviving are the widow, six sons, William B. [HETZNER], of Toledo, O., Frank [HETZNER], Denver, Ind., David [HETZNER], Harry [HETZNER], Ed [HETZNER] and Fred HETZNER, all of Ft. Wayne, and four daughters, Mrs. Loy ROSS and Mrs. Frank P. DAVIDSON, of Rochester, Mrs. Mary SCOTT, of Elkhart, and Mrs. Emma JONES at home.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Althea WARE, of Medary, Calif., will come to Rochester to attend the funeral of her sister, Mrs. Jack SAYGER.

Wednesday, January 5, 1921

Funeral services for Michael HETZNER Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the Evangelical church. The Rochester lodge I.O.O.F. will have charge of the services.

Quite a number from here attended the Orin SEELEY funeral at Leiters Monday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mrs. Jennie BRYANT went to Knox Tuesday to attend the funeral of her nephew of that place.

Thursday, January 6, 1921

Dr. H. B. ABBOTT died Wednesday morning at his home at Fletchers Lake, a victim of Brights Disease. He is well known in Rochester, being a former resident but years ago moved to Fletchers Lake to practice medicine. The burial will be Friday at Bourbon.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Summit Chapel Cemetery, Tippecanoe Twp.: Harrison B. ABBOTT, 1849-1921; Amanda E. ABBOTT, 1869-1944.]

Funeral services for Mrs. John SAYGER at the residence Friday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, January 7, 1921 to Saturday, January 8, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, January 10, 1921

Mrs. Florian DOVICHI recently received word of the serious injury of her brother, Joseph BERNERO, who was severely burned on his right side, when he fell into fire at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jiacomo BERNERO, near Geneoa, Italy.
Mrs. Bernero, Mrs. Dovhchi's mother, who has been living in Italy since before the war, is an invalid and probably this fact and the shock of his son's injury caused the demise the day following of Jiacomo Bernero, 81, who was found dead in bed, according to the word received by Mrs. Dovichi.
Mrs. Dovichi had then made all arrangements to go to Italy and care for and probably bring back to the United States her mother and brother, both helpless, when she received a cablegram from Italy to the effect that her mother, Mrs. Louise BERNERO had died a day or two before Christmas.
Mrs. Dovichi is now in Chicago conferring with her brothers, one of whom will probably go back to Italy to care for the injured brother and settle up the estate of his parents.

Tuesday, January 11, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, January 12, 1921

Donald J. MOORE will be the second Fulton county gold star man to be buried with full military honors. The body of Donald Moore was shiped from new York Wednesday morning and is expected to arrive at Kewanna, where the funeral services will be held, on Friday. Details concerning Moore's antecedents of his service record could not be secured from the Kewanna post, American Legion. The rifle squad of the Leroy C. Shelton post, American Legion, has been requested to take charge of the funeral services, which will be held Sunday afternoon. Moore died in France during the latter part of 1918. The local firing squad will leave Rochester by motor shortly after noon Friday to attend the obsequies.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Union Twp.; Donald J. MOORE, Montana Pvt 362 Inf 91 Div, Oct 4, 1918.]

Mr. and Mrs. M. F. JENKINS and Frank RANS attended the funeral of Dr. ABBOTT near Fletcher Lake Friday. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

J. C. ASHLEY and wife attended the funeral of Mrs. John LIGE Sunday at Bethel. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Thursday, January 13, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, January 14, 1921

Word has been received here by Mrs. James ABBOTT, of the death of her sister, Mrs. Libbie HENDERSON, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mrs. Henderson was formerly Miss Libbie KOCHENDERFER, of this city, and was well and favorably known in this community.

Saturday, January 15, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, January 17, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. Harry HAMLETT received word Sunday of the death of the latter's sister, Mrs. Hanna HOPPER, 79, of Walton, Ind. Funeral services Tuesday at the Sycamore Chapel.

A crowd that filled the Baptist church to the overflowing attended the funeral of Donald J. MOORE, who died as the results of wounds in France. Rev. READER of the above church preached the sermon, while the American Legion posts of Kewanna and Rochester took charge of the services. The rifle squad from the Leroy C. Shelton post carried out the full military honors. More than thirty ex-service men in uniform attended.

Tuesday, January 18, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, January 19, 1921

James LONG, a pioneer resident of Harrison township, Cass county, was found dead in his home by neighbors who made an investigation after noting that he had not taken mail from the mail box. The man had been dead for several days. Heart disease is believed to have caused the man's death. He had lived alone for years.

Samuel SHOBE, 77, well known farmer of Fulton county, who had been living in this city for the last two years, died at his home on W. Third street at 11:10 Tuesday night, the result of complications due to old age. Mr. Shobe had been in ill health for several years and gradually grew worse until the end. His children were at the bedside when the end came.
Samuel Shobe was born in Allen County, Ohio, on February 1, 1843, where he spent his young manhood. He was married to Cinderella CONRAD and to this union eight children were born. In 1880 Mr. Shobe moved his family to Fulton county and took up his residence on his farm northeast of town, where he resided until about two years ago. Mrs. Shobe died in 1906. He was married a second time to Mrs. Susie KNOTT, who preceded him in death, having passed away a year ago.
Six children survive, Mrs. Jacob UTTER, Edwin [SHOBE], Herb [SHOBE], John [SHOBE], of this vicinity, Dan [SHOBE], of Hammond, and Sam [SHOBE], of Plymouth. Two daughters, Emma [SHOBE] and Lelia [SHOBE], preceded him in death. A number of grandchildren and several great-grandchildren also survive. He was a member of the United Brethren church and the Odd Fellows Lodge.
The funeral will be held at the United Brethren church at Athens at 11 o'clock Friday, Rev. DIXON, of Fulton in charge. Burial in Athens cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. RHODES attended the funeral of the latter's grandmother at Sycamore Tuesday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Funeral services for the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett GRAHAM were held Friday at 2:30 at the M.E. church. - - - AKRON ITEMS.

Thursday, January 20, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, January 21, 1921

Miss Trella HARTER has gone to Monterey to attend the funeral of Mrs. David LIGHT.

Mr. and Mrs. B. L. PERSCHBACHER went Thursday to Plymouth to attend the funeral of Mrs. Claude EMERSON.

Saturday, January 22, 1921

South Bend, Jan. 22 -- Police today were bending every effort to solve the mystery of the death of Robert B. KING whose body was found late Friday in an alley.
Neighbors reported the man had been acting strangely for some time, and a theory of suicide was first advanced. This theory was abandoned when no weapon could be found near the body.
The body when found, had the throat cut and a slash was inflicted on the side of the head. King was married but his wife has been reported out of the city for a few days.
__________

Robert B. King, aged about 40, was a veterinary surgeon and a former resident of Rochester. He practiced in this community for 15 or 20 years, and moved from here to South Bend just four years ago.
His wife, Mrs. Myrtle KING, was in Rochester at the time of his death, visiting her sister, Mrs. Earl WICKS. Mrs. King was summoned to South Bend Saturday morning, but before leaving here knew little of the details surrounding her husband's death.
Dr. King, who had been in ill health for the past few months, suffered from leakage of the heart and his physician had intimated to Mrs. king that he was suffering also from softening of the brain. He had abandoned his practice and his illness probably was the cause of suicide, if that is the manner in which he died.

Monday, January 24, 1921

Wilfred T. McKEE, who was born and brought up near Kewanna, was killed on Jan. 3 at Forrest, Ill., when the auto which he was driving was struck by some freight cars at a Wabash crossing at that place. His brother-in-law and the latter's wife, who were also in the car, were killed, but Mrs. McKee, miraculously escaped.

Practically every resident of Culver paid homage Monday afternoon to Jacob Russell SAINE, who was buried from the Grace Reform church in that town at two o'clock with full military honors.
Saine had been a member of the home guards during the world war and member of the Culver Post, American Legion conducted the funeral services together with 700 cadets from the Culver Military Academy.
At noon every place of business in town was closed and remained so for the balance of the day as a mark of respect for the man that gave his life in aiding in the capture of the five bandits, who on December 29, made an unsuccessful attempt to loot the bank there.
The business men attended the funeral in a body and the capacity of the church could not begin to accomodate the many mourners. Rev. J. F. JAPEY preached the funeral service and the body was taken to the grave on a caisson from the academy.

Tuesday, January 25, 1921

Elizabeth Jane ABBOTT, 84, died at 8:30 o'clock Monday evening at her home near Mud Lake after a very short illness. She was stricken with acute indigestion and died 36 hours after the attack. Mrs. Abbott had been a resident in Fulton county for many years, moving to this locality from Indianapolis where she was born. Surviving are three children, Mrs. Catherine KOCHENDERFER, of near Fulton, James ABBOTT of Rochester and Leslie ABBOTT, at home, seven grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren. Funeral from the residence of Mrs. Newton CHIMONS, near Fulton. Burial at Shelton's cemetery.

Mrs. Samuel REED, 32, committed suicide by hanging herself at her home west of Silver Lake Saturday afternoon. The body was found in a corn crib about 30 minutes after death. A coroner's verdict declared that the woman took her life while temporarily insane. She leaves a husband and a daughter, Mildred [REED], age 11. In a note left by the woman, she told of her intentions but assigned no reason for her act. She asked that good care be taken of her daughter.

Mrs. A. B. GREEN and Mrs. C. B. CARLTON were in South Bend Monday, attending the funeral of Mrs. Marvin CAMPBELL. Mrs. Campbell has been the Conference Treasurer of the Home Missionary Society for about 30 years.

Wednesday, January 26, 1921

Joseph AULT, 72, died late Tuesday evening at his home on West Sixth street, a victim of dropsy and heart trouble, from which he had suffered since last spring. Mr. Ault was born in Wayne county, Ohio, February 29. He was twice married, the first wife preceding him. The widow, Mrs. Elizabeth AULT, three sons, Fred [AULT], John [AULT] and Clyde [AULT], all of Fulton county, and a sister, Mrs. Rebecca TALLY, of Rochester, survive. Mr. Ault had been a resident of this community since childhood. Funeral services from the Trinity Evangelical church Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. E. H. EBERHARDT in charge. Burial at Citizen's cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Citizens Cemetery, Rochester Twp.: Joseph AULT, 1848-1921; Martha E. AULT, 1855-1923.]

That Robert B. KING, 45, of South Bend, took his own life by severing his juglar vein, was the verdict rendered by Coroner C. B. CRUMPACKER of South Bend, following an inquest over the body which was found lying on a street corner Friday afternoon.
There was a deep gash on the left side of King's neck. That either the piece of glass found near the body of the dead man, or that a safety razor blade that could not be located were the instruments used by King, is the theory of the coroner.
"Everything in the case," Crumpacker said, "points to suicide."
King was a former resident of this city.

Russell (Jake) SAINE, who was shot while trying to capture the Culver bank robbers, died Friday at 1 a.m. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The Cadets and Cavalry horses and all of the Artillery from the Academy attended. - - - MAXINKUCKEE ITEMS.

Thursday, January 27, 1921

Hezakiah S. DRAKE, 82, civil war veteran and prominent retired farmer, who had made this city his home for the past 24 years, died late Wednesday evening at his home on south Main street, a victim of hernie from which he had suffered for many years. Mr. Drake had been able to be about up until Sunday when his condition became acute and he gradually sank until death relieved his suffering.
Hezakiah S. Drake was born in Hornersville, N.Y. June 3, 1838, fifth son of a family of nine children born to Leonard and Elizabeth DRAKE. He moved with his family to Erie county, Ohio when he was five years of age. When he had reached young manhood he became a farmer.
He enlisted in the 101st Ohio Infantry in August, 1862, serving until the close of the civil war. He was wounded in the arm in an engagement, but otherwise passed thru the remainder of the war unscathed.
On December 25th, 1864 he was married to Miss Mary MORRIS. They lived in Ohio until 1871 when they removed to Fulton county, residing on a farm just south of Rochester until he retired from active life 24 years ago.
Mr. Drake was crippled in the leg as the result of having been kicked by a horse. He was a member of the Masonic lodge and a life-long republican, altho he took no active part in politics.
He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Mary DRAKE, two sons, Benjamin DRAKE, of Tracy, California and Chas. DRAKE, of Ft. Worth, Texas, who is now in Rochester, a sister, Mrs. William BOYD, of Fremont, Ind., and two brothers, Asa DRAKE, of Broken Bow, Iowa and Leonard DRAKE, of California. Two sons, Benjamin [DRAKE] and Fred [DRAKE], preceded him.
Funeral services from the house on South Main street Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, January 28, 1921

Tobias GOSS, 74, died at 10:30 o'clock Thursday evening at the home on the corner of Main and 13th streets, that he had occupied for more than 45 years. Mr. Goss had been ill for some time and was incapacitated for work for a longer period, but his decline has been gradual and death came largely from old age combined with hardening of the arteries.
Tobias Goss was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, October 14, 1864, a son of Henry and Elizabeth GOSS. He moved with his family to a farm in Fulton county near Fulton, where he resided until November 30, 1875, when he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah WOODFIELD, and moved to the home he had prepared at 12th and Main streets.
There were no children born to this union and Mr. Goss was the last of his immediate family to pass away. He had been a brick mason by trade in his active years and was a democrat by political faith, altho never having taken an active interest in politics.
He was a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge and of the Christian church. The widow, Mrs. Sarah GOSS, three nephews and a niece survive. Funeral services from the residence Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT and the I.O.O.F. lodge in charge. Interment at the Mausoleum.

Saturday, January 29, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, January 31, 1921

Roy TAYLOR, 54, Akron liveryman, died shortly after noon Friday from a self inflicted gun shot wound that passed thru his head. Taylor had attempted suicide and the fact that death was not instantaneous was remarkable, owing to the fact that the bullet fired from a borrowed revolver, passed directly through both temples, severing the optic nerve. He had seemed well on the road to complete recovery until Thursday, when he suffered a relapse that resulted in death. He is survived by the widow and a son, Seth TAYLOR, of Warsaw.

Fred DRAKE, of Tulsa, Okla., is here, being called on account of the death of his grandfather, T. S. DRAKE.

Lou R. LINKENHELT, night police officer went to Garrett Saturday to attend the funeral of his brother, Charles LINKENHELT, which was held today. Charles died at Seattle, Washington, and his body was brot to Garrett for burial.

Tuesday, February 1, 1921

Marion DAVIS, 68, a life long resident of Fulton county, took his life late Monday afternoon by hanging himself in the barn at the rear of his residence on south Franklin Ave.
Mr. Davis, who had been in ill health for the past six months and unable to do any work, left the house at about 2:30 o'clock Monday afternoon ostensibly to take a little walk in the fresh air.
When he had not returned at a late hour in the afternoon, Mrs. Davis and her daughter, Miss Annabell DAVIS, immediately started to seek him. They inquired all about the neighborhood and places he usually visited and when they had not located him, they went into the barn, where they found his lifeless body suspended by the neck from a rope attached to a rafter in the loft. The sheriff was summoned to the scene, and after a cursory examination, he called the coroner, in the meantime cutting down the body, which was barely raised off the floor, and taking it into the house.
The coroner returned a verdict of suicide.
Mr. Davis, who was a carpenter by trade, had been forced by ill health to give up his work of recent months. It was seen that his mind was growing weaker, but his family had no intimation whatever that he at any time contemplated suicide. The family could assign no reason other than ill health for his act.
Francis Marion DAVIS was born in Akron September 13, 1852. He moved to Rochester approximately 40 years ago, where he has since made his home. Twenty-nine years ago he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Emma WOODHOUSE. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Sarah DAVIS, two daughters, Mrs. John DAMAS, west of Rochester, and Miss Annabelle DAVIS, at home; a half-brother, who resides in New Jersey, one grandchild and three sisters, Mrs. William DAVIS, east of Rochester, Mrs. Nancy POWELL, of Akron, and Mrs. Martha FLITCRAFT, of California.
Funeral services from the residence on south Franklin Avenue Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. CRAIG in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery

The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth Jane ABBOTT was held at the home of CLEMANS, Wednesday morning. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Wednesday, February 2, 1921

Mrs. Catherine MULLICAN attended the funeral of Hesakiah DRAKE at Rochester last Saturday. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, February 3, 1921 to Friday, February 4, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, February 5, 1921

Zane RUSSELL, 81, died Friday evening at 10:15 o'clock at his home six miles northeast of Rochester, after an illness extending over a period of 18 months. Mr. Russell suffered a stroke of paralysis more than a year ago, and while he had not been completely incapacitated, his health was broken, and he was stricken on two other occasions during that period, the last stroke coming within a week of his demise.
Zane Russell was born in Knox county, Ohio, February 25, 1830. He moved to Fulton county when he was sixteen years of age and had resided at his present home for nearly 50 years. He was in the West for a short period during his life, but the greater portion of his time was spent in Fulton county.
He was twice married, the first wife, Mrs. Ellen RUSSELL, having preceded him by 25 years. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Mary A. RUSSELL, a daughter, Mrs. Monda BARKMAN, of this city, and two sons, Charles RUSSELL, of Detroit and F. F. RUSSELL, of Liberty, Ind.
Funeral services at the Athens church Monday morning. The corgege will leave the residence at 10:30 a.m. Burial at Athens.

Monday, February 7, 1921

[no obits]

Tuesday, February 8, 1921

Mrs. Robert KING passed away Sunday evening after a lingering illness, her daughters have been here caring for her for sometime. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Wednesday, February 9, 1921

Mrs. Susan DICK received word from Chicago that her sister that lived there had stepped out after a few sticks of wood and dropped over dead. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Mrs. Lizza BARR got a telephone message Sunday evening from Culver that her brother, E. KESLER, had died with blood poison. His funeral will be Tuesday at Athens about 12:00 o'clock, burial in Athens cemetery. - - - TALMA ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. D. W. TRANBARGER and son attended the funeral of Zane RUSSELL at Athens Monday. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, February 10, 1921

Mrs. Hollis TUCKER, 60, well known Akron lady, passed away Sunday evening at 6:30 at her home. Mrs. Tucker was stricken with paralysis one week ago, which was the cause of her death.
Those who survive are her husband, five sons, Oren [TUCKER], Marion [TUCKER], Merle [TUCKER], Charles [TUCKER] and Horace [TUCKER]; one daughter, Mrs. Constant SMITH; four brothers, Peter ALEXANDER, of Warsaw, Geo. ALEXANDER, of Burket, Jonathan ALEXANDER, of south of Burket, Frank ALEXANDER, of near Silver Lake, and one sister, Mrs. Elias PARKER, of Claypool.
The funeral services were held at Akron, Wednesday morning at 10:00 o'clock. Burial at the Palestine cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Palestine Cemetery, Harrison Twp.: Hollis C. TUCKER, Feb. 14, 1857 - Jan 14, 1928; Nettie F. ALEXANDER TUCKER, his wife, Nov. 27 1858 - Feb 6, 1921.]

Friday, February 11, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, February 12, 1921

Mrs. Susan D. MITCHELL, 44, died at her home on south Main street Saturday morning at 9:30 o'clock, after an illness extending over a period of one year. Mrs. Mitchell suffered from tumor and cancer of the stomach, probably augmented by other complications before death came. She had been bedfast for the past 18 weeks and her condition was critical for several weeks before death relieved her of her suffering.
Susan D. PENCE was born at Newcastle, Ind., September 12, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. PENCE. She lived at Newcastle all during her girlhood and was married to Charles MITCHELL, of this city, March 21, 1897.
Shortly after her marriage she moved with her husband to this city where she has since resided. Surviving are the husband, Charles MITCHELL, two sons, Billy [MITCHELL] and Fred MITCHELL, the father, W. M. PENCE, of Newcastle, a brother Frank [PENCE] and a sister, Miss Crete PENCE.

The death of Mrs. Asenith ANDERSON, 79, took place at the home of her sister, Mrs. Susan BIDDLE, three miles east of Rochester, Friday evening. She was born on the farm where she died. Mrs. Anderson was the daughter of William and Rebekah BIDDLE, and one of six sisters, Mrs. BIDDLE being the last surviving sister.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983: J. Andrew ANDERSON m. Asenith L. BIDDLE, Aug 3, 1865.]

Mr. and Mrs. Frank LOWMAN and daughter, Mrs. Ray MYERS, left today for Kentland, Ind., to attend the funeral of Mrs. Velma HANDY. Mrs. Handy was formerly Miss Velma JOHNSON and has visited in Rochester a number of times.

Monday, February 14, 1921

Charles Ivis BROWN, 35, years of age, died late Sunday afternoon at his home, 411 north Jefferson street, after a very short illness. His death was caused by black diptheria, but it was not discovered that this was his ailment until shortly before death came. It was stated by his attending physician that he was bedfast only a few hours before his demise.
Charles Ivis Brown was born in Fulton county, January 5, 1886, a son of James B. and Emaline BROWN, who with the widow, Mrs. Ruth S. BROWN, two sons, three brothers, Eugene [BROWN] and Charles [BROWN], of Rochester, and Henry [BROWN], of Traverse City, Mich., and one sister, Mrs. Friday CASTLE, of this city.
Private funeral services at the residence Tuesday morning at 12 o'clock, Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT, in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Sarah TRICKLE, 83, for more than 50 years a resident of Fulton county, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Samuel ESSICK, of Plainfield, Ind., early Sunday morning following an illness of several months. Death was caused by senility and complications.
The deceased was born in Allen county, Ohio, February 5, 1838, the daughter of Jacob and Mary SCHINDLER. In 1858 she became the wife of Thomas TRICKLE and 4 years after migrated with her husband to Fulton county, settling on a farm near Rochester, where she resided until 16 years ago when she came to Rochester and resided with her children and during the succeeding years she had divided her time between this city, Laketon and Plainfield.
She is survived by five sons, W. A. [TRICKLE], of Elkmont, Ala., W. E. [TRICKLE], Rochester, E. H. [TRICKLE], Carlton, Wash., J. L. [TRICKLE], Laketon and S. C. [TRICKLE], Watsonville, Calif., and one daughter, Mrs. Samuel ESSICK, Plainfield. Her husband preceded her 25 years ago.
The body was brot to Rochester Monday and may be viewed by friends from 11 to two o'clock Tuesday at the Zimmerman undertaking rooms.
Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock with graveside services, Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT officiating.

Charles SMITH, 86, died early Sunday morning at the county farm where he had been an inmate for the past 48 years. He had no intimate relatives, so far as could be ascertained and little is known of his antecedents. His death was caused by old age and complications.

Funeral services for Mrs. Susan MITCHELL at the residence on south Main street Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. E. Q. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank PENCE, of Newcastle, are here on account of the death of his sister, Mrs. Chas. MITCHELL.

Tuesday, February 15, 1921

Henry DITMIRE, 68, a resident of Fulton county for more than 60 years, died shortly after nine o'clock Tuesday morning at his home on south Main street after an illness extending over a period of at least a year. His ailment was organic heart trouble and his death came after a gradual sinking illness.

Henry Ditmire was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, September 24, 1832, a son of Adam and Elizabeth DITMIRE. When he was about six years of age he moved with his parents to Fulton county, settling on a farm in Aubbeenaubbee township.
He was united in marriage August 10, 1875 to Margaret ELLIS. There was no children born to this union. Mr. Ditmire was elected county treasurer on the democratic ticket in 1886 and when he took office in 1887 moved to Rochester, where he has since resided.
When he was out of office he opened a book store on Main street opposite the court house, where he engaged in active business until three years ago when he rettired on account of failing health. He had been a democrat politically thruout his life and was a member of the Presbyterian church.
He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Margaret DITMIRE and three brothers, Frank [DITMIRE], of Fulton, Emanual [DITMIRE], of Toledo, O., and Simon DITMIRE, of Delong.
Funeral arrengements later.

Robert MITCHELL, of South Bend, was in this city Monday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Chas. MITCHELL.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank PENCE left this afternoon for their home in Newcastle, after being called here by the death of his sister, Mrs. Charles MITCHELL.

Word was received here from Mrs. Dan BROWN, of Hammond, of the death of Mrs. Brown's sister, Mrs. Ethel SANDERS, of New Mexico. Mrs. Sanders is well known in Rochester.

Wednesday, February 16, 1921

Funeral services for Henry DITMIRE, who died early Tuesday, from the residence on south Main street Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The friends and relatives of Mrs. Robert KING gathered at her home on Thursday, February 11, at 1 p.m., where a short service was held. The funeral then proceeded to the Trinity Reformed church in Delong.
A most wonderful sermon was preached by Rev. TAPY of the Revorm church, of Culver, Ind., the text being as follows: How are the dead raised up? and with what body do they come?
Mrs. Robert King was laid to rest in the Leiters Ford cemetery.
Lottie DAVIDSON KING was born of Scotch parents in the north of Ireland on Dec. 25, 1839 and died Feb. 6, 1921, aged 82 years, 1 month and 9 days. At an early age she came with her parents to the U. S. They located at Springfield, Ohio. At the age of 27 she came to Fulton county, Ind., and on May 27, 1867, she was married to Robert KING. Shortly after marriage, moved on the farm where she ever remained until called to her eternal home. She is the last of a large family and has gone home to join them and her own family of seven children and three grandchildren.
There are left to mourn her loss, the husband and two daughters, Elizabeth KING KINSLEY, of Wakarusa, Ind., and Margaret KING BURNER, of Chicago. There are also five grandchildren living.
She was reared in the faith of the Episcopal church. After marriage she united with the M.E. church in Leiters Ford, later to transfer her membership to Trinity Reformed church in Delong.
By friends she is remembered as true, faithful and charitable; by husband and daughters she is remembered as a precious jewel, always diligent, always patient, kind and pure; by the grandchildren she is remembered as a dear, darling grandma. She is remembered as one who never turned her back, but marched breast forward, never doubting cloud would break, never doubting prayer nor love of God. Mrs. King never turned beggar or needy from her door.
Her constant wish was that she might be in Abraham's bosom.

Thursday, February 17, 1921

Mrs. Anna KILER and daughter, Maleta [KILER], were here today to attend the funeral of Henry DITMIRE. They spent the day with Mrs. C. D. SHOBE.

Friday, February 18, 1921

George HESS, 43, son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Joe HEFFLEFINGER, is dead at his home in Hamilton, Ohio. Mr. Hefflefinger received a telegram from his daughter Friday morning announcing his death. Mr. Hess married Grace HEFFLEFINGER at Peru, Indiana, in 1910. He often visited here in the summer and was well known in the vicinity. He leaves besides his wife and two sons, one sister and two brothers. Mr. and Mrs. Hefflefinger left Friday morning to attend the funeral.

Saturday, February 19, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, February 21, 1921

Henry BROWN has returned to his home in Traverse City, Mich., lafter being called here by the death of his brother, Chas. BROWN.

Tuesday, February 22, 1921 to Thursday, February 24, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, February 25, 1921

E. B. SCOTT, 48, teacher of history in the Argos schools, died Monday a victim of pneumonia. He is survived by a widow and three daughters.

Saturday, February 26, 1921

Fred FELL, of Monterey, died early Thursday morning following an apoplectic stroke. He was stricken while in bed and his illness was not known until death came.

Monday, February 28, 1921

B. F. GREEN has received word of the death of his cousin, John J. SWARTZELL, of Farmersville, Ohio. Funeral services there Tuesday.

Tuesday, March 1, 1921

Mrs. Florence SEE, a former resident of Deedsville, is reported as being among the fatalities of the New York Central and Michigan Central wreck at Porter, Ind. Mrs. See and her daughter are thought to have been passengers on the eastbound Michigan Central train which was derailed directly in front of the oncoming west bound New Y ork Central flyer.
Mrs. See is the wife of Ralph SEE and the couple lived in Peru for some time. Mr. See was for some time employed in the Lake Erie shops there and later was a brakeman on the north local running through Rochester. Later he took charge of the Lake Erie yards at Michigan City, removing with his fmily to the latter place. It is also reported that an eight year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. See was killed at the same time with the mother.
Both Mr. and Mrs. See came from the vicinity of Deedsville and have many relatives living there, Mrs. See being the daughter of Newton LEFFELL. They are well known among the railroad people and have many friends in Rochester who will be shocked to learn of the sad death of the wife and daughter.

Mrs. Charles RICHMOND went to Mentone today to attend the funeral of a friend.

Wednesday, March 2, 1921

The body of Mrs. Josephine Alice LUDEMAN, 37, who died early Wednesday morning at her home in Hammond as the result of influenza, was shipped to Rochester Wednesday for burial. Mrs. Ludeman had been ill only a short time and Rochester relatives had no idea that her illness was serious until word had been received of her demise.
She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ami NELLANS of this city.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Richland, Twp.: Josie A. NELLANS, July 12, 1883 - March 1, 1921.]

Mrs. Nevada B. CLARY, 65, died early Wednesday morning at her home on east Ninth Street, after an illness of but eight days. Death was caused by a complication of diseases.
Nevada B. WILLIAMS, was born near Grass Creek, October 21, 1855, a daughter of Joseph P. and Mary WILLIAMS. She lived with her family until her marriage, December 21, 1876, to Albert CLARY. Following her marriage she lived in Cass and Pulaski counties, moving to Rochester 23 years ago, where she had since resided.
Surviving are the mother, Mrs. Mary WILLIAMS, the husband, three children, George CLARY, of Chicago, Mrs. Laura GOODNOW, of Los Angeles, Calif., and Harvey CLARY, of Rochester, two sisters, Mrs. Laura CONRAD, North Dakota, Mary WILLIAMS, Los Angeles and three brothers, S. L. WILLIAMS, near Monterey, Daniel WILLIAMS, Santa Brabara, Calif., and George WILLIAMS, near Kewanna.
Funeral arrangements later.

The death of Mrs. Levi CLOUD occurred at her home on E. Main street in Peru Sunday, caused by double pneumonia. Mrs. Cloud's maiden name was Cordelia FOOR, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry FOOR. - - - MACY ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Levi CLOUD, 1866-1945; Cordelia CLOUD, 1864-1921; Maud CLOUD, 1868-1895.]

Thursday, March 3, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, March 4, 1921

Funeral services for Mrs. J. A. LUDEMAN Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at the residence of Ami NELLANS. Burial at [Richland Center] I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, March 5, 1921 to Monday, March 7, 1921

[no obits]

Tuesday, March 8, 1921

Funeral services for Rev. Z. DIXON, pastor of the Fulton United Brethren church, who died at his home there Thursday after a few days illness of pneumonia, was held Monday afternoon. Rev. Dixon was well known in the St. Joseph United Brethren conference.

Word was received here today of the death at his home in Fulton of Charles REED, following an illness of scarlet fever. No particulars were available.
[NOTE: See Thursday, March 10, 1921.--WCT]

Mr. and Mrs. Chancy STRAWDERMAN, of Plymouth, motored here Monday to bring Rev. and Mrs. George CRANE to attend the funeral of Rev. DIXON. They returned for the evening services at Plymouth.

Wednesday, March 9, 1921

[no obits]

Thursday, March 10, 1921

Charles REED, aged about 40, died Wednesday evening at about five o'clock at his home west of Fulton, a victim of scarlet fever, from which he had suffered but a short time. Reed's demise had been reported earlier in the week, but the report had been misconstrued from the true informaion that he was in a dying condition at that time. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Leona REED, two daughters, a son, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel REED, west of Fulton, and several brothers and sisters.

Friday, March 11, 1921

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. Dee MARTIN, of Glendora, Calif. She died following an operation. Mr. Martin was formerly from Rochester.

Saturday, March 12, 1921

Mrs. Martha Ann SHELTON, 94, a pioneer resident of Fulton county, passed away Friday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Albert BITTERS, 1216 S. Madison street, after a long illness. Mrs. Shelton had been in poor health for a number of years and a fall eight months ago is believed to have hurried her demise. She was bedfast for but a few days. Death was caused by old age and complications.
Martha Ann LEAGUE was born near Harrodsburg, Ky., September 25, 1826, a daughter of John and Martha LEAGUE. She lived with her parents there until in 1834 when she moved to Greenwood, Ind. Here she met Samuel P. SHELTON to whom she was united in marriage March 19, 1846. In November of the same year they moved to Green Oak, where they resided until in 1866, when she moved to the residence on S. Madison street now occupied by her daughter.
Surviving are three children, Mrs. Albert [Emma E. SHELTON] BITTERS, John SHELTON and Horace SHELTON, both of this city. Her husband, parents and three sisters receded her.
Funeral services from the residence Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. H. Gerald GEIGE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, March 14, 1921

Mrs. Mahala MOORE, 70, widow of the late Milton MOORE, who died 10 years ago, passed away early Monday morning at the home of her son, Homer MOORE, on east Ninth street, after a three weeks illness. Death was caused by old age and complications.
Mrs. Moore [Mahala METZ] was born in Fulton county, March 2, 1851, a daughter of William and Jane METZ. She had resided all of her life in this locality, all of her married life having been spent on the Moore farm three miles east of Rochester.
Surviving are two sons, Homer MOORE, Rochester, and Henry MOORE east of the city, three brothers, Oscar [METZ] and George METZ, of Mentone, and Lott METZ of Nebraska, and a half brother, C. A. MITCHELL, of this city.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Susan ZINN, a former resident of this city, died Sunday at the home of her son, Roy SHANKS, at Plymouth, according to word received here. The body will be brot to this city for burial Tuesday following funeral services at the Hoover chapel Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Mrs. Zinn is survived by two children, her son and a daughter, Mrs. Pearl CARR, of this city.

Tuesday, March 15, 1921

Funeral services for Mrs. Mahala MOORE Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the U.B. church, Rev. G. F. CRANE in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

M. H. INGRAM, for many years following the Civil War, editor and publisher of the Winamac Democrat-Journal, died at the home of his son, John C. INGRAM, at Trinidad, Colorado, on Thursday night, March 2, as a result of a breakdown incident to his old age. He was 86 years of age at the time of his death.

Mrs. John ERB went to Wabash Thursday to attend the funeral of a relative.

Wednesday, March 16, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. Louis MOORE, of Michigan City, are here to attend the funeral of his aunt, Mrs. Mahala MOORE.

Thursday, March 17, 1921

Elizabeth A. GRUEL was born February 3, 1841, departed this life March 13, 1921, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Emma BARKER. She was united in marriage to John J. BEATTIE, April 6, 1862. To this union seven children were born, Walter T. [BEATTIE], of Missouri, Marion W. [BEATTIE], of Indianapolis, William M. [BEATTIE], of Logansport, Emma J. BARKER, of Fulton, Minnie M. BARKER, of Rochester, Lucy E. SEE, of Tracy, Colo., and Cora A. FITES, of Deedsville. The father and son, Walter, preceded her to the spirit world. She was united again in marriage to David SLOPPY, he also having passed away before. Early in life she was converted and united with the Baptist church at Marshtown, to which she still belonged.
The children, 1 brother, 4 sisters, 21 grandchildren, 23 great-grandchildren and many friends are left to mourn the loss.

Mrs. Mary TOBEY, Mrs. Jack IRWIN and Mrs. George TOBEY attended the funeral of their aunt, Mrs. Cal SCOTT of Spring Creek.

Friday, March 18, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, March 19, 1921

Jesse W. EMMONS, 84, a resident of Fulton county since 1839 passed away at the home of his son, Milo EMMONS, in Mout Morris, Michigan, Friday night after a lingering illness caused by a complication of diseases and senility.
The deceased was born in Kentucky February 2, 1837, the son of John and Martha EMMONS. At the age of two, he came with his parents to Fulton county, Indiana, making the journey by covered wagon. At the age of 23 he was united in marriage with Miss Susanna BURKETT and to this union, ten children were born.
Jesse Emmons was a well known citizen in Fulton county, where he conducted a farm for many years, in Newcastle township. About ten years ago moved to Mount Morris, Michigan, and since has resided there.
He is survived by a widow and ten children, namely: Dan [EMMONS] and Mrs. Dora CUNNINGHAM, of Rochester; Milo [EMMONS], of Mt. Morris, Michigan; Frank [EMMONS], of Harlan, Michigan; Newton [EMMONS], of Thompsonville, Michigan; Harry [EMMONS], of

Argos; Mrs. Dan METZKER, of Goshen; Mrs. Henry ROBBINS, of LaPorte; Mrs. Del LEAVELL, of South Bend and Mrs. Frank GOULD, of Detroit, Michigan.
Funeral services will be held in Mt. Morris, Monday afternoon, burial there.

Monday, March 21, 1921

Mrs. Floe Agatha HAYS, 21, wife of John R HAYS, Jr., died at 11:25 o'clock Sunday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. MILLER, south of Rochester, after a short illness. Death was caused by complications. Mrs. Hays was born in Fulton county, where she had resided practically all her life, September 17, 1899. She is survived by the parents, the husband, one child, a nine months old son, John HAYS, and three brothers, Otto [MILLER] and Hugh MILLER, of Rochester, and Frank MILLER, of Kewanna. Funeral services from the United Brethren church at Rochester Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. George R. CRANE officiating. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

County Agent L. R. BINDING came home from Stockbridge, Mich., Monday where he was at the bedside of his father, Willis BINDING, who died at his home there Sunday. Mr. Binding will return for the funeral.

Tuesday, March 22, 1921

Mrs. Harry KAHN, of Indianapolis, formerly Miss Carrie MICHAEL, of this city, died at a hospital in Cleveland Monday, the result of an operation. This information was received in a telegram sent by her husband to Mrs. Arthur WILE. The news of her death came as a shock to Mrs. Kahn's wide circle of friends here who were not aware that she was seriously ill. Just what was the exact cause of her death, whether she died following a recent operation or one performed last fall, is not known as no particulars were given.
Carrie MICHAEL KAHN was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Julius MICHAEL, who lived in Rochester about twenty years ago. She grew to young womanhood in this city and after moving to Indianapolis with her parents, she was married to Harry KAHN, of the National Furniture Company, and made her home there ever since.
She is survived by her husband, her father, a half-sister, Mrs. Pauline MEYER, and a half-brother, Joe MICHAEL, all of Indianapolis. Her mother died while she was a young girl. The funeral will be held from the home of a brother of the husband, Nathan KAHN, Wednesday afternoon.

Isaac J. SWANGO, 33, a resident of Fulton county for the past 23 years and a veteran of the world war, died suddenly Monday evening at the home of his sister, Mrs. Allen SOSBE north Main street, after a short illness. He had just recoverd from an attack of diptheria when he was suddenly stricken with Brights disease.
Isaac Swango was born in Shelby county, May 8, 1887, a son of William and Harriet SWANGO. He moved to this community 23 years ago and enlisted in the army July 22, 1918. He served in the 36th division and was stationed at Camp McClellen, Ala., prepared to go overseas when the Armistice was signed.
He is survived by a brother, Frank [SWANGO], of Rochester, a half-brother, Edwin SWANGO, Rochester, and three sisters, all of this city, Mrs. Allen SOSBE, Mrs. Charles HIGGINS, Mrs. Clarence POFFENBARGER.
Funeral services will be held from the United Brethren church Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. George CRANE officiating. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The firing squad of the Leroy Shelton Post, American Legion, will have charge of the services at the grave.

The body of Mrs. May FARRINGTON HIATT, a former resident of this city, was brot to Rochester from her home in Marion, where she died Sunday morning, for burial. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon from the residence of her aunt, Mrs. Frank McKEE. Rev. E. O. LAUDEMAN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, March 23, 1921

Charles Robert [BELLENGER], infant son of William and Florence BALLENGER, died this morning at the home of his parents, 405 Ohio street, a victim of pneumonia. Besides the parents, a sister, Helen Louise [BALLENGER], survives. Funeral services from the residence Friday afternoon at one o'clock, Rev. G. R. CRAIG officiating. Burial at Macy I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur WILE and Mrs. Murray McCARTY went today to Indianapolis to attend the funeral of Mrs. Carrie MICHAELS KAHN.

Thursday, March 24, 1921

From the Indianapolis Star:
Eulogized as "the bringer of light and hope to the needy in the highways and byways of Indianapolis," Mrs. Carolyn M. KAHN, who died Monday after a life devoted to charity and welfare work, was buried yesterday afternoon in the cemetery of the Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation following ceremonies at the Congregation Indianapolis Temple, Delaware and Tenth streets. The temple was filled with relatives, friends and those who have been aided through the benefactions of Mrs. Kahn. The altar was piled high with floral offerings.
Rabbi Morris M. FEUERLICHT, who delivered the funeral sermon, likened Mrs. Kahn to Esther, beloved queen of the ancient Jews, who interceded in the plots of wicked King Haman and delivered her people from his wrath. Mrs. Kahn, he said, delivered her people from suffering through her acts of charity.
Mrs. Kahn, wife of Harry KAHN, of the National Furniture Company, died at the Lakeview hospital in Cleveland, where she had been undergoing treatment after an illness of two years. She was 42 years old. Mrs. Kahn was interested in numerous charities, was associated with the Council of Jewish Women and served with the Red Cross during the war. She devoted a great deal of her time to the establishment and maintenance to milk stations for the poor of the city. A memorial service was conducted for her last night at the temple.

Friday, March 25, 1921

Charles Henry WOOD, six months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Russell WOOD, died Saturday evening at the home of his parents, after a short illness of pneumonia. Funeral services were held from the house Monday afternoon, Rev. George CRAIG officiating. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Dora HIRT, 22, died late Wednesday at the home of her sister, Mrs. Clarence GIBBS, west of Rochester, a victim of tuberculosis.

Daniel BEARSS, a lifelong resident of Marshall county, is dead at his home near Bourbon, where he had resided for the past 70 years.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Summit Chapel Cemetery, Tippecanoe Twp.: Daniel R. BEARSS, 1837-1921; Rhoda A. BEARSS, 1837-1920; Fred E. BEARSS, 1861-1936; Myrtle C. BEARSS, 1868-1952.]

Saturday, March 26, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. Henry FOGLESONG went to Larwell, Ind., to attend the funeral of her aunt, Mrs. Seville WHITTENBERGER.

Monday, March 28, 1921

Mrs. Isabelle C. GROVE, 63, wife of Orange K. GROVE, died at 5:30 o'clock Monday morning at her home, a victim of a complication of diseases. She had been ill for a period of 18 months with her condition gradually becoming worse until death came.
Isabelle C. JORDAN was born August 14, 1857 at Etna Green, a daughter of Henry and Melissa JORDAN. She was united in marriage March 18, 1880 at Talma, where she then resided and moved to Rochester in 1893, where she has since made her home.
Surviving are six daughters, Mrs. Sylvia STERNBERG, of Oakland, Calif., Mrs. Don DuBOIS of Kewanna, Mrs. Ray MOWE, of Richmond, Mrs. Everett STONER, of South Bend, Mrs. Harold HOOVER, of Detroit and Mrs. Lee YOUNG of Chicago. She was a member of the Eastern Stars, Macabees and the Baptist church.
Private funeral services from the home Wednesday morning at ten o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at Richter cemetery.

Tuesday, March 29, 1921

An entire family of three persons was wiped out at noon Tuesday when Mr. and Mrs. John HEIGHWAY, of Macy, and their daughter, Mrs. LONG, of near Akron, were instantly killed by a speeding Winona interurban car that struck the automobile in which they were riding at a cross road two miles north of Akron.
According to an eye witness of the tragedy, a woman who resides in the neighborhood and saw the whole affair from a distance of less than a quarter of a mile, the Heighway car, a Ford touring car, was being driven east across the interurban tracks at what is known as Bear's crossing.
The automobile crossed the tracks and evidently was being driven too fast to make the abrupt turn south on the road that follows the railroad tracks into Akron, for the machine was halted.
After but a momentary stop, the car was backed up onto the interurban tracks, evidently to enable the driver to make the turn south into Akron, when the Winona south bound train due in Akron at about noon, came along at a speed estimated at approximately 45 to 50 miles an hour and hit the automobile.
The interurban traveled between 200 and 300 feet before being brot to a complete stop and the automobile was ground to a broken and twisted mass of wreckage beneath the big car.
The occupants of the car were scattered about, the youngest member of the party, Mrs. Long, having been thrown fully 100 feet from the crossing, where the auto was struck.
All were dead when picked up by the crew and occupants of the interurban, having suffered many broken bones and their skulls were crushed by the terrific impact with the swiftly moving car.
The bodies were taken to Akron.
Mr. and Mrs. John HEIGHWAY were life long residents of Fulton county. Mr. Heighway was especially well known over the county, having taught school at Kewanna and later he was elected trustee of Henry township. He had resided for many years on his farm on the Ft. Wayne road, east of Rochester and almost due north of Athens. He was little more than 50 years of age.
Mrs. Heighway about 42 years of age, was formerly Miss Myrtie KESSLER, daughter of Mrs. M. L. KESSLER, of Chicago. She is survived by the mother and a sister, Mrs. William KING, also of Chicago. Mr. Heighway is survived by a brother, Colfax HEIGHWAY, of Newcastle township, and a sister, Mrs. Anna LEININGER, who also resides east of Rochester.
The daughter, Mrs. Worth LONG, is survived by her husband. She lived on a farm near Akron.
The motorman of the interurban car, Grant HILLIARD, of Warsaw, is said by Akron residents to be noted for the manner in which he operates his car. He is said to be negligent and his car has figured in several accidents recently, the last one the only one in which there were any fatalities. There was no testimony offered up to the Sentinel's press time as to whether or not the motorman had blown his whistle for the crossing.
________

It was later learned that Mr. and Mrs. Heighway had motored from Macy, where he is the principal of the schools, to their farm north of Athens, where their daughter and her husband reside. Mrs. Long accompanied them from there to the interurban crossing, where the family intended to take a car to Mentone, where they expected to attend the funeral of an uncle. They had driven across the tracks to the cross roads, where they turned the automobile around and were driving back across to park the car until they had returned from Mentone, when they were struck.

Wednesday, March 30, 1921

A triple funeral, probably the first ever held in Fulton county, is planned for John and Myrtle HEIGHWAY and their daughter, Mrs. Worth LONG, all of whom were instantly killed at noon Tuesday when their automobile was struck by a Winona interurban at a crossing just two miles north of Akron. The services are to be held Thursday afternoon at the Bethlehem church, north of Athens, while interment will be made at the Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.
First reports of the accident at the Baer crossing were, as usual, hazy, but it has since been learned that Mr. Heighway borrowed the car that figured in the tragedy of a cousin and drove from his home to Macy to his own farm near Athens, where his daughter resides. The party in the car was seen by the motorman to drive across the tracks which accounts for the fact that his car continued to maintain its high rate of speed.
Then, almost without warning, the motorman saw the auto turn and come back onto the tracks. He is said to have already whistled for the crossing, and a passenger on the car delares that suddenly he heard the whistle blow again and then felt the brakes being applied in such a manner that the whole trolley car trembled.
In the next instant this passenger, Lot LOSEY, of Plymouth, well known here, felt an impact as the interurban struck the auto and when the car came to a stop he dashed out to see what had happened.
He it was who first reached Mr. Heighway, whom he found in a ditch, his body badly mutilated and already lifeless. He then looked about and went to where the daughter was lying. As he turned her over he discovered that she too was dead and another passenger on the car had already reached the mother, Mrs. Heighway, also found horribly mutilated and already dead.
The crossing where the accident occurred is open, a clear view of the track being afforded from either direction. Mr. Heighway is believed to have stalled his motor while on the tracks when he evidently saw the swiftly approaching trolley. Mr. Losey says that it is his belief that the motorman of the car was absolutely free from blame, especially in view of the fact that the motorman's story and that of two eye witnesses of the tragedy corroborate in all details. The motorman is said to have collapsed immediately after stopping his car.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: John D. HEIGHWAY, 1870-1921; Myrtle KESSLER HEIGHWAY, his wife, 1878-1921; Lucile HEIGHWAY LONG, 1902-1921.]

Thursday, March 31, 1921

The funeral services for Mr. and Mrs. John HEIGHWAY, of Macy, and their daughter, Mrs. Worth LONG, of near Athens, who were struck and instantly killed Tuesday, near Akron by a Winona interurban car, was held Thursday afternoon in the Baptist church of this city. The services were at 2:30 o'clock but throngs of people were at the church two hours before the services began. Many people were turned away. Rev. W. J. NIVEN, pastor of the Baptist church, was in charge of the service. Rev. J. B. SPALDING Methodist minister at Macy, told of the school work of Mr. Heighway and Rev. BENDER, of Kewanna, spoke of the entire Heighway family. Rev. NIVEN talked upon the terrible disaster which befell these people. F. E. BRYANT and Rev. NIVEN sang solos and the Bethlehem choir also sang. A very large number of people attended the funeral from Akron, Macy and Bethlehem and also Kewanna. About 50 people from the Macy schools, of which Mr. Heighway was principal, were present.

Ray MOWE, of Richmond, was here Wednesday to attend the funeral services of Mrs. O. K. GROVE.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack IMLER, of Logansport, were here Wednesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. O. K. GROVE.

Elden [FREESE], the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank FREESE, died Saturday night the result of having been severely burned that afternoon. Funeral services Tuesday afternoon at Leiters. Burial at Monterey. - - - LEITERS FORD ITEMS.

Friday, April 1, 1921

[no paper available]

Saturday, April 2, 1921

The three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank FREESE, of near Leiters, was burned to death last week when its clothes caught fire from leaves the child's mother had been burning.

Monday, April 4, 1921

Mrs. Taylor PRIEST, formerly a resident of this city, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harry MARSHALL of Whiting. The body was brought to this city Monday afternoon and taken to the home of her son, A. M. PRIEST, near this city. Funeral services Tuesday afternoon from the Baptist church, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

John D. HEIGHWAY, youngest son of Albert H. and Maria HEIGHWAY, was born in Fulton County, Indiana, October 19, 1870; departed this life March 29, 1921, age 50 years, 7 months and 9 days.
He united with the Bethlehem Baptist Church at the age of 15 years and lived a life of service for the Master until called home, having served as Teacher, Sunday School Superintendent and was a Deacon when the last call came.
His object in life was not to be served but to serve.
Early in life he had the ambition for an education, having worked his way through the University of Valparaiso, at Valparaiso, Indiana, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Science. He taught high school at Kewanna, Akron and Macy, just finishing his second year at the latter place, and was to have continued there another year. He also served the people of Henry township as Trustee for four years.
He was united in marriage to Myrtle KESSLER, December 1st, 1900. To this union was born one daughter.
He leaves an aged father and mother; two brothers, Frank [HEIGHWAY] of Crown Point, and Colfax [HEIGHWAY] of near Rochester; one sister, Mrs. William LEININGR, of near Akron to mourn the loss of a loving son and brother; besides these a legion of friends.

Myrtle HEIGHWAY, formerly Miss Myrtle KESSLER, daughter of Martin and Louvisa KESSLER, was born in Fulton County, Indiana, October 6th, 1878, died March 29, 1921, age 42 years and five months.
Mrs. Heighway was reared on a farm and received her education in the rural schools of Fulton County.
She united with the Baptist church April 2, 1893, where she has lived a consistent Christian for 21 years.
She was a beloved wife and companion, a kind and adoring mother, a true and faithful Christian woman. Myrtle, as she was affectionately known, was a good and helpful neighbor, who consistently lived up to the Biblical injunction of, "Follow peace with all men." She was one who was loved by all who had the good fortune of knowing her.
Myrtle Kessler was united in marriage to John D. HEIGHWAY, December 1st, 1900. She was the mother of one daughter, Lucile [HEIGHWAY]. She leaves to mourn her untimely end, an aged mother, one sister, Mrs. Margaret KING, who is a resident of Chicago. Her father preceded her to her eternal home several years ago.

Lucile HEIGHWAY, daughter of John and Myrtle HEIGHWAY, was born January 29th,

1902, and died March 29, 1921, age nineteen beautiful years and two months.
She gave her Godquickened self to the services of the Bethlehem church, of which her father and mother were each faithful members, on April 22nd, 1914, where she has been in happy Christian Fellowship for seven fruitful years.
Lucile HEIGHWAY LONG received her education in the rural schools of Fulton County, Indiana, and after her eighth grade graduation she entered the Akron High School the following Autumn, where she continued her quest for knowledge for four years, graduating in May of 1919.
After graduation she attended the Winona Normal school in which she fitted herself for the teaching profession in which she identified herself as a teaacher for one year.
On April 22nd, 1920, she became the beloved wife of Worth LONG, of the required sunny environment Akron. In this happy union she found through which the tender petals of her young life unfolded daily.
Mrs. Long leaves to mourn her untimely demise a grief stricken husband, a legion of friends, and two saddened families of relatives who regret that her young life was called to appear in the presence of her God before it had opportunity to ripen and fruitfy in its earthly planting.

Tuesday, April 5, 1921

Thomas COOK, 85, brother of D. T. COOK, of this city, died at North Manchester last Saturday and was buried in that city. He was well known by many Rochester people.

Wednesday, April 6, 1921

Hanna T. QUICK, wife of Philo QUICK, died at 10 o'clock Tuesday evening at her farm home near Fulton a victim of old age. She was born in Ohio on April 26, 1835 and would have been 86 years of age on her next birthday. She moved to Indiana in 1854 and to her present home in 1870. Surviving are the husband, a son, Hubert QUICK, of Macy, and a daughter, Mrs. Edgar McCARTER, of near Fulton. Funeral services Thursday afternoon at the Macy Christian church.

Thursday, April 7, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, April 8, 1921

Benjamin WALLACE, banker and circus owner, of Peru, died this afternoon at the Mayo hospital in Rochester, Minn.

Saturday, April 9, 1921

The body of Benjamin F. WALLACE, 73 years old, pioneer circus man, who died early Friday morning at a hospital in Rochester, Minn., where he had been undergoing treatment for six weeks, undergoing several operations, was brought to Peru today and the funeral services and burial probably will be held next Monday.
At his bedside when death came were Mrs. Wallace, the widow; Charles E. CORY, of Lafayette, a nephew, and Al MARTIN, a well known circus man, who hurried home from China when he learned of Mr. Wallace's illness. Mrs. Charles MURDOCK of Lafayette, a sister, and Bernard WALLACE, of Kokomo, a nephew, also survive.
Mr. Wallace was a native of Pennsylvania. After serving in the civil war, he came to Peru, where he engaged in the livery business. in 1883 he entered the circus business with William ANDERSON. They conducted an overland show for two years. Fire destroyed their menagerie in 1884 and they encountered many difficulties during the first years of the business.
After two years a railroad show was put out and from then until five years ago, Col. WALLACE, as he was familiarly known, continued in the show business, becoming the greatest single owner of circuses in the country.
With the sale of the Wallace-Hagenback shows five years ago, Mr. Wallace turned his energies to banking and farming. His farms aggregate 3,600 acres of river bottom land, and he has improved and beautified them until they are included in the show places of this part of the state. He was president of the Wabash Valley Trust Company, owner of the Wallace theater here and a heavy stockholder in the Senger Dry Goods Company.
Mr. Wallace was well known by many Rochester people and the following residents of this city, George DAWSON, John SWARTWOOD, Foster HAZLETT, Robert WALLACE, George WALLACE and several others were related to him. According to some of the old residents here Mr. Wallace lived in Rochester before he settled permanently at Peru and conducted a livery barn here.

Monday, April 11, 1921

Mrs. Clara N. DAVIS, 46, wife of O. A. DAVIS, of this city, died at their home at 810 Main street Sunday morning at seven o'clock after an illness of but three days. Death was caused by sceptic peritonitis as shown by a post mortem examination.
Clara NEWTON was born at Chelsea, Mich., August 10, 1874, a daughter of Fredrick and Clara NEWTON. She was united in marriage to O. A. DAVIS at her then home in Marion, Ind., July 31, 1919. She is survived by a son by former marriage, Earl GEIGER, of Indianapolis, and a sister, Mrs. Samuel GUTHRIE, of Chelsea, Mich. She was a member of the Methodist church and the Order of Lady Maccabbees and was well beloved by her host of friends both here and at her former home.
Funeral services from the Charles A. DAVIS residence, corner Seventh and Pontiac streets Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. P. J. STINGLEY and Mrs. Julia HOOVER are at Winamac today, where they attended the funeral of the late Joseph CORBETT, a cousin of the former. Mr. Corbett was a Civil War veteran and was well known here, as he attended the reunions of the local post regularly.

Tuesday, April 12, 1921

Laura Matilda LACKEY was born in Fulton county, February 22, 1847 and died April 2 in Whiting, Ind., at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. A. MARSHALL, age 74 years, 1 month and ten days.
Dec. 3, 1868 she was united in marriage to Taylor PRIEST, who departed this life 8 years ago. To this union 8 children were born, all of whom are living but one, Willard L. [PRIEST].
The surviving children are Mrs. H. A. MARSHALL, Mrs. O. S. MACKEY, Mrs. Edward HILL, Mrs. P. B. THRUSH of Whiting Ind., and Mrs. Edward TETZLAFF and A. M. PRIEST of Rochester.

She was a member of the Baptist church, having united with this church several years ago. She lived in this county until three years ago, when she became an invalid and was compelled to give up her home and go to live with her children.
Besides her children and a host of friends she leaves one sister, Mrs. Newton WOODFIELD, of Plymouth, Ind.

Wednesday, April 13, 1921

Marjorie May [HARTER], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William D. HARTER, died Wednesday at the home of her parents near Akron. Funeral services Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the residence. Burial at Nichols cemetery.

Mrs. Samuel ONSTOTT died at her home in Disko Saturday evening about six o'clock. She had been ill about two days and has been cared for by the neighbors, having no relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank MILLER, Mrs. Charles REDING and Mrs. Geo. BRUSH of Muncie, and Misses Lucy BEBB, Ada LYON and Mrs. Denese GROVE and Arthur KINSEY, all of Marion, were here Tuesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. O. A. DAVIS.

Thursday, April 14, 1921

Mrs. Lola WAKELY, 35, widow of the late Guy WAKELY, died early Thursday morning at the home of her parents with whom she resided. Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge MOORE, south of Akron. She had been ill for a long time. The deceased is survived by the parents, a sister, Mrs. Selah MABY, and a brother Orville MOORE. Funeral services from the Christian church at Akron Saturday afternoon at two o'clock.

Bonnie Helen [CLIFF], wife of Charles E. CLIFF, of Hobart, Ind., died Thursday afternoon, April 7, at St. Mary's hospital, Gary, Ind. At her bedside was her mother, Mrs. W. W. WATSON, her husband and her sister, Mrs. Vine CURTIS. She left besides these to mourn her loss five children, Albert [CLIFF], Helen [CLIFF], Ruth [CLIFF], Robin [CLIFF] and an infant daughte, and a son deceased, a sister, Mrs. A. E. MANNING, of Chicago, two brothers, W. Percy WATSON of Chicago and Charles W. WATSON of Kewannee, Ill. Mrs. Cliff was well known here having lived in this city in the DAVIS property on E. 14th street for several years. Her many friends will be shocked to learn of her passing away. The funeral was held at the residence of her brother, W. Percy Watson, of Chicago, burial at Rose Hill cemetery.

Friday, April 15, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, April 16, 1921

Mrs. Conley WILLIAMSON, of Burket, died Wednesday evening, after having been fatally injured when the Dodge automobile, which she was driving, was struck by an east bound Nickle Plate freight train.

Monday, April 18, 1921

Mrs. Anna REITER, 72, widow of the late Jacob REITER, and for 45 years a resident of this city, died at eight o'clock Sunday morning at her home on the corner of Third and Pontiac streets, a victim of asthmatic complications. Mrs. Reiter was born in New York, a daughter of David and Maria NEWTON. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. John HALL, of this city. Funeral services at the residence Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. H. G. GAIGE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Millicent KARN has received word of the death Friday morning at a hospital in Warm Springs, Mont., of her son, Walter M. KARN, 42, of Townsend, Montana. Mr. Karn was a former resident of this city, having moved to the West about 16 years ago. He had been ill for about a year, but little other than this is known here of his demise. He is survived by a widow, Mrs. Myrtle KARN, two children, his mother and three brothers, Oren [KARN], Russell [KARN] and Harry KARN, of this city. The body will be shipped to Rochester for burial.

Tuesday, April 19, 1921

Mrs. Murray DEMMING, for the past two years a resident of this city, who was stricken ill some time ago and later removed to Chicago for treatment, died Sunday morning at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles WATTS, 8206 Cornell Ave., Chicago. Mrs. DEMING is survived by the parents, the husband and two sons. Funeral services at the Chicago home Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock.

Wednesday, April 20, 1921

Charles E. BECKER, 48, well known Fulton county resident and former county commissioner, was instantly killed late Tuesday afternoon when his car was struck by a northbound Lake Erie passenger train on a grade crossing at Tyner, near Plymouth.
Beckere and a companion, a Plymouth manufacturer, had motored in Becker's car from Plymouth to Tyner earlier in the afternoon to witness a new gravel screening machine in operation. The machine had just been delivered to Becker, who has extensive road contracts in the locality, and they wished to see it when it was first operated.
When starting on the return trip to Plymouth, the two men approached the grade crossing. The road slopes downhill at this point and the crossing is cut thru a grade, which hinders the view of the tracks.
As they approached the tracks, Becker brot his car to a complete halt and both occupants of the machine looked carefully in both directions as far as they could see.
Mr. Becker, it is said, remarked to his companion that they must exercise considerable care as he believed a train was due by reason of the fact that a mail pouch was hanging out at the depot.
The car was then driven forward onto the tracks by Mr. Becker and had almost reached safety on the opposite side when it was struck by the locomotive of the passenger train that passes thru Rochester at about 3:30 p.m.
The rear end of the car was struck with such force that the front end was whirled around until it too, was struck by the enging. Either as the car was whirled around and by this momentum, else by jumping, he does not know which, the other passenger in the car was thrown clear, landing about 20 feet away from the scene of the crash not much the worse for the accident.
Becker, however, was thrown into the locomotive, his head striking it with such force that it was crushed and the upper part almost completely torn off. Death was instantaneous.
The body was taken to Plymouth Tuesday evening and Wednesday afternoon taken to the Becker home at Fulton, from where funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Clinton E. BECKER was born in Fulton county, the son of Charles and Lena BECKER. He had lived in this county all his life.
Some years ago he and his brother, Henry BECKER, organized the Fulton Telephone Company, which they now have sold. Mr. Becker was also engaged in the hardware business with Postmaster Otto McMAHAN of this city, at Fulton, Twelve Mile and North Manchester. He preceded John T. LEAVELL as county commissioner and was well known and popular all over the county.
He is survived by the mother, Mrs. Lena BECKER, of Fulton, the widow, Mrs. Edith BECKER and five children, Ruth [BECKER], Omer [BECKER], Mary [BECKER], Herschel [BECKER], and Sylvester [BECKER], all at home, five brothers, Henry [BECKER], east of Rochester, Julius [BECKER], of Plymouth, John [BECKER], of Rochester, Herman [BECKER], of Kokomo and Edward [BECKER] and Ernest [BECKER] at home and one sister, Miss Emma BECKER, who lives with her mother.

Thursday, April 21, 1921

The funeral of Walter M. KARN will be held at the Hoover Chapel on Friday afternoon at two. It will be private. The body arrived from Warm Springs, Montana.

Paul RENTSCHLER, 16, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. George RENTSCHLER, died at 9:30 Wednesday evening at the home of his parents, one mile east of Fulton, a victim of scarlet fever. Young Rentschler had been ill only since last Sunday. He is survived by the parents and six brothers, Andrew [RENTSCHLER], Henry [RENTSCHLER], George [RENTSCHLER], Jr., Robert [RENTSCHLER], Elza [RENTSCHLER] and Clarence RENTSCHLER]. Another brother precedes him.

Marie KEITZER, wife of W. E. KEITZER, died at her home in Fulton county, near Leiters Ford, about 8 o'clock last Friday morning, of tuberculosis.
She had been ailing about ten years and had tried many means of getting relief. She spent some time in the South and later went to the sanitarium at Ottawa, Ill., and from there she returned to her home where she died. She was born December 24, 1880.
The funeral services were held at the residence Monday afternoon and burial was in the Leiters Ford cemetery.

Word was received here Thursday of the death at his home in Noblesville, of Jasper "Jap" HORNER, a former resident of this city. No particulars were available.

Mr. and Mrs. John CROUDER attended the funeral of Mr. Crouder's aunt, Mrs. Louisa WHEELER at Bunker Hill Saturday afternoon. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Friday, April 22, 1921 to Saturday, April 23, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, April 25, 1921

Mrs. Nancy DOLPH, 75, former resident of Fulton county and well known in this vicinity, died at the home of her son, Allen DAVENPORT, at Lapaz. Death came as the result of ulcers of the stomach.
Mrs. Dolph was one of the pioneers of the county and lived in the Mentone neighborhood until about ten years ago when she moved to Lapaz to be with her son. She is survived by a sister, Mrs. Hanna BRYANT, of Rochester, and a brother, Joe BYBEE, of Talma, besides her son. Funeral at Lapaz Tuesday afternoon.

Tuesday, April 26, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, April 27, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. Frank BRYANT went Tuesday to Lapaz, Ind., to attend the funeral of his aunt, Mrs. Nancy DOLPH.

Thursday, April 28, 1921

Walter W. COMPTON, 48, who moved here from Wabash about two years ago, and who was until recently associated with Frank MARSH in the grocery business, died very suddenly at an early hour Thursday morning of heart failure. Compton had been in his usual good health apparently all day, but awakened at about midnight feeling ill. After taking some medicine for his ailment, he again retired, saying that he felt relieved, and just a few minutes afterwards died. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Kitty COMPTON, a brother, John COMPTON, of Wabash, and a sister, Mrs. Amanda LYTLE, also of Wabash. Short funeral services will be held at the residence on West Fifth street Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. The body will then be removed to Wabash, where funeral services will be held Sunday.

Mrs. Laura SOUTHARD, of this city, died at her home in South Bend Wednesday, a victim of cancer, from which she had been suffering for some time. Mrs. Southard had not resided in Rochester for several years. The body will be brot to this city Friday afternoon for burial.

Mrs. Elizabeth BREECE died at her home on Piety Hill Saturday night at eleven o'clock, at the age of 83 years. She had been gradually failing for some time but was only confined to her bed about a week. Her maiden name was ENGLISH and was married three times, her last husband being Joe BREECE, who preceded her in death a number of years ago. She leaves three children, Mrs. Amanda NICODEMUS of Macy, Wilson OXLEY who lives Booth [sic] of Lapere, Mich., who spent the past winter with her mother. [sic] She also leaves two granddaughters and four great-granddaughters. The funeral was held in the Dunkard church at Mexico, the Dunkard minister having charge of the services, assisted by Rev. J. B. SPARLING, pastor of the Macy

Methodist Church. Interment was in the Dunkard cemetery at Mexico.
The relatives from a distance who attended the funeral of Mrs. Breece were, Mr. and Mrs. Leo POOLE and daughter of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. L. D. HERLEM and children of Peru and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson OXLEY of Logansport. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mrs. Sophia SNAPP has gone to Danville, Ill., to attend the funeral of her sister.

Friday, April 29, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, April 30, 1921

Otis BISHOP, formerly a resident of this city, where he was employed by Sol ALLMAN for a period of perhaps 25 years, died Tuesday at his home in Bakersfield, Calif., where he had made his home for the last 15 years, of erysipelas. He had been ill but a few days. A widow survives.

Monday, May 2, 1921

Funeral services for Richard BUTT, who died Monday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. H. KIME, near Deedsville, will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the Ebenezer church. Burial at Denver.

William L. BLACK, 52 colored, died Sunday morning at the home of his brother, George BLACK, of this city, of a complication of diseases. He is survived by four brothers and one sister. Funeral services from the residence Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at Citizen's cemetery.

Tuesday, May 3, 1921

Very unexpectedly the death angel visited the Horner home Thursday morning at 5:30 a.m., and claimed the husband and father, Jessie L. HORNER, age 61 years, 1 month and 24 days.
He was the son of Joseph and Margaret HORNER and was born and raised in Kosciusko county, Indiana. He was united in marriage to Rachel E. BYRD, of Culver, Ind., Dec. 24, 1884, who has been his helpful companion these many years. To this union was born 11 children. He was preceded to the other world by a daughter, Jessie [HORNER], aged eight, and four infants, leaving six children to grieve their loss.
They are as follows: Mrs. Georgia LOUGH, Monterey, Ind., Harvey HORNER, Mrs. Mary BRICKLEY and Mrs. Golda WORKMAN, all of ndianapolis, and Gerald [HORNER] and Charles [HORNER], who live at home. He also leaves six grandchildren, whom he much loved.
He has been known by all those who knew him best, as a faithful and loving father, always planning some way to make his children more happy. As a companion he was always congenial and thoughtful of the ones he loved.
For many years Mr. Horner was a member of the Methodist church and a member of the Gleaner lodge.
For many years he has been in the furnace business and for the last three years had been Branch Manager for the Holland Furnace Co., at Noblesville, Ind., coming from Rochester, where he had lived for ten years. As a business man he has always made a favorable impression and since coming to Noblesville, he has made many business as well as personal friendships.
Besides the widow and children he is surived by two sisters and one brother, Mrs. Sarah Ann PADDOCK, of El Reno, Okla., and Mrs. Jane STUCK, of South Bend, Ind., and Harvey HORNER, of East Akron, Ohio, and a host of relatives and friends. - - - Rev. K. Edward MAYNARD, Pastor S. 9th St., M.E. Church, Noblesville, Ind.

Mrs. Elizabeth OGDEN, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob SMITH and Lloyd SMITH and family attended the funeral of a cousin at Chili Sunday.

Thursday, May 5, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, May 6, 1921

Samson CLAYTON, 68, a life long resident of Fulton county, and for the past 8 years a resident of Rochester, died at 8:30 p.m. Thursday at his home on S. Franklin Ave., a victim of cancer of the liver, from which he had suffered since last January.
Samson Clayton was born in Fulton county September 29, 1852, one of 12 children born to George W. and Anna CLAYTON. He was actively engaged in farming in this county until 18 years ago, when his health failed and he moved to Rochester, where he has since been occupied from time to time in light work.
He was married December 23, 1891 to Alice YOUNG, who with two children, Miss Ruth [CLAYTON], at home, and Mrs. George NICHOLSON, of this city, a brother, George CLAYTON, also of Rochester, a sister, Mrs. John ROUCH, of Newcastle township and two grandchildren, Clayton [NICHOLSON] and Billy NICHOLSON, survive. Two sons died in infancy.
He was a member of the Rochester Lodge I.O.O.F. for more than 30 years. Funeral services from the Christian church Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. ASCHANHORT officiating and the I.O.O.F. in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Jake POLAY is in receipt of a communication from the War Department stating that the body of her brother, Jacob GOLUB, one of the Fulton county lads who made the supreme sacrifice during the war, had been shipped from France, where it had been buried, to this country and would land at New York Saturday, May 7. Golub was a private in the 26th Field Artillery and was killed in action in France in July, 1918. The body will be met in New York by a brother, Max GOLUB, who resides there. Burial also will be made in New York. Mrs. Polay will not go East, but there is a possibility that her husband may go to New York to attend the funeral.

Saturday, May 7, 1921

Nancy C. BYBEE was born in Kosciusko county, Indiana, Jan. 28, 1848, departed this life at the home of her son, Allen DAVENPORT near Lapaz, Marshall county, Ind., on April 23, 1921, at the age of 73 years, 2 months and 25 days. In the year 1866 she was united in marriage to James M. DAVENPORT and soon after their marriage they came to Marshall county, where she has been a continual resident.
To this union was born three children, Lima [DAVENPORT], Minnie [DAVENPORT] and Allen [DAVENPORT], Lima and Minnie having preceded the mother in death, as did also her husband, James M. Davenport on Aug. 11, 1901. In the year 1904 she was married to Albert W. DOLPH and on Feb. 22, 1914, she was left alone in the world for the second time. Sister Dolph when quite young united with the Baptist church, and about four years ago united with the Brethren church. She lived an exemplary earnest christian life. Being naturally of a cheerful disposition, she was strong in faith, gentle and thoughtful in serving her church and family continuously, regular in her attendance at the house of God as long as health permitted, and always lenient and charitable in thot toward others. She was anxious about the welfare of her household and her greatest desire was to see them do well and live right. She possessed a strong christian character and invariably impressed for good those with whom she came in contact. Her going was peaceful. Her trust in God never wavered and He sustained her mightily to the end.
In her departure she leaves one brother, Joseph BYBEE, and four sisters, namely: Mrs. Hanna BRYANT, Mrs. Phoebe SHOEMAKER, Mrs. Syntha EHERMNMAN, Mrs. Almeda EHERNMAN; one son, Allen DAVENPORT, four grandchildren, one step-daughter and 2 step-sons and a host of other relatives and friends. She passed in the triumphs of a living faith in her Savior to whom she had yielded her life for more than a half century. Thus is the first resurrection when the dead in Christ shall come forth we shall meet her again and together be caught up with our Lord in the air, thus forever to be with the Lord.
Funeral services were held from the Union church in Lapaz, Ind., on April 26, 1921 at 2:00 p.m. in charge of Eld. C. C. GRISSO, her pastor.

Monday, May 9, 1921

"Colonel" Enoch MOW, well known Rochester resident, who has lived in Fulton county and Rochester all his life, died at nine o'clock Monday morning at his home, corner Seventh and Madison streets of complications from which he had suffered for nearly a year. He was operated upon some time ago, and while he made a partial recovery, has never been active since first stricken, and sank slowly until death came.
Enoch Mow was born in Richland township, March 8, 1849. He has followed the occupation of auctioneering for a number of years. He was married March 8, 1868 to Mary F. BARNETT, who with two sons born to this union preceded him. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Etta MOW, a son Elden MOW, and a brother, Henry MOW, of this city.
Funeral services from the residence Wednesday morning at 2:30 [sic] o'clock, Rev. George CRAIG in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Ira MILLS and sons went Sunday to Winamac, where they were called by the death of her brother, who died in Hammond Saturday. The funeral will be held Tuesday.

Tuesday, May 10, 1921

It was erroneously stated in Monday's issue of the Sentinel that the funeral services of Enoch MOW would be held Wednesday morning at 2:30, when it should have been Wednesday afternoon at 2:30. Mr. Mow was married to Miss Etta TOBEY, May 4, 1893. He had been twice married previously and is survived by the widow, a son, a brother and six sisters.

Wednesday, May 11, 1921

Word has been received here of the arrival in New York of the body of Clifford BENNETT, son of P. D. BENNETT, of Los Angeles, Calif., a former resident of this city. Bennett, as has been stated previously, was killed in action with the A.E.F. in France during the world war, and the body is one designated for shipment to the United States for burial, having arrived in this country last week.
According to present arrangements, now being made by Alex RUH, who will act for the parents of the former Rochester youth, who made the supreme sacrifice, the body will be brot to Rochester for burial in the Bennett family lot at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Bennett is survived by a widow, Mrs. C. K. BENNETT, of Stella, Mo., but none of the immediate members of the family will come to Rochester to attend the funeral, which will be conducted under the auspices of the Leroy Shelton Post, American Legion.
Special arrangements are being made to conduct this funeral, which will be the first of its kind ever held in Rochester. The American Legion post here plans to turn out in a body to attend and it is probable that the military aspect of the ceremony will be heightened by bearing the flag-draped casket containing the body in a caisson secured from the Culver Military Academy.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: Clifford K. BENNETT, Co C 110 Fld Sg Bn AEF, 1896-1918.]

Thursday, May 12, 1921

Amos BUSSERT, 87, civil war veteran, member of the McClung Post, G.A.R., who has made his home in Rochester for many years, died late Wednesday afternoon at the home of his son, Daniel BUSSERT, 315 Fulton avenue, a victim of pneumonia and complications.
Amos Bussert was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter BUSSERT. He was born in Fairfield, Ohio, November 7, 1833. He moved to this locality early in life and has since made his home in Rochester. He is survived by four sons, Salem D. [BUSSERT], and Daniel BUSSERT, of Rochester, John [BUSSERT] of South Bend, and Loren [BUSSERT] of Dayton, Ohio, the wife, Mrs. Emaline BUSSERT having died 17 years ago. He is also preceded by four sons, Charles [BUSSERT], Augustus [BUSSERT], William [BUSSERT] and Oren [BUSSERT].
Funeral services will be held from the Methodist church Friday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. George CRAIG and the McClung Post G.A.R. in charge.
Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wm. MATTHEW, Mrs. Rose DORMAN and Mrs. John WILDERMUTH, of Gary, were here Wednesday to attend the funeral of Col. Enoch MOW.

Friday, May 13, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, May 14, 1921

Mrs. Lyda G. LAWTON, of Peru, died Friday morning at nine o'clock at the home of her mother, Mrs. John BANISTER, of Logansport. She formerly lived in Rochester. Besides the husband she leaves a small daughter, one sister, of Peru, and a brother, George [BANISTER], of Indianapolis. Funeral services Monday afternoon at 2:30 from the Baptist church, Rochester, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge.

George W. MOORE, 55, a resident of this locality practically all his life and for more than a year an inmate at the county farm, died there early Saturday morning a victim of Brights disease from which he had suffered for some time. Little is known of Moore's antecedents. He is survived by two half-sisters, Mrs. Lee DAVIDSON, of Green Oak, and Mrs. EDMUNSON, of Peru. Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, May 16, 1921 to Thursday, May 19, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, May 20, 1921

George PEEPLES, 47, died at 4:30 on'clock Friday morning at his home north of Rochester, a victim of blood poisoning from injuries received in an automobile accident three weeks ago.
Peeples, who lives on a farm just off the Michigan road east about a mile north of the city, drives a school hack, a Ford machine, upon which has been placed an enclosed body with seats running along the side. On Thursday, May 4, he was driving to the school from his home, and just as he neared the Fultz farm on the Talma road, a nut dropped off the steering rod of the car, causing it to careen into the ditch where it stood almost directly on end.
Peeples, at the wheel in the front sear, was thrown forward into the windshield, which cut a two inch gash in his face that required several stitches to close. He was practically uninjured otherwise and none of the other occupants of the car were hurt.
He was taken back to his home and given medical attention and seemed well on the mend when complications set in the wound with the result that he gradually sank until the end came early Friday morning.
George Peeples was born near Culver, July 28, 1873, a son of Mr. and Mrs. John PEEPLES, who now reside in Rochester. About 15 years ago he moved to this community and for a time conducted the north end feed store, in Rochester, later moving to the farm north of the city. He is survived by the parents, the widow, Mrs. Clara PEEPLES, two sons, Donald [PEEPLES] and George [PEEPLES], two daughters, Ruth [PEEPLES] and Evelyn [PEEPLES], all at home, and two brothers and four sisters.
Funeral arrangements later.

Jacob ZERBE, 72, a former resident of Rochester, died early Friday morning at his home in Argos following an attack of paralysis more than a week ago. Zerbe, who lives alone, was suddenly stricken ill early Monday morning, May 9. He was unable to walk, his whole right side having been affected, but in some manner he was able to get down the stairs probably falling, as his body was badly bruised.
He lay at the foot of the stairs for almost four days, keeping himself alive by eating raw eggs, which he managed to get within reach, until the mail man hearing a tapping in the house, went to the window and looking in, saw the aged man lying on the floor.
The house was broken into and medical aid given Zerbe, but to no avail. He is survived by six children. Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, May 21, 1921

Funeral services for George PEEPLES Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at Poplar Grove, near Culver. There will also be a short funeral service at the home north of the city at one o'clock. Burial at Poplar Grove.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Poplar Grove Cemetery, Union Twp.: George A. PEEPLES, July 28, 1873 - May 20, 1921; Clara A. PEEPLES, Feb 13, 1878 - Apr 2, 1951; George N. PEEPLES, 1909-1969.]

Monday, May 23, 1921

Mrs. McTAVERISH, sister of Warren GOHN, of Rochester, died Sunday night at eight o'clock at the I.O.O.F. home in Greensburg, Ind. The funeral services will be held Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. from the home of Warren Gohn, west of this city.

Charles RICHMOND and family went today to Mentone to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law, Sheldon KESSLER.

Tuesday, May 24, 1921

The body of Clifford BENNETT, war veteran who died over seas, will probably arrive in this city about Friday, according to the word just received here by Alex. RUH. Bennett's body was shipped with a large consignment of others to Detroit and will be sent on from there Wednesday. As the relatives will not be notified until the body arrives in this city, the funeral will probably take place early next week.

Mrs. Oscar WELSHEL left Saturday morning to attend the death bed of her father, Dr. Shelby WRIGHT, of North Manchester.

Wednesday, May 25, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. George FARRAR, Mrs. C. F. OLIVER and Mrs. J. A. SLUSSER attended the funeral of their uncle, Patrick RAYMER, in Peru Monday. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, May 26, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, May 27, 1921

Mrs. Mary BERKHEISER died at the home of her son, Merritt BERKHEISER, east of Rochester at 4:45 Friday morning after a long illness. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

The body of Clifford BENNETT, former Rochester boy, who died in France during the World War, has arrived in this city from New York and will remain at the Zimmerman morgue until the funeral, which will be held Thursday, June 2 at 11 o'clock in the morning at the Presbyterian church. The services will be in full charge of the local post of the American Legion and will be conducted with the full military ceremonials, including the use of artillery caisson secured from the Culver Military Academy, instead of a hearse. Burial will be made at the Odd Fellows cemetery.

Saturday, May 28, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, May 30, 1921

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, May 31, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 1, 1921

Mrs. Bertha MECHLING, 39, wife of Delbert MECHLING, well known farmer, living north of Tiosa, died suddenly early Monday morning, the result of a bursted blood vessel causing a riot in the brain. Mrs. Mechling had been in poor health for about a year but her death came very unexpected. She became ill about mid-night and within two hours passed away.
Besides her husband, she leaves a son, Loyd [MECHLING], a sister in Chicago and a brother, Leland [ - - - -], of Ft. Wayne. The funeral was held Wednesday morning with the burial at Argos.

Several people from here attended the funeral of Grandma KIMBALL, of Fulton Thursday. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Will PAUL, of Gary, attended the funeral of Bernard JENKINS Friday. - - - BLUE GRASS ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. William COWEN spent Saturday at Peru attending a funeral of their aunt. - - - BETHEL ITEMS.

Thursday, June 2, 1921

The funeral of the late Clifford BENNETT, who died while in the service in France, was held Thursday morning at the Presbyterian church. The American Legion had charge of the ceremony, while Rev. A. E. WRIGHT, of the U.B. church of Chicago, in which Bennett belonged, preached the funeral.
The Legion members in uniform with their rifle squad and colors, took charge of the body at the court house. With the flag draped coffin resting on a caisson the procession went to the church, where Rev. WRIGHT, Rev. H. G. GAIGE, Earl SISSON, Rev. ROUCH and the Legion assisted by the ladies quartet conducted the services. Following the procession they went to the I.O.O.F. cemetery, where the rifle squad fired the final volley, taps were blown and the body committed to the earth.
Out of town relatives and friends here for the funeral were:
C. Y. KENNEY and Mr. and Mrs. E. E. DICKINSON, of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. JOHNSON, Mrs. Mary BENNETT SMITH and Mrs. Mary ROTHROCK, Monticello, Mr. and Mrs. W. N. RICHTER, Miss Sarah BELL, Mr. and Mrs. C. K. DICKINSON and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. BROWN, Monon, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. KENNEY, Terre Haute and J. O. KENNEY, New Albany.

Friday, June 3, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, June 4, 1921

The desire to secure a mess of fish ended fatally for Clarence MOW, 36, school teacher and farmer, who resides about five miles northwest of this city, when as he was preparing a blast of dynamite, presumably to throw in the river, the explosive went off in his hands, causing injuries that resulted in his death just a few hours later. The accident occurred late Friday afternoon, about 4:30 and death came shortly after seven o'clock this morning.
Stories of this accident, as told by those who profess to know, are conflicting, the other members of the party associated with Mow asserting that he was preparing to blast out a stump. The correct version of the matter, however, as fixed by circumstantial evidence, is that a party of five men, MOW, John [WALTZ] and Jesse WALTZ, Charles CISSEL and Forrest CALVERT, all neighbors, had gone to the Ananias BAKER farm, just north of Rochester on the river, to saw up cord wood in the woods that run down to the banks of the river.
After working all day at this, and while the others were still otherwise occupied, Mow went down to the banks of the river. He was on a curve in the stream where there is a deep hole and a drift, an ideal location for what he was about to do. The young man was probably seated or in a kneeling posture and had evidently just lighted the fuse on the dynamite preparatory to tossing it out into the stream, when a premature explosion occurred.
His companions hurried to the scene and found him in an unconscious position, his body terribly torn by the force of the blast. He was hurried to the hospital in Rochester, where his injuries were dressed and put in very good condition, considering their nature, but he never regained consciousness and died early the following morning from the shock sustained.
His injuries consisted of his left hand torn off at the wrist, the right leg fractured, or rather shattered between the knee and ankle, the left leg lacerated and badly burned, the right arm burned, the eyes burned and practically torn out of their sockets and his chest and face literally peppered with dirt driven into the skin by the force of the explosion. It was stated at the hospital that his was paobably the worst case that had ever come to the institution.
Clarence Mow has been a resident of this locality since birth. He was a son of Marion MOW and lived on the old MOW homestead which he had recently purchased from his father. During the winter he had taught school and farmed in the summer. He is survived by the father, the widow, Mrs. Edna MOW, four children, Ferman [MOW], Herschel [MOW], Othelia [MOW] and Charles [MOW], and four brothers, Clayton [MOW], Clyde [MOW], Dean [MOW] and Lee MOW.
The peculiarity of the accident is the fact that almost in the same spot another man was injured in the same manner. His hand was blown off, but he was otherwise comparatively uninjured and recovered from his accident. The local police authorities have not made public whether any action will be taken as to prosecution of Mow's companions.

Walter W. STICKLES, aged 70 years, and who roomed at 117-1/2 Division Street, died in the Elkhart General hospital at 10:30 o'clock Saturday night. Death was caused by heart trouble after an illness of several years and during the last months of which his condition had been serious. He was taken to the hospital 11 weeks ago. Mr. Stickles, who had lived here nearly all of the time for 35 years was well known because of his activities in connection with the First Evangelical church and Sunday school, as a member of the Woodmen of the World and as a printer.
The funeral services were held at 3 o'clock this afternoon, Rev. F. C. BERGER officiating. The burial took place at Grace Lawn cemetery.
Mr. Stickles was born near Montpelier, Vt., on June 19, 1851. After coming to Elkhart he worked in various printing establishments, including the Reveiw office. He began learning the printer's trade in the office of the South Bend Tribune when Schuyler COLFAX was one of its owners. His last employment was with the Garden City Stationery Co., by which he was employed 20 years. Because of the failing health of Mrs. Stickles, Mr. Stickles sold their home here and went to California a few years ago with the expectation of making his home in that state permanently. Mrs. Stickles died three years ago, and Mr. Stickles decided to return to this city.
Surviving Mr. Stickles are a son, Perry STICKLES; two daughters, Mrs. Dolas TRACY and another daughter, Minnie TENNEY, all of El Degunda, California, and seven grandchildren.

Monday, June 6, 1921 to Tuesday, June 7, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 8, 1921

Clarence Lasalle [MOW], eldest son of Marion L. and Eva L. MOW, was born November 10, 1883, near Richland Center, Ind., and departed this life, June 4, 1921, aged 37 years, 6 months and 24 days.
Clarence spent his early life at home with his parents and worked hard to gain an education, graduating from the elementary schools, and the high school, then at Tiosa, Ind.
He then began teaching at the age of nineteen and has taught each consecutive term until his death.
He spent almost ten years of his life at Thompsonville, Michigan, going there in the spring of

1909 and returning to Richland township in the fall of 1918.
Although not a member of any religious institution he has always contributed to any worthy cause, willingly helping those in need and always ready to assist a neighbor or friend.
On June 20, 1908, he was united in marriage to Edna Fern BEEHLER.
To this union four children were born: Forman Everett [MOW], age 12, Herchel William [MOW], age 10, Othelia Jane [MOW], age 4, and Charles Marion [MOW], age 2.
He leaves to mourn his loss, the wife and children, a father, Marion L. MOW, (the mother having preceded him in death three years ago), four bothers, Clayton [MOW], Clyde [MOW], Dean [MOW] and Leo [MOW], all of Richland township, besides a host of relatives and friends.

Thursday, June 9, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, June 10, 1921

Loyd RAY, father of Mrs. James DICE, of Fulton, was found dead in his bed last Saturday morning at his home in Lafayette, the cause of his death being heart failure. The burial took place Sunday evening at Covington, Ind. A wife and four children survive him.

Saturday, June 11, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, June 13, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. Steven PARCELL and Mr. and Mrs. HANNA, of Kewanna, motored Sunday to Logansport to attend the funeral of Paul DUNN whose body was recently brought from France. The American Legion of Logansport, Kewanna, and Star City had charge of the funeral.

Tuesday, June 14, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 15, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. Louis FELDER, Mrs. Frank GORDON and daughters and Pauline TETZLAFF and daughter, Ida [TETZLAFF], went to Logansport Wednesday to attend the funeral of the former's aunt. - - - ANTIOCH ITEMS.

Thursday, June 16, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, June 17, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. SHONK were in Flora yesterday, where they attended the funeral of a relative.

Saturday, June 18, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, June 20, 1921

The first lake fatality of the season occurred about 100 yards off the Long Beach Park early Sunday afternoon when Denzil RUST, 21, of Kokomo, while swimming from the beach to Big Island, went down in the channel in 30 or 40 feet of water. Searching parties were organized immediately and the vicinity in which young Rust met his death was dragged during the balance of the day Sunday and powerful searchlights were used after night, and while the lake has been gone over as with a fine toothed comb, at time of going to press the body had not been recovered.
Young Rust and a companion, Robert RYAN, also of Kokomo, came to Rochester Sunday morning on the Lake Erie excursion and went to Long Beach where they ate a hearty noon meal and then donned bathing suits and went into the water.
Ryan was in a rowboat and Rust, it is believed, was trying out his prowess in long distance swimming with Ryan rowing along beside or a little behind him.
The Rust lad had reeached a point several hundred feet directly off shore towards the island where the channel flows and was swimming along strongly. He was asked by Ryan whether or not he was tired, but said he still felt strong enough to swim back to shore, despite his companion's urge to give it up and get into the boat.
Just a moment later, according to Ryan's story, which was rather incoherent on account of the shock he suffered when he fully realized what had happened, Rust appeared to be in distress and suddenly and without uttering a sound sank out of sight.
After waiting a few seconds to see if he came up again, Ryan leaped into the water and dove for his friend, whom he secured but was unable to carry to the boat.
He then loosed his hold on Rust and swam back and recovered the boat which he had shoved away from the scene of the accident as he dove into the water, and when he had brot it to the spot where Rust went down, dove under a second time and caught his companion. He was unable again to get him to the boat and was forced to release his hold in order to keep himself from drowning.
As near as could be learned, however, Rust did not drown but succumbed to a heart attack evidently brot on by over exertion coupled with the fact that he had just finished eating when he entered the water.
Ryan sounded an alarm and his cries for help were answered by a number of people in rowboats, among them several who dove into the water repeatedly in an effort to find the body of the dead youth. But these efforts were all in vain, and in the meantime grappling hooks were secured from the city and the lake dragged.
It is now believed that owing to an under current in the channel that the body may have drifted a hundred yards or more away from where Rust went down and there is a strong probability that the body may not be located until decomposition sets in and it arises to the surface.

Word of the accident was forwarded to Kokomo and Rust's brother and brother-in-law came to this city with an ambulance to take the body back to Kokomo. They will remain here until they find the body. Rust is survived by a widowed mother, a brother, and a sister. He was a powerful swimmer, it was stated, but heart failure was prevalent in the family, another brother having succumbed to a sudden attack recently.

Tuesday, June 21, 1921 to Wednesday, June 22, 1921

[no obits]

Thursday, June 23, 1921

After hiding its victim for a period of about 90 hours, the waters of Lake Manitou thursday morning disclosed the body of Denzil RUST, 21, of Kokomo, who was drowned in an effort to swim from Long Beach to Big Island Sunday afternoon. The body was discovered by the brother of the dead youth, Harry RUST, also of Kokomo, who has maintained a constant vigil since his arrival at the lake a few hours after his brother had been drowned.
Harry RUST and Elmer FOLKER, of this city, had been on the lake all night long Wednesday, and shortly after day break Rust went back to the vicinity of the drowning alone. At about eight o'clock, probably a few minutes one way or the other, Rust discovered the body of his brother floating almost on the surface of the lake at a point about 50 yards from where the float had been placed where the young man was last seen.
When he saw his brother, Harry Rust rowed to it immediately, crying to those on shore for help. He had been on the lake almost continually since Sunday afternoon and was in a highly nervous condition and afraid to touch his dead brother. He said afterwards that he had heard that the body would remain afloat for only a minute or two when it first made its appearance on the surface and feared to touch it in the belief that before he could get a good hold it would again disappear.
However, help came from shore at once and willing hands grasped the body of the drowned boy and conveyed it to shore in a row boat. Sheriff ARTER and Coroner STINSON were summoned and the body was held at the beach until a brief inquest was held.
The finding of the coroner was that Rust met death by drowning, with cramps a contributory cause. The theory is also advanced that death was due, not to drowning, but to heart failure, induced by sudden contact with the chill waters of the channel where the boy went down. This theory seems entirely plausible, owing to the fact that in the majority of cases of drowning, a struggle is made and the body arises to the surface two or three times which was not the case with the Rust boy. Another factor that enters the case also is the fact that heart trouble is common in the Rust family, another brother having met sudden death from this cause just recently.
The body was taken to Rochester to the Zimmerman morgue, a Kokomo undertaker having been summoned in the meanwhile. The body was not treated here, but was first removed to Kokomo. Funeral arrangements were made for Friday afternoon but no definite plans were completed before Rust left this city.
Denzil Rust, 21, is survived by a mother, Mrs. Minnie RUST, a brother, Harry RUST, and two sisters, Mrs. Charles LAWRENCE and Miss Florence RUST.

Mark RARRICK, well known Monterey sale crier, died very suddenly Wednesday morning, according to word received here.

Friday, June 24, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, June 25, 1921

Mrs. Roy SHEETS, of Akron, died Thursday morning at four o'clock at the Woodlawn hospital. She underwent an operation last week when a cancer was discovered. Mrs. Sheets has been in poor health for nearly a year. She leaves a husband, two sons, [Robert Lincoln SHEETS and M. Emerson SHEETS - - - WCT] a mother, two sisters and three brothers. The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at the Methodist church at Akron.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Albert Leroy SHEETS, 1885-1938; Goldie WILHOIT SHEETS, wife of Roy, March 22, 1887 - June 23, 1921]

Monday, June 27, 1921

[no obits]

Tuesday, June 28, 1921

Word has been received here of the death Monday at Perrysburg of Mrs. Harold MICHAELS of Marion. Hazel GUCK and before her marriage lived several years in this city, coming here from Peru. Death, which was due to spinal meningitis, came suddenly while Mrs. Michaels was visiting at the home of her brother. Two other brothers and her parents Mr. and Mrs. W. O. BUCK, survive. A sister preceded her in death three years ago.
The deceased was affiliated with the Seventh Day Adventist church and from time to time had been employed as a nurse. Burial was held at 11:00 o'clock Tuesday morning in the Deedsville cemetery.

John KREITER, a farmer of near Disko died at five o'clock Tuesday morning following an operation for appendicitis. He is survived by a wife and five children.

Word has been received by Mrs. Wesley GOOD, of this city, of the death of her brother, Carton GAILBRAITH, at Hudson, Michigan. Gailbraith was seized with cramps while swimming Sunday in Lake Michigan, near Hudson. Mrs. Good left Monday for Hudson where the funeral will be held Wednesday.

Wednesday, June 29, 1921

Miss Martha L. KESSLER, age about 60, died at her family home southeast of Fulton early this morning. She had been a resident of the community for nearly 40 years. She lived with her two brothers, Richard [KESSLER] and Anthony [KESSLER], and sister Susan [KESSLER], none of whom have ever been married. All of the above survive her as does another brother, Dan [KESSLER], wh lives at Camden with his family.

IN MEMORIUM: In living memory of our dear Uncle Jacob FOGLE, who went away one year ago today, June 29, 1920. - - - - Niece and Nephew, Sarah and Alpha RAYS, Port Allegany, Pa.

Thursday, June 30, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, July 1, 1921

Mrs. Isaac NICODEMUS, of Jonesboro, Indiana, formerly of this city, died late Thursday of complications brought on by advanced years. Death followed an illness of probably a year.
Mrs. Nicodemus was formerly Miss Eunice BARB, the daughter of David and Mary BARB, and was born at Bristolville, Ohio, in 1848. The deceased was a member of the Presbyterian church, of the Eastern Star and Rebakah lodges and of the Women's Relief Corps.
The body will be brought to Rochester Monday afternoon and burial services will be held in the I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rev. WELCH, of Jonesboro, being in charge.
The deceased is survived by a husband and a sister, Mrs. Alice GOULD, of this city. A sister Ella [BARB], preceded her in death.

Saturday, July 2, 1921

Funeral service for Mrs. Ella NICODEMUS of Jonesboro will be held Monday afternoon at two o'clock from the home of Mrs. Alice GOULD, North Madison street. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Leroy BRYANT went today to Chicago to attend the funeral of her cousin.

Monday, July 4, 1921

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, July 5, 1921

Mrs. Emily L. AGNEW, 78, wife of Daniel AGNEW, one of Rochester's most prominent society women for many years, died at 11:20 o'clock Sunday evening at her home on S. Main street, a victim of pneumonia. Mrs. Agnew had been in ill health for the past 15 years, having been partially invalided and confined to her home during the larger part of that period. Her condition became gradually weaker during recent months until she was stricken with the disease that ended her life.
Emily L. MILLER was born in Fulton county February 10, 1843, one of 12 children born to the late Judge Hugh and Mrs. Phoebe MILLER, pioneers of this section of the country. She received her education in this community, where she had lived all her life with the exception of one or two years and was united in marriage on February 25th, 1862 to Daniel Agnew.
To this union was born a son, Charlie [AGNEW], who died in infancy. Mrs. Agnew was always prominent in social, church and lodge enterprises in Rochester, and for a number of years

held the post of Worthy Matron of the Rochester lodge O.E.S. She was also a member of the Presbyterian church. The husband and one brother, John MILLER, of this city survive.
Funeral services were held from the residence Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, July 6, 1921

Julius ROWLEY, 84, prominent democrat, attorney, president of Fulton County Fair Association and a resident of this city for nearly half a century, died unexpectedly at seven o'clock Wednesday morning at his home on S. Madison street following a sudden stroke of apoplexy.
He arose Wednesday morning, and after dressing for the day, started to work at his desk before breakfast, on a telephone list of persons to call up regarding the fair this fall.
His daughter, Mrs. E. H. MATTICE, with whom he made his home, had been going about her house work, Mr. Mattice having eaten and left the home. Mrs. Mattice told her father that she would get his breakfast for him when he was ready, and then passed his bedroom where he was working at his desk and went into a front room to lie down for a moment. Just a few moments later she noticed that her father was breathing hard, and arising, she went to the bedroom and found him lying back in his chair, apparently asleep.
She shook and called to her father in order to get him to return to his bed and then, discovering that he was unconscious, ran to the neighbors for help. In the meantime, Mr. Rowley's breathing continued to grow more labored and when a physician arrived just a few minutes later, he was placed on the bed. He seemed to be in great pain, and when asked about his troubles, made an effort to speak, but could not summon the strength. Not more than 15 minutes from the time he was stricken, he passed away.
Julius Rowley was born in Clarenden, N.Y., March 6, 1837 one of four children, now deceased, born to Amos and Clarissa ROWLEY. He lived with his parents until he reached the age of 19 years, when he moved to Schoharis, N.Y., where he was married July 4, 1855 to Miss Harriett NETHERWAY, who died in this city about 10 years ago.
At the time of his marriage he was teaching school in New York state, but later gave up this work and entered the University of Alabama law school, from which he graduated May 25, 1865, when he was admitted to the bar.
After practicing law in New York he moved to this city in 1876, where he has since resided. Upon arrival in Rochester he resumed his practice, forming a partnership with H. HERMAN. After they had practiced for a number of years, this firm dissolved and Mr. Rowley again formed a partnership, this time with Isaiah CONNER, which continued until Mr. Conner was elected to the circuit court bench, after which Mr. Rowley formed a third partnership with M. A. BAKER and a fourth with his grandson, Floyd MATTICE.
He gave up his active law practice nine years ago, or about the time of the death of his first wife, and married Mrs. Nettie BROWN, who died about a year ago. While he had abandoned his active practice, Mr. Rowley continued active in other enterprises, having all his life taken a strong interest in every public project. He was a prominent democrat, but never held a political office.

Eli LAWRENCE, 80, former resident of Ropchester, died Tuesday at his home in Harlan, Michigan. His body will be brought to Rochester for burial and the funeral services will be held at the Hoover Chapel at 2:30 Thursday afternoon. The deceased was a brother-in-law of George ADAMS. He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Arthur SWEET, who lived at Harlan.

Sanford BECK, practically a life-long resident of this vicinity, died Tuesday afternoon about two o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Rollin PONTIUS, with whom he had made his home for the last four years. Death was due to paralysis and followed a serious illness of a week or so.
Mr. Beck was born in Hancock county, Ohio, on July 9, 1852, the son of John and Mary BECK. From childhood Mr. Beck had lived near this city and had been actively engaged in farming until about four years ago when he came to live with his daughter in this city. He was united in marriage to Katherine KOCHENDERFER on October 22, 1881, his wife preceding him in death several years. Mr. Beck was a member of the Evangelical church, but belonged to no fraternal orders.
The deceased is survived by three children, Alberta [BECK] and Charles [BECK], of Indianapolis, and Mrs. Rollin PONTIUS, of this city, and by three grandchildren.
Funeral services Thursday afternoon at 2:30 at the Evangelical church here.Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Milton WHITTENBERGER and family attended the funeral of Mrs. Phil LUDEWIG at Fulton Tuesday. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: Philip M. LUDEWIG, 1851-1930; Ida May LUDEWIG, 1861-1921]

The funeral of Mrs. Phil. LUDEWIG was held at the Baptist Temple at 10:30 Tuesday morning. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Thursday, July 7, 1921

The funeral of the late Julius ROWLEY will be held at the home of his daughter on south Madison street at three o'clock Friday afternoon. Rev. H. G. GAIGE will preach the sermon. The Fulton County Bar Association will attend in a body and court will be adjourned in honor of the deceased.

Friday, July 8, 1921

James Hubert STANLEY, 24, of Peru, died Thursday morning at his cottage on the east side of the lake after an illness of two years from a complication of diseases. The body was taken to Peru and cared for by the Crawford-Costin undertaking parlors.
Mr. Stanley was the son of Charles STANLEY, of Illinois. He was a veteran of the late world war. While in the service he contracted the Spanish influenza and had not fully recovered from the effects of the disease. He is survived by his wife, his father, one brother, and one sister. The funeral will be held at the residence of the deceased's father-in-law Saturday and will be private. The American Legion will have charge of the services.

Mrs. Sarah C. FOSTER, 73, died at four o'clock Friday morning at her home in Mishawaka, according to word received here. Funeral services will be held at Tiosa Sunday. She is survived by a son, William FOSTER, of Whippoorwill, and two daughters, Mrs. Olive BIDWELL, of Mishawaka and Mrs. Jocie BUSSERT of South Bend.

Mrs. P. H. PHILLIPS and daughter, Geneva [PHILLIPS], of Bourbon, attended the funeral of Sanford BECK Thursday.

Saturday, July 9, 1921

Wilson Theodore [MILLISER], 2-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Surphis MILLISER, died Friday, being survived by his parents, two sisters, Irene [MILLISER] and Violet [MILLISER], and a brother, Hershell [MILLISER]. The funeral will be held at 10:00 o'clock Sunday morning.

Monday, July 11, 1921

Word has been received here of the death by drowning at Fruit Port, Michigan on Saturday of James BATCHELOR, son of James and Mary BATCHELOR, deceased, and a former well known resident of this city. Batchelor was evidently drowned at Lake Michigan, but details are lacking. Word of the accident reached this city through a brother, John BATCHELOR, of Logansport, who stated that the body would be brot to this city for burial in the family plot at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Esther MILLER, 23, wife of Fred MILLER, died Sunday evening at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Martin FORD, south of Rochester, victim of tuberculosis. She is survived by the husband, the parents and two small children. Funeral services from the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church Tuesday afternoon, Rev. H. Gerald GAIGE in charge. Burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.

R. D. COUCH, of Indianapolis, died Friday evening in that city. Mr. Couch is well known in this city, where a number of years ago he was the local ticket agent for the L. E. & W. R.R. The funeral and burial was held Monday in Noblesville.

Tuesday, July 12, 1921

Samuel BERRY, 60, died early Tuesday at the County Farm. Mr. Berry was born April 12, 1861 in Grant County, Indiana the son of Joseph BERRY and Mary KING. The deceased was a day laborer by occupation but has lived for some time at the County Farm. No relatives in this locality survive him. The body was prepared for burial at Val Zimmerman undertaking parlors. Burial will be held in the Rochester Citizens' Cemetery.

Wednesday, July 13, 1921

Funeral and burial services for the late James BATCHELOR, formerly of here, were held Wednesday at 11:00 a.m. at the Citizen's cemetery. Two brothers, John C. [BATCHELOR] and A. E. BATCHELOR, and a sister, Maggie [BATCHELOR], attended the services. The deceased is survived by another brother, Fred [BATCHELOR], who is in Colorado.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Citizens Cemetery, Rochester Twp.: James BATCHELOR, 1890-1921; Mary BATCHELOR, 1856-1919; James M. BATCHELOR, 1840-1892; also military marker: J. M. BATCHELOR, Co E 69th Ind Inf]

William LEFFLE, about 73 years of age, who lived near Twelve Mile all his life, died Tuesday morning of lung fever. Mr. Leffle was a brother of the late Mrs. Henry A. BARNHART, of this city. He is survived by his wife and two children. He was a lifelong member of the

Methodist church. The funeral will be at the Bethlehem church near Twelve Mile, Thursday, at 2:00 p.m.

Thursday, July 14, 1921 to Saturday, July 16, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, July 18, 1921

W. S. HEDGES died at his home in Lima, Ohio, Sunday evening of complications, following an illness of about a year. Mr. Hedges was born at Rockford, Ohio, June 14, 1854, the son of Mr. and Mrs. S. P. HEDGES. Mr. Hedges' occupation was that of a tinner. He was a member of the Church of God. The deceased is survived by two brothers and one sister besides the following children: Sam HEDGES of this city, W. B. HEDGES, Lester HEDGES and Clarence B. HEDGES, of Lima, Mrs. A. J. GOFF, of Muncie, Indiana, J. S. HEDGES, of Oklahoma, and Mrs. Mabel LaMEAD, of Cleveland. The funeral will be held Tuesday at the home and burial will be at Lima. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Hedges and family, of this city, went Monday to Lima to attend the funeral.

Mrs. Daisy SWEET returned this moring to Harlan, Michigan, after being here on account of the death of her father, Eli LAWRENCE.

Tuesday, July 19, 1921

Edna Fay [DAMAS], four year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John DAMAS, south of Rochester, died Tuesday afternoon after a severe illness from infantile paralysis.

Word has been received by Rochester relatives of the death in a hospital at South Bend of Mrs. David DUMBAULD, a former resident of this city, whose home for many years has been in Niles, Mich. Mrs.Dumbauld is a sister-in-law of Mrs. Nina MEYER and Mrs. Cy DAVIS, of this city. She is survived by the husband and four children.

Mary Ida DAVIS, daughter of Jesse and Mary (CARTWRIGHT) DAVIS was born at New Creek, Virginia, September 22, 1843, and passed from this life July 15, 1921, at Macy, Indiana, aged 77 years, 9 months and 23 days. She was united in marriage to Richard Willis SWIFT December 11, 1866. To this union were born nine children, five of whom preceded her in death.
She lost her husband through an accident May 8, 1886; for thirty-five years she remained a widow.
Her ambition was to raise her family, keeping them together for inspiration and comfort. Twenty-six years ago she moved from Keyser, West Virginia, to Macy, where she spent the rest of her life.
Her oldest son, Dr. E. D. SWIFT, died June 10, 1910. His death proved to be a great shock to her and she never fully recovered from it.
Her life has ever been characterized by a remarkable devotion to her children. She always inculcated in their minds the principle of devotion to duty and walking in the paths of righteousness.
Although her school life was cut short on account of the Civil War [she was] informed on many subjects. She was thorough and systematic in the performance of every duty. To these qualities she added a very quiet, but charming, manner.
Early in life she united with the Presbyterian church and remained a loyal member of the same through life.
Those who survive her are one brother, Rev. L. H. DAVIS, of Missouri, and two sisters, Mrs. Mattie DICKINSON, of Missouri, and Mrs. Laura McNEMAR, of West Virginia. The four children who survive her are Mrs. H. B. McDOWELL, of Fulton, Mrs. S. H. MUSSELMAN, of Macy, Amory B. SWIFT, of Detroit, Michigan, and Dent E. SWIFT, of Winamac. Three of her grandchildren, Eleanor [MURPHY], Richard [MURPHY] and Elizabeth MURPHY have made their home with her for seven years. These grandchildren have felt the influence of her fine personality. Three other grandchildren are Mary [MUSSELMAN] and Oren MUSSELMAN and Dorothy SWIFT. - - -
The funeral was held at the home Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. J. B. SPARLING, pastor of the Macy M. E. church, assisted by Rev. E. H. KENNEDY, of Alto, a former pastor and Rev. C. E. SEIFRES, pastor of the Macy Christian church. Interment was made in Plainview cemetery.

Wednesday, July 20, 1921

The funeral of Edna Fay [DAMAS], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John DAMAS who died Tuesday from a brain lesion, will be held Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church at 2:30, Rev. G. F. CRAIG in charge.

Dr. W. F. KIRKENDALL went Wednesday to South Bend to attend the funeral of his sister, Mrs. David [Sarah E. KIRKENDALL] DUMBAULD, a former resident of this city. He will return Friday. Mrs. Dumbauld moved from here to Niles, Michigan, a number of years ago. She died Monday in a South Bend hospital, aged 66, the fictim of cancer.

Edna Fay [DAMAS], the only child of John and Fay DAMAS, was born in Rochester June 21, 1917 and departed this life July 19, 1921 at the age of four years and four weeks, death being caused by brain lesion. She leaves to mourn her departure her father, mother, two grandmothers, Mrs. Marion DAVIS, of Rochester, and Mrs. Fred DAMAS, of Alagon, Wisconsin, and a host of little friends for little Edna was loved by all who knew her. - - -

Mr. and Mrs. James KIFFEL, Mrs. Jennie BRYANT and daughters, Clara [BRYANT] and Lena [BRYANT], attended the funeral of Mr. and Mrs. Will BIDDINGER'S three year old daughter of Leiters Ford Sunday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Albert BIDDINGER brought their little daughter, Vivian [BIDDINGER], back from South Bend Saturday evening for burial Sunday. The funeral services were held at Leiters Ford. - - - BETHEL ITEMS.
[NOTE: Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Births, 1882-1920: Vivian BIDDINGER born to Albert L. and Rosa M. CURTIS BIDDINGER, February 2, 1919]

Thursday, July 21, 1921

Mrs. Cy DAVIS went this morning to South Bend, where she will attend the funeral of a relative.

Friday, July 22, 1921

John STALLARD, aged about 77 a veteran of the Civil War and practically a life long resident of Rochester, died at three o'clock Friday afternoon at the Woodlawn hospital, where he had been taking treatment since an injury a number of weeks ago.
Stallard, who was the son of a circuit preacher and had been born in this community, was a carpenter by trade, and followed this occupation until incapacitated by rheumatism. About three years ago he fell and suffered a broken hip, from which he had almost completely recovered when he fell a second time and broke the other hip. He was a widower, his wife having died a number of years ago and had no children. A niece, a resident of Macy, is probably the only survivor.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery: John R. STALLARD, 46th Ind Inf 1861-1865, 1843-1921; Hattie B. STALLARD, his wife, 1851-1911]

Saturday, July 23, 1921

Mrs. William HICKMAN, a long time resident of Mentone, passed away Friday evening, July 15, 1921, at her home in Mentone, aged 79 years, 3 months and 13 days. She had made her home with her step-son, Ed HICKMAN, for the past seven years.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Mentone cemetery, Franklin Twp.: Samantha E. HICKMAN, wife of Wm. HICKMAN, 1842-1921]

Funeral services for the late John STALLARD, who died at Woodlawn hospital Friday, will be conducted at the residence at 2:30 p.m., Monday, by the Rochester Order of Royal Arch Masons. Burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. It has not yet been decided who will preach the sermon.
Mr. Stallard was born in Rush county, Indiana, July 11, 1843, and moved with his parents to Fulton county in December, 1846, where he resided in a cabin on what is now known as the STEFFY farm until the fall of 1848. In that year the family took up residece in their new home adjoining the Steffy farm. Stallard lived there until October, 1861, when with the late A. G. SINKS and others he enlisted for three years in Company K, 46th Indiana regiment. After two years service he re-enlisted for three years or of the duration of the war. He was taken prisoner by the Confederate forces and spent eight months in a southern prison. On December 5, 1864, he was paroled and reached home soon after, being mustered out September 4, 1865. In 1867 Stallard removed to Rochester and took up the carpenter trade. He was united in marriage March 26, 1871, to Hattie Blanche KEYES who passed away June 1, 1911. Following the death of his wife Stallard lived alone until 1916 when he entered the Soldiers' Home at Marion, Indiana.
John R. STALLARD was a member of the Masonic Lodge since 1873, both of the Rochester chapter and the Plymouth Commandery No. 26, and also of the Eastern Star at Plymouth. He was the last remaining charter member of McClung Post No. 95, G.A.R.

Monday, July 25, 1921

Mrs. Henry PASCHALL, resident of this city for more than half a century, passed away about 6:30 a.m. Monday at her west Third street residence. Death was caused by paralysis and followed an illness of three months.
Rachel Ann SINCOTE was born July 3, 1846, in Randolph county, Indiana, the daughter of John and Mary SINCOTE. She married Henry PASCHALL on January 22, 1866, and in 1868 moved with him to this city where she has since made her home. The deceased was a member of the Women's Relief Corps and of the Spiritualist church.
Five children and six grandchildren survive the deceased. Three daughters, Mary Audrey [PASCHALL], Florence Davis [PASCHALL] and Gladys Allen [PASCHALL], all of Hammond, land two sons, John [PASCHALL] and Carl [PASCHALL], of this city are survivors.
Funeral services will be held at the home Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. E. Q. LAUDEMAN will preach the sermon and C. J. IRWIN will sing. Burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, July 26, 1921

The season's second lake fatality occurred shortly after eight o'clock Tuesday morning when Frank HOWARD, 65, of Marion, who had been visiting his daughter, Mrs. Winfred RUNYAN, of Huntington, at her cottage on Koffle's Point, fell out of the row boat from which he was fishing after having suffered what is believed to have been a stroke of paralysis or apoplexy.
Mr. Howard started out from the cottage in a small duck boat and had anchored just outside the grass line directly in front of the cottage within probably 125 feet of the shore. He had been fishing there for a short time when he evidently decided to move as he was seen by other cottagers to arise from his seat and pull up one of his sinkers.
Then, it is believed, he walked to the other end of his boat where he was about to pull up the second anchor, when suddenly, without a sound or warning of any nature, he threw his hands into the air and toppled over into the water.
The people in the cottages came running and Mrs. Howard and her daughter, Mrs. Runyon, heard the splash and seeing that Mr. Howard had gone under called for help.
Other cottagers, among them men and young men clad in bathing suits, came within but a minute or two after the accident, but after diving for some time failed to locate the drowned man. The boat which Mr. Howard had been using was still firmly anchored, marking the exact spot where the body went down, but there is a sudden drop in the bottom at this point, making the water approximately 25 or 30 feet deep, and extremely hard to dive into to reach bottom and make a search.
In the meantime the widow, Mrs. May HOWARD, was overcome and had an attack of her heart, and it was necessary to summon physicians to resuscitate her. The entire family was overcome.
__________

All of the original efforts to locate the body by diving were futile, and grappling hooks were brot out from Rochester and used. The searchers worked hard for two hours without avail, and then finally Edward FEISER appeared on the scene with a piece of barbed wire, which he used to drag the bottom, finally catching on to the clothing of Mr. Howard.
He was found in about 25 feet of water and about 10 feet south of the boat from which he fell.

Physicians were there when the body was located and they worked with him using pulmotors for some time, but life was extinct.
Dr. Archie STINSON, county coroner, was summoned and he made an examination but withheld pronouncing his decision until Wednesday morning. He intimated however, that in view of the fact that there was little if any water in Mr. Howard's lungs, that he would pronounce death due to heart failure or apooplexy. The theory of sun stroke was deemed improbable as Mr. Howard had not been exposed long enough.
The body was removed to a local morgue and will be removed later to either Huntington or Marion, where funeral services and burial will take place.

Wednesday, July 27, 1921

Bernard GILMORE, 15, died Sunday morning of typhoid fever at five-thirty after two weeks illness. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. A. M. BURKETT attended the funeral of her uncle John STALLARD, at Rochester, Monday.

Thursday, July 28, 1921

The body of the late Frank HOWARD, of Marion, was removed to the Marion residence and the funeral services will be held there Friday. Burial will be made in the Mausoleum, Huntington. Coroner A. E. STINSON gave the cause of death as apoplexy.

Friday, July 29, 1921

Dan P. KESSLER, about 64 years of age, and well known citizen of Fulton county is dead at the family home southeast of Fulton as the result of a sudden attack of pneumonia. Mr. Kessler, who lives at Logansport, attended the funeral of his sister, Martha [KESSLER], about three weeks ago and while there became ill. He gradually grew worse until the end. He is survived by a wife and three children. The funeral will be held Saturday at 10:00 a.m. at Metea church.

Mrs. Marion BURKETT, mother of Cecil BURKETT, 11, charged with the murder of Bennie SLAVIN, 7, has caused the arrest of Mrs. Harry SLAVIN, mother of Bennie, on the charge of assault with intent to commit murder. The bitter feeling between the two families culminated in an assault made by Mrs. Slavin, who, Mrs. Burkett charges, attempted to kill her. The trials of Mrs. Slavin and Cecil will take place as soon as September court convenes. The two families live at Ora, Indiana.

Israel GELBAUGH, residence West Fourth street, who has lived in this city for forty-seven years, died at Woodlawn hospital Thursday afternoon a little before five o'clock, a victim of cancer, which had caused him a painful illness of five weeks. Three weeks ago when his situation became very serious he was taken to the hospital where he had since remained.
Mr. Gelbaugh was born January 2, 1857 at Ducanon, Pennsylvania, the son of Philip and Catherine GELBAUGH. He moved to this city in 1874 from Bucyrus, Ohio, and married on August 16, 1890, Olive V. HIVELY. To this union were born six children, four sons and two daughters, three sons since being deceased. Mr. Gelbaugh was a laborer by occupation and had

been employed until recently at the bridge factory, being at that place for fourteen years. The deceased was a member of the Lutheran church and was for forty years a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Kewanna.
The deceased is survived by a widow; three children, Elsie [GELBAUGH], Serena [GELBAUGH] and Israel Eugene [GELBAUGH]; a sister, Mrs. E. M. STOCKWELL of Pontiac, Michigan; and three brothers, Andrew [GELBAUGH] of Rochester, Philip [GELBAUGH] of Crestline, Ohio, and George [GELBAUGH] of Bucyrus, O.
Funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m. Saturday at the residence, the Kewanna lodge of Odd Fellows being in charge. The Rochester I.O.O.F. hall will be opened at 1:00 p.m. and between one and two o'clock Rochester members of the lodge will assemble there with the Kewanna delegation. The sermon will be preached by Rev. G. F. CRAIG. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

John [WALTERS], age two, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph WALTERS, of near Gilead, drowned Thursday afternoon in a water tank across the road from his home. The child had been playing about the tank for some time, presumably. The lad's body was found by his father late in the afternoon and since no one witnessed the tragedy, it is not known how long the body had been in the tank.

Saturday, July 30, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, August 1, 1921

Frank SEVERNS died shortly before three o'clock Monday afternoon at his farm home three miles northeast of Rochester, following an illness of five weeks from a complication of diseases which baffled several physicians.
Mr. Severns was born in Fulton county about the year 1860. In 1904 he married Miss Sadie RUSSEL. Mr. Severns made farming his occupation but he varied this a little when he operated a restaurant in this city for three years on the south side of the court house. The deceased was a member of the Evangelical church and of the Odd Fellows' lodge.
The survivors are three children, Orville [SEVERNS], Marion [SEVERNS] and Eva [SEVERNS]; four sisters, two of them being Mrs. Norman STONER and Mrs. Frank MICKEY, Rochester; two brothers, Oliver [SEVERNS] and Wellington [SEVERNS], and a step-daughter, Mrs. Ed THOMPSON.

Tuesday, August 2, 1921

Mrs. Mark RICHTER for more than forty years a resident of this city, and a life-long resident of Fulton county, passed away at her east 12th steeet residence at 7:30 p.m. Monday. Death resulted from heart failure and attendant complications. The deceased had been ill for several weeks and in poor health for a number of years.
Elizabth WAGONER was the daughter of William and Mary WAGONER and was born in Fulton county on October 3, 1844. Her entire life was spent in this county and community where she became a member of the Church of God and in young womanhood married Mark RICHTER whose occupation was tool grinding.
The deceased is survived by her husband; two children, Mrs. J. A. YOUNG, of Des Moines,

Iowa, and Leslie RICHTER, of Rochester; a brother, Samuel [WAGONER]; and two sisters, Mrs. Lucinda COOK and Mary RUSSELL, of this county.
Funeral services for the deceased will be held at two p.m. Thursday at the residence, Rev. Van VACTOR, of Argos preaching the sermon. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Dan KESSLER died at the home of his brother south of Fulton Wednesday, and was buried at Metea Saturday. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Wednesday, August 3, 1921

Mrs. Robert WALLACE, one of Rochester's most prominent women, passed away at 4:40 a.m. Wednesday at her Jefferson street residence following a lingering illness caused by cancer. Mrs. Wallace was well known and well liked in this community and her death will be mourned by many.
Margaret DAVIS was born in Fayette county, Ohio, on November 14, 1885, the daughter of John H. and Mary E. DAVIS. In December of 1880 she was married to Robert C. WALLACE and came with him to this city from Akron, Indiana, having from that time made her home here. Mrs. Wallace was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and was active until incapacitated several years ago in various benevolent enterprises, having been a member of the state board of charities and of the Women's Christian Temperance Union.
The deceased is survived by a husband, Robert C. WALLACE, one brother, Charles DAVIS, and a sister, Mrs. James CURTIS of Akron.
The details of the funeral have not yet been arranged and will be announced later.

Thursday, August 4, 1921

The funeral of the late Mrs. Robert C. WALLACE will be held Friday afternoon at 1:30 at the M.E. church. Rev. G. F. CRAIG will preach the sermon. Burial will be in the mausoleum.

John MATHIAS, one of Fulton county's best-known farmers, living in the Burton neighborhood, died at midnight, Wednesday at his farm home south and west of the Burton church. Neuritis and diabetes had wasted away his strength for the last five years and caused him to be bedfast the last three months. Mr. Mathias was prominent in the Burton neighborhood and has many friends who will be bereaved by his loss.
The deceased was born early in the year 1853 in canton Berne, Switzerland, the son of John and Magdelina MATHIAS. He came with his parents to this country at the age of two years. The parents settled in this community and it was here that Mr. Mathias was brought up. In the year 1875, John Mathias married Susanna WALES, ten children blessing the union, three dying in infancy. Mr. Mathias has lived practically all of his life in this community having made his home at the same place for the past forty years.
From his childhood Mr. Mathias had been united with the United Brethren church and had for a number of years been a member of the Maccabbee lodge.
The survivors are the widow; the children, William [MATHIAS], Wesley [MATHIAS], Charles [MATHIAS], Earl [MATHIAS] and Mrs. Minnie MARSH, Mrs. May MOORE, and Mrs. Ruth CASTLEMAN; two brothers, Jacob [MATHIAS] and Charles [MATHIAS], and a sister, Susanna [MATHIAS].
The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon at Burton church, the Rev. Joseph TODD of

Decatur, Illinois, being in charge. Burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery in this city.

Joseph Marion MOORE, well-known farmer living east of Athens, died at 2:00 a.m. Thursday of complications, following an illness of seven weeks. Although Mr. Moore had been in failing health for some time his death came as a shock to his many friends.
The deceased was the son of Benjamin and Nancy MOORE, and was born in Logan county, Ohio, on February 5, 1858. In that same year he came with his parnts to Indiana and settled three miles west of Akron where he has since resided. From his boyhood Mr. Moore had been a member of the Mt. Hope church and has for some time been a member of the Maccabbee lodge. In 1888 he married Clio Maye ROBBINS. Besides a wife he leaves one brother, Willis [MOORE], of Logansport, and four sisters, Mrs. Mollie BURNS, Mrs. Ella DRUDGE, Mrs. Flora MOORE, and Laura [MOORE] to mourn his loss.
The funeral will be held at 10:30 Sunday morning at the Mt. Hope church, Rev. WELLS in charge. Burial will be in I.O.O.F. cemetery here.

Mrs. Charles FLAGG has gone to Kalamazoo, Michigan, to attend the funeral of a niece.

Friday, August 5, 1921

The funeral of the late John MATHIAS will be held at Burton church Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock instead of in the afternoon as previously announced. Rev. Joseph TODD, of Decatur, Illinois, will be in charge and burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery here.

Benjamin HARTZ son of Nicholas and Eliza HARTZ of Delong, who lost his life with the American Expeditionary Forces in France in 1918, was returned home Friday for burial. Funeral services will be held at Leiters Ford, Sunday morning, Rev. ROUSCH in charge.
Hartz was a member of the 130th infantry and received preliminary training before going to France at Newport News, Va., Beauregard and Camp Taylor. He was wounded on October 14, 1918 and died the following day in an army hospital.
Fred HARTZ, a brother of the returned soldier, died of pneumonia at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, on October 23, 1918, six weeks after entering the service. He was buried at Leiters Ford shortly after that time.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F., Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Frederick HARTZ, Co A 5 Engrs, 1898-1918; Benjamin J. HARTZ, Co H 126 Inf, 1890-1918]

Dr. John WALLACE of Chicago and W. D. WALLACE of Marion were in Rochester Friday to attend the funeral of Mrs. R. C. WALLACE.

Saturday, August 6, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, August 8, 1921

Isom R. NEW, Civil War veteran, and practically a life-long resident of Fulton county, passed away at his home on Jefferson street Saturday evening at the age of eighty-four years. Death was due to old age and followed a period of broken-down health lasting since last November, of nearly nine months.
Isom Ross NEW was born in Ripley county, Indiana, on April 10, 1837, the son of Jethro and Elizabeth NEW. In his early youth he came with his parents to this county where he has since resided. He became a member of the Methodist church and in 1858 married Elizabeth OLIVER. Five daughters, three of whom died in infancy, blessing the union. Two daughters, Kate [NEW] and Agnes [NEW], grew to womanhood.
Mr. New was among the first to enlist as a volunteer when the Civil War broke out, enlisting in 1861 in the 29th Indiana Volunteer Infantry regiment, for a period of three years. At the end of that time he again enlisted, serving nearly the entire period of the war. He saw service at numerous battlefields and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Stone River and Chickamauga.
Sergeant New was wounded September 20, 1863, at Chicamauga and lay unattended on the battlefield for an entire week. He was taken prisoner from the field where he lay and was in the hospital at Chattanooga and Nashville until November 1863. He was exchanged the following May.
After returning from war service, Mr. New followed the occupation of farming, operating several farms in this county. In 1898 he moved to Rochester and engaged in the hardware business on north Main street in partnership with Lee MILLER. In 1917, because of advancing years, he retired from business.
The deceased is survived by a sister, Ella NEW HENTHORNE, of Peru, who had made her home with the deceased in recent years; two grandsons, Edward HUNTER of Plymouth and Robert SHEETS of Rochester and four great-grandchildren.
The funeral which was in charge of Rev. G. F. CRAIG was conducted with full military honors at the residence Monday at two p.m. Burial was in the Mt Olive cemetery, where the American Legion firing squad and the McClung Post of the G.A.R. performed the last rites.

Mrs. Joseph HOUSE died Saturday at her home on the Michigan road north of Fulton. Mrs. House was formerly Sarah Jane FREY, the daughter of Samuel and Anna FREY, and was born in Paulding county, Ohio, on November 2, 1854 In girlhood the deceased joined the dunkard Brethren church at Mexico, Indiana, to which place her family removed. On March 3, 1875 Sarah Frey was united in marriage to Joseph HOUSE. To them was born six children, five since being deceased.
The deceased is survived by her husband; a son, Walter HOUSE, of this city; three sisters, Mrs. Pearl BRETBRUNNER, Mrs. Emma SCHRADER and Mrs. Lily WHITE, of Logansport; and one brother, L. C. FREY of Kansas City.
Funeral services will be held at the home Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. Irvin FISHER of Mexico in charge. Burial will be in the Fulton cemetery.

Tuesday, August 9, 1921

Isaiah KRIDER, 93, one of the pioneers of the Twelve Mile neighborhood, is dead at the home of his son, Rev. Roy KRIDER. He lived near Twelve Mile most of his life. For nearly ten years he lived near Fulton. He was a prominent member of the Methodist church and during the later years of his life he wrote a history of Cass county and also about the pioneers of northern Indiana. He was a brother-in-law of Mrs. Rachael GREEN and an uncle of A. B. GREEN, both of this city. The funeral will be held at the Burton church near Fulton on Wednesday.

J. M. SOUERS has received word of the death of his father, M. M. SOUERS of Long Beach, Calif., Monday at the age of 85 years. The deceased is survived by nine children, J. M. Souers of this city is a son and Mrs. Harry CANADAY of Kokomo, who has been spending the summer at the lake, is a daughter of the deceased. Mr. Souers' wife was formerly Miss Carrie PONNEL of this county. Three sisters live at Huntington. The late Mr. Sours' father lived to be 100 years old.

Wednesday, August 10, 1921

Nathaniel COLLINS, 59, well known farmer who lived three miles northeast of Kewanna on the Rochester road dropped dead very unexpectedly from heart trouble, Tuesday evening while working with a threshing outfit. His death was a shock to his family and community as he had not complained of ill health at any time and was working just before he died.
The threshing ring was finishing up the last loads at the home of Alman HILLS and Mr. Collins, who had been working on top of a load of unthreshed oats, remarked that he was not able to work as hard as he used to as his breath was short. He climbed down from the wagon to rest and while talking to a friend suddenly gave a gasp and sank to the ground. He was dead when the men carried him into the house.
He is survived by a wife, one daughter, three sisters and three brothers. The funeral at the residence, Thursday.

Relatives in this city received word Wednesday morning of the death of David McCANCE at the Northern Indiana Hospital for the Insane at Logansport. Death occurred early Wednesday morning after Mr. McCance had been seized with a severe attack of convulsions. The body arrived in this city shortly before noon.
Mr. McCance was born in Shelby county, Indiana, on July 23, 1854. He became a member of the Methodist church in Shelby county and in later life joined the Odd Fellows lodge. On February 17, 1876, he was united in marriage to Eliza LOUDEN, and three years later they moved to Fulton county to make their home.
For a number of years Mr. McCance was a farmer but later on became incapacitated and was forced to retire. On March 17, 1920, Mr. McCance's mental condition became so grave that he was committed to Longcliff asylum where he remained until his death. He was subject to attacks of the sort which brought about his death but was only yesterday taken worse, passing away today.
Funeral arrangements have not been made and will be announced later.

Mrs. George SWANK, a widow, dropped dead Wednesday morning of apoplexy, at the home of her son, William [SWANK], southwest of Green Oak, where she had made her home since the death of her husband several years ago.
Fietta NOECKER was born in Schuylkill county, Penna., on January 8, 1844. In early life she moved to Fulton county and in young womanhood she married George SWANK, several children being born to the union. Mrs. George GOTTSCHALK and Mrs. William GOTTSCHALK are two surviving daughters.
Arrangements for the funeral will be made and announced later.

Mr. and Mrs. John ROBBINS, Mr. and Mrs. Otis KEEL, Mr. and Mrs. H. O. BLACKBURN, Mr. and Mrs. Omer KEEL and Mrs. Elmer OLIVER attended the funeral of Isom NEW in Rochester Monday. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. GREEN, Mrs. Rachael GREEN and Mrs. Charles [MOGLE] and Ella MOGLE attended the funeral of Isaiah CRIDER this afternoon near Twelve Mile.

Thursday, August 11, 1921

The funeral of the late David McCANCE will be held at 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon at the Franklin avenue residence, Rev. G. F. CRAIG in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Funeral services for the late Mrs. George SWANK will be held at 10:30 Friday morning at the home near Green Oak, Rev. NORRIS of Culver in charge. Burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery here.

Mrs. Jennie RANNELLS, 80, of Perrysburg, a pioneer of the locality, passed away at six o'clock Wednesday evening at the residence of her son, Deo [RANNELLS], at Fulton. About four weeks ago she went to visit at her son's home. Two weeks ago she fell and broke her hip which was followed by illness which culminated in her death. Mrs. Rannells was widely known about Perrysburg and Fulton and has numerous friends who will mourn her death.
Jennie AITKEN was born near Kewanna in the year 1841, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert AITKEN. She became a member of the Methodist church and in 1861 was married to Jacob RANNELLS, who preceded her in death several years ago.
Five children survive the deceased, Deo [RANNELLS], of Fulton; Omer [RANNELLS], of Perrysburg; Charles [RANNELLS], of Indianapolis; Mrs. Mary EMRICK, of Los Angeles; and Mrs. Nellie McELWEE, of Peru.
Funeral services will be held at two o'clock Friday afternoon at the residence of Deo Rannells in Fulton, Rev. LYONS of Perrysburg in charge. Interment at Perrysburg.

Friday, August 12, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, August 13, 1921

Mrs. William MICKEY, a life-long resident of Fulton county, died at 3 o'clock Saturday morning at her home on the Rochester-Warsaw road near Talma aged about 84 years. Tuberculosis, which had incapacitated Mrs. Mickey since March 1, was the cause of death.
Rhoda ALSPACH was born in Rochester township in October of the year 1873 the daughter of Joseph and Adaline ALSPACH. She became a member of the Christian church at Talma and in 1893 was united in marriage to William MICKEY.
The deceased is survived by the husband, two sisters and three brothers. They are John [ALSPACH] and Mrs. Lueretta HUDKINS, of near Talma; Max ALSPACH of near Mentone and Mrs. J. Corey BEERY, of the Burton neighborhood. One brother, Benton [ALSPACH], passed away a number of years ago.
Funeral services will be held in the Christian church of Talma at 2:30 p.m., Monday, Rev. George D. FOSTER in charge. Interment at Talma.

Monday, August 15, 1921

Carl LOUDEN of Chicago, Paul [BREADLOVE] and Ernest BREADLOVE of Indianapolis and Coty ORDERS of Greenfield have returned home after attending the funeral of their uncle, David McCANCE.

Tuesday, August 16, 1921

Jennie AITKEN RANNELLS, the last one of the Aitken descendants, was born near Kewanna, Indiana, June 25, 1841 and died at the home of her son, Dio [RANNELLS], at Fulton, August 10, 1921, age 80 years 1 month and 16 days.
On her twentieth birthday she was married to Jacob S. RANNELLS and to this union were born five children: Nellie McELWEE, Charles RANNELLS, Mary B. ENICK, Omer RANNELLS and Dio RANNELLS. There are also eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild who survive.
During the greater part of her life Mrs. Rannells lived in Perrysburg where she had been a member of the Methodist church for more than half a century. - - -

Wednesday, August 17, 1921

Mrs. Charter TALBERT, 53, well known resident of this community for the past ten years, died at 8:20 o'clock at her home on the north shore of the lake Tuesday evening following a severe stroke of paralysis suffered Sunday afternoon at one o'clock. Mrs. Talbert had been in the best of health prior to her stroke.
She was born near Mexico, Indiana, April 25, 1868, a daughter of Nathaniel and Martha CLINGENPEEL. On August 1, 1899 she was united in marriage to Charter TALBERT, who with a son, the mother, three sisters and two brothers, survive. Funeral services from the Hoover Chapel Friday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Cletus [STREBE], the young son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward STREBE, who lived two miles north of Macy, died Friday of infantile paralysis, after an illness of three days. The funeral was held in the yard at the home, Saturday afternoon, conducted by Rev. GILLILAND of Gilead. On account of the fear of this dreadful disease it was impossible to obtain singers. The family have the deep sympathy of many friends in their bereavement. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, August 18, 1921

Mrs. Columbus MURPHY, one of Rochester's well-known women and until recent years an active charities worker, passed away peacefully Wednesday evening about 7:30 o'clock at the residence on south Elm street, after a long and painful illness of fully a year from the ravages of cancer. The death of Mrs. Murphy takes from the community a fine woman but considering the terrible suffering she had to undergo, it can be regarded in no other way but as a blessing.
Sarah COOK was born in Miami county, Ohio, August 6, 1851, the daughter of John and Eliza COOK. On November 13, 1871 she married Columbus MURPHY and in 1889 the family moved to this city from Denver, Indiana, to make their home. Besides the husband the two children born to this union survive the deceased. They are T. A. MURPHY, of this city and Mrs.

L. W. DAVIDSON, of South Bend.
At the time of her death Mrs. Murphy had lived in this city thirty-two years and was aged seventy years and 11 days. The deceased was a member of the Baptist church and took an active part in the work of the church here, teaching a Sunday school class for a number of years.
Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the Baptist church. Rev. C. S. DAVISSON will preach the sermon. Interment will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Herman MOORE, aged about eighty years, passed away at 8:00 o'clock Wednesday evening at his residence northeast of Rochester after a year's illness. He is survived by the widow, Julia Anne ALSPACH MOORE, and one son, Charles A. MOORE, of South Bend. The funeral will be held Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Further details concerning the life of Mr. Moore and further arrangements for the funeral have not been obtained.

Friday, August 19, 1921

Mrs. Harriet STRADLEY, aged about eighty-five years, resident of Rochester for a number of years, died Thursday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Clarence ALLMAN, at Argos, a victim of paralysis. For the past year Mrs. Stradley, the widow of Charles STRADLEY, had been ill and had been staying with her daughter at Argos. Two other children survive the deceased, Mrs. Lydia LOOMIS, of Cleveland, Ohio, and C. J. STRADLEY, of this city. During a great part of her life Mrs. Stradley was a member of the Methodist church.
Funeral services will be held at Argos, at the residence of Clarence Allman, at 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The body will be brought here for burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. There will be a short service at the grave.

Saturday, August 20, 1921

Mrs. John CLOUSE, resident of this city for seventy years, died at 6:30 Saturday morning at the residence on Park Street, at the age of eighty-six years. The husband and several children survive. A son, John [CLOUSE], lives in Washington, Isaiah [CLOUSE] lives in Moscow, Idaho, Frank GOSS lives at Plymouth, Mrs. Lizzie DEO at Plymouth, Ind., and Mrs. John HAGAN in this city. A brother, Richard REED, lives at Fulton.
Margaret REED was born in Ohio in the year 1835, the daughter of Richard and Elizabeth REED and came to this vicinity to live in her childhood. She married Emmanual GOSS, who died a number of years ago, and later married John CLOUSE, now living. Mrs. Clouse was a member of the U.B. church during her life.
Funeral services will be held sometime Monday afternoon. Other details will be arranged later.

Mrs. Isabelle ENYART, aged 68, born in Fulton county in 1853, the daughter of James and Elizabeth MOORE, died recently at Elkhart, where she has made her home for the last 35 years. Funeral services will be held at the First Evangelical church there Monday.

Monday, August 22, 1921

The body of John NICODEMUS, who was reported killed in action in the Argonne, September 1918, will arrive in this country as soon as possible and sent on to this city for interment. Wm. NICODEMUS, father of the boy, received a telegram from government officials Sunday morning stating that the body would arrive at Rochester on the twenty-fifth of the present month. The government's action follows out a request made by Mr. Nicodemus nearly three years ago that his son's body be returned.
John Nicodemus entered service at Columbus, Ohio, at the age of seventeen, which was rather remarkable because of his short stature. He trained there and at Fort Sam Houston, became a private in Company B, 3rd Infantry and was transferred to Company F, 26th infantry division with which he sailed for France. He was wounded in both hands July 19, 1918 and taken to a hospital at Rouen, erroneously reported killed. In the St. Mihiel drive Nicodemus received a gun wound in a leg and was out of action for a time but returned to fight in the Argonne battle September 27, 1918 and was reported killed in action between October 1 and 11.
Several different times Nicodemus was reported killed and his parents and friends here were in doubt for a long time, refusing to believe that the boy was dead. It was believed that he might have been a victim of shell shock but this idea was eventually given up when it was reported that he was buried in the Romaines-Argonne cemetery.

Mrs. Fietta NOECKER was born at Schuylkill Haven, Schuylkill Co., Penn., on January 9, 1844. She was united in marriage to George SWANK Aug. 31, 1862, departed this life Aug. 10, 1921. Age 77 years, 7 mo., and 1 day. To this union were born one son, Four daughters, one daughter preceded her in the spirit world. Those left to mourn are William SWANK, at home, Mrs. Adam HUFFMAN, of Anderon, Ind., Mrs. William GOTTSCHALK and Mrs. George GOTTSCHALK, of Green Oak, besides two sisters, Mrs. Emma DAWALD, of Perrysburg, Ind., and Mrs. Kate BERGER, of Kansas. Also 17 grandchildren, 1 great-grandchild. In early life she gave herself in God's keeping and remained faithful to the end. She was a kind and loving mother, always willing to lend a helping hand. None knew her but to love her, she lived for the loved ones and the good that she could do. - - - -

Tuesday, August 23, 1921

Mrs. Jemima NEISWONGER died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Carey WILSON, southwest of town, Friday morning, of cancer of the stomach. She was born and reared in Clarke county, Ohio, and after her mariage to William NEISWONGER, spent the rest of her life in Indiana, the last four years being at Macy.
She was the mother of five children, but during the terrible epidemic of black diptheria in 1892 lost three of her daughters in one week. Later the oldest daughter, Viola SEIDNER, died, leaving Mr. and Mrs. NEISWONGER with only one daughter, Mabel [NEISWONGER], now Mrs. Carey WILSON. Mr. Nieswonger died suddenly a number of years ago, and since that time Mrs. Neiswonger lived alone in Macy.
She was a member of the Christian church and was a devoted Christian and a very fine character. Her age was 76 years and nine days.
Besides the daughter, she leaves six grandchildren, Harold SEIDNER, of Ft. Wayne, Donald [WILSON], Lynn [WILSON], Howard [WILSON], Ellis [WILSON] and Richard WILSON.

The funeral was held at the Christian church Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. C. E. SEIFRIS. Interment was made in Plainview cemetery.
Those from a distance who attended the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. Harold SEIDNER and two children, E. E. NEISWONGER and Mrs. H. W. NEISWONGER, of Ft. Wayne, Mr. and Mrs. Mearl NEISWONGER of Tyner, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank CARLSON, of Plymouth. - - -MACY ITEMS.

Mrs. S. L. BADER and daughter, Mrs. Clarence FULTZ, of Basil, Ohio, who were called here by the death of Mrs. Bader's mother, are the guests of John HAGAN and family.

Wednesday, August 24, 1921

John J. KUMLER, aged 81 former treasurer of Fulton county and prominent Wayne township farmer, passed away at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday at his home in Grass Creek, the victim of old age and disease comlications. He had been ill during the greater part of the summer.
Mr. Kumler was born in Ohio in the year 1840 and later moved to this vicinity to live. He married Almeda URBIN, nine children, all of whom survive, being born to this union.
The deceased was a member of the G.A.R. and of the U.B. church at Grass Creek. During the years 1896-1897 he served a term as treasurer of the county, which office is now occupied by his son, H. B. KUMLER.
The surviving children are: Mae [KUMLER], at home, Mrs. Maude MURRAY, Ed KUMLER, Roy KUMLER, all of Grass Creek; Mrs. Carrie PHILLIPS, Argos; J. Frank KUMLER and Harley B. KUMLER, Rochester; Oliver KUMLER, Logansport, and Mrs. Pearl HEIMBURGER, Reynolds. Mrs. Kumler died several years ago.
Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at Grass Creek and burial will be in the Grass Creek cemetery.

Thursday, August 25, 1921

Donna SHAFER, 16-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John SHAFER, living 1 mile south of Tippecanoe, killed herself early Wednesday morning near her home by firing a shotgun bullet through her brain. Despondency was the probable cause of her action.

Friday, August 26, 1921

Charles FREEMAN, aged about 50 years, well-known truck gardener west of town and practically a life-long resident of this community, died very suddenly Thursday afternoon at one o'clock, a victim of paralysis, after an illness lasting only two days. For the past week Mr. Freeman had not been feeling well but had not been confined to his home west of the Fair Grounds.
The deceased, whose birthplace is not known, was the son of Daniel and Adeline FREEMAN. He was one of several children, being survived by two brothers, Alonzo [FREEMAN] of Hammond, and Frank [FREEMAN], of South Bend. A widow, formerly Mrs. Tincy HUNTER, also survives.
Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

Mrs. Lucy KISTLER arrived from Indianapolis yesterday to attend the funeral of her stepmother, Mrs. John CLOUSE. She will remain here to visit several days.

Saturday, August 27, 1921

Funeral services for Charles FREEMAN will be held at the residence west of the city Sunday afternoon at two o'clock.

Monday, August 29, 1921 to Tuesday, August 30, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, August 31, 1921

Lyman Beecher EDWARDS, a life long resident of the town of Mexico, died at his home in that village yesterday afternoon at 4:00 o'clock following an illness of several months' duration, of heart disease. He was born at Mexico, on February 19, 1851, and was the son of the late John EDWARDS and Hannah STEELE EDWARDS.
He was united in marriage to Miss Margaret L. GRAFT on October 3, 1873. He is survived by the widow and two sons, Webster E. [EDWARDS] and Lyman Paul EDWARDS of Fairview, Oklahoma. Four grandchildren also survive: John [EDWARDS], the son of Webster Edwards, and Margaret [EDWARDS], Lyman [EDWARDS], and Joseph [EDWARDS], the children of Paul Edwards. One brother, C. A. EDWARDS, of Oakland, Calif., also survives.

William TRICKLE, 53, a life long resident of Fulton county, except for a few years spent in other cities, died at six o'clock Tuesday evening at the hospital here, where he had been taking treatment for Bright's disease, with which he had been practically bedfast for the past three months. Mr. Trickle had been in poor health for several months, following the demise of his mother, and 13 weeks ago he went to Rochester, Minnesota where he was under the care of the Mayo Brothers for several weeks. He was later sent to Rochester, where he remained until death came.
William Trickle was born in Fulton county, August 27, 1868, a son of Thomas and Sarah TRICKLE, deceased. He was reared in this community and when a young man, took up the barber's trade, which he had followed all of his life. He is survived by four brothers, W. A. TRICKLE, Elkmont, Ala., E. H. TRICKLE, Carlton, Wash., J. L. TRICKLE, Laketon and S. C. TRICKLE, Watsonville, Calif., and a sister, Mrs. Samuel ESSICK, of Plainfield.
Funeral at the Zimmerman Chapel at 2:30 Thursday afternoon with burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Oliver JORDON and Mrs. Delbert JORDON attended the funeral of Mrs. HARTZ in South Chicago Saturday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, September 1, 1921 to Saturday, September 3, 1921
[no obits]

Monday, September 5, 1921

[no paper - holiday]
Tuesday, September 6, 1921

Mrs. Ida B. PHILLIPS, 56, died at noon Tuesday at her home on East Ninth street, a victim of dropsy, from which she had suffered for the past year. Mrs. Phillips, who was the widow of the late John PHILLIPS, had lived in this locality since 1890, moving to Rochester with her husband two years after her marriage. She was born in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, April 16, 1865. She is survived by a half-sister, Clara THOMAS, of Mt. Vernon, O. Funeral services from the United Brethren church Thusday at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. George CRANE in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, September 7, 1921

[no obits]

Thursday, September 8, 1921

Mrs. I. N. GRISSO, of Petersburgh, Ill., was taken very ill Tuesday, while at the Bearss hotel with her husband in Peru. She was taken at once to Dukes hospital, but died in a short time. The Grissos were former residents of Peru, where he was pastor of the Christian church. The funeral services will be held Friday at 10:30 o'clock at Macy. Mrs. Grisso was a sister of Mrs. C. A. MITCHELL, of this city.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview cemetery, Allen Twp.: Isaac N. GRISSO, 1860-(no d.d.); Emma A. GRISSO, 1859-1921]

A telegram to William NICODEMUS Wednesday evening from the army headquarters at Hoboken, New Jersey, announced that the body of his son, John [NICODEMUS], who was killed in action in the war, would be shipped on the Erie railroad Thursday morning. According to this it should arrive some time Friday in this city.

Melvin W. COOPER, 68, died early Thursday morning at his home five miles northwest of Akron, according to word received here. Mr. Cooper, who was a well known farmer of that community, is survived by a widow, Mrs. Anna R. COOPER. He was born in Ashland county, O., July 13, 1853.

Friday, September 9, 1921

Arrangement has been made that the funeral services for the late John NICODEMUS, son of Mr. and Mrs. William NICODEMUS, of this city, whose body has arrived from France, where he was killed in action in the Argonne in October of 1918, will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Evangelical church. Rev. E. J. NICKEL will preach the funeral services and full military honors will be accorded by the Shelton Post American Legion.

Saturday, September 10, 1921

Mrs. Mary LEONAR, of Warsaw, died at her home in Warsaw, Wednesday morning and was buried in Silver Lake cemetery Friday morning. She was the mother of Mrs. C. VEIRS, of this city.

Funeral services for Melvin COOPER, of near Akron, will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at Athens, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Emma BUCHANAN, mother of Mrs. Edward HALEY, died at the home of her daughter, 221 W. Main street, Peru, Ind., Tuesday at 11:45 p.m., following an illness of nine months of dropsy. Mrs. Buchanan was a resident of Wheeling, W. Va., until three months ago, when she came to Peru to be with her daughter during her illness. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Frank ROSS, of this city, and Mrs. Edward HALEY, of Peru. Funeral services were held at the Haley residence at 1:00 o'clock p.m. Thursday, conducted by Rev. Dr. HUFF, of the Baptist church of which she was a member. The funeral cortege went overland to Rochester, where the interment took place at the Odd Fellows Cemetery.

Monday, September 12, 1921

The Evangelical church was well filled Sunday afternoon with persons paying their last respects to John A. NICODEMUS, who was killed in action in the Argonne in October 1918. Full military ceremonies were accorded by the Shelton Post, American Legion.

Tuesday, September 13, 1921

Melvin W. [COOPER], son of Catherine and Jacob COOPER, was born July 13, 1853 Ashland county, Ohio. Was united in marriage with Lovina METCALF May 15, 1877. To this union were born two children, Mrs. Jennie TRAN of Mishawaka, Ind., and William H. [COOPER], residence unknown.
His companion was taken from him Nov. 10, 1891.
He again united in marriage with Anna R. LARGE, Aug. 21, 1897. He united with the Bethlehem Baptist church 27 years ago and later removed his membership to the United Brethren church at Burton and lived a faithful Christian life until Sept. 8, 1901, when he was called home.
He leaves to mourn their loss a devoted wife, the daughter, one son, one step-son, two grandsons and a host of friends and relatives.

Wednesday, September 14, 1921

Mrs. Maurice POLAY, 33, died Sunday at her home in Kewanna, according to word received here by her cousin, Jake POLAY. Mrs. Polay had lived in this country just a little more than a year, coming to Kewanna from her former home in Minsk, Russia. She is survived by five children, one an infant two weeks old, and the husband. The body was taken to Chicago Monday for burial.

John Abraham NICODEMUS, son of William and Agnes NICODEMUS, was born on January 19, 1900, at Dowagiac, Mich. With his parents he removed to Miami county, and then to Rochester, where he attended the public schools. On January 1, 1917, he enlistd at Columbus, Ohio, being assigned to Co. B, 3rd Inf., at Eagle Pass, Texas. On the following May he was transferred to Co. F, 26th Inf., and sailed for overseas, June 27, 1917. A detailed history of the movements and activities of this unit is contained in the record "The Twenty-Sixty Infantry in France."
He was wounded July 19, 1918, at Soissons, again in August, in the Champagne district; likewise in the St. Mihiel offensive in September. According to official records he was killed by a high explosive shell, while guarding equipment, between October 1 and 11, 1918.
On his Victory Medal are five little bars which indicate the extent of his service overseas -- Montdidier-Noyon, Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Defensive Sector.
The body arrived in Rochester Friday, September 9, 1921, memorial services being conducted on Sunday, September 11 under auspices of Shelton Post, American Legion. The immediate relatives of the deceased are his father and mother, a sister, Mrs. Carl PFLUEGER, of Indianapolis, and two brothers, Harry [NICODEMUS] and Fred [NICODEMUS], of Rochester. Many other relatives and friends honor his memory.

The funeral of Mrs. I. N. GRISSO was held at the Christian Church in Macy, Friday morning, conducted by Rev. WARD of Illinois and Rev. SCEIFERS of Macy. Interment was in the Plainview cemetery.
Mrs. Grisso was the daughter of Avery P. and Angeline CARVEY, and was born and reared in this community. For the past few years her home has been in Illinois. She was very popular in religious circles and helpful wherever she was. Mrs. Margaret CARVEY and A. P. CARVEY of this community are a sister and brother of the deceased. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, September 15, 1921

Word has been received here of the death at his home in Michigan of Grant RICKEL, a former resident of the Athens neighborhood. No details were available.

There were a good many people around here attended the funeral of Melvin COOPER, held at Athens Sunday. - - - LOYAL ITEMS.

Friday, September 16, 1921 to Saturday, September 17, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, September 19, 1921

What had started out to be a pleasant week's vacation ended in a grim tragedy for Otto S. MILES, 37, of Indianapolis, who died at the Frank EMERICK cottage on the east side of the lake Sunday, a victim of acute bronchial asthma. Miles and his wife and two children arrived at the lake last Friday and were spending a most enjoyable vacation when death entered their household. Miles is a son of Ethan Allen MILES, well known Indiana prohibitionist and himself a Big Four railroad yard clerk at Indianapolis. He is survived by the parents, wife and two children. The body has been removed to Danville for burial.

Tuesday, September 20, 1921

William SCHOONOVER, prominent citizen of Argos and of Marshall county, died at his home in that town at five o'clock Saturday afternoon after an illness of more than three weeks. Mr. Schoonover was 84 years of age and had been for several decades a leading merchant of Argos and well known in Rochester and over the county for his prominence in business circles.
William Schoonover was born near Cambridge, Guernsey county, Ohio, August 24, 1837. During the year 1850 with his parents he moved to Wells County, Indiana. His home continued in Wells county till the year 1880, and during the time he was married to Nancy ORMBY on Dec. 25, 1860. From the latter place he moved to Wisconsin, where he remained about three years when he traded his land for a stock of general merchandise in Argos and moved there during the year 1883 and since then he has made Argos his permanent home.
He was active in the business for about twenty years when he, with his wife, concluded to retire from active life and after sixty years of companionship, his wife preceded him by only a few months in death, on the fifth of April last.
His three sons continue to live in Argos, B. C. [SCHOONOVER], in the telehone business and Charles [SCHOONOVER] and Alonzo L. [SCHOONOVER] in the mercantile trade.
The funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Christian church. Burial in Maple Grove cemetery.

Wednesday, September 21, 1921 to Thursday, September 22, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, September 23, 1921

John Howard REED, three year old son of Robert and Margaret REED, of near Richland Center, died at 10 o'clock Friday morning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank KEESEY south Fulton avenue, following an attack of cholera infantum, suffered while the youngster was visiting the fair here this fall. The body was removed to the home of Mrs. Lydia TRIMBLE and Mr. and Mrs. Reed, near Richland Center, where funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock. Besides the parents, an eight months old brother survives.

Mrs. Rachel DAWSON, formerly of Rochester, died at the home of her daughter, in Chicago, Thursday morning. She will arrive here today for burial. Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, September 24, 1921

William COOPER, 50, a resident of Michigan, who underwent an operation at the hospital here in which his right leg was amputated because of a cancerous condition, died Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Rosanna COOPER. Funeral serviced will be held at the Richland Center church Monday morning at 10 o'clock with burial at the Richland Center cemetery.

Funerals services of Mrs. Samuel DAWSON were held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Hoover chapel, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial was made at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, September 26, 1921

Funeral services for the late Mrs. Elizabeth KITT, who died at Goodland, where she had made her home with her son, Al KITT, well-known in this city, were held at the graveside at the I.O.O.F. cemetery here Monday at 2:30 o'clock. The body was brought from Goodland to Rochester to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Eliza PUGH, Monday morning. Mrs. Kitt was a former resident of this city.
__________

The body of Mrs. Anna KITT, of Goodland, Ind., arrived today in this city and the burial took place at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The remains were taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Alida PUGH.

Tuesday, September 27, 1921

Elias DRISCOL, 79 died at 3:50 o'clock Tuesday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Charles GOHN, with whom he had made his home for some time recently, after a long illness, extending over a period of several years. Death was caused by catarrh of the stomach and liver trouble, and while he had been seriously ill for a long time, he stood up under the suffering without complaint.
Elias Driscol was born September 29, 1842 on a farm near Lafayette. At the age of 21 he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth HILL. To this union three children were born. Forty-one years ago his wife died and he then moved with his family to Danville, Ill. Twenty-two years ago he moved to Rochester near his daughter and had lived here from that time until death came.
He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. GOHN, another daughter, Mrs. Cora SIMPSON having died six years ago. A son, Willard [DRISCOL], died in infancy. Funeral services at Lafayette Thursday afternoon at two o'clock.

Thomas Jefferson SANDERS, 82, died at 10:30 o'clock Monday morning at his home near Richland Center after an illness of but five days. He was a farmer and had lived in this county for 55 years. Mr. Sanders was born in Ohio, December 21, 1839, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry SANDERS. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Rebecca SANDERS, five sons, Henry [SANDERS], Thomas [SANDERS], Daniel [SANDERS], Amos [SANDERS[ and Charles [SANDERS] and two daughters, Katie [SANDERS] and Ellie [SANDERS]. Funeral services from the home at Whippoorwill Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. SNYDER, of Culver in charge. Burial at Richland Center cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. George CARR and two children returned today to their home in Indianapolis, after being here on account of the death of Mrs. Anna KITT.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry DOWNING will return Wednesday to their home in Chicago. They came here to accompany the body of her mother, Mrs. Anna KITT, of Goodland, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank STEININGER, of Copemich, Mich., and George FULT, of Sherman, Mich., arrived here Monday to attend the funeral of Wm. COOPER. Mr. Fult will remain several days to visit his daughter, Mrs. Arlie STEININGER and family.

Wednesday, September 28, 1921

[no obits]

Thursday, September 29, 1921

Estel O. KINDIG, 42, well known Fulton county farmer, who had lived in this county all of his life, died Wednesday at his home south of Sugar Grove, according to word received in this city Thursday morning. Kindig, who was the son of Orville O. and Alfaretta KINDIG, was born in this county on May 22, 1879. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Bessie KINDIG, and six children. Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, September 30, 1921 to Wednesday, October 5, 1921

[no obits]

Thursday, October 6 1921

Orpha Madeline DuBOIS, one year old daughter of Briggs DuBOIS, north Pontiac street, died at 10 o'clock Thursday morning following a severe attack of cholera infantum. The child is survived by the parents who have three other children.

Friday, October 7, 1921

Isaac N. GRAY, 67, died at his home on west 13th street Friday afternoon of complications from which he had suffered during a period of four weeks time. He is survived by the widow and other relatives. Funeral arrangements later.

Peter GRAY, of Galion, Mich., came to be at the bedside of his brother, who died Friday.

Orpha Madeline DuBOIS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Briggs DuBOIS, died Oct. 6, 1921, age one year, one month and fourteen days. Besides the father and mother she leaves two sister, Dorcas [DuBOIS] and Zetta [DuBOIS]; two brothers, Keith [DuBOIS] and William [DuBOIS]. Funeral services will be held at Mud Lake chapel, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. E. J. NICKEL in charge. Burial in Horton's cemetery.

Saturday, October 8, 1921

Funeral services for Isaac N. GRAY Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Evangelical church, Rev. NICKELS in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. Cemetery.

Monday, October 10, 1921

Isaac N. GRAY was born in Darke County, Ohio, the third day of January, 1854, and departed this life on October 7th, 1921, in Rochester, Ind., aged 67 years, 8 months and 4 days. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. James and Anna GRAY. He was united in marriage to Ellen HEETER the 24th day of March 1879. To this union were born three children, one of whom died in infancy.

He was converted and baptized by Rev. MARKS of the Evangelical church in the year 1891 in the month of February and joined the church at that time. He had been in delicate health for several years and took to his bed on the 12th day of September, 1921. In sickness Mr. Gray was a patient sufferer and had all the care loving hands could give him. He was ready when his master called him home.
He was preceded in death by a half-sister, Mrs. Adeline WEYANT, a brother, James [GRAY], and sister, Susan [GRAY]. He is survived by his wife, Ellen [GRAY], two daughters, Mrs. Leslie E. WOLFE, of Delong, Indiana, and Mrs. John W. WALTERS of Rochester, two grandchildren, Annabelle [WALTERS] and Raymond WALTERS; one sister, Mrs. William DeMONT of Rochester, two brothers, Peter [GRAY] of Buchanan, Mich., and William [GRAY] of South Bend, one half-brother, George [GRAY], of New Carlisle, Indiana, besides a host of friends and other relatives.

Tuesday, October 11, 1921

Wm. HEETER and wife, Mrs. Levi HEETER, M. M. HEETER and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Carl SORHAG, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. GINTHER attended the funeral of Isaac GRAY at Rochester Sunday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. I. EDGINGTON and Mr. and Mrs. W. H. HEETER attended the funeral of Mrs. ALLEN at Monterey, Thursday. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. William LOCK went to Kokomo Saturday to attend the funeral of a relative, who died suddenly there. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Wednesday, October 12, 1921

Mrs. D. F. HAYMAN, of Silver Lake, passed away Sunday night at 10 o'clock at her home. Death was due to cancer of the stomach and bowels with which she had been suffering for the past number of months. Mrs. Hayman underwent an operation four weeks ago in Cincinnati, Ohio, and had been in a very critical condition since then.
She was a very well known resident of Silver Lake, having made her home there for the past number of years, moving to Silver Lake from Van Wert, Ohio, where she was born.
The deceased was about 50 years of age and a member of the Lutheran church in Silver Lake.
She is survived by her husband and one sister, Mrs. DENEKER, of Van Wert, Ohio.

The funeral of Miss Addie SIMONTON was held at the M.E. church in Perrysburg Friday afternoon of last week, conducted by Dr. Harry NYCE, pastor of the Presbyterian church at Peru and was assisted by Rev. H. A. PARK, pastor of the Methodist church at Denver.
Miss Simonton, who was the daughter of Hamilton and Keziah SIMONTON, was born in Pennsylvania but spent most of her life near Perrysburg, Indiana. The past few years she had spent at the Methodist Old Folk's Home at Warsaw, where she died at the age of 88 years.
She was a lovely woman and a splendid Christian. Mrs. Palmer CARVEY, of Perrysburg, and Mrs. Wm. McELWEE, who resides east of Macy, were nieces. Besides other relatives she leaves a host of friends. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, October 13, 1921

Henry BOWEN, 73, pioneer farmer of Fulton county, died at 10 o'clock Wednesday night at his farm home in Henry Township a victim of senility and other complictions. He had been ill for five years.
Mr. Bowen was well known in the community where he had resided practically all of his life. He was born in Miami county and moved to Fulton county in his early years. He was a member of the Baptist church and is survived by the widow, Mrs. Julia BOWEN, three sons, Scott BOWEN, of Montana, Lew BOWEN, of Huntington, and Orange BOWEN, of Oklahoma, and one daughter, Mrs. Laura WINES, of Roann.
Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, October 14, 1921 to Saturday, October 15 1921

[no obits]

Monday, October 17, 1921

Dr. McKendriee GREEN, a former resident of this county, but for the past 35 years a practicing physician and resident of Pleasant Lake, Steuben county, Indiana, died Saturday evening at the Odd Fellows Home in Greensburg, Ind., at the age of 78 years. He had been in failing health for the past four years. He was a brother of Benjamin F. GREEN of this city, Cornelius GREEN of Twelve Mile, Indiana and Mrs. Henry MYERS of Fulton, Indiana. B. F. Green went to Greensburg this morning to attend the funeral which will be held at that place today.

Tuesday, October 18, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. ANDERSON and daughter, Winifield [ANDERSON], have returned home from Elgin, Ill., where they attended the funeral of Mr. Anderson's brother, who was brought back from France. He formerly worked for the Van Trump Printing Co., of this city.

Wednesday, October 19, 1921

[no obits]

Thursday, October 20, 1921

Isabelle TRIMBLE [WOOD], 75, wife of William WOOD, died at seven o'clock Thursday morning at her home on south Main street, a victim of a complication of diseases from which she had suffered during the past two years.
Isabelle Trimble was born in Rochester, December 18, 1846, a daughter of William and Elizabeth TRIMBLE, and is the last of a family of eight children. She was united in marriage January 17, 1872 to William WOOD, who with several nieces and nephews, is the sole survivor. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and of the Rochester lodge O.E.S.
Funeral services from the Presbyterian church Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. S. A. STEWART, Laporte, in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, October 21, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, October 22, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. KILLEN, of Warsaw, are here, called by the death of the latter's aunt, Mrs. Wm. WOOD.
Mrs. Isabelle WESTFALL of Seattle, Washington is on her way East to attend the Funeral of her Aunt, Mrs. William WOOD. Thomas WOOD and Mrs. CASTLEMAN of Logansport will also come for the funeral.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Isabelle WOOD, 1846-1921; William WOOD, 1844-1931]

Monday, October 24, 1921

Frances May [CARR], three and one-half year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray CARR, was almost instantly killed at about nine o'clock Monday morning at the home of her parents, a few miles southwest of Argos, when she became entangled in a gasoline engine being used to furnish power to a chothes washing machine.
Word of the accident was received by the grandparents of the child, Mr. and Mrs. Ben CARR, east of the city. They did not know how the child became caught in the engine nor what was the nature of the injuries that caused her death. The child is survived by the parents, a sister, Irena [CARR] and two brothers, Walter [CARR] and Samuel [CARR].

Tuesday, October 25, 1921

Funeral services for Frances May CARR, Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Christian church, Rev. W. C. ASCHENHORT in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, October 26, 1921

Mrs. Delila FOUTS, 50, wife of Joseph H. FOUTS, died Tuesday evening at her home near Macy, according to word received here Wednesday morning. Funeral services from the Macy Christian church Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Burial at Plainview cemetery.

A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. Will FARRAR Saturday night, but the little life expired after a short existence. Burial was made in the Plainview cemetery Sunday. The mother is getting along nicely. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, October 27, 1921

Miss Louise GINTHER, aged about 30, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John GINTHER, of Leiters Ford, died at the home of her parents Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock a victim of tubrculosis from which she had suffered for some time.
Miss Ginther, who had lived all of her life at Leiters is survived by the parents and two brothers, Henry GINTHER, of Colorado, and William GINTHER, of South Bend. Funeral services at Leiters Ford, Saturday afternoon at two o'clock.

Friday, October 28, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, October 29, 1921

Mrs. Carrie GINTHER went today to Leiters Ford to attend the funeral of her sister-in-law, Miss Louise GINTHER.

Monday, October 31, 1921

W. E. MOHLER received word that Mrs. M. E. TROUTMAN, of Chicago, whose husband is Mr. Mohler's cousin, was killed Sunday evening in that city by an automobile. Mr. and Mrs. Mohler will go to Chicago Wednesday to attend the funeral.

Tuesday, November 1, 1921

The funeral of Brenton DOUD was held Thursday at the Baptist temple. Burial at the Fulton cemetery. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Mrs. John KALEY and Mrs. Simon KALEY attended the funeral of Mr. GALAGHER at Logansport Friday.

Wednesday, November 2, 1921

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. MOHLER went today to Chicago to attend the funeral of Mr. Mohler's cousin, Mrs. M. E. TROUTMAN, who was killed by an automobile Sunday evening.

Thursday, November 3, 1921

Mrs. Evangeline BANKSON HOLMAN, 40, wife of Hugh HOLMAN, of this city, died Thursday morning at the sanitarium at Battle Creek, Mich., where she had been taking treatments for a cancder from which she had suffered during the past three years, according to word received by Rochester relatives. Mr. Holman was with Mrs. Holman at the time of her demise.
Evangeline BANKSON was born in Sioux Falls, S.D., one of a family of two girls and three boys, all of whom, together with the parents survive. She lived practically all of her life in Sioux Falls, where she was educated, in later years, however, coming to Indiana, where she taught music in the public schools for several years.
About 15 years ago she came to Rochester where for two years she was employed in the local schools as a music and art teacher. On December 28, 1908 she was united in marriage to Hugh Holman, of this city, where she has since made her home. Besides the husband, parents, brothers and sisters, two children, Louise Evangeline [HOLMAN] and Hugh [HOLMAN], Jr., survive.
The body was brought to South Bend Thursday afternoon and transported overland to Rochester to the home of George HOLMAN, the father-in-law. Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, November 4, 1921

Died at Logansport, Ray MAUDLIN, of near Grass Creek, after several weeks sickness from a fall, in which his back was broken. The funeral occurred Tuesday morning at Grass Creek, burial at Fletchers Lake.

Funeral services for Mrs. Hugh HOLMAN will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the residence on Madison and 14th streets, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery. Among those who are expected to attend the funeral are two of her brothers and a sister, of Sioux Falls, Ia., and Mrs. George BEACH, of New York.

Mrs. Catherine HIRE, age 101, believed to have been the oldest residet of Kosciusko county, died Wednesday evening at the Kosciusko County Infirmary, at Warsaw, where she was taken two weeks ago from her home in Mentone because her husband, who is eighty-six years old, was unable to care for her. She was born in Ohio and came to this state fifty years ago. In addition to her husband three children survive.

Saturday, November 5, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, November 7, 1921

Samuel ZARTMAN, aged about 75, one of the well known farmers of Fulton county, dropped dead Sunday afternoon at his home two miles east of Fulton, according to word received here Monday morning. Mr. Zartman has been in ill health for the past year or more and with increasing age became more weak. Sunday he was working about the house and feeling that he had overtaxed his strength sat down in a chair on the porch to rest for a moment before continuing with the chores. He had been seated but a few minutes when he suddenly succumbed to an attack of heart failure and fell over dead. He is survived by the widow, a daughter, Mrs. Colonel WHYBREW, and two sons, Verne ZARTMAN, of Fulton, and Earl ZARTMAN, of Mobile, Ala. Funeral services Tuesday afternoon at Macy.

Tuesday, November 8, 1921

Word has been received here of the death Saturday at his home in Huntington of John ZINK, for many years a prominent farmer of Richland township in the neighborhood of Zink's lake which was named in his honor. Mr. Zink had been in ill health for some time and death came as the result of increasing age. The body was brought to Richland Center where the funeral services are to be held Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock.

Mary Frances CARR, little daughter of Ray and Ruth CARR was born in Fulton county, Indiana, June 11, 1919, and met her untimely death at her home in Marshall County, on October 24, 1921, aged 2 years, 4 months and 13 days.
Mary Frances is the first of the Carr children to pass into the great beyond. She is now looked upon as a jewel in whom the affections of the entire family are centered.
She is survived by her father and mother; one sister, Irene [CARR], age 9; two brothers, Walter [CARR], age 7, ad Samuel [CARR], age 6; her grandfather, B. F. CARR; two grandmothers, Mrs. Martha DAWSON and Mrs. B. F. CARR; besides many uncles, aunts and other relatives and friends.
She will be missed, but the knowledge that she is waiting over there will draw us all to a preparation for that reunion which never ends.

Mrs. Etta MOW and Mrs. H. F. MOW went today to Plymouth to attend the funeral of Mr. Mow's niece, Mrs. HESLER.

Wednesday, November 9, 1921

Mrs. Maria Louisa HEIGHWAY, 78, for many years a prominent resident of Fulton county, died at her home in Newcastle township Tuesday after a long illness. Maria Louisa SMITH was born in Laurelton, Pa., April 20, 1843, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter SMITH. She was the wife of Albert H. HEIGHWAY, who with two sons, Frank P. HEIGHWAY, of Crown Point, and Henry C. HEIGHWAY, of Rochester, and a daughter, Mrs. Anna LEININGER, of Akron, survive. Another son, John D. HEIGHWAY, was killed in an accident near Akron some time ago when his automobile was struck by a Winona interurban. Funeral services from the Baptist church at Rochester Friday afternoon, the cortege to leave the residence in Newcastle township at one o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Maria Louisa HEIGHWAY, daughter of Peter and Christiana SMITH, was born near Laurelton, Union Co., Penn., on April 20th, 1843. She was called to her last reward Nov. 8th, 1921, aged 78 years, 6 months and 18 days. When 15 years of age, she was converted and united with the M.E. church at Laurelton, Penn.
The following year her father with his family came to Indiana and settled in Fulton county. She taught a summer school in '61 and the next year while going to a select school at Rochester, she heard that two of her three brothers were wounded at the battle of Chicamauga. She started at once for the southland to care for them, making the journey alone. She found Jerry [SMITH] in a field hospital with a slight wound but could find nothing of John [SMITH], but subsequently learned that he had been captured and taken to Andersonville, where he finally died. She stayed for some time mending clothing for the soldiers.
After coming back she taught school in Kosciusko county, where she became acquainted with and was married to Albert H. HEIGHWAY on Nov. 15th, 1864. To this union were born three sons, Frank P. [HEIGHWAY], of Crown Point, Henry C. [HEIGHWAY], of Rochester and John D. [HEIGHWAY], who with his wife and daughter, preceded her in death on March 29th, 1921. One daughter, Anna LEININGER, of Akron.
She with her husband were charter members when the Bethlehem Baptist church was organized, and lived consistent members until she received her last call, having seen all her children following in the footsteps of her Master. She found it a pleasure to read her Bible every day and when not able, had someone to read to her.
She had been in poor health for several years and when the news came that her youngest son, with his entire family had met death in an accident, it was more of a shock than her frail body could stand and she never fully recovered from it. She was the last one of a family of eight children.
She leaves besides the husband, two sons, one daughter, and four grandchildren besides a legion of friends to mourn the loss of a loving wife, mother and friend. - - -
Funeral services at First Baptist church, Rochester, Ind., Friday, Nov. 11 at 1:30 p.m., Rev. A. EDGINGTON officiating. Interment at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. John CLOUD, Mrs. Micajah FRIELAND and Mrs. Otto CLOUD, of Macy and Henry [CLOUD] and John CLOUD, of Rochester, attended the funeral of Mrs. Mary BEMENDERFER at North Manchester, Thursday of last week. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, November 10, 1921

Dorothy Marie [SEE], infant daughter of Doris and Russell SEE, was born May 20, 1921, died Nov 5, 1921, age 5 months, 16 days. She was dearly loved by all who knew her. She had a sweet smile for all and is sadly missed by parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts and a host of friends. - - -

Friday, November 11, 1921

[no obits]

Saturday, November 12, 1921

Mrs. Sarah Ann KEEL, 72, widow of the late John KEEL, died at 11 o'clock Saturday morning at her residence on Fourteenth street after an illness of about one month. Mrs. Keel, who was born in Fulton county, had lived here practically all of her life, marrying John KEEL 51 years ago. She was a member of the Methodist church and the Green Oak Rebekah lodge and is survived by two daughters, Estella [KEEL] and Bessie [KEEL], with whom she made her home, and three sons, Charles [KEEL], Sol [KEEL] and Omer KEEL, all residents of this community. Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, November 14, 1921

Clevie BEATTIE, son of W. S. BEATTIE and brother of Mark BEATTIE, of this community, died Sunday at his home in South Carolina, according to word received here. There were no particulars in the dispatch to the local residents, but it was announced that the body would be brot to this city for funeral services and burial. A widow and two children survive.

Mrs. Edith CRAMMER, 66, of Chalmers, sister of Judge R. R. CARR, of this city, died suddenly Saturday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William BURCH, at Huntington, according to word received here. Death was caused by heart failure. Mrs. Crammer is survived by four children, Mrs. BURCH, Arthur CRAMMER, south of Rochester, Leyland CRAMMER, and Eddie CRAMMER, of Chalmers, and three brothers, Reuben CARR, of this city, Luther CARR, of Chalmers, and Judge B. F. CARR, of Monticello. Funeral services Tuesday from the residence at Chalmers. Judge and Mrs. R. R. Carr of this city went to Chalmers Monday morning.

The funeral of Mrs. Sarah Ann KEEL was held at her residence Monday afternoon. A large number of relatives and friends attended to pay their last respects. Rev. ASCHANHORT, of the Christian church officiated. Burial was in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, November 15, 1921

William Howard [WILLIAMS], three months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde and Ruth WILLIAMS, died Monday. The body will be taken to Plymouth for burial Wednesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed HUNTER, of Plymouth, and Mrs. Ella HENTHORNE, of Peru, were here Monday to attend the funeral of Mrs. S. A. KEEL.
Mr. and Mrs. Gussie COLLINS returned last evening to their homes in Chicago, after being here to attend the funeral of his aunt, Mrs. Sarah Ann KEEL.

Wednesday, November 16, 1921

Word has been received here of the death Tuesday at his home in Claypool, of Charles SNOKE, brother of Sylvester SNOKE, of this county.

Funeral services for the late Cleavie BEATTIE, who died at his home in South Carolina, will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the residence of Mark BEATTIE, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body arrived in this city Wednesday evening at eight o'clock.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: W. C. BEATTIE, 1885-1921]

Arthur CRAMMER and family went to Chalmers Sunday to attend the funeral of the former's mother.

Thursday, November 17, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, November 18, 1921

John CLIFTON, aged about 84, well known Henry township resident, died Thursday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John JUDD, northwest of Akron, according to word received here.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: John W. CLIFTON, Jan 3, 1841 - Nov 16, 1921]

John W. MILLER, 70, well known Fulton County farmer, died at 11 o'clock Friday morning at his farm home just north of Rochester on the Michigan road following an apoplectic stroke suffered early Tuesday morning. Mr. Miller had been in excellent health prior to Tuesday.
He was born in Fulton county April 22, 1851, and had lived in the county all of his life. He was a member of the United Brethren church and is survived by a widow, Mrs. Ida MILLER, one son, Robet MILLER, of Rochester, and a bother, Ben S. MILLER, south of the city. Funeral arrangements later.

John McCAUGHEY and Wylie WYNN of Lucerne, Indiana, were here Thursday to attend the funeral of Cleavie BEATTIE.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry LEASE and son Harry [LEASE], of Grass Creek, were here Thursday to attend the funeral of Cleavie BEATTIE.

Saturday, November 19, 1921

Funeral services for John W. MILLER Monday morning at 11:00 o'clock from the U.B. church, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

C. "Cleavie" BEATTIE was born in Fulton county, near Kewanna, Ind., Oct 16, 1885, died at his home in Charleston, S. C., Nov. 13. The remains arrived in Rochester Wednesday evening and were taken to the home of his brother, Mark P. BEATTIE, from where the services were held. Interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
At the age of 21 years he went to South Bend Indiana, were he enlisted in the U. S. Marines and served eight years. He saw service at Charleston, S. C., and Panama, after which he returned to Charleston and married Miss Sallie T. McCANTA. By this union there were two children born: Fushia [BEATTIE], 8 years, and Willard [BEATTIE], 6 years old.
Besides these he leaves a father, William F. BEATTIE; four brothers, Clyde R. BEATTIE and Mark P. BEATTIE, of Rochester; Clayton BEATTIE of Detroit, Mich., and Ray S. BEATTIE of Corvolis, Ore., and Grover B. SEARS of South Bend, step-brother who are left to mourn his early demise besides his many friends.

Monday, November 21, 1921

Mrs. Eliza LOWER, aged about 80, prominent resident of Wayne township, died Saturday at the home of a daughter, whom she was visiting in Whitley county, according to word received here. The body will be removed to Wayne township where funeral services will be held at the Grass Creek U. B. church, Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock. Mrs. Lower, who was the widow of the late William LOWER, a G.A.R. veteran, is survived by two daughters and three sons, Mose [LOWER], Robert [LOWER] and William LOWER, of Fulton county.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Grass Creek cemetery, Wayne Twp.: Rev. William LOWER, father, 1837-1897 - d. July 2, 1897, ae 60y-3d; Elizabeth LOWER, wife of William, 1837-1921, d. Nov. 19, 1921, ae 84y-8m-11d; also military marker: Wm. LOWER, Co E 191st Ohio Inf.]

Mrs. Isabelle COOK, wife of Edward B. COOK, died at 11 o'clock Monday morning at her residence on south Jefferson street following a stroke of apoplexy a week prior. She had been in ill health for about three years.
Isabelle PRYOR was born in Miami county September 17, 1876, a daughter of John and Madeline PRYOR. She was married to Edward B. COOK, February 23, 1876. They lived for a time in Miami and later in Cass county, moving to this community 20 years ago where she has since made her home. To this union was born one son, Robert [COOK], deceased, and a daughter, Mrs. Myrtie HENDRICKSON, of Kewanna, who with a sister, Mrs. George STUBER, of Mexico, two brothers, Lincoln PRYOR, of Logansport, and Moses PRYOR, of Maringo, and seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild survive.
Funeral services from the Methodist church at Kewanna Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock following short services at the residence, 1204 Jefferson street.

Tuesday, November 22, 1921

Short funeral services for Mrs. E B. COOK from the residence on South Jefferson street, Wednesday at 1:00 p.m., after which the body will be taken to Kewanna, where the services will be conducted by Rev. F. D. HOWARD, of Crawfordsville and Rev. F. O. FRALEY of Rochester, at 2:30 from the M.E. church. Way of conveyance will be provided for friends.

Samuel ZARTMAN, son of Margaret and Andrew J. ZARTMAN, was born in Perry county, Ohio, on February 21, 1857.
Departed this life November 6, 1921, age 64 years, 8 months and 16 days. On February 5, 1882, he was united in marriage with Sarah C. SCHINDLER, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul SCHINDLER, near Macy, Ind. To this union three children were born, Archie Earl [ZARTMAN], of Mobile, Alabama, Goldie WHYBREW, of Fulton, and Verne Elmer [ZARTMAN], also of Fulton, Ind.
At the age of 22 years, he was united with the German Reform church of near Macy, Ind., and remained faithful until death.
Samuel was a kind husband and a loving father, also a friend and neighbor to all. He leaves to mourn their loss a faithful wife, two sons, one daughter, three grandchildren, two brothers and a host of relatives and friends. - - -

Wednesday, November 23, 1921

[no obits]

Thursday, November 24, 1921

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, November 25, 1921

Miss Catherine LANDIS, 60 years old, died at Logansport Wednesday night after a long illness. Federal Judge K. M. LANDIS of Chicago, and Fred LANDIS of that city, brothers, were at her bedside. Two other brothers, Charles B. LANDIS, of Chicago, ex-representative in Congress from the Ninth Indiana district, and Dr. John LANDIS, of Cincinnati, Ohio, survive.

Vine CURTIS received word Friday of the death Thursday at her home in Hammond, of his aunt, Mrs. Kate MOONSHOWER, widow of the late David MOONSHOWER, a former resident of Athens. She is survived by two sons, Estil [MOONSHOWER], of Akron, and Otis [MOONSHOWER], of Hammond.

Saturday, November 26, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, November 28, 1921

William C. HAY, 35, formerly of this city, was killed at his home, Bloomington, Illinois, on Saturday, according to the word received by Mrs. Frank SHEWARD and Mrs. Cal ALSPACH, sisters of the victim. The telegram gave no particulars about the accident. Mrs. Sheward and Mrs. Alspach left Monday morning to attend the funeral which will take place Tuesday.

Catherine Ann [BECKER MOONSHOWER], daughter of J. J. and Mary A. BECKER was born August 14th, 1844, in Allen Co., Ohio. After the death of her parents in 1863 she came to Indiana and located near Akron, Ind. She was united in marriage to David MOONSHOWER in 1864. To this union were born four sons. The husband the two sons preceded her to the spirit world. She was left a widow 37 years ago, after which she moved to Hammond, Ind., her present home. A few weeks ago she went to Columbus Grove, Ohio, to visit her two sisters and only brother, when she was suddenly stricken with her last illness of only a few days. On Nov. 24, 1921, just as the day was drawing to its close, life's silver cord suddenly lost tension, and there was a letting go of all things earthly and her spirit returned to its God. She was permitted to walk down life's pathway, 77 years 3 months and 10 days. She identified herself with the United Brethren church at Mt. Hope a number of years ago in which faith she still held. She leaves to mourn two sons, Otis MOONSHOWER of Hammond, Ind., Esta MOONSHOWER, of Akron, Ind., one brother, of Harrod, Ohio, two sisters, of Columbus Grove, Ohio, one sister of Akron, Ind., four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a host of relatives and friends who hold her in sacred memory.
Rev. Benj. H. CAIRO officiated. Burial was made in the family lot at Mt. Hope cemetery on Sunday, Nov. 27, 1921.

Tuesday, November 29, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, November 30, 1921

Mrs. William McCARTER, mother of Frank McCARTER, of this city, is in receipt of a communication from Chicago stating that the body of her sister, Mrs. Charles LYNCH, 57, who died at her home in that city,Tuesday, would be shipped to Rochester Thursday for burial. Details of the demise of Mrs. Lynch could not be secured.

Thursday, December 1, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, December 2, 1921

James BRINEY, 76, Civil War veteran, who had lived in this community for many years, the majority of them having been spent in the Richland township neighborhood, died at midnight Thursday at his home just north of the city after a six months illness. Death was caused by old age and complications.
Mr. Briney, who was born in Ohio December 2, 1844, enlisted in Company K, 154th Ohio

Infantry, served thruout the Civil War, moving to Fulton county shortly after the close of the war. He was engaged in the occupation of farming until advanced age caused his retirement.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Angeline BRINEY, two daughters, Mrs. Bert OVERMYER, of Rochester, and Mrs. John O'BLENIS, of Whippoorwill.
Funeral services Sunday at the West Whippoorwill German church, the cortage leaving the house north of the city at 10 o'clock in the morning. Burial at Whippoorwill.

Saturday, December 3, 1921

Details of the death of William C. HAY, former resident of this city, who was killed in an accident at Bloomington, Ill., last Saturday, have been received by local relatives who are in receipt of a newspaper article concerning the death which says in part that "Hay, a traveling representative of the Royal Tea Company was killed when he was run over by an automobile driven by Clifford D HAMILTON.
"The car was going north," the article continues, "and Hay was crossing the street at an angle, when he fell in front of the slow moving car, or was struck and knocked down by it suffering a broken neck."
Death occurred almost instantly. Hay had resided in Bloomington for the past 12 years. Hamilton was exhonerated by the widow, Mrs. Hattie HAY.

Mrs. Ida ERNSPERGER, 80, widow of the late F. M. ERNSPERGER, died shortly after noon Saturday at her home 1117 Franklin Avenue a victim of dropsy, heart failure and complications. Mrs. Ernsperger, who was practically a life long resident of this county is survived by three children, Miss Belle ERNSPERGER, of this city, Mrs. K. A. HOLLIS, of Highland Springs, Va., and Fred ERNSPERGER, of Rochester. She was a member of the Spiritualist church. Funeral services at the residence Monday afternoon at two o'clock.

The funeral services for the infant of Mr. and Mrs. John CHAMBERS of the Mt. Olive neighborhood was held at the home Saturday afternoon. The child was born dead.

Monday, December 5, 1921

Emanuel R. ROUCH, 69, well known Fulton county farmer, died at 11 o'clock Saturday night at his residence southwest of Mt. Olive, after an illness of two years.
He was born in Fulton county March 13, 1852, and had lived in this community practically all of his life.
He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Vic ROUCH, two sons, Omer [ROUCH] and Vuell ROUCH and seven brothers, William [ROUCH], of this city, Frank [ROUCH], Barstow, Calif., George [ROUCH], Oklahoma City, Okla., Silas [ROUCH], Lake Worth, Texas, Alfred [ROUCH], Fulton county, Sylvester [ROUCH], Fulton, and Tobias ROUCH of Peru.
Funeral services from the Fulton United Brethren church Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock. Burial at Salem cemetery.

Myers DEEMS has gone to Huntington, where he was called by the death of a chum, J. O. WHITELOCK, who was killed Saturday night by an automobile.

Tuesday, December 6, 1921

Mrs. C. J. LORING, 67, wife of Dr. C. J. LORING, well known resident of Rochester, died at her home on South Main St., at 11:30, the result of a stroke of paralysis. She had been in ill health for some time and had gradually become worse until the fatal stroke occurred.
Malinda THOMPSON, was born in Kosciusko county December 4, 1854. She was united in marriage with Dr. Loring July 20, 1882 and soon afterwards moved with him to Rochester, where they have since made their home. Early in life she became a member of the Methodist church and in her earnest way maintained her belief.
Mrs. Loring was a typical home woman devoting her life unselfishly to the rearing of her husband's daughter. She was possessed of many of the lasting virtues that are the treasures of human life. As a true citizen her life among the people of this community was an open book, that of real womanhood.
Funeral services will be held from the residence, 1028 South Main street, Thursday, December 8th, at two in the afternoon with Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Friends may view the body from 9 to 12 Thursday. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, December 7, 1921

Jacob BRINEY was born in Seneca county, Ohio, Dec. 20, 1844, where he also spent his boyhood and school days and at the age of 19 years, May 29, 1864 he enlisted as volunteer in Civil War, Company K, 164th Ohio Regiment and received his honorable discharge Aug. 27, 1864. Soon after his discharge he came to the state of Indiana and settled in Richland township, Fulton county, and proved his character as an honest and energetic citizen.
In the year of 1870 on the 18th of May he was united in marriage to Angeline MILLER, which union continued over a half century in love, peace and prosperity. To this union were born 4 children, two sons and two daughters.
Mr. Briney was a good husband and father and provided well for his family.
About 14 years ago he left the farm and moved near Rochester, where he spent the remainder of his life, which came to an end at his home Dec. 1st, 1921, at the age of 76 years 11 months and 11 days.
He leaves to mourn his departure a sorrowing widow, two daughters, Mary [BRINEY] and Belle [BRINEY], one foster-son, Ed McCARTER, two sisters, Mrs. HIBBERT of Oregon and Mrs. S. WASHINGTON, Rochester, 7 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren, 2 sons preceding him in death. Brother Briney became a member of the Lutheran church in his youth by the right of confirmation.

Mr. and Mrs. John KALEY received word this week of the death of Mrs. Kaley's sister, Miss Esther LANG at Denver, Colo., where she had gone some months ago hoping to benefit her health. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. A. V. SMITH and Mr. and Mrs. O. J. LAMBORN were at Peru Wednesday to attend the funeral of a relative. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Thursday, December 8, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, December 9, 1921 to Monday, December 12, 1921
[no obits]

Tuesday, December 13, 1921

Glenn D. L. MEANS PERSONETT, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles MEANS, was born at Walnut, Indiana May 18th, 1899 and passed away from this life into the greater life, at the home of her mother, Mrs. James THOMAS at Maxinkuckee, December 4th, 1921 at the age of 22 years, 6 months and 16 days.
She was united in marriage to Arista PERSONETT on the 7th day of July, 1917 and to this union two children were born, the oldest Arista Glenn [PERSONETT], now two years old and James Irwin [PERSONETT], two weeks old, she leaves her husband and two children, her mother and step-father, Mr. and Mrs. James THOMAS, two sisters, Mrs. David CAREY of Rochester, Ind., and Mrs. Fanny MURRAY of Talma, Ind., and one brother, Jacob H. MEANS, of Argos, Indiana and many other relatives and friends to mourn. She joined the M. P. church at Maxinkuckee about six years ago under the leadership of Rev. A. L. VERMILLION.

Wednesday, December 14, 1921

John H. LOSHER, civil war veteran, died Friday evening after an illness of several months. He was the son of Jacob and Hannah JUSTISON LOSHER and was born Oct. 11, 1842 in Columbiana county, Ohio, being the fifth in a family of six children. When 14 years of age, he with his parents moved to Miami county, Indiana, where he spent most of his life, with the exception of the past ten years when he lived near Green Oak, moving to Macy this fall.
He served in the 99th Indiana Infantry during the Civil War and was with Sherman on his memorable march to the sea.
Oct. 18, 1866 he was married to Mary Agnes WAYMIRE, to which union four children were born, one dying in infancy. His wife died April 5, 1912 and Jan. 22, 1913 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Amanda SAMPSEL. He is survived by the widow, three children who are Mrs. John BAKER, who resides near Deedsville, Wilson LOSHER of Peru, and Nelson LOSHER of Kokomo, besides three grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, one brother, Dallas LOSHER of Perrysburg, one sister, Mrs. Mary STRONG who lives near Deedsville and a host of friends.
The funeral was held in the Macy Methodist Church at 1 o'clock Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. B. SPERLING. Interment was made in Plainview cemetery. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, December 15 , 1921

Francis A. ROGERS, 76, died at one o'clock Wednesday afternoon at his farm home five miles northeast of Rochestr, after an illness that developed suddenly last Monday morning when he was at the breakfast table.
He was born in Wayne county, Indiana, in April 1845 and had lived in this locality since he was seven years of age.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Ella ROGERS, a brother, James ROGERS, northwest of Akron, a sister, Mrs. Nancy J. SPENCER, three sons, Walter [ROGERS], east of Rochester,

Leonidas [ROGERS], north of this city, Raymond [ROGERS], at home and two daughters, Mrs. Elsie GROSS, north of the city and Mrs. Lilly MYERS, of Talma Funeral at Nichols chapel Friday morning at 10 o'clock. Burial at Nichols cemetery.

Friday, December 16, 1921

Mrs. Ida VANDEGRIFT and daughter attended the funeral of Amos HATCH at Macy Friday afternoon. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Saturday, December 17, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, December 19, 1921

Mrs. Eva COOPER, 64, wife of William COOPER, and formerly a resident of this city, where she was very well known, died suddenly Saturday evening at her home in South Bend, following a stroke of apoplexy, according to word received by Rochester relatives.
The body will be brought to Rochester Tuesday morning, where funeral services will be held at the Methodist church at two o'clock. The body may be viewed after 12 o'clock Tuesday morning.
Surviving are two sons, Lou COOPER, of this city, and Roy COOPER, of South Bend, the husband, one brother, Dr. J. L. HEFFLEY, of Muskegon, Mich., and three sisters, Mrs. William ROSS, Mrs. John SMITH and Mrs. Edwin MERCER, of this city.

Tuesday, December 20, 1921

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 21, 1921

Francis SEITNER, 60, died one hour after being struck by a passenger train on the Vandalia railroad at Roann shortly before noon Tuesday.

Eva C. HEFFLEY, born at Rochester, Indiana, to Samuel and Sarah HEFFLEY, March 27th, 1857, departed this life at her home in South Bend, Indiana, about 11:30 p.m., December 17th, 1921, age 64 years, 8 months, 20 days.
United in marriage at Rochester, to William H. COOPER on March 7th, 1877, and to this union there was born three children: a daughter, Edith [COOPER], who departed from this life in 1890 at the age of four years, a son, Louis [COOPER], of Rochester, and a son, Leroy [COOPER], of South Bend, both of whom together with the husband, William, and 3 grandchildren, survive to mourn the loss of a most devoted and beloved mother and wife.
In addition to the immediate members of the family mentioned above, Mrs. Cooper is survived by a brother, Dr. J. W HEFFLEY, of Muskegon, Mich., and three sisters, Mrs. John W. SMITH, Mrs Edward C. MERCER and Mrs. Wm. P. ROSS, of Rochester, two aunts, Mrs. Clarissa BACON and Mrs. Mary PENCE.
Mrs. Cooper's life was lived at Rochester with the exception of the past two years, she with her husband having moved to South Bend in October, 1919, where a modern home had been erected at 2026 Lincoln Way West.
Mrs. Cooper was of the Methodist faith, having united with the church at Rochester many years ago, and was also a member of the Rebekah Lodge of Rochester.
The death of Mrs. Cooper came suddenly and therefore without warning. She had apparently been in usual health, had spent her last day on earth attending to the usual household duties and after the evening meal conversed with her husband until near ten o'clock after which time she retired, still feeling no warning of the end so near at hand. After having been in bed a short time Mrs. Cooper had occasion to get up and upon again retiring asked Mr. Cooper to get some additional bed covering for her. This was attended to and very shortly thereafter Mr. Cooper, thinking to see if anything further could be done for her before turning off the lights, found her dead, still lying in the same position, so the end came peacefully, but without the golden opportunity for those that survive to say a last farewell -- a last good bye -- to Mother, Wife, Sister.

Mrs. John ABBOTT, of Muskegon, Mich., was here Tuesday to attend the funeral of her aunt, Mrs. Wm. COOPER, of South Bend. She returned this morning to South Bend.

Thursday, December 22, 1921

[no obits]

Friday, December 23, 1921

John UMBAUGH, 78, well known Newcastle township farmer, who had lived in Fulton county for the past 35 years, moving here from Ohio, died this morning at his farm home as the result of a long illness from cancer of the stomach. Umbaugh is a former county commissioner. Surviving are 12 children, the widow, two brothers, who live at Tiosa, and a large number of grandchildren and other relatives.

Francis A. ROGERS, son of Caleb and Tabbitha ROGERS, was born in Wayne Co., Indiana, April 2nd, 1845. Departed this life Dec. 14th, 1921, aged 76 years, 8 months and 12 days.
He came with his parents to Kosciusko Co. in 1852. At the age of 16 years he united with the Methodist church and was a member of the same when called home.
On May 24th, 1868 he was united in marriage to Fanny BRIGHT, who preceded him in death on Nov. 4th, 1874. To this union were born two sons, Walter [ROGERS], of near Athens, and Leonidas [ROGERS], of near Rochester.
Seeing the need of a home for his two small children he was again united in marriage to Martilla E. BOWMAN, on March 25th, 1875.
To this union there were born four children, Mrs. Ida BLACK and Mrs. Elsie GROSS, of near Rochester, Mrs. Lillie MYERS, of Talma and Raymond [ROGERS], who lives on the old homestead.
He served near 23 years teaching in the public schools and also gave a great number classes in singing. Having a fine voice, he was always willing and glad to serve mankind and his Master in song.
He leaves a widow, 6 children, 18 grandchildren, one brother, James ROGERS, and one sister, Mrs. Will SPENCER, north of Akron, and a legion of friends to mourn the loss of a loving husband, father and friend.

Mrs. Dora FAIRCHILD and son, Paul FAIRCHILD, went to South Bend Wednesday to attend the funeral of her twin granddaughters aged 5 months. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Samuel OBERLIN, of Ora, who has been postmaster there for the past 30 years, died Friday morning. He was well known in this city.

Saturday, December 24, 1921

[no obits]

Monday, December 26, 1921

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, December 27, 1921

Loren STRONG, 52, of near Mexico, lshot and killed himself with a shot gun Tuesday. He was found by his wife in the woodshed where he fired the fatal shot. The gun had been so close to his body that it set his clothing on fire and he was badly burned when foujnd. He is survived by the wife and an adopted daughter.

Ralph DAY, son of Mr. and Mrs. John DAY, of this city, was killed in an automobile accident Sunday at Atlanta, Ind., according to word received here. Details of the accident were lacking.

Mrs. Anna MERLEY BARNES died Saturday at her home near Silver Lake. She formerly lived in this city. The funeral was held Monday at the Nichols chapel.

Wednesday, December 28, 1921

A. H. BOELTER, 65, a former resident of this city, where he was occupied in the milling business, died early Tuesday morning at his home in Chicago, according to word received by Mrs. William BOELTER, who is visiting Rochester relatives. Boelter, who is survived by a widow and six children, was born in Germany, emigrating to this country when 15 years of age. He lived in Illinois and LaPorte before moving to this city, where he patented and manufactured a carpet cleaning machine.

Mr. and Mrs. Milton SMILEY were called Tuesday to Milford, Ill., by the death of Mrs. Smiley's father, B. F. THOMAS, 92 years old. He was a former resident of Rochester, where he lived for about 15 years.

Thursday, December 29, 1921

James Alwyn [GILLILAND], three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. R. K. GILLILAND, died at 9:30 o'clock Wednesday evening at the home of his parents after a long illness. The child, a twin born July 20, 1918, had been an invalid from birth. Surviving are the parents, two sisters, Mary [GILLILAND] and Alice [GILLILAND], and three brothers, Geiger [GILLILAND], Robert [GILLILAND] and William [GILLILAND]. Funeral services at the home Friday afternoon at 2:30

o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

John UMBAUGH, son of Elias nd Susanah UMBAUGH, was born in Carrol county, Ohio, November 14, 1843. In infancy he was baptized by the Rev. DeWalt CRONOWET. During this period and in childhood, in the environment of a Christian home, and under the influence of the Sunday school, he grew to Christian virtue. As a young man he renewed the sacred vows of baptism and was confirmed in the Lutheran faith by the Rev. A. S. BARTHOLOMEW, pastor of Zion's Lutheran church at Elma, Ohio. He continued steadfastly in this faith until he entered into the joys of eternal life December 23, 1921, at the age of 78 years, 1 month and 9 days.
At 26 years of age he was united in marriage to Hanna Elizabeth RIDENOUR at Creiderville, Ohio, by the Rev. G. W. UMBAUGH. He enjoyed her companionship until death separated them April 1, 1874. To this union were born three children, Sarah Darvillah [UMBAUGH], Elias Franklin [UMBAUGH] and Mathias Edward [UMBAUGH].
On December 31, 1874, near Elida, Ohio, he took to himself his life companion, Rachel Jane SHOBE. Ten children were born to this union, Samuel Arthur [UMBAUGH], Minnie Ellen [UMBAUGH], Amy Amanda [UMBAUGH], Ira Eugene [UMBAUGH], John Ellen [UMBAUGH], Mary May [UMBAUGH], Edwin Thornton [UMBAUGH], Otis Frederick [UMBAUGH], Blanch Edna [UMBAUGH], and Rata Dell [UMBAUGH], all of whom are still living excpet Ira Eugene, who died Feb. 21, 1893.
In October, 1884 he moved to Indiana, where he resided on a farm six miles east of Rochester. Eighteen months later he moved to the home near Tiosa, where he spent the remainder of his days.
He was a good father and husband, and had the esteem of all of his children. In his death the community loses a valuable citizen and the church one of its pillars.
He was a good and useful citizen. He servied one term as County Commissioner of Fulton county and was always proud of the service he rendered. He was ever strictly honest in all his dealings.
He was always a hard working man, and was frugal in his habits. He kept his vigor until his last illness incapacitated him.
He was one of the influential members of the St. Paul's Lutheran church, and served on its council for many years. When he first came to Indiana he was instrumental in organizing the Sunday school in connection with the congregation, and was the first Superintendent. He brought up all his children in the church.
He believed in education. He himself taught school in his younger days, and most of the children were school teachers at some time in their lives.
His illness dates back for several months but he continued at his work. Later it was found that he suffered from cancer of the stomach. He bore his suffering patiently, though often in intense pain. He was bedfast three weeks. The end came quietly and peacefully on Friday morningat 4:45 o'clock, when he entered into life.
Besides his wife, he leaves 4 brothers, 2 sisters, 12 children, 38 grandchildren, 3 great-grandchildren, and many other relatives and friends.

Grandma RULE, who had been seriously ill at the home of her son, Edward JOHNSON, for some time, passed away Thursday morning, aged nearly 94 years. Funeral services were held at Gilead M.E. church Saturday at 1:30. - - - GILEAD-JORDAN ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Gilead

Cemetery, Green Twp.: Mary A. RULE, Aug 12, 1827 - Dec 22, 1921; George RULE, July 6, 1807 - June 2, 1890.]

Friday, December 30, 1921

Mrs. Chester McCALLA, of Deedsville, was in this city today to attend the funeral of the small son of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. GILLILAND, of whom she is a cousin.

Saturday, December 31, 1921

Word has been received here of the death at his home in Goodland of A. J. KITT, 69, well known in this locality, where he was born and lived for many years. Mr. Kitt, who spent the greater part of his life in the newspaper profession, established for many years. [sic] Mr. Kitt, was married in 1886 to Hattie SPOOR, who with three children survive.

Mrs. Magdalene RUSH, 61, wife of Albert RUSH, died Friday night at her home in East Rochester, after a long illness of complications. Mrs. Rush was born August 17, 1860 in Ohio, a daughter of Ira and Elizabeth RABER. She had lived in this city for many years. Funeral services Sunday.