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FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1922

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1997

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 

 


Rochester Sentinel

1922

Tuesday, January 3, 1922

Ray WALLER, 36, died Friday in a hospital at Okmulgee, Okla, after several weeks illness, following an operation for appendicis. He is a son of D. A. WALLER, of this city. His home was in Okamah, Okla., where he was an active real estate dealer and was also in the oil business. Besides his father and several brothers and sisters, he leaves a wife. Mr. Waller left this city about 10 years ago and went to Oklahoma. He attended the Rochester Normal College and was a graduate of the commercial course. Mrs. Archie BROWN, of this city, and Mrs. Warren SMITH, of Huntington, sisters of Mr. Waller, left last week for Okmulgee to see their brother, but he passed away before they reached there. He was buried in Okemah on New Years day.

Dr. S. C. LORING, 51, of Plymouth, brother of Dr. C. J. LORING, of this city, died at midnight Monday following a stroke of apoplexy earlier in the day. Dr. Loring had suffered a stroke in February, 1921, and has been practically invalided since. He was well known among the northern Indiana medical profession and especially well known in Rochester Masonic circles. He had been a resident of Plymouth for the past 20 years and he is survived by the widow, Mrs. Carrie LORING and a daughter, who lives in Chicago. Funeral services from the Methodist church at Plymouth Thursday afternoon at two o'clock.
Dr. C. J. Loring, of this city, was called to his brother's bedside when he suffered his relapse Monday morning and remained with him until death came, returning to this city Tuesday morning.

Word has been received here of the death at Mishawaka Sunday evening of Irvin ELLIS, 18, son of Mrs. Mary ELLIS, who lives a mile south of Argos on the Michigan road. Ellis, who had just recently been married, had been spending the Christmas holidays with relatives in Mishawaka when he was taken suddenly ill with a critical attack of appendicitis. He was taken to a hospital where an operation was performed, but death could not be averted. A brother, who was also visiting at Mishawaka, was also taken critically ill with the same affliction and is now confined to the hospital at Mishawaka. The body has been returned to Argos for burial.

Carlos FEIKERT, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. William FEIKERT, just north of Argos, died within five minutes after being accidentally shot thru the lungs while hunting with his cousin, Andrew LEFFERT, Monday.
Feikert, who had been married just before Christmas to Miss Mary HISEY, of Argos, and was living with his parents, went hunting for rabbits Monday with his cousin. The two young men had scared up a rabbit, which went into a brush pile on the Feikert farm.
As the hunters poked around in the pile to get the rabbit out it suddenly dashed into view and both of the boys reached for their guns. As he swung about Leffert in some manner still unknown to him, suddenly discharged his weapon. The shot from the gun went into Feikert's right side penetrating the upper portion of his right lung.
He fell over and Leffert rushed to him. Feikert told Leffert that he realized that he was dying fast. He kissed his cousin goodbye and asked that he be remembered to all his relatives and friends. With his last breath he exonerated Leffert from blame in the accident and then passed away.
Feikert was well known in Argos where he had lived practically all of his life. He was a member of the K. of P. lodge, a graduate of the Argos schools and was a member of the Argos band. He had been married only a brief time and had planned to look after his father's farm, his father planning to move into Argos some time in the near future. Surviving are the parents, the widow and three sisters.

A message from Crown Point to Newcastle township relativbes brings the sad information of the death of Prof. Frank F. HEIGHWAY at his home there Monday evening. He had been an invalid for three years with neuritis. He was fifty-six years old and leaves a widow and one daughter, his aged father, Albert HEIGHWAY, and other near relatives. He was born in Newcastle township and began his career as an educator in Fulton county and Rochester. Later he went to Crown Point as principal of the high school, was soon promoted to superintendent, and for fifteen years had been county superintendent of Lake County Schools. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, a member of the State Board of Education and was once offered the State Superintendency of Schools but his health would not permit his accepting.
Prof. Heighway was a brother of John HEIGHWAY, who with his family of three, was killed on the Winona Interurban last Spring and his is the fifth death in his immediate family since last March, his aged mother having passed away only two months ago.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Albert H. HEIGHWAY, father, Co D 29 IVI, 1841-1926; Maria L. HEIGHWAY, mother, 1843-1921.]

Wednesday, January 4, 1922

The funeral of Mrs. W. H. D. DAY, who died Tuesday of last week after three days' illness of pneumonia, was held at the M.E. church Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. B. SPARLING. Interment was made in Plainview cemetery. She is survived by two sons, Harvey [DAY], of Niagara Falls, and Lloyd [DAY] at home, three daughters, Mrs. Wm. CLEM of Olympia, Washington, Mrs. Robert MEANS, of Indianapolis and Miss Nellie DAY, at home; one brother, E. B. SUTTON, of Macy and two sisters, Mrs. Marie DAY, of Macy and Mrs. Melvin KEESECKER, of Sawtelle, California. She was a member of the M.E. church and the O.E.S. at Macy. -- MACY ITEMS.

Thuirsday, January 5, 1922

[no paper available]

Friday, January 6, 1922

R. C. SCHOONOVER, of Argos, manager of the Argos Telephone Company and very well known in this city, died early Friday morning following a sudden stroke of paralysis, according to word received by friends in this city.

Saturday, January 7, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, January 9, 1922

Glenn Burdell HARSH, 11, son of Mrs. Henry HARSH, of Niles, Mich., died at six o'clock Sunday evening at the home of his sister, Mrs. George BIGGS, 1107 Monroe street, after having been an invalid since infancy. Death was caused by complications. Funeral services at the residence Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Eddie Newton STOCKBERGER, 38, died at three o'clock Sunday morning at his home in Newcastle township as the result of injuries sustained Saturday morning when he lost his balance and fell into a huge gravel screen at the Anderson pit where he was aiding in the work of preparing gravel to be used on the Mickey road.
Stockberger's body, which entered the machine feet foremost, was crushed and torn horribly and it is believed he would have been entirely dismembered and his head itself crushed had the machine made but one more revolution before it was stopped.
Eddie N. Stockberger was born in Fulton county, August 4, 1883, a son of Township Assessor and Mrs. George STOCKBERGER. He lived in this county all of his life with the exception of visits made to California, where he met his wife, formerly Miss Violet DAY, of San Diego, to whom he was married less than two years ago.
Surviving are the parents, the widow, one infant son, Robert Austin [STOCKBERGER], three brothers, Clyde [STOCKBERGER], George [STOCKBERGER] and Jonas STOCKBERGER, all of this county and two sisters, Mrs. Eva WOLF, of Ohio, and Miss Frances STOCKBERGER, at home.
Funeral services from the Talma Christian church Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock.

Tuesday, January 10, 1922

Word has been received here of the sudden death at her home in Detroit, of Mrs. Converse McMILLAN, formerly a resident of this community and at one time, just prior to the incumbency of Mr. and Mrs. BYBEE, caretakers of the county POOR FARM. The body was taken to Kewanna for burial.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F., Union Twp.: Converse McMILLAN, Oct 8, 1850 - Feb 11, 1935; Ruth McMILLAN, Apr 8, 1862 - Jan 7, 1922]

The Miami county grand jury has been called in special session at Peru for the purpose of investigating the murder of Mrs. Joseph FLITCRAFT, whose husband confessed that he slew her and buried her underneath the house in which they resided in that city. Flitcraft was brought to the Rochester jail soon after his arrest for fear of mob violence. It was later announced that he was removed from Rochester to Michigan City, but he is now in jail at Peru, where he is believed to have been all the time that he was not in Rochester.

Wednesday, January 11, 1922

Mr. C. McMILLAN and daughter, Letta [McMILLAN], of Detroit, Mich., are in the city today, having come from Kewanna, where they have just buried Mrs. McMILLAN, who died in Detroit last week. Mr. McMillan was formerly superintendent of the County POOR FARM, where he made many friends, all of whom sorrow with him and his family in their bereavement. -- SHORT NEWS.

It is reported that Wilda [McCAIN], the four year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McCAIN, who are spending the winter in Florida, died Friday evening of diphtheria. The older sister, Dorothy [McCAIN], is very ill with the disease. -- MACY ITEMS.

Mrs. Ruth (MARTENEY) McMILLAN passed away at Detroit, Mich., Friday, following an operation. The remains, accompanied by the family, arrived here Sunday and were taken to the home of J. C. HUDKINS, from which place the funeral was conducted Monday afternoon, with interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Deceased leaves three daughters, Mrs. Phon HUDKINS, of Detroit, Mrs. John DuBOIS, of Rochester and Miss Letta [McMILLAN], at home, besides the husband, Mr. Converse McMILLAN. -- KEWANNA ITEMS.

Thursday, January 12, 1922 to Friday, January 13, 1922

[no obits]

Saturday, January 14, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. LOY are in receipt of a letter from Mrs. Theo. PARKER GOULD of Pacific Grove, Calif., in which she informs them of the sudden death of her husband, A. E. GOULD. No further details are known than that Mr. Gould was sick only about one hour. Mrs. Gould is the sister of Mrs. Loy and has other relatives in the city.

John KRATHWOHL, a brother-in-law of John HAGAN, of this city, died Friday evening at his home in Peru. The funeral services will be held at 1:30 p.m. Monday.

Monday, January 16, 1922

Mrs. Frances SMITH, 72, wife of John SMITH, well known Liberty township resident, died Sunday at the farm home south of Rochester on the Peru road, according to word received in this city. Mrs. Smith, who was formerly Miss Frances MILLER, was born in Miami county October 30, 1849 and had lived in the community practically all of her life. Funeral services Wednesday with burial at the Macy cemetery.

Tuesday, January 17, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, January 18, 1922

Miss Lillian WEIRICK has received word of the death of her aunt, Mrs. Elizabeth KATES, at Chetek, Wisconsin. Mrs. Kates was a sister of Mrs. Henry WEIRICK and Harry HAMLETT of this city.

Silver Lake, Ind., Jan. 18. -- Amanda AMISS died today at the age of 100 years. She had never been seriously ill until a few weeks ago. In the forties she was a great friend of northern Indiana Indians.

Thursday, January 19, 1922

Mrs. Minnie MOORE, 59, wife of Ebe MOORE, died very suddenly at seven o'clock Wednesday evening at her home in Fulton, following an attack of acute indigestion. Mrs. Moore, who had resided south of Fulton until three years ago, had been ill with Bright's disease, but her condition of health recently had been better than usual. She is survived by the husband, four children, Harley [MOORE] and Harold MOORE, Miss Freda MOORE and Mrs. Maddie KIRK, and two children [sic] and two sisters.

Fred GRAEBER, well knon Fulton county farmer, died very suddenly Thursday morning at 11 o'clock at his home one mile north of Richland Center of heart failure. Mr. Graeber, who was about 50 years of age, had been enjoying good health recently.

Friends in Rochester have received word of the death of Aaron MAUS of Mexico, which occurred Wednesday at his home at that place. He was a brother of Joseph MAUS, well known farmer of the Tiosa neighborhood. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at the home at two o'clock.

Mrs. John F. SMITH died at her home two miles west of Macy Sunday evening after a two day's illness of apoplexy, which was the result of a stroke of paralysis which she suffered several years ago. Her maiden name was Frances MILLER and she was the daughter of John C. and Eliza MILLER. She was born in Miami county in 1849 and was one of a family of six children, all of whom have preceded her in death except one brother, Benjamin MILLER who resides in Oklahoma. September 5, 1891, she was united in marriage to John F. SMITH, who besides the brother, she is survived by a step-son, Russell SMITH, upon whom she lavished all of a mother's love and affection. She was a lovely woman, cheerful in disposition, and had a large number of friends. She was a member of the Macy M.E. church and of the Macy Rebekah Odd Fellow lodge. Her funeral was held in the Macy Methodist church Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. J. B. SPERLING. Interment was made in Plainview cemetery. -- MACY ITEMS.

Friday, January 20, 1922

Relatives of South Zion have received word of the death of Butler BATZ, aged 70 years, at Bakersfield, Calif. He was born in Newcastle township, this county, but went to California when a young man. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Isaac EDGINGTON, north of Leiters Ford, and one sister in California.

William [GOTTSCHALK], four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John GOTTSCHALK, of near Grass Creek, died Wednesday morning, presumably from the effects of running a sliver into his foot.
The accident occurred on October 3, 1921 and the sliver had been in the foot all the time until Tuesday when the lad was brought to a Rochester physician, who removed the splinter, which measured an inch in length and was about an eighth of an inch in thickness and was deeply imbedded in the flesh.
The boy had been under the care of his family physician from the time that the sliver was found, and had been taken also to Kewanna where efforts to locate the splinter were futile. Later as the foot became infected, an X-ray was taken at a Logansport hospital, but even this failed to indicate the presence of the splinter, and it was deemed more or less of a fortunate occurrence that it was found by the Rochester physician on Tuesday.
The boy and his parents were much delighted at the removal of the splinter when the left Rochester for home Tuesday, but before they arrived at their destination the lad was stricken with convulsions.
When the convulsions subsided the injured boy went into a deep stupor and did not regain consciousness before death came.
The case is considered very peculiar, in that there were no indications of tetanus when the operation was performed and the convulsions indicate that it was tetanus that caused the death. It was stated that possibly embalism, which is the formation of a blood clot in the circulatory system, generally locating in the brain or heart, occurred. This would make the death easily accountable, but it seems highly improbable on account of the convulsions experienced before death.

Mrs. Samantha MURDEN, 73, wife of Lafayette MURDEN, died Thursday morning at the home of her son, Hugh FENTERS of Macy, following a stroke of paralysis. Mrs. Murden was the mother of Homer FENTERS, sheriff of Miami county, Frank FENTERS, Fulton county farmer and Clarence FENTERS, also of Macy.

Elting DuBOIS, 50, well known resident of this city, and formerly a farmer residing south of the city on the Peru road, died at 11 o'clock Friday morning at his home on S. Bancroft avenue after an illness of three years from cancer. DuBois had lived in this locality practically all of his life with the exception of some time spent in Tennessee.
Surviving are the mother, Mrs. Hanna DuBOIS, the widow, Mrs. Cora DuBOIS, seven children, Helen [DuBOIS], Edgar [DuBOIS], Thelma [DuBOIS], Albert [DuBOIS], Gilhelmus [DuBOIS] and Cleo [DuBOIS] and Leo [DuBOIS], the latter twins, and two brothers, Thomas J. DuBOIS, of Green Oak, and William DuBOIS of Denver.

Word was received in this city late Friday afternoon of the death at his farm home southwest of Rochester of George FINNEY, well known Fulton county farmer. Finney suffered a stroke of paralysis several days ago and failed to overcome the effects of the stroke. Finney was about 60 years of age. He was always prominent in road work in the county and in this capacity developed a wide acquaintance over the county.

Announcement has been received here of the death of Mrs. Oscar MANNING, formerly a resident of this city, but at the time of her death a resident of Denver, Colorado, where she had been living in an effort to build up her health. Mrs. Manning was a victim of tuberculosis, from which she had suffered for some time. The body will reach this city Saturday, where burial will take place.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: J. Oscar MANNING, 1881-1942; Bessie I. MANNING, his wife, 1884-1922]

Saturday, January 21, 1922

Funeral services for Mrs. Oscar MANNING Monday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the Baptist church. Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge.

Oren YOUNG, 24, better known to his many friends as "Rodney," died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William YOUNG, on East 10th Street, about eight o'clock Friday evening. Death came as the result of paralysis and abscesses on the head.
About eleven weeks ago Oren suffered an attack of paralysis and was confined to his bed. He suffered several strokes following this and although at one time he grew better his condition was such that phisicians held out no hope for him. Rodney was known by practically the entire community and was well liked because of his always cheerful disposition.
Oren Alpheus YOUNG was born in Rochester February 23, 1897 and was 24 years 10 months and 27 days old when he died. He lived in Rochester most of his life with the exception of 14 months he spent in the service of his country during the war. He enlisted here and spent most of his service in the southern states. He also worked in South Bend at different periods.
He is survived by his father and mother, a sister, Mrs. Oldia McCARTY and his grandmother, Mrs. Ben SWEET. Funeral at the residence Tuesday at 10 o'clock with burial in the old [Citizens] cemetery, Rev. W. J. NIVEN officiating.

Funeral services for George FINNEY, 64, who died early Friday afternoon at his home west of Rochester, will be held from the Prairie Grove church Monday afternoon, the body leaving the house at 1:30 o'clock. Burial at Kewanna I.O.O.F. cemetery. Finney, who was a supervisor of roads and who died following a stroke of paralysis on Monday, is survived by the widow, Mrs. Resta FINNEY, a son, Charles FINNEY, a resident of Fulton county, and one sister, Mrs. Sarah IMHOFF, of Missouri.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Kewanna I.O.O.F., Union Twp.: George E. FINNEY, 1858-1922; Arresta L. FINNEY, 1857-1945]

Monday, January 23, 1922 to Tuesday, January 24, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, January 25, 1922

Johnathan WOOD, 63, of Logansport, brother of William WOOD, of this city, died at his home there Wednesday morning of leakage of the heart and complications. Mr. Wood was well known in Rochester where he had visited often.William Wood will go to Logansport Thursday for the funeral.

Mrs. Susannah MURDEN died at the home of her son, Hugh FENTERS, east of Macy, Thursday morning after an illness of several months' duration of paralysis. -- MACY ITEMS.

The funeral of Mrs. Ebe MOORE was held at the U.B. church at Fulton Saturday afternoon with Rev. BUTLER and Rev. MILLER in charge, with burial at Metea. -- FULTON ITEMS.

Thursday, January 26, 1922

Samuel A. POLING, 64, died late Wednesday afternoon at the county farm where he had been an inmate during the past three years. Death was caused by dropsy and complications. Poling was born in Pennsylvania, and lived many years in Ohio, later moving to Fulton county, Indiana. He is survived by two sons, three daughters, a brother and sister. The body will be shipped to Delphos, Ohio, for burial.

Friday, January 27, 1922 to Saturday, January 28, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, January 30, 1922

Mrs. William WILSON and Mrs. Charles KRIEGHBAUM were called to Wabash Saturday by the death at 11 o'clock in the morning of their nephew, a son of their sister, Mrs. Roy JUDY, of that city. The lad was run over by a motor truck in front of his home and died within half an hour of the accident.

Word has been received here of the death Saturday at his home just east of Fulton of David POORMAN, 60, whose illness had developed only a week prior to his demise. Death was caused by paralysis. Other details were not available.

Mrs. Myra BAIR, of Mishawaka, was here Thursday to attend the funeral of the 9 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Claud WELLER. -- KEWANNA ITEMS.

Tuesday, January 31, 1922

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. W. CARPER was buried Saturday afternoon at the Leiters Ford cemetery. -- DELONG ITEMS.

Wednesday, February 1, 1922

The funeral of David POORMAN was held at the Baptist temple Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock. Burial at Fulton cemetery. -- FULTON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. John WALTERS, Mr. and Mrs. Frank SMITH, of Rochester, and Mr. and Mrs. John NUNGESSER and son, Layton [NUNGESSER], of Loyal, motored Tuesday to Wabash, where they attended the funeral of C. F. JUDY, who was accidentally killed. When coasting down a hill he was run over by a heavy truck. -- SHORT NEWS.

Thursday, February 2, 1922 to Tuesday, February 7, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 8, 1922

John BAKER, 68, well known Gilead stock dealer, is dead at Long Beach, Calif., according to word received here. The body will be buried at Long Beach. Mr. Baker, who was well known in this locality, was an uncle of Tim Baker, of this city.

Mrs. Jerry EDINGTON and daughter Florence [EDINGTON], Mr. and Mrs. Irvin WALTERS attended the funeral of Mrs. Morris RUNNELLS of Plymouth Sunday forenoon. Burial at Richland Center. -- BETHEL ITEMS.

Whit HEMINGER and family were at Winamac Monday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Heminger's father, N. R. FREEMAN. -- KEWANNA ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey ROUDEBUSH and Mr. and Mrs. Jacob SMITH attended the funeral of Mr. Daniel POORMAN at Fulton Tuesday. -- GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, February 9, 1922

-Onis LEONARD attended the funeral of his friend, Paul KEISLING at Kokomo Sunday afternoon.
-Misses Verna [CARRUTHERS] and Velma CARRUTHERS attended the funeral of Sube JONES at Twelve Mile Sunday afternoon. -- MACY ITEMS.

Friday, February 10, 1922

Charles D. SISSON, 67, well known resident of this city, died at his residence at 916 Jefferson street Friday morning at about seven o'clock. While Mr.Sisson had been seriously ill suffering with paralysis agitans for the past 10 years, the last few of which he was invalided, death came unexpectedly.
Earl SISSON, the son, had been with him at five o'clock in the morning and did not re-enter the sick chamber until after seven o'clock. At this time he noticed immediately that something was wrong and summoned a physician, who stated that death had occcurred some time prior to his arrival.
Charles D. Sisson was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, November 23, 1854, one of 10

children born to Nathaniel and Betsy Jane SISSON. He was married December 23, 1883 and moved to this locality in 1882.
In 1889 he opened up the Arlington hotel and was elected assessor in 1896, serving four years in this capacity. Later he took up farming, which occupation he continued until in 1905, when he established the SISSON FEED BARN on E. Eighth street, which he managed until a few years ago when his health forced him to retire from active pursuits.
He was a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge, and served one term as vice chancellor commander of the grand lodge of Indiana. He was always more or less active in politics, adhering to the Republican faith.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Jennie E. SISSON, a son, Earl SISSON, four brothers, A. E. SISSON of Erie, Pa., Leonard [SISSON] of Gerard, Pa., John [SISSON], of Monroe, Ohio, and F. E. SISSON, of Pueblo, Col., and four sisters, Elizabeth [SISSON], of Erie, Pa., Mrs. Anna GUNNINSON, of Gerard, Pa., Mrs. Mary JOHNSON, of West Springfield, Pa., and Mrs. Sarah LEEKA, of Durago, Col. One brother is dead.
Funeral services from the Methodist church Monday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body may be viewed at the residence Monday between the hours of 10 and two.

Saturday, February 11, 1922

James V. POORMAN, 56, a life long resident of Fulton, died very suddenly shortly after midnight Friday evening following an attack of acute indigestion. Poorman had been about his daily business as usual and closed up his barber shop at about 10:30 o'clock. Shortly after this he became ill and summoned a physician. He later left his home and went to the physician's office where he died soon after his arrival there.
Poorman was well known over the community in which he had lived. A brother, David POORMAN, died just two weeks ago. Surviving are three sons, Omer [POORMAN], Earl [POORMAN] and William POORMAN all residents of Fulton. Funeral services from the United Brethren church at Fulton Monday afternoon, Rev. John MILLER in charge. Burial at Fulton.

Monday, February 13, 1922

Those from a distance, who came to attend the funeral of Charles D. SISSON, were Mr. and Mrs. John SISSON, of Painesville, Ohio, Walter K. STERNER, of Kenosha, Wis., A. E. SISSON, of Erie, Pa., Mr. and Mrs. J. T. MUNCEY and Mrs. Herald BEAUDOIN, of Kankakee, Ill.

Tuesday, February 14, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 15, 1922

Mrs. Dora KIME, 39, died early Wednesday morning at her home on the Michigan road just north of Rochester following a stroke of paralysis suffered last week. While Mrs. Kime had been ill for several years, her stroke several days ago was the first critical affliction with which she was visited and death was more or less of a shock.

Dora BIBLER was born in this community June 9, 1882, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry BIBLER and had lived here all of her life. She was educated in the city schools and in December, 1900 was united in marriage with Samuel KIME, who with the son, three brothers, Arthur [BIBLER], Joseph [BIBLER] and Robert BIBLER and three sisters, Mrs. Alta WERTS, Mrs. Bertha BRILES and Mrs. Russell PARKER survive.

Mr. and Mrs. Earl CHAPMAN went Friday to Milford to attend the funeral of Mrs. Chapman's cousin. --TALMA ITEMS.

Thursday, February 16, 1922

Relatives in this community received word Wednesday evening of the death of James R. SHELTON, 76, a former resident of Rochester, which occurred Wednesday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Fatima Bundy, of Western Springs, Ill., following an illnes of about two weeks. He had made his home with his daughter for a number of years.
Mr. Shelton was born in 1846, and married Miss Margaret MARTIN and later was in the wholesale grocery business in Rochester. He was a resident of this county practically all of his life until the last few years and he served as clerk of Fulton county for several years. He was a member of the Methodist church of Mt. Olive.
Besides his wife, he leaves a son, Maurice SHELTON, of Indianapolis, and a daughter, Mrs. Fatima BUNDY, of Western Springs.
The body will arrive in Fulton Sunday afternoon and funeral services will be held immediately afterward. Burial at the Mt. Olive cemetery.

James THOMPSON, pioneer of the Richland Center neighborhood, is dead at his old home place, east of the village, where he lived, Mr. and Mrs. William ROGERS, the latter being his daughter. Mr. Thompson, who was nearly ninety years of age had been failing for years and kidney trouble was the immediate cause of his death.
His exact age is not known, due to the fact that when he came to this country from Ireland at the age of 12 with his parents, the trunks with all their belongings were stolen on the boat and in them were the family birth records. Shortly after landing the family came westward and when a young man Mr. Thompson settled in the Richland Center community, and has resided there most of his life, following the pursuit of farming.
Mr. Thompson was married twice, the first time to Susan TACHBOLD. After her death he married Chrystina WORKING, who is living. He was a member of the Methodist church of Richland Center.
He is survived by eight children, the four by his first wife being William [THOMPSON], Charles [THOMPSON] and Albert [THOMPSON], all of Kansas, and Joseph [THOMPSON], of Rochester, and by his present wife, Mrs. Will ROGERS, Argos, Mrs. Burt KESTNER, Rochester, Mrs. William ROGERS, Richland Center, and John WATERMAN, of Illinois.
Funeral at Richland Center M.E. church with burial at cemetery there. Time to be announced later.

Mrs. Alta WERTS and son, Donald [WERTS], of Kokomo, are in Rochester to attend the funeral of her sister, Mrs. Sam KIME who died Wednesday.

Friday, February 17, 1922

Mrs. C. L. LEONARD, wife of Senator LEONARD, of Silver Lake, died Friday. Mrs. Leonard was a sister-in-law of Mrs. Clarence VEIRS and Mrs. Addie LEONARD, of this city.

Dorothy Kathryn [REED], three months old daughter of Jacob W. and Mattie REED of Knox, Ind., died Thursday evening, of brain trouble. The body will be brought to this city and the funeral held Saturday at 11:30 o'clock at Richland Center. Burial at Richland Center cemetery. Jacob Reed is the brother of Miss Metta REED. Besides the parents there survive three sisters, Jene Margaret [REED], Helen Frances [REED] and Jacob Richard [REED].

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. BITTERS, of Kokomo, came today to attend the funeral of Mrs. Sam KIME.

Saturday, February 18, 1922

Bert WHITE, who formerly lived near Richland Center, and who moved later to Argos, died last Thursday following an illness of several weeks.

Theodore STICHLER, 57, farmer who lived near the Pendleton bridge is dead of cancer of the stomach. He had been ill about six months. He is survived by a widow and five children. Funeral Sunday at 10 a.m. at the Whippoorwill church. Burial at Richland Center.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Richland Twp.: Theodore STICHLER, Nov 17, 1865 - Feb 16, 1922; Maine STICHLER, July 27, 1881 - June 3, 1969]

Monday, February 20, 1922

Mrs. Ed LEAVELL, 50, is dead at her home in Fulton the result of cancer of the breast. Mrs. Leavell who had been operated on about six weeks ago was much better following but about two weeks ago she suddenly took a turn for the worse and gradually sank to the end. She passed away Sunday night at eight o'clock.
She is survived by her husband, who has been an employee in the O. M. ENYART store for many years, and by two daughters. Mrs. Leavell was well known in the fulton community, where she and her husband were faithful workers in the Baptist church.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Fulton Cemetery, Liberty Twp.: Edwin E. LEAVELL, 1877-1953; Effie G. LEAVELL, 1874-1922]

Tuesday, February 21, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 22, 1922

Mrs. Warren BEATTIE was called to Lakeville Tuesday to attend the funeral of her uncle.

The funeral of James SHELTON was held at the U.B. church in Fulton Friday. - -FULTON ITEMS

Mr. and Mrs. H. O. BLACKBURN and Mr. and Mrs. Calder ALSPACH attended the funeral of Mrs. Guy HINEL at Plymouth Sunday afternoon.

Thursday, February 23, 1922

Zela Madeline FAHLER, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Edward FAHLER living east of Star City was burned to death Monday evening about 7 o'clock. She had started out the back way of the house with the lantern and was only a short distance from the house when her parents heard her scream. Mr. and Mrs. Fahler rushed to her at once finding her clothes a mass of flames. Before the fire could be smothered out her body was badly burned from her knees up. All of her clothing was burned off.

Friday, February 24, 1922

Betty Louise [TIPPY], six months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred TIPPY, died Wednesday evening. Funeral services at the residence at Talma Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Burial I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester.

Mrs. Celia C. DIXON, 81, widow of the late Thomas F. DIXON, died at 4:15 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Thomas TOUGHMAN, just east of Rochester. Mrs. Dixon had been ailing for several years. Death was caused by old age and complications.
Mrs. Celia Dixon was born in Pennsylfania December 21, 1840. She is the last of a family of 12 children. In September 1862 she was married to T. F. DIXON and to this union two children were born, both surviving. They are Mrs. TOUGHMANand Charles DIXON, west of Rochester. She had lived in this county for the past 15 years.
Funeral services from the residence Monday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

John HOOVER, of Chicago, a former resident of this city, where he is well known, died at 11:30 o'clock Thursday night, according to word received by his sister, Miss Lou HOOVER, of this city. The body will be brought to Rochester Saturday for burial at Mt. Hope cemetery Sunday.

Saturday, February 25, 1922

Mrs. Emma SURGUY, widow of the late Dr. SURGUY, of Tiosa, died early Saturday morning at the county farm, where she had made her home for the past five years. Death was caused by old age and complications. She was 71 years of age. There are two brothers surviving, but their whereabouts is unknown here. There are no other near relatives in this vicinity.

Clark ENYART is in receipt of a message from Los Angeles, Calif., telling of the death at her home in that city of his mother, Mrs. E. B. COX, 90. Mrs Cox, who was a former resident of Rochester, where she is well known, died of old age and complications, according to the message received here. She is survived by two sons and two daughters.

Having experienced some difficulty about a similar matter on a previous occasion, C. L. DOWNEY, of Wabash, came to Rochester armed with a bench order to get his daughter, the child of Mrs. Walter COMPTON of this city, to attend a funeral with him. Even then Mrs. Compton refused to let the child go with the father, attending the funeral herself. Downey is a former husband of Mrs. Compton.

Monday, February 27, 1922

Mrs. S. C. BRANTHOFFER died at the Woodlawn hospital at 11 o'clock Sunday night. She had been afflicted with paralysis for a number of years. About a month ago she fell and fractured her hip, which hastened her death. The body was removed to the home of her daughter, Vera URBIN at Kewanna. Funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 at the M.E. church at that place.
Mrs. Branthoffer was the last member of a family of 12 children. She was 78 years, 2 mo. and 6 days. She removed with her parents from Fairfield Co., Ohio, in the spring of 1864 and spent the remainder of her life in and near Kewanna, her husband, J. W. BRANTHOFFER, passing away 19 years ago.

Betty Louise TIPPY, the daughter of Raymond and Emma TIPPY, of Talma, Indiana, was born July 29th, 1921, and departed this life February 23rd, 1922 at the Woodlawn hospital, Rochester, Indiana. Age 6 months and 28 days. She was a member of the Cradle Roll class, of the Talma M.E. Sunday School.
She leaves to mourn her loss besides the parents, her grandparents, great-grandparents and a host of relatives and friends, for whom she always had a smile. Funeral services were held at the house at 10:30 Saturday morning, February 25th, by Rev. EDINGTON. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester, Indiana. -- Raymond Tippy.

Tuesday, February 28, 1922

David O. CLEMANS, 61, died suddenly Tuesday morning at his home east of Athens, from an attack of apoplexy. Clemans, who had been in good health recently, except for dizzy spells during the past day or two, had arisen as usual Tuesday morning and went about his chores at the barn. When Mrs. Clemans had prepared breakfast and her husband failed to put in an appearance, a nephew, Frank FUNK, who is staying at the Clemans farm, went out into the barnlot and there found Mr. Clemans unconscious. He was taken into the house and medical aid summoned, but he died a few minutes later without having regained consciousness.
David O. Clemans was born in Fulton county April 1, 1861 and lived all of his life on the Clemans farm near Athens. He was married just 24 years on the day of his death, the widow, Mrs. Rosella FUNK CLEMANS and four brothers, Floyd [CLEMANS], Harland [CLEMANS] and James [CLEMANS], of Fulton county and Lon [CLEMANS], of Miami county and a sister, Mrs. Minerva CRAIG, of Akron surviving.
Funeral arrangements later.

Wednesday, March 1, 1922

Velma MILLER, nine year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank MILLER, of Pulaski, died Wednesday morning at Woodlawn hospital, the result of obstruction of the bowels. The little girl was brought here several days ago after a protracted illness but her disease failed to respond to treatment. Burial services will be at the home of the parents in Pulaski.

Earl W. HULSE, 38, of Salt Lake City, former resident of Rochester, died Tuesday at Pekin, China, according to a cablegram received by relatives in this city, from the U. S. Consul at Pekin. No particulars were given as to the cause of his demise. According to the last word that his mother, Mrs. B. F. SHEWARD, and his sister, Mrs. Carl VanTRUMP, received, he was in the best of health and was enjoying the beginning of a trip around the world, which he was making with his wife. They had left their home at Salt Lake City, Utah on January 12th for the globe circling tour which would have taken about a year as they had planned.
Mr. Hulse was well known by many of the Rochester residents having spent six years of his boyoood here with his parents. He has visited his relatives here several times, the most recent one being in the summer of 1920. He attended Rochester College while living here and graduated from that institution and afterwards he received a diploma from Lewis Institute at Chicago.
Since moving to Utah some time age his business career was very successful. He was president of The Commonwealth Bank at Green River Utah, and was interested in the mining and real estate business in Salt Lake City. In 1909 he married Miss Lillian STEVENSON, of Salt Lake City.
Earl Hulse was born at Maxinkuckee, the son of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. HULSE, October 4, 1883. He moved to this city while a lad with his parents. He was a member of the Methodist church and a leading business man in his home in the West.
He is survived by his father, who lives in Chicago, his mother and sister of this city, his wife of Salt Lake City and an aunt, Mrs. Calder ALSPACH, of Rochester. Nothing is known concerning the funeral arrangements, but it is thought that his body will be brought to Salt Lake City for burial.

Mrs. Margaret A. HOOVER, 85, widow of the late Christian HOOVER, died at 11 o'clock Tuesday night at her home on the corner of Sixth and Jefferson streets after an illness extending over a period of more than a year. Death was caused by old age and complications. Mrs. Hoover had been in ill health since the demise of her husband four years ago and her condition gradually became worse from time to time. Later she suffered mental lapses and became very weak physically. Just 15 months ago she fell while walking about the house and suffered a broken hip, since which time she has been confined to her bed. During this period she was unable to move and only at rare times knew those about her.
Margaret A. BARKDOLL was born in Adams county, Pennsylvania, August 20, 1836. She moved to Indiana in 1864 and was married to Christian HOOVER February 13, 1866. She was Mr. Hoover's second wife. But one child was born to this union, John HOOVER, of this city, who with a step-daughter, Mrs. Milt REES and a foster daughter, Miss Trude HOOVER, are the only survivors.
Mrs. Hoover was especially well known in the community. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and had always been active in church work as well as in other enterprises of general interest in the community.

Funeral services will be held from the residence Friday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. Scott HERSHEY, of Ohio in charge, assisted by Rev. PERRY. Rev. Hershey is an old friend of the Hoover family and a former resident of this city, where he was at one time pastor of the Presbyterian church. Interment in the mausoleum.

Funeral services for David O. CLEMANS, of near Athens, Thursday afternoon from Mt. Hope church, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Thursday, March 2, 1922

[no obits]

Friday, March 3, 1922

Sylvester ALSPACH, 69, one of the most prominent of Rochester's merchants, and a life long resident of this community, died at seven o'clock Friday morning at his residence on south Main street after an illness of six weeks. Death was caused by complications.
Sylvester Alspach was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, September 20, 1852, a son of Henry and Deborah ALSPACH. When an infant his family moved to Fulton county, where he resided with them on a farm in the Mt. Zion neighborhood until he had reached the age of 21 years.
On February 15, 1872 he was united in marriage to Mariah GOSS, after which they moved to Rochester, where he engaged in the meat business at the location now occupied by his son-in-law, Charles TAYLOR, at the corner of Main and Ninth streets.
He continued in this occupation until about 25 years ago when he opened the HUB SHOE STORE with his son, Guy ALSPACH, as a partner. The two continued this business until a few years ago, when Mr. Alspach turned the business over to his son and opened up another shoe store with his grandson, Hubert TAYLOR, as a partner.
He had been in good health until a few weeks ago, when he began to fail rapidly. His ailment was diagnosed as anemia. Mr. Alspach seemed to know that he would not recover from this sickness and accordingly completed all of his own funeral arrangements. He was a member of the Methodist church and the Knights of Pythias lodge.
Surviving are the widow, two daughters, Mrs. Charles TAYLOR, of this city and Mrs. C. M. HART, of Salt Lake City, Utah, and one son, Guy ALSPACH, of Rochester.
Funeral services from the residence Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

James Henry MOORE, 61, editor and publisher of the FULTON LEADER, died at his home in Fulton at 10 o'clock Thursday evening a victim of paralysis. He had suffered a sudden stroke February 16th, and gradually failed until the end came. Prior to that time his health has been good.
James H. Moore was born in Miami county, near Peru, July 2, 1858, a son of Mr. and Mrs. H. D. MOORE, deceased. He engaged in the newspaper business when a young man at Peru under Major BITTERS and was following this occupation at Hammond when he was married December 31, 1902 to Miss Nellie May KING, of Peru.
Prior to his marriage, however, he and David WINTERS had launched the Peru Chronicle and after his brief sojourn at Hammond he returned to Peru and the Chronicle, where he remained until 13 years ago when he purchased the Fulton Leader of David HOFFMAN, which he published until the time of his death.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Nellie MOORE, a brother, E. H. MOORE, of Peru, and two sisters, Mrs. Amy KIRTLEY, of Defiance, Ohio, and Mrs. Mary STURGEON, of Peru.
There will be a short funeral service at the home in Fulton Sunday afternoon at two o'clock with Rev. BROWN and Rev. John MILLER in charge. The body will then be taken to the home of his niece, Mrs. Fred SOUDERS 163 East Main Street, at Peru, where services will be held at 2:00 p.m., Monday. Burial at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Peru.

Michael COOPER, 82, well known resident of Fulton county, died at two o'clock Thursday afternoon at the county farm after an illness of about a year. He had broken his hip about a year ago and his health gradually failed since that time. Death was caused by complications. Mr. Cooper had been in inmate of the county farm for the past two years. Surviving are four children, William COOPER, Mrs. Emma SCHALLE, Mrs. Sallie McCROSKY and Mrs. Lizzie COOPER, all residents of the county.
The body was taken to Fulton, where services will be held at the United Brethren church Saturday afternoon at two o'clock.

Mrs. William MILLOW, 84, died Friday morning at her farm home in the Whippoorwill neighborhood after a very short illness. She had been in her usual good health until three days ago when she contracted a severe cold which developed into pneumonia. She was born in Kentucky a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James GINN and had lived most of the 50 years of her married life in the community where she died. Surviving are the husband, two sons, Roy MILLOW, of Rochester, and Reuben MILLOW, of Akron, and a brother and sister. Burial will be made at the Mt. Hope cemetery at Athens.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Matilda J. MILLOW, 1849-1922; William MILLOW, 1844-1925]

Mrs. Carl VanTRUMP went to Chicago Friday morning to visit her father, F. M. HULSE, who so far as can be learned here has not yet been notified of the death in Pekin, China of his son, Earl HULSE of Salt Lake City.

Saturday, March 4, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, March 6, 1922

Mrs. Carrie E. GINTHER, 35, died at 4:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon at her home on south Main St., a victim of tuberculosis. She had been ill since the first of the year, when she contracted a severe cold, which settled in her lungs. Her condition gradually became worse as time advanced until death came.
Carrie E. CAMERER was born in Fulton county, south of Rochester October 5, 1886, a daughter of Henry E. CAMERER, deceased, and Mrs. David A. WALLER of Rochester. She lived practically all of her life in this community until her marriage in June, 1910 to Harry GINTHER.
They lived in Rochester for a short time after marriage, moving later to Ft. Wayne and from there to Louisville and later Covington, Kentucky, where he contracted influenza and died three

years ago.
Following the death of her husband, Mrs. Ginther moved to Rochester, where she had since resided. Surviving are the mother, one daughter, Marjorie [GINTHER], and a brother, Fred CAMERER, who is in the West.
Funeral services from the Methodist church Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Frank Lamar FENSTERMACHER, 57, of Indianapolis, died at 1:15 o'clock Sunday morning at the residence of his mother, Mrs. Julia FENSTERMACHER, of this city, where he had been visiting since early in January. Death was very sudden, resulting from a heart attack and eurmic poisoning. Mr. Fenstermacher had been ill for some time, but his condition was such that he was able to be about until Saturday when he was stricken very suddenly.
Frank L. Fenstermacher was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, December 3, 1864, a son of Enoch and Julian FENSTERMACHER. He lived in Ohio for a short time, later moving to Rochester with his parents. He spent his boyhood in this city and worked at the printing trade when a young man under Major BITTERS of this city.
Later he moved to Findlay, O., where he continued in the printing business and it was here that he was united in marriage to Miss Jane HUFF on January 17, 1894. A number of years ago he engaged in the coal and ice business, which he continued until the time of his death, having removed to Indianapolis some time ago.
Surviving are the mother, the widow, Mrs. Jane FENSTERMACHER, and two brothers, Ora [FENSTERMACHER] and Al M. FENSTERMACHER, of this city.
Funeral services from the residence Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, March 7, 1922

Mrs. Mary PETERS, a well known citizen of Macy, died at her home in Macy, at 2 o'clock Monday morning. She was a sister to John [HANSON] and William HANSON, of Peru.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County, Indiana, Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Dr. John B. PETERS, Father, 1851-1916; Mary A. PETERS, Mother, 1866-1922]

Mrs. Priscilla CARTER-SMITH, 88, died at nine o'clock Monday evening at the county farm following a long illness. Death came as the result of old age and complications. Mrs. Carter-Smith was for more than 40 years a resident of Rochester, where she was well known.
Priscilla JONES was born in Kentucky, May 20, 1833, a daughter of Isaac and Freelove JONES. She moved with her family to Fulton county about 40 years ago and later resided in Rochester, where she was married to William H. CARTER, who died a number of years ago. Later she was united in marriage to Henry SMITH, who preceded her. Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Tobias GOSS, S. Main street and Mrs. Jake SNOWGRASS.
Funeral services from the Methodist church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. S. H. HOFFMAN were called today to Miami county to attend the funeral of a niece, Mrs. Noah BARNHISEL.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County, Indiana, Cemeteries, Gaerte Cemetery, Perry Twp.: Mary C. BARNHISEL, 1865-1922; Noah B. BARNHISEL, 1863-1948]

Wednesday, March 8, 1922

Joseph WASHBURN, a paper hanger and painter, who lived at North Manchester at one time, died suddenly at his home in Silver Lake.

Mr. and Mrs. William DELP and Miss Flo DELP went to Denver Wednesday where they will attend the funeral of their brother-in-law, Aaron ZOOK, who died at his home near Denver Monday morning of heart disease. The widow, Mrs. Emma ZOOK, is a sister of Wm. and Miss Flo Delp, of this city and the late Mrs. Harry BERNETHA. Four sons, Albert [ZOOK], Floyd [ZOOK], Omer [ZOOK] and Donald ZOOK and a daughter, Mrs. Alma KNISELY, the latter a former resident of Rochester survive.

Thursday, March 9, 1922

John WILSON, [age not readable], died Wednesday night at his home in Hebron, according to word received here from his son, Dr. M. WILSON, who was with his father at the time of his demise. The widow and several other children besides Dr. Wilson survive. Funeral services will be held at Hebron Saturday afternoon at two o'clock.

Friday, March 10, 1922

Relatives in this city have received a cablegram from Mrs. Earl HULSE, wife of the late Earl HULSE, who is still at Pekin, China, that her husband died of small pox after an illness of only three days. The message also stated that she will sail for the States on March 19th. The trip will take 22 days. It was not stated whether or not she would bring the body back to their home city, Salt Lake City, Utah. Mrs. Frank SHEWARD was the mother and Mrs. Carl VanTRUMP a sister of the deceased.

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben WAECHTER attended the funeral of Mrs. Margaret HOOVER at Rochester Thursday. -- AKRON ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Kirt GINN and Mrs. Rufus MILLOW attended the funeral of Mrs. William MILLOW at Athens Sunday. -- AKRON ITEMS.

Mrs. Myra BAIR, of Mishawaka, was here Tuesday to attend the funeral of Aunt Cal BRANTHOFFER. -- KEWANNA ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry MOW, Mrs. Etta MOW and Mrs. Charles STURKENS went yesterday to Warsaw to attend the funeral of Mrs. James DICKEY, a sister of Mr. Mow. -- SHORT NEWS.

Saturday, March 11, 1922

Mrs. Ina PIEFFER and daught er, of Warsaw, attended the funeral of their aunt, Mrs. Wm. MILLOW Sunday. -- ATHENS ITEMS.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Matilda J. MILLOW, 1849-1922; William MILLOW, 1844-1925]

Mr. and Mrs. Scudder WILSON and Mrs. Cora WHITTENBERGER attended the funeral of Mrs. Whittenberger's aunt, Mrs. Maggie HOOVER at Rochester, last week. -- MACY ITEMS.

Mrs. Edward ELLIS went to Danville, Illinois last Thursday to attend the funeral of her brother-in-law who died during an operation in a hospital in that city. -- MACY ITEMS.

Mary Alice [PETERS], daughter of John W. and Amanda E. HANSON, was born November 11, 1867. She was united in marriage to Dr. John B. PETERS, May 10, 1886. To this union were born two children, Mary Olive [PETERS], who died in infancy, and Robert [PETERS], of Indianapolis.
She obeyed her Saviour at Valparaiso, Ind., at the age of 11 years, was baptized on her eleventh birthday on the 11th day of the 11th month from a class of eleven girls. She was a member of the Woman's Home Missionary society of her own church, of the W.C.T.U., Mother's club, of the Order of the Maccabees and was the oldest record keeper of the Rebekah Odd Fellows, Ben Hur and the O.E.S. She had lost two brothers and one sister and her husband died July 3, 1916. She is survived by her son, Dr. Robert J. D. PETERS of Indianapolis, her mother, of Fulton, two brothers, and a sister of Peru, several nieces and nephews and friends as numerous as her wide acquaintances.
She died March 6, 1922 of influenza, at the age of 54 years, 3 months and 26 days.
Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock with C. E. SCIEFRES, her pastor, officiating. Interment in Macy cemetery.

Monday, March 13, 1922

Mrs. Rosetta SMITH, wife of Jacob SMITH, died Saturday afternoon at home near Mud Lake, with pneumonia. She wqas 66 years old and besides the husband she leaves four children, Mrs. Harvey ROUDEBUSH, Mrs. Court DuBOIS and Lloyd SMITH all of near Green Oak and Ira SMITH of Macy, and two grandchildren. Funeral services at Macy, Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 at the Christian Church. Burial at Macy.

Tuesday, March 14, 1922

Mrs. Elizabeth WAGONER, 418 E. Tenth street, received a telegram Monday announcing the death at Oswego, N.Y., of her brother, Robert L. CALLISON. Mr. Callison was born in this city and lived here until he was about 20 years of age. He had made frequent visits to Rochester of late years, however, and was well known in the community.

Elise W. FROMM, widow of the late John F. FROMM, died shortly after nine o'clock Tuesday morning, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. I. N. GOOD at their residence on north Jefferson street. Mrs. Fromm had been ailing for several years, but her condition had been as usual until Monday when she fell. Her injuries are believed to have brot on complications which brot about her demise. She was 74 years of age.
Elise W. CORNELIUS was born in the kingdom of Hanover, Germany, September 5, 1847, a daughter of Magdelene and Frederick CORNELIUS. She moved with her parents to the United States in 1866 and was married in the same year to John F. FROMM at Rochester, where she has since made her home. Besides the daughter, Mrs. Good, has two sons, Henry FROMM, of Chicago, and Fred FROMM, of South Bend, a half-brother and a half-sister in Germany, survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

Wednesday, March 15, 1922

William BROWN, brother of the late Colonel Isaac BROWN, well known in this city, died Wednesday morning at the residence of Dal BLACK, where he had made his home for the past two years, during which time his health has been failing. He was found in a serious condition lying on the floor Tuesday, suffering with the grip, and he sank from that time until death came. He was about 65 years of age.
Mr. Brown, who had lived in this community for many years, having farmed in the county near Rochester, went to Tipton about 12 years ago, where he remained until his health forced him to retire. Two sisters, Mrs. Mel THURBER, of New York, and Mrs. Lizzie CULLER, of Indianapolis, survive.

Funeral services for Mrs. Elise FROMM from the residence on North Jefferson street Thursday afternoon at three o'clock, in charge of Rev. Paul SPOEPPELWORTH, of Peru.

Thursday, March 16, 1922

Funeral services for John William BROWN Friday afternoon at three o'clock from the Ray BROWN residence on W. 10th street, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. The members of the I.O.O.F. lodge will attend in a body.

Friday, March 17, 1922

Mrs. George DYER and Mrs. George CULLER came today from Indianapolis to attend the funeral of John William BROWN.

Saturday, March 18, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, March 20, 1922

Mrs. Mae CRIM CURTIS, daughter of Jake CRIM of this city, and a former resident of Rochester, died March 12, at her home in Brawley, California, according to word received here. She was 56 years of age and was born in Rochester, where she was reared to young womanhood. Surviving are the husband, H. C. CURTIS, the father and mother and three sisters, Mrs. J. R. SHOWLEY and Mrs. H. H. WILGUS, of San Diego, and Mrs. D. G. CARVER, of Los Angeles.

Franklin OVERMYER died at his home at Burr Oak Saturday morning at 3:30 o'clock, at the age of 87 years.
Mr. Overmyer was one of the most prominent and successful business men of Marshall county, and was known over a wide area for his keen business judgment and successful operations in farming and the elevator business. He kept up his business activity until about a year ago, when the infirmities of old age began to tell upon him to such an extnt that he was compelled to relinquish gradually his usual occupation.
Mr. and Mrs. Overmyer reared a large family of children, among them George W. OVERMYER, postmaster at Culver, and Lewis OVERMYER, contractor of Burr Oak, and Harvey OVERMYER of Rochester.

Tuesday, March 21, 1922

Mrs. Louisa EYTCHESON, 78, died at 4:30 o'clock Monday afternoon at her home 801 East 12th street, a victim of old age and complications. Mrs. Eytcheson, who was a daughter of William and Louisa GROVER, was born in Missouri, May 30, 1843, and had lived in this community, where she was very well known for 41 years. She was a member of the Christian church. Six children, Albert [EYTCHESON], Curry [EYTCHESON], Nate [EYTCHESON] and Perry EYTCHESON and Mrs. Martha LATCHAW, all of Rochester and Mrs. Myrtle GREER, of Loyal, survive. Funeral services from the residence Wednesday afternoon, at two o'clock, Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT in charge. Burial at Citizens Cemetery.

Paul James SMITH, son of L. F. SMITH, a former resident of Rochester, died in a hospital in Detroit, according to word received in this city.

Wednesday, March 22, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Charles MEISER attended the funeral of the latter's grandfather near Culver. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, March 23, 1922

[no obits]

Friday, March 24, 1922

Defiance, O., Mar. 24 -- Harry MARTIN, 35, Rochester, automobile dealer, received injuries that will probably prove to be fatal Thursday evening at 6:40 o'clock when a Ford coupe driven by A. J. GLEICHAUF, of Nark, Ohio, Goodyear tire salesman, with headquarters at Van Wert,

crashed into the rear of an Overland touring car beside which Martin was standing.
Martin received a fractured skull and severe concussion of the brain. He was operated on here Friday and is not expected to live.
Gleichauf is held in the county jail without charge. He is 37 years old. Sheriff Charles ZESCHKE says he will be prosecuted on a charge of driving while in an intoxicated condition if Martin should recover.
Martin, accompanied by A. R. MILLS, 28 of Fulton county, Indiana, was driving an Overland car to Rochester. They had left Toledo Thursday afternoon. Martin stopped when about two miles and a half north of Defiance near the A. R. FORSYTHE home to close his cutout. Mills, who drove behind him, stopped his car in front of the Martin machine and got out to see if he could assist. He saw Martin about to get back into his machine when Gleichauf, driving at a fast rate of speed, crashed into the rear of the Martin car.
Martin has not recovered consciousness since the accident. His car received a badly bent tire carrier and springs. The front of the Gleichauf car was demolished.
Mrs. Martin, who received word of the accident here by telephone late Thursday night, motored to Peru and took a train from there early Friday morning for Defiance to be with her husband.
Martin is the son of Mrs. Ella MARTIN, north of Rochester. He has one son, Emerson [MARTIN], age 10 years.
It was later learned that Mrs. Ella Martin, the mother, was summoned to the bedside of her dying son. She was called on Friday and left here for Defiance at once.

William Joel [STOCKBERGER], infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis STOCKBERGER, died at one o'clock Friday morning at the home of his parents. His health had been poor since birth, March 4. Funeral services from the residence Friday afternoon, Rev. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, March 25, 1922

Harry MARTIN, 35, well known automobile agent and garage proprietor of this city, died at eight o'clock Friday evening in a hospital at Defiance, Ohio, as the result of injuries sustained near Defiance Thursday evening, when he was struck by a car driven by A. J. GLEICHAUFF, of Nark, Ohio. Martin suffered a fractured skull when Gleichauff, who is being held in jail at Defiance, and who was said to have been intoxicated at the time of the accident, drove his car into the rear end of the Martin car and struck Martin himself. Martin had been outside his car making an adjustment and was about to drive on. The fractured skull resulted in severe concussion of the brain, and while an operation was performed to remove the pressure, he died 25 hours after the accident without having regained consciousness.
Mrs. Martin was with him at the time of his death. He had been enroute from Toledo, O., in company with A. R. MILLS, of Fulton with two Overland cars, for which he was the agent, when the accident occurred.
The body was removed from Defiance to Peru by train Saturday morning and taken overland to the home north of Rochester Saturday afternoon. The mother, Mrs. Ella MARTIN, north of Rochester, started for Defiance to be with her son, when she received word at Peru that he had died.
Harry Martin was born in Fulton county near Mt. Zion, July 8, 1887. He was reared on the farm in that locality, where he remained until he attained young manhood. Later he moved to Peru, where he engaged in the furniture business and was subsequently married to Miss Alta MYERS, of Logansport in 1916. Three years ago he returned to this locality and has since been engaged in the automobile business in Rochester. Surviving are the mother, the widow, and one son, Emerson [MARTIN], aged 10 years.
A noticable incident concerning the accident and death is the fact that, according to report and entirely unknown to his family, Martin had recently taken out a $5,000 life insurance policy with double indemnity clause in the event of accidental death, which means that his estate will receive $10,000 from the insurance company.
Gleichauff, it has been stated by Sheriff ZEACHKE, of Defiance, would be prosecuted for driving a car while intoxicated in the event of Martin's recovery, which leads to the assumption that since Martin's death, charges of manslaughter will be preferred.

Word was received here late this afternoon that the father of L. E. DILLMAN, of this city, had died. No particulars are available.

Miss Sarah WENTZEL, 78, died Tuesday at her home near Bruce Lake following a stroke of paralysis suffered Saturday night. She was not found until Sunday morning and she did not regain consciousness before death came. Two brothers, George [WENTZEL] and Ed WENTZEL and a sister, Mrs. Fred MEISER, survive. Funeral services were held Friday morning with burial at Bruce Lake.

Monday, March 27, 1922

Mrs. Catherine GOODNER, of the Mt. Olive neighborhood, received word today of the death of her son-in-law, Mr. WHITLOCK, of Pueblo, Colo. Her son, Noble GOODNER, also of the Mt. Olive neighborhood, will leave immediately for that place. No particulars of his death were received.

Miss Ida JOY, 54, widow of the late Joseph JOY, died early Monday morning at her home at the corner of Elm and Thirteenth streets a victim of diabetes from which she had suffered but three weeks. Mrs. Joy was a lifelong resident of this community, where she was born and reared and was very well known. She is survived by three children Funeral arrangements later.

Funeral services for the late Harry MARTIN, who died as the result of an accident in which he was struck by a motorist near Defiance, O., Thursday, were held from the Baptist church Monday afternoon, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. A large delegation from the Peru lodge, B.P.O.E., of which Martin was a member, was present to attend the services.

Tuesday, March 28, 1922

Funeral services for Mrs. Ida JOY Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Mt. Zion church.

Wednesday, March 29, 1922

[no obits]

Thursday, March 30, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Howard BARTS and baby went today to Tyner, Ind., to attend the funeral of their grandfather, John STULL.

Friday, March 31, 1922

FIRST WAR HERO TO BE BURIED IN COUNTY
The body of Leroy C. SHELTON, first Fulton county soldier to make the supreme sacrifice overseas, and for whom the Shelton Post, American Legion was named, has arrived in New York, according to word received here by the parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. Eugene SHELTON, of the Mt. Zion neighborhood. It is expected that the body will not be shipped on to Rochester for several days, as no word other than that announcing the arrival has been received here. An elaborate military funeral will be conducted, however, when the body does reach Rochester.

Mrs. Samuel KNOOP died Thursday evening at her home in Brooklyn, N.Y., the result of heart disease. She had been ill four months.
Minnie FOGLESONG was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John FOGLESONG, of Kewanna. She lived in Rochester with her sister, Mrs. Henry PFEIFFER, while she attended high school here. After graduating she taught school in the Kewanna neighborhood. She married Samuel KNOOP, whose home was at Claypool, and later the couple went to Brooklyn, where Mr. Knoop represented the BEYER BROTHERS interests in the east. They have made their home there ever since, but returned to Rochester to visit their friends and relatives quite often.
Mrs. Pfeiffer, now of Logansport, was at the bedside when the end came. She is also survived by another sister, Mrs. Laura SHAFER, of this city. Mrs. Knoop was a member of the Dr. Hillis Congragational church at Brooklyn.
The lady will be brought to Claypool for burial, the services to be held Monday afternoon.

Mrs. Robert MOWE left this morning for her home in Lilbourn, Mo., after being called here by the death of her mother, Mrs. Ida JOY.

Saturday, April 1, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Merle REAMS and daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Tona MILLER and Mr. William HUDKINS attended the funeral of Harry MARTIN Monday afternoon.- - - LOYAL ITEMS.

Monday, April 3, 1922

William W. CLAYBURN, well known Rochester township farmer, residing west of the city, died at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon at his farm home following a long illness. Mr. Clayburn was stricken ill late in November and continued to decline until death came. He was 88 years of age.
Mr. Clayburn was born in Worcester, Ohio, May 23, 1838. At the beginning of the Civil war he enlisted in the First Michigan Volunteers, serving thruout the war, during which time he was twice wounded, one in the laft shoulder and again in the left leg.
At the close of the war he removed to Indiana, where in 1870 he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth STAVER, at North Manchester. Later they moved to Fulton county, where they have since resided.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Elizabeth CLAYBURN, seven children, Otto [CLAYBURN], Fred [CLAYBURN], Jennie [CLAYBURN] and Pearl CLAYBURN, at home, and Clyde [CLAYBURN], of Logansport, Ed [CLAYBURN], of Elkhart and Mrs. Myrtle PRATT of Kewanna; eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Two children, James [CLAYBURN], a veteran of the World war, and Inez [CLAYBURN], are dead.
Funeral services from the Baptist church at Rochester Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. George V. DAWSON went Monday to Dayton, O., to attend the funeral of her nephew, Irvin CAMPBELL, who died following a severe attack of shell shock brought on by his participation in the war.

Tuesday, April 4, 1922

Samuel AKINS, 67, well known blacksmith and general repairman, died Monday afternoon at 4:20 o'clock at his home, 412 N. Madison street after a long illness. Death was caused by dropsy. Samuel Akins was born in Zanesville, Ohio, July 2, 1854, a son of David and Eva AKINS. He had lived in this city 40 or 45 years and was very well known thruout the community. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Fanny AKINS, and a son, Archibald AKINS, of Hammond. Funeral from the residence Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock, Rev. NICKLES in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

William FEECE, aged about 75, died Saturday at his home at Burr Oak, according to word received here. Mr. Feece was a former resident of this community, having lived for many years on a farm east of the lake, where he instituted the sanitarium a number of years ago known as "Feece's Well," where a mineral water with high medicinal properties was obtainable. Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at Leiters Ford.

Earl MARSH died Monday at his home at Marshtown, a victim of typhoid fever, according to word received by Rochester relatives. He was a cousin of Frank [MARSH], Robert [MARSH] and Misses Emma [MARSH] and Nettie MARSH.

Wednesday, April 5, 1922

Oscar WELCHEL left for North Manchester Sunday, to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law, Robert MOORE. - - - MT. ZION ITEMS.

Word has been received here of the death of Billy FEECE, near Leiters Ford. He was the brother of Peter FEECE of this vicinity. He was buried at Leiters Ford Wednesday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Thursday, April 6, 1922

The following out-of-town people were here Wednesday to attend the funeral of Sam AKINS: Charles AKINS and family, of Bourbon, Archie AKINS, of Hammond, John GRIFFITH, of LaPorte, Martha AKINS, of Etna Green and Miss Gladys HATHAWAY, of Tiffin, Ohio.

Friday, April 7, 1922 to Saturday, April 8, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, April 10, 1922

Mrs. Mary ROTH, 68, widow of the late Rev. J. P. ROTH, at one time minister of the Presbyterian church of Rochester, died at two o'clock Monday afternoon at her home on West 11th street after a very short illness. She had been enjoying her health up until just a week prior to her death, when she was stricken very suddenly and her condition continued to grow worse, until death came Monday, as the result of an acute attack of Bright's disease. Mrs. Roth had lived in Rochester for the past 10 or more years, and had also lived here prior to that time when her husband occupied the local pulpit. She is survived by two daughters, Miss Edna ROTH, at home, and Mrs. Lena WITHERS, of Columbus, O., and two sisters, one a resident of Crawfordsville and the other living in California.

Tuesday, April 11, 1922

The funeral of Mrs. Mary ROTH will be held at the Presbyterian church Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Rev. D. S. PERRY will officiate. The body will lie in state at the church from 12:30 until the funeral hour Wednesday, where it may be viewed by friends.

John Davidson STINSON, son of Mrs. Almeda STINSON, east of Rochester, and himself a former resident of this community, died suddenly Monday morning while at his work in Cleveland, Ohio. He had been in poor health for the past year, but death came unexpectedly. He was a member of the Episcopal church. Funeral services from the home of Mrs. Arch STINSON, at Athens, Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester.

Mrs. J. B. WITHERS, of Columbus, Ohio, is in this city where she was called during the illness of her mother, Mrs. Mary ROTH, who died Monday afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. P. O. CORNELL have returned from Marshtown, where they were visiting his mother, Mrs. Ben COLWELL [sic], and attending the funeral of Mrs. Jacob SNYDER.

Wednesday, April 12, 1922

Among the out-of-town attendants of the funeral services for Mrs. Mary ROTH Wednesday afternoon were Dr. L. O. SCHENCK, of Crawfordsville, Dr. W. A. ROTH, of Fairbuty, Ill., Albert ROTH, of Seaton, Ill., and Mr. and Mrs. J. B. WITHERS, of Columbus, O.

Thursday, April 13, 1922

Mrs. T. E. STINSON returned Wednesday to Indianapolis, after being here to attend the funeral of John STINSON.

Friday, April 14, 1922

[no obits]

Saturday, April 15, 1922

A most unfortunate and mysterious circumstance has arisen in connection with the recent death and burial of Miss Sarah WENTZEL, which was fully detailed in the Kewanna paper of March 24th. As soon as she died a message was sent to her brother, Jacob WENTZEL, of Clara City, Minn. He informed the messenger that he would not be able to come to Kewanna for the funeral but later decided to come and started at once. Last Friday, Harry WENTZEL received a letter from Mrs. Jacob WENTZEL at Clara City stating the above facts and adding that she had not seen him or heard from him since the day he started for Kewanna to attend the funeral of his sister. She (Mrs. Jacob Wentzel) has just recently returned home from the hospital where she underwent an operation for gall stones and states that she is naturally greatly exercised about her husband and asks for information of the Kewanna relatives. J. S. WENTZEL stated on Tuesday that none of the relatives hereabouts know anything whatever of Jake's whereabouts and the receipt of this letter last Friday was the first inkling they had that he had even started for Kewanna. - - - - KEWANNA HERALD.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank LOWMAN and Mr. and Mrs. Ray MYERS will go Sunday to Mentone to attend the funeral of Mrs. Elliott MANWARING.

Monday, April 17, 1922

John L. CLOUSE, 90, a former resident of this city, where he had made his home for 15 years, died at four o'clock Sunday afternoon at the home of his son, C. W. Clouse, of Mishawaka, a victim of old age and attendant complications. Mr. Clouse was a veteran of the Civil War and was a member of the McClung Post G.A.R. Surviving are four children, C. W. CLOUSE, of Mishawaka, J. R. CLOUSE, of Kokomo, Mrs. L. C. KISTLER, of this city, and Mrs. C. L. WALKER, of Orlando, Fla. The body will arrive in Rochester Monday evening and may be viewed Tuesday at the Baptist church between the hours of 12 and two o'clock. Funeral services at the church Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, April 18, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Foster HAZLETT received word Tuesday that their nephew, Charles RENO, of Indianapolis had died.

Wednesday, April 19, 1922

[no obits]

Thursday, April 20, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Martin IRVINE and family will motor to South Bend to attend the funeral of Mrs. Irvine's niece, Miss Rosetta WIDMAN, which will be held Saturday.

Friday, April 21, 1922 to Saturday, April 22, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, April 24, 1922

Word has been received in this city that Mrs. MONTGOMERY, of Elwood, a daughter of Mrs. Jacob FOGLE and mother of Miss Madeline LAMB [printing not clear?], of this city, had died in a hospital in Indianapolis.

Mrs. Diana LYNCH, 84, widow of the late William LYNCH, died at 3:30 o'clock Monday morning at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Charles COPLEN, of this city, after an illness extending over the entire winter. Mrs. Lynch had been failing, and last Friday her condition became so bad that she was removed from her home north of Rochester to the Coplen residence. She had been a life-long resident of Fulton county and is survived by one sister, Mrs. Eliza JENKINS, one daughter, Mrs. COPLEN, and two sons, B. B. LYNCH and Ira CRAFT. Funeral services from the Coplen residence Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Howard CURTIS, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon CURTIS, west of Rochester, committed suicide at about 8:30 o'clock Monday morning by swallowing a quantity of carbolic acid. Refusal of Miss Leotta HUNTER, daughter of Mrs. Charles FREEMAN, to marry him, was believed to be the cause of the act.
Curtis, who is a farm laborer, had been having trouble with his parents over the girl, Miss Hunter, and as a result he left home about a week ago, and went to the Benjamin NOFTSGER farm home, where he was employed at the time of his suicide, and lived there alone.
Sunday he took Miss Hunter riding in his car, and while she was driving, she lost control of it and it went into the ditch. Later in the day he secured assistance in rescuing the machine, which was not badly damaged. Neiter he nor Miss Hunter were injured in the accident.
Sunday evening he called upon Mr. and Mrs. Francis ZEGAFUSE, who reside near the Noftsger farm, and carried on a conversation as usual, except just as he was leaving for home at about 10 o'clock in the evening Mr. Zegafuse, noticing a parcel wrapped in newspaper, chided him about "batching it" and asked him if he had a part of his meal wrapped in the paper. At this Curtis merely sobered and looked at the package and said nothing. It is believed that this parcel contained the carbolic acid.
This was all that was heard of Curtis until Monday morning at about 6:30 o'clock. At this time he telephoned to Mrs. Joseph BARNETT, who resides near the home of his parents, and asked Mrs. Barnett to tell his father to come to the Noftsger farm right away. Mrs. Barnett asked him if his father should bring a wagon, and he replied yes. That was the extent of the conversation with Mrs. Barnett.
The message was delivered to the father, who at once hitched up, arriving at the Noftsger farm at 10 o'clock, to find his son lying on a spring cot dead .
Mr. Curtis summoned aid at once. Coroner STINSON, of Athens, was called and pronounced the case one of suicide. A search was made for a bottle in which he may have had the acid, but this could not be found.
It - - - - was found near him with a small quantity of carbolic acid in the bottom of it. He had evidently drank the death-dealing poison from this tumbler and in taking it must have thrown it down his throat, for he was not burned about the face or mouth, the first burns showing up deep in the throat.
The body was yet warm when the father arrived, and Coroner Stinson stated that in his opinion he had died at about nine o'clock, evidently having taken the poison immediately after phoning for his father. Curtis was lying fully dressed on the cot, which gave evidence of his suffering before death came.
Knowing of the trouble with his parents over the Hunter girl, led friends to believe that her alleged refusal to marry him was the cause of his act.
The following note which was found on a table folded was all that he left behind to explain his deed:
"Monday Morning, April 24, 1922.
"Whoever finds this letter, please call Ben NOFTSGER and tell him what has happened to me. I have nothing to say about him. He is the best man I ever worked for. I have said this morning everything but was my last time. I am in trouble and I took this plan to end them. Whoever finds this letter take me home.
"Howard Curtis."
Surviving are the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon CURTIS, five sisters, Mrs Myrtle HERD, and Mrs. Chloe KINGERY, of Kewanna, Mrs. Norabelle SHOEMAN, of Rochester, and Mabel [CURTIS] and Jennie CURTIS, at home, and three brothers, Warren [CURTIS], George [CURTIS], and Ralph CURTIS, at home.
Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, April 25, 1922

Funeral services for Howard CURTIS, who committed suicide Monday morning, are to be held from the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon CURTIS, west of Rochester on Thursday.

Wednesday, April 26, 1922

Logansport, Ind., April 26 -- Funeral services for Charles B. LANDIS, ex-representative in Congress from the Ninth Indiana district and vice president of the DuPont Engine Company of Wilmington, Del., who died at Asheville, N.C., Monday, were conducted at the home here Wednesday afternoon in charge of Dr. George L. MACINTOSH, president of Wabash college and a classmate of Mr. Landis. Dr. Macintosh was assisted by the Rev. J. S. CORKEY, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of this city.
Those who served as pall bearers were Judge A. B. ANDERSON of Indianapolis, Ed BOWEN and Ed CARTWRIGHT of Delphi, John M. JOHNSON of this city, and two brothers, Frederick K. LANDIS, of this city, and Kenesaw M. LANDIS of Chicago.

Henry A. BARNHART, boyhood friend of the deceased and Hugh A. BARNHART attended from Rochester.

Thursday, April 27, 1922

Mrs. Lucile LEONARD and J. B. WADDELL attended the funeral of Charles LANDIS Wednesday in Logansport.

Mrs. Herman L. ANDERSON, of near Tiosa, has gone to DesMoines, Iowa, to attend the funeral of her sister, Mrs. George CAMPBELL.

Friday, April 28, 1922

BODY OF LEROY SHELTON ARRIVES FROM FRANCE
The body of Leroy C. SHELTON, first Fulton county boy to fall in battle in the world war, arrived home Friday afternoon at 1:15. The body was immediately taken to the home of the late hero's brother, Ray SHELTON, where it will lie until Sunday.
Sunday afternoon at two o'clock a public funeral, with the local post of the American Legion in charge, will be held at the Methodist church. The members of the post wll turn out in uniform, the firing squad will be present, and full military honors will be given the youth after whom the post was named.
Rev. S. C. NORRIS, retired minister, who was formerly in charge of Green Oak, will preach the funeral services. Following the ceremony here the body will be taken to Green Oak, where the remains will be laid by the side of Shelton's wife.
Leroy C. Shelton, the son of F. Eugene and Aletha SHELTON, who was 32 years old at the time of his death, was a clerk when he entered the service, March 29, 1918. He trained at Camp Taylor and sailed May 5, 1918 with the 28th Division being a private in Company A. 111th Infantry. He saw action at Chateau Thierry and on the Vesie River front. He was killed in action at Fismette on the Vessie River the night of August 10, 1918.

Saturday, April 29, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, May 1, 1922

Merrill KROFT, 29, died at Akron Saturday evening at five o'clock following an illnss of complications from influenza. He was a partner of W. C. MILLER in the hardware business and was a popular young man in that city. Mr. Kroft came to Akron about two years ago and associated with Mr. Miller. Before that he had been doing agricultural work. He is survived by his father, mother, a brother and two sisters, all of Greensburg. Mr. Kroft was a graduate of Purdue University and was a member of the Masonic lodge. A short funeral service was held at Akron Sunday. The body was taken to Greensburg Monday.

Mrs. LaMont [Ruth] GILBERT died Saturday at her home near Chili. She [Ruth GREEN] was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. GREEN of near Fulton and a granddaughter of B. F.

GREEN, of this city. She leaves a husband and four children. Funeral services Tuesday afternoon at the Chili Baptist Temple. Burial at Chili.

The funeral of Leroy C. SHELTON, first Fulton county boy to fall in action in the late war was very largely attended Sunday afternoon.
The ceremony which was conducted by the Leroy C. Shelton Post of the American Legion, was very impressive. There was one of the largest turnouts of men in uniforms seen here since the close of the war.
Taking charge of the body in front of the courthouse, the procession was formed and moved to the Methodist church. Leading was Commander Earl SISSON and Chaplin Fred McCLURG of the post, followed by the colors with their guard and the Legion firing squad. The Citizens Band, members of the American Legion, members of the Women's Auxiliary, members of the Odd Fellows lodge, members of the G.A.R., the immediate family and relatives and mourners made up a long procession.
At the church Rev. S. C. NORRIS, former pastor of the deceased, at present of Culver, preached the funeral sermon. Rev. FRALEY led in prayer, while solos were sung by Mrs. Harry SUTHERLAND and Frank E. BRYANT. Following the Legion funeral ceremony was conducted by Mr. Sisson and Mr. McClurg.
The firing squad stood at "present arms" while the body was carried from the church and placed on the artillery cassion drawn by six black horses. Legion men in uniform rode the horses and the caisson as the procession marched to Main street and south to 14th street. Machines then carried all the mourners to the cemetery where the Odd Fellows first conducted their funeral ceremony and the American Legion carried out their farewell rites ending with the three volleys from the rifle squad and the blowing of "taps' by Bugler Arch TIMBERS.

Word has been received by Rochester relatives of the death in Pasadena, Calif., of Mrs. Susan MARTIN. She was well known in this city, where she lived until going to California a few years ago.

Russell EIKELBERNER, 30, of Logansport, and nephew of Mrs. Peter J. STINGLY of this city, was instantly killed Saturday night when he was thrown from a speeding automobile and his neck was broken. The driver of the car was only slightly injured.
Eikelberner was riding with his friend who had a powerful racing car, on the road between Logansport and Lake Cicot. They came up behind another automobile going the same way and attempted to turn out to go around it. Before they could get back into the road the car traveling at a high rate of speed crashed into a stone abutment at a bridge over a canal. Eikelberner was thrown 40 feet ahead of the car and was dead when picked up.
He served in the U. S. army overseas during the war. He is survived by a wife and two children. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock.

Tuesday, May 2, 1922

Irvin KINDIG, north of Rochester who was injured about six weeks ago when a team which he was driving ran away, died Monday evening in the Marshall County hospital at Plymouth from the effects of the injuries he sustained. Kindig, who lives north of the Marshall county line just south of Argos, was injured so severely that he was taken to the hospital at Plymouth last Saturday at which time his leg was amputated. Amputation was necessary on account of blood poisoning which had set in. His condition at the time of the operation was critical and the operation was a last resort in an attempt to save his life, but it failed.
[NOTE: Irvin F. KINDIG, Sept 26, 1872 - May 1, 1922; Tenia E. STAUFFER, his wife, Aug 24, 1890 - June 18, 1957 - Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Cemeteries, Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery]

Wednesday, May 3, 1922

Word was received by wire Wednesday of the death in Chicago this morning of Mark M. KILLEN, a former resident and merchant of Rochester. Particulars concerning his death are not available at this time, it is understood, but the end came very unexpectedly.
Mr. Killen came to Rochester in 1877 together with four brothers, Harry [KILLEN], Ernest [KILLEN], James [KILLEN] and William [KILLEN], and three sisters, Mrs. D. E. HOWARD, Mrs. Jay SHIELDS and Mrs. John PFAFF. He engaged in the grocery business in the Centennial Block, in that same year and in the following year met and married Miss Martha MOON.
Among other things Mr. Killen identified in the restaurant business and at one time owned and managed the East Side Hotel, after selling which he went to Chicago, where he again engaged in the grocery business in which he continued until forced to abandon it on account of a paralytic stroke. He has continued to live in Chicago until his death this morning.
Mrs. Killen preceded him to the other life in 1908, they having raised a family of three: Mark M. [KILLEN], Jr., married and living in Chicago, Sarah [KILLEN], married and living in Oakland, Calif., and Lucy [KILLEN], also married and living in Tarryton, N.Y., all of whom survive
Mr. Killen was well and favorably known in Rochester and his old associates will be grieved to learn of his death.

Thursday, May 4, 1922

Will HASSENPLUG and family attended the funeral of Leroy SHELTON at Rochester Sunday. - - - SOUTH ZION ITEMS.

Mrs. Lewis FEECE received word from Plymouth of the death of her brother, Irvin KINDIG, yesterday. - - - SOUTH ZION ITEMS.

Friday, May 5, 1922

The body of Mark KILLEN arrived Friday afternoon at 1:15 from Chicago and funeral services were held immediately following at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge.

Mark KILLEN and daughter, Antoinette [KILLEN], of Chicago, were here today to attend the funeral of the former's father, Mark KILLEN.

Saturday, May 6, 1922

Word has been received here of the death at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mary CROWELL, of South Bend, of Robert ELLIS, 62, who had been a life long resident of Fulton county until recently when he went to South Bend to live with his daughter. Ellis was born near Leiters and had been a farmer in Newcastle township for many years. The first word of his illness was received at midnight Friday when it was learned that his condition was critical, while later word announced the death at three o'clock Saturday morning.
Surviving are the daughter in South Bend, Mrs. Nellie MORMAN, of Bourbon and Miss Margaret ELLIS, of Argos, four sons, Linus [ELLIS], of Tippecanoe, Robert [ELLIS], of Bremen, Elmer [ELLIS], of Hutchinson, Ka., and Jesse [ELLIS], of Logansport, and two sisters, Mrs. Henry DITMIRE and Mrs. F. C. MONTGOMERY, of this city, and a brother, John ELLIS, of Delong.
Funeral arrangements later.

Dr. and Mrs. B. F. OVERMYER, of Leiters, left early Friday afternoon for Buffalo, Arkansas, as the result of word received in Leiters of the death at that place of Robert H. DAVIDSON, 47, a brother of Mrs. Overmyer and Mrs. Martha ROUCH, also of Leiters.
The telegram received by the Leiters relatives of the man merely stated that Davidson had been killed, but in what manner the local people have not yet ascertained. Mrs. Rouch states that she does not expect to learn of the particulars until after the arrival in Buffalo of Dr. and Mrs. Overmyer.
Davidson who was a former resident of Fulton county and well known here, has lived for a number of years in Buffalo. He is survived by the widow, who wired word of the death, one daughter, Mrs. Florence NEIDERMIER, of Chicago, the two sisters at Leiters, and another sister, Mrs. GALLAGHER, of South Bend, and a brother, T. M. DAVIDSON, also of Leiters. It is probable that the body will be returned to Fulton county for burial.

Monday, May 8, 1922

Elmer EDDINGER, aged about 50, president of the Farmers' State Bank, of Mentone, and well known thruout this section, died very suddenly Saturday afternoon following a stroke of apoplexy. Eddinger, who had been enjoying his usual health until Saturday, went with another man to Akron by motor Saturday afternoon. While there he became ill and they started for Mentone. Eddinger gradually became worse and was taken to the C. M. Tucker farm, about half of the distance home, where he died. A widow and three children survive.

Dr. and Mrs. B. F. OVERMYER, of Leiters, returned late Saturday evening from Buffalo, Arkansas, with the body of her brother, Robert H. DAVIDSON, who was killed at that place last Wednesday. When word of the death was received by Fulton county relatives, Mrs. Overmyer, Mrs. Martha ROUCH, a sister, and T. M. DAVIDSON, of Leiters, details were lacking. Upon their return here, however, Dr. Overmyer states that Davidson, a former resident of this locality, was shot and killed by moonshiners in the hills near Buffalo. Davidson, who had lived at Buffalo but a few months and was a comparative stranger, was evidently taken for a revenue officer. Two of the moonshiners implicated in the death have been arrested. Funeral services and burial were held at Leiters Monday afternoon at one o'clock.

Adam ZEGAFUSE, 26, son of Mr. and Mrs. John ZEGAFUSE, killed himself at the home of his parnts, five miles west of Rochester Sunday afternoon at about 4:30 o'clock. A verdict of death by suicide was pronounced by Dr. A. E. STINSON, Fulton county coroner.
Mr. and Mrs. John Zegafuse had gone to Rochester Sunday afternoon to attend the Sunday school rally, and had left the son at home alone. They were returning to the home, which they reached at 4:35 o'clock in the afternoon and entered the house. As Mr. Zegafuse started to step into the living room he saw his son, Adam, lying on the floor with the entire top of his head blown off.
He attempted to intercept Mrs. Zegafuse, who followed him, but failed in this and both rushed to the boy's side. Both believed that he was still breathing when they reached him, but this is hardly thought possible by Dr. Stinson, who was summoned soon after.
Zegafuse had evidently held the end of a double-barreled shot gun to his head at a point just behind the right ear and then stooped over and pulled the trigger. He had fallen in his tracks and lay there where his parents found him. The body was still warm and the room was filled with smoke from the discharge of the shot gun, which leads to the belief that he had committed the act but a few minutes before his parents entered the house, or reached the prmises, as they did not hear the report of the weapon. They believe that he must have seen them approaching from a distance and then fired the fatal shot.
His parents can assign no reason for the act, and they stick to the theory that his death was accidental, altho they can see no reason why he should have had the shot gun in the living room on Sunday afternoon.
The theory advanced by friends, however, is to the effect that he was grieving over the death of Howard CURTIS, who committed suicide a number of days ago, and at whose funeral Zegafuse had acted as pall bearer. As the two young men were not close friends, however, this seems also to be improbable. The father, however, stated that his son, who always was quiet of disposition and had little to say at any time, grew even more moody after the Curtis suicide.
He had no love affairs, nor sickness or trouble of any kind that are known to his parents or friends, and having left behind no messages of any kind, the reason for his act may always remain a complete mystery.
Adam Zegafuse was born in Fulton county at the farm home where he ended his life December 2, 1895. He had always lived on the farm with his parents and had no brothers or sisters. The body was taken to a Rochester undertaking establishment Sunday afternoon but removed to the home Monday. Funeral services from the Evangelical church at Rochester Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank LOWMAN will go Tuesday to Mentone to attend the funeral of E. M. EDINGER.

Tuesday, May 9, 1922 to Thursday, May 11, 1922

[no obits]

Friday, May 12, 1922

Following is an article taken from the Arkansas Gazette, of Little Rock Ark. printed May 6, in which further details of the slaying of Robert DAVIDSON, former Fulton county resident, are set forth:
"Cotter, May 5 -- Herbert SEASE of Mountain Home and Jack BEAVERS, who lived on the Sease farm, on the White rive, near Nellie's Apron, were arrested yesterday charged with the murder of R. H. DAVIDSON, who was shot from ambush while plowing in his field Wednesday afternoon. At the time the bullet hit Davidson in the back, his wife was on the back porch calling him to supper. She said that he was leaning over covering some seed with his hand when suddenly a shot sang out and he fell forward on his face. She ran to him, but he did not regain consciousness, and died shortly after.
"Sheriff James MARTIN, with several prohibition enforcement officers who arrived Wednesday afternoon, left for the scene of the killing early yesterday morning. They gathered what evidence they could at the Davidson home, then went to the Sease farm, where they arrested Jack Beavers. At this place they also captured one of the most complete distilling outfits ever taken in north Arkansas. It was a 60-gallon copper still modernly equipped. They also got 700 gallons of mash. Herbert Seast was not present, but was captured about midnight, when he arrived home. It is said that Sease and Jack and Albert BEAVERS were at the Davidson home drinking on the afternoon of the shooting.
"The reason officers assign for the killing is that Davidson refused to participate in illicit distilling operations being carried on in that neighborhood.
"The murdered man was 49 years old. He served in the Philippines and in the World war as a master engineer. He and his wife bought the place where they lived in February, and had been improving it ever since. His old home is in Leiters Ford, Ind. The body will be returned to that place tomorrow. A group of Odd Fellows, in which order he belonged, went from this place to Nellie's Aapron this morning and took charge of funeral arrangements.
"Jack Beavers is in jail at Mountain Home. Sease was taken to Yellville today for safekeeping."

Marguerite [MORRETT], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce MORRETT, died Thursday shortly after birth. Funeral services from the home Friday afternoon.

Saturday, May 13, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, May 15, 1922

Funeral services for Leslie LEE, 29, son of George LEE, of South Bend, a former resident of Rochester, were held Monday afternoon from the Hoover chapel, Rev. NIVEN in charge. A squad from the local post American Legion acted as pall bearers. Lee, an ex-service man, died May 11 in the National Military Home at Dayton, Ohio.

Mrs. Ora WILSON, of near Mentone, died Sunday at noon at the hospital, where she had been brought for treatment about 18 hours before. She had given birth to a child two weeks prior to her demise. The body was taken to Mentone Sunday.

Mrs. Mary F. WILEY, 81, died at 12:45 o'clock Sunday night after an illness extending over a period of 20 years, during which time she was an invalid from a nervous affliction. Death came as the result of advanced years and complications.
Mrs. Wiley was born in Quincy, Ohio, February 3, 1841, a daughter of James and Rebecca GAINER deceased. She was married on January 16, 1866 to Newton WILEY, and they lived on a farm near Rochester until his death about 13 years ago, when she moved to Rochester, where she had since made her home with her brother, James GAINER.
She is survived by her brother, Mr. Gainer, and another brother, Joseph T. GAINER, of Long Beach, California. There were no children. Funeral services from the Gainer residence Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. H. E. BUTLER in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, May 16, 1922

Dr. Perry HEATH, prominent dentist, died at 1:35 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at his residence on south Pontiac street after a long illness. Death was caused by pernecious anemia from which he had suffered for probably more than a year, his condition having become acute 10 weeks ago when he went to the Battle Creek sanitarium for treatment. At this time two blood transfusions were made in an effort to save his life, but this treatment was subsequently given up as futile, and six weeks ago he was returned to his home in Rochester, where he sank gradually until he came to a peaceful end. He was 50 years of age.
Perry Heath was born in Wolcott, Indiana, January 24, 1872, a son of James and Elton J. HEATH. The father preceded him. He was the second of a family of 10 children, all of whom with the one exception, are living.
He was united with the Methodist Episcopal church at Kentland at the age of 16 years and came to Rochester in 1898. Here he was a student at the Rochester Normal university where he met Miss Glendolyn MYERS, to whom he was married.
There were two children born to this union, both sons, the eldest of whom died in infancy. The other son, Curtner [HEATH], 11, survives.
In 1900 he attended the Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis, graduating in 1903. He was the president of his class and graduated with the highest credits of any of his classmates.
On September 3, 1903 he opened up dental offices in Rochester where he continued in a growing practice until illness recently forced him to retire.
Dr. Heath was active in all civic and social affairs of the community, was an active republican and was elected a member of the city council on the republican ticket, serving during the administration of Former Mayor Hiram G. MILLER. He was also a member of the board of directors of the Rochester Country Club, a charter member of the original golf club and active at all times in the welfare of the organization.
Funeral arrangements later.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983: Perry HEATH m. Glendolyn MYERS, Dec. 25, 1900]

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. LEE returned today to South Bend, after being here to attend the funeral of Maxwell LEE.

Wednesday, May 17, 1922

Funeral services for Dr. Perry HEATH, who died early Tuesday afternoon, from the residence on south Pontiac street Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, May 18, 1922

Those from a distance who were in Rochester Thursday to attend the funeral of Dr. Perry HEATH were Mrs. Frank REMOKLES and Mrs. Leo MILLER, of Portland, Ind., Mr. and Mrs. Earl DRAKE, of Oak Park, Ill., Mr. and Mrs. J. A. TREADWAY and family of Logansport, Mr. and Mrs. George TROUTMAN and family of Kewanna, Mr. and Mrs. G. A. SPRAY, Mr. and Mrs. R. N. WALLACE and Miss Anne SIMMS, of Frankfort, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank MARSH are in receipt of word from Chicago of the death of Miss Irene SAGE, of that city, who met with an automobile accident last Thursday and died as a result Friday. She was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Walter SAGE, well known in this city, where they had often visited.

Friday, May 19, 1922

Mrs. Alger NORRIS of Burr Oak who has been seriously ill for some time passed away Wednesday and was buried Saturday.

Saturday, May 20, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, May 22, 1922

Mrs. Adelia ZACHMAN, aged 85, died late Saturday afternoon at the home of Mr. and Mrs Oscar BALDWIN, with whom she had made her home recently. Death was caused by old age and attendant complications. Mrs. Zachman had come to Rochester more than a half century ago. She was the widow of the late Martin REED and late George ZACHMAN, whom she married following Mr. Reed's demise. She was a member of the Methodist church and the Women's Relief Corps. Funeral services from the Methodist church Monday afternoon at four o'clock. Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Warren HEETER about 65 years old, well known resident of Athens, committed suicide early Monday morning at his garage there by blowing his brains out with a shot gun. Mr. Heeter was dead when found by his son, Darwin [HEETER]. No reason is known why Mr. Heeter committed the act, but it is thought that several pressing debts and an impending sheriff's sale of some of his property caused him to worry to such an extent that he decided to end it all.
Shortly before seven o'clock Monday morning Mr. Heeter appeared at the home of his son, Darwin, and borrowed his shotgun. Lucy CLEVENGER, who gave him the gun, stated that she thought he acted peculiarly at the time and sat down on the porch to watch him. From the house Heeter went to his garage just across the Erie tracks and left the shotgun there. Then he went to the

Fred ROWE store where he purchased three shotgun shells.
He was seen to return to the garage and close the door. A short time later Lucy CLEVENGER and Howard ROUCH, a neighbor, both heard a loud report coming from the garage. Darwin Heeter was informed that it was feared his father had killed himself and the son ran to the garage and on opening the doors found his father lying dead with the top part of his head blown away.
As far as could be learned it was evident that Mr. Heeter had placed the muzzle of the gun just in front of and above the left ear, leaned over and pulled the trigger. Part of the shot took impact in the roof of the building.
Warren Heeter was well known in the Athens neighborhood and also in Rochester, he having been a life-long resident in the county. He was born near Prill's school house, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Noah HEETER, and lived about Athens all of his life. He affiliated himself with the socialist party and proned to argue religion. He is survived by a wife, Mrs. Ellen HEETER, two sons, Darwin [HEETER] and Hollis [HEETER], four daughters, Mrs. Loyd RILEY, Mrs. Ellis RILEY, Mrs. James HUTCHINSON, all of near Athens, and Mrs. Edith ADAMSON, Portland, Ore., and two sisters, Mrs. William SHIVELY, Athens, and Mrs. Hiram RALSTON, of Plymouth.
Funeral arrangements later.

Tuesday, May 23, 1922

Funeral services for Warren HEETER Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the residence at Athens.

Wednesday, May 24, 1922

Mrs. Adelie ZACHMAN, who died Saturday, left one-half of her estate to the Methodist church, according to her will which was made public Wednesday by John TROUTMAN, executor. The gift to the church amounting to $3,500 was divided as follows, one-third to the Women's Foreign Missionary Society of the Northwestern Indiana Conference, one-third to he Home Missionary Society and one-third to the Grace M.E. church of Rochester. The estate will total about $7,000. The other half will go to relatives living at Portage, Wisconsin and Arlington, Ore.

Mr. and Mrs. S. M. HOLLENBACK and Mrs. Roy WILLIAMS went this morning to Grass Creek to attend the funeral of Derrick NICKELS, who died Sunday.

Thursday, May 25, 1922

[no obits]

Friday, May 26, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd CHRISTMAN have returned from Delta, Ohio, where they attended the funeral of his grandmother, Mrs. CHRISTMAN.

Saturday, May 27, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, May 29, 1922

Milton ENYART, of Macy, well known in this city, was reported Monday afternoon to have dropped dead. The report was not verified.

Tuesday, May 30, 1922

[no paper - holiday]

Wednesday, May 31, 1922

Mrs. Otto SMITH, 31, died Wednesday morning at her farm home near Tiosa, a victim of cancer, from which she had suffered for about five months. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George WRIGHT, of Tiosa, who with the husband, two half-brothers, Ralph [WRIGHT] and Dorsey WRIGHT and a half sister, Mrs. Pearl BOWERS, survive.

Milton ENYART, of Fulton, who died suddenly late Saturday afternoon, was buried at the I.O.O.F. cemetery Tuesday noon.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam HEDGES went Tuesday morning to Fulton to accompany the funeral cortege of Milton ENYART to Rochester.

Thursday, June 1, 1922

[no obits]

Friday, June 2, 1922

The body of August F. HARTMAN, aged about 42, a former resident of Rochester and Fulton county, who died Thursday at his home in Richmond, arrived in this city Friday. Funeral services are to be held Saturday afternoon from the United Brethren church at two o'clock, with burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
August Hartman had been ill since the first of the year, gradually declining until death came. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Jennie HARTMAN, five sons, the father, Joseph HARTMAN, of this city, and three sisters, Miss Mabel BEATTIE and Mrs. M. L. SPURLOCK, of this city, Mrs. Alice FRAYLICK, of Avilla, and Mrs. Clarence UTTER, of Akron, and two brothers, Charles HARTMAN, of Pennsylvania, and W. L. HARTMAN, of Greensburg.

Saturday, June 3, 1922

Jack BEAVERS, the man who fired the shot that killed R. H. DAVIDSON of Cotter, Ark., formerly of Leiters Ford, was tried recently and found guilty of murder in the first degree according to the word received by Leiters Ford relatives of the dead man. Beavers has been

ordered to be electrocuted by the judge on or before August 15th. SEASE, who was the other man involved was found to have not been guilty of the act by a coroners' jury and was exhonerated.
It will be remembered that relatives here received word of the sudden death of Davidson and on going there learned that he had been shot from ambush by the above men because he would not join them in distilling liquor.

Mrs. Hattie FINNEREN, wife of W. J. FINNEREN, died Friday evening at the home of Albert BISH, south of Macy, a victim of paralysis from which she had suffered for three years. She was born in Ohio January 27, 1844, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah McMILLEN. The body will be taken to Knox Sunday for burial.

Monday, June 5, 1922

Howard SLAYBAUGH, 32, a resident of east of Akron, was instantly killed Monday morning in a woods about two miles east of Silver Lake in which he was chopping trees. Slaybaugh was struck and killed by a tree which he had felled and was found at 11 o'clock. He was working alone in the woods at the time of the accident. He is survived by a widow and four children. Details of the accident were not available. The body was removed to the home.

Tuesday, June 6, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 7, 1922

Mrs. Ida E. CARTER, 58, wife of Eugene CARTER, of the Burton neighborhood, died at the hospital Tuesday afternoon. Her affliction was hernie from which she had suffered for some time. She was born in Fulton county September 13, 1863, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George REARICK. The husband and one son, who is in the U. S. Navy, survive. Funeral services from the farm home west of Rochester Thursday afternoon at two o'clock.

Augustus Freeman HARTMAN, son of Joseph and Sarah HARTMAN, was born at Athens, Indiana October 14, 1881 and died at Richmond, Indiana June 1, 1922, age 40 years, 7 months and 17 days.
He was married to Jennie BRAMAN, December 24, 1903. To this union were born five children, all of whom with his widow survive him.
He had been in failing health since the first of the year, which led up to a serious operation for mastoid six weeks ago. While the nature of his operation was very serious, hopes for his recovery were good until just a few days before his death, when he was taken much worse and meningitis set in which caused his death.
During his convalescent period he was able to leave the hospital and be about, during which time he was able to attend a series of revival meetings being held in his home town, expressing himself of having taken a stand for Jesus Christ, his Lord and Savior. Among the last words he was heard to say were, "I am trusting in the Lord. Pray for me."
He leaves to mourn his loss his widow, five sons, Leonard [HARTMAN], Monde [HARTMAN], Vaughn [HARTMAN], Norman [HARTMAN] and Emil [HARTMAN], all of Richmond; his father, Joseph HARTMAN, of Akron, Ind., four sisters, Mrs. Viola SPURLOCK,

of Rochester, Ind., Mrs. Alice FRAYLICK, of Aville, Ind., and Mrs. Mabel BEATTIE, of Akron, Ind., two brothers, Charles HARTMAN, of Shivley, Ind., and Walter HARTMAN, of Greensburg, Penn., besides a host of other relatives and friends. . . . .

Thursday, June 8, 1922

Lyman TOWNE, 78, died at 6:30 o'clock Wednesday evening at the county farm, where he had been a resident for some time. Towne had followed the trade of broom maker until his sight failed him. The body was taken to Argos for burial.

Mr. and Mrs. Maley SPURLOCK was called to Richmond last week on account of the death of her brother, August HARTMAN.

Mrs. Wm. BOWMAN and Mrs. Milton POFFENBARGER and Mrs. Tona MILLER attended the funeral of August HARTMAN.

Friday, June 9, 1922 to Saturday, June 10, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, June 12, 1922

The body of Mrs. Lizzie RICKMAN, colored, who died at her home in Wabash, was brought to Rochester Monday for burial. Mrs. Rickman was a sister-in-law of Robert RICKMAN, of this city.

Mrs. Margaret Jane ORR, 68, died at seven o'clock Saturday evening at her home in this city, a victim of chronic catarrah of the stomach, from which she had suffered for a period of 20 years. She was the wife of William ORR, well known in Rochester.
Margaret Jane GREER, daughter of Larry and Martha GREER, was born March 31, 1852, in Fairfield county, Ohio, near Lancaster. She moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, at the age of 20 years, where she married William Orr 49 years ago. She has lived in Rochester for many years and was well known in the community. She was a member of the Presbyterian church for 42 years.
Surviving are the husband, two sons, Robert G. ORR, of South Bend, and Eldridge A. ORR, of Mishawaka, and eight grandchildren. She was the last of a family of nine.
Funeral services from the Presbyterian church Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Delilah Elizabeth RUNKLE, 68, died at 9:30 o'clock Sunday morning at the BREECE farm home near Milark, where she lived. She was the widow of the late Franklin RUNKLE and was born in Ohio, December 5, 1854. The body was taken to Macy where funeral services are to be held from the Christian church Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.

Tuesday, June 13, 1922

Marion SMITH, 73, died at his home at Green Oak at seven o'clock Tuesday morning of heart trouble. He was a brother of John SMITH, of this city, and was well known in the community in which he lived for a great many years. Funeral services will be held at the Green Oak church Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock, Rev. DAVIS in charge. Burial at Shelton cemetery.

Wednesday, June 14, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. PIERCE have returned from Illinois, where they attended the funeral of Mr. Pierce's brother, who died last Saturday following a stroke of apoplexy.

Thursday, June 15, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Lee DAVIDSON, of Tippecanoe, were here today to attend the funeral of Marion SMITH, of Green Oak.

Friday, June 16, 1922

Mrs. Elias MAXWELL, of near Green Oak, has received word that her brother, Cyrus L. BURTON, of Parson, Kansas, had been accidently killed. He was 73 years old and leaves five children.

Wade CALLOWAY, seventeen-year-old son of Otto CALLOWAY, of near Mud Lake, was drowned shortly after one o'clock Friday afternoon while swimming at the river, northeast of Rochester, in company with Donald PEEPLES, son of John PEEPLES.
The Calloway boy, whose father disappeared early this week, presumably as the result of financial troubles, had secured work at the new oil filling station being erected on Main and Sixth streets, but had been laid off for the afternoon.
Young Peeples, who had been in the habit of going swimming at the river in the afternoon asked the Calloway boy to accompany him, and the two went to the swimming hole east of the Michigan road bridge near the site of the old dam.
The boys had been swimming for a short time, when Calloway called to his friend. The Peeples boy swam to him immediately and had hold of the drowning boy, who at this time had gone under twice.
When he first took hold of the Calloway boy, however, Peeples said that Calloway grabbed him and fearing that they would both drown he fought himself free of the drowning youth and then before he could get him from the rear the Calloway boy sank to about nine feet of water and did not come up again.
The Peeples boy ran for help and a number of people went out to the river from Rochester, among them George ICE, who donned a bathing suit and located the drowned boy shortly after 2:30 o'clock, almost an hour after he had drowned.
Attempts were made to resuscitate the lad, but to no avail. Dr. Archie STINSON, county coroner, who arrived on the scene soon after the boy's body was taken from the river, pronounced death due to drowning, as there was water in the lungs. The body was removed to Rochester, but at the Sentinel's press hour it was not known what further disposition would be made of it.

The father, mother and brothers and sisters survive. Word was sent to the grandfather, Schuyler CALLOWAY, south of Rochester.

Lewis [OVERMYER], infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Chester OVERMYER, died Thursday afternoon at the home of his parents near Loyal of a summer complaint. There were no brothers or sisters.

Saturday, June 17, 1922

The body of Wade CALLOWAY, 17 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto CALLOWAY, who was drowned while in swimming at the river Friday afternoon, was taken Saturday to the home of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Schuyler CALLOWAY, near Mud Lake. Funeral arrangements were not announced, however, pending the possible solution to the mystery of the whereabouts of the parents, who disappeared earlier in the week, presumably as the result of financial divviculties of the father.
It was later announced that funeral services would be held Sunday aftenoon at 2:00 o'clock from the residence of the grandfather, S. T. CALLOWAY. Burial at Fulton.

Monday, June 19, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. James SULLIVAN and Mr. and Mrs. Clyde WILSON were called to Huntington Monday by the death at his home there early Monday morning of Mr. Sullivan's father, Jesse O. SULLIVAN, aged about 70 years. Mr. Sullivan had been ill for the past nine months. Death was caused by a cancer. He is survived by the widow and three sons, James SULLIVAN, of this city, John SULLIVAN, of Huntington, and Garl SULLIVAN, of Lima, Ohio. Funeral services at the home in Huntington Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock.

Tuesday, June 20, 1922

Loren G. KILMER, 73, died at nine o'clock Monday night at his home in Rochester, a victim of paralysis, from which he had suffered for eight weeks. He was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, August 22, 1848, and had been a resident of this community since he was eight years of age, having followed the profession of farming during practically all of his life. Surviving are two sons, Charles [KILMER] and George KILMER, and one daughter, Mrs. Bessie MORNINGSTAR, of Detroit.

Wednesday, June 21, 1922

The body of Wm. R. BRIDEGROOM, who died in Loft Springs, Wyo., will be brought to this city for burial.

Charles ROHRER and son of Bunker Hill, were in Rochester today en route to Argos to attend the funeral of Miss Nettie ROHRER.

Chester Louis [OVERMYER], infant son of Chester and Ruth OVERMYER, passed away June 15. They had the deepest sympathy of this community. -- SOUTH ZION ITEMS.

Thursday, June 22, 1922

Mrs. Frank BOGGS, of Argos, received burns at the Advent church at Argos Wednesday afternoon which resulted in her death at 11 o'clock Wednesday night. Mrs. Boggs and a number of other women had gone to the church early in the afternoon to clean up the premises following the yearly conference, which had been held on Tuesday.
Mrs. Boggs laid kindling in the kitchen range with which to start a fire and applied what she thot was kerosene from a can in the church. But the fluid in the can proved to be gasoline instead of kerosene and when she touched a match to it, it exploded and set fire to her clothing.
She ran out of the church, her clothing a mass of flames with the other women following her. By concerted efforts, the flames were finally quenched but not before the fatal burns were inflicted. Portions of her face and the soles of her feet were all of her body that escaped the blaze.
Mrs. Boggs realized that she was dying and retained consciousness until death relieved her of her suffering. She made her own funeral arrangements. One daughter, Mrs. Eugene DEMONT and a granddaughter, Florence DEMONT, survive. Funeral services at the church Sunday afternoon. Burial at Argos.

Elizabeth Ann [DOLPH], six months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert DOLPH, died at the farm home of her parents near Delong at eight o'clock Thursday morning, a victim of cholera. The parents and three brothers survive. Funeral services from U. B. church Friday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. DOLPH and daughters, of Elkhart, were here today to attend the funeral of their grandchild, Elizabeth Ann DOLPH.

Friday, June 23, 1922

Mrs. Emily Jane CULVER, widow of Henry Harrison CULVER, founder of Culver Military academy, is dead at Berkeley, Cal. Mrs. Culver has been an active member of the board of trustees of the school since the death of her husband in 1897. Mrs.Culver's maiden name was Emily Jane HAND. She lived in Marshall county, where Mr. Culver married her in 1864.

Saturday, June 24, 1922

[no obits

Monday, June 26, 1922

Mrs. Myrtle BUNN, of near Richland Center, is dead the result of cancer of the stomach. She passed away Saturday morning at the home of Clyde LOUGH, West Sixth street. She had suffered from the disease for a long time. She is survived by her husband, Albert BUNN three children, Frances [BUNN], 18, Ralph [BUNN], 16, and Dorothy [BUNN], 13, and one sister, Mrs. Lawrence McCARTER, of South Bend. The funeral was held Monday at the Richland Center church.

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence McCARTER and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. ZINK, of South Bend, and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph BREESICK and daughter, of Preble, Ind., came today [to] attend the funeral of Mrs. Albert BUNN.

Tuesday, June 27, 1922

Word was received here Tuesday morning of the death Monday at her home in LaPorte, of Mrs. Verna H. QUICK, 29, wife of Orval QUICK, well known auctioneer and a former resident of this community. Mrs. Quick is the daughter of George HAZLETT, west of Rochester, and was at one time a teacher in the county schools. Death was caused by cancer. Mrs. Quick is survived by the husband, father, one child, and two brothers. Further details were lacking, but it is believed the body will be brought to either Rochester or Macy for burial.

Wednesday, June 28, 1922

Mrs. Ella MARTIN was called to Oklahoma City, Okla., a few days ago to be at the bedside of her brother, Mac WHEELER. A telegram later announced his death on June 23.

The Rev. Horace Greely OGDEN, who held his first pastorate at Kewanna many years ago and later advanced to high position in the Methodist Church, died at his home at Albany, New York, Tuesday afternoon. He was pastor of the First M. E. Church at Albany.
Mr. Ogden was born at Danville, Indiana, Sept. 22, 1867. He graduated from DePauw University in 1893. Following a course of graduate study in the east at several schools he came to Kewanna where he was very popular as a young minister. From there he went to Attica, then Frankfort, Louisville, Ky., Jamestown, N.Y., Rochester, N.Y. and Albany, N.Y.
During his time he held many high positions in the church and gained a nation wide reputation as a lecturer and at the national conferences. He is survived by his wife, three sons, his mother, sister and brother. He will be buried at Danville Friday.

Mrs. Myrtle BUNN, wife of Bert BUNN, passed to the great beyond Saturday at the home of the latter's sister, Mrs. Clyde LOUGH at Rochester. She was taken to the hospital April 21, where she remained for a few weeks and was then removed to the Lough home, suffering greatly at all times from cancer. Her husband, two daughters, Frances [BUNN] and Dorothy [BUNN], and one son, Ralph [BUNN], survive her and a large number of relatives and friends. Rev. G. A. KENYON held the funeral services at Center church Monday at 2 o'clock, assisted by the Naomi Rebekah Lodge, of which she was a member, Clover Leaf lodge of Leiters and Pearl of Tiosa, who attended in a body. Burial in the [Richland Center] Odd Fellows cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur SHIREMAN and family were in Denver Tuesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Sarah McHENRY, who died at her home there Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. SOUERS motored today to Warren, Ind., to attend the funeral of Mrs. Souers' sister.

Friday, June 30, 1922

Lukens Lake, located about 15 miles east of Rochester, was the scene of a drowning about three o'clock Thursday afternoon when Arthur R. TUTTLE, 27 years of age, fell into the lake when his rowboat capsized. He was the community service director of Peru, and was very popular in that city.
Tuttle had taken a party of boys to the lake for an outing and was directing their play in the water when the accident happened. He was rowing out into the lake and several of the boys swam to his boat and clung to the sides as they progressed.
Suddenly without warning, the increasing number of boys hanging on one side of the boat caused the craft to turn over and Tuttle was thrown into the water. He could not swim and sank immediately before any help could reach him. The boys held onto the overturned boat and all escaped. It is thought by some that he died of heart disease as the result of the shock.
Tuttle's body was recovered nearly two hours after the accident and was taken to Peru. A widow and two children survive.

Saturday, July 1, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Milton SMILEY and daughter, Jewell [SMILEY], attended the funeral of Mrs. Smiley's brother-in-law, Ed DAWSON, at Monroeville, Ind.

Monday, July 3, 1922

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 4, 1922

[no paper - holiday]

Wednesday, July 5, 1922

Word has been received here of the death Tuesday at his home in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, of George KOCHENDERFER, 47, a former resident of this city and an uncle of Chief of Police Harley KOCHENDERFER. Kochenderfer's death was caused by typhoid fever. His wife died four years ago. Five children survive. The body is to be brought to Rochester for burial probably arriving here Thursday.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: George W. KOCHENDERFER, 1875-1922; Lucy J. KOCHENDERFER, 1882-1918.]

Thursday, July 6, 1922

Chief of Police Harley KOCHENDERFER went today to Argos to meet Mr. and Mrs. Frank KOCHENDERFER, of Cleveland, Ohio, who came to Rochester to attend the funeral of George KOCHENDERFER, their brother, who died July 4th at Chippewa Falls, Wis.

Friday, July 7, 1922

The funeral services for Geo. KOCHENDERFER Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the Church of God. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Otto CALLOWAY, coming from no one knows where, has reappeared. Unexpectedly the wife of the defaulting contractor arrived in Fulton Thursday morning on the 2:30 a.m. train and immediately went to the George ULCH home near there, where the body of her father, Frank GREGORY, lay awaiting burial. There she met her daughter, Mildred [CALLOWAY], and quietly awaited the funeral which took place at Ulch's Friday afternoon.
When a Sentinel representative called to see Mrs. Calloway it was expected to find her ill in bed as a rumor had spread around Fulton that she had broken down as the result of sad events that have shattered her family circle. Instead the lady was found to be up and feeling perfectly well. She was considerably fatigued from her hard trip, however.
She stated to the reporter that the death of her son and also that of her father had been a great shock to her but that she was bearing up under the strain as she was sure all was for the best and that it would all turn out all right in the end.
Mrs. Calloway refused to make any statement about her recent flight from Plymouth with her husband or where he was located. But from close friends and neighbors it was learned that the daughter, Mildred, had been in communication with her parents since they left and that when Mr. Gregory becme seriously ill she telegraphed her mother to come at once. It is understood that the young girl did not inform her parents of the death of their son, Wade [CALLOWAY], by drowning as she did not have the heart to send such a message.
The contractor's wife was first heard of when she arrived in Peru. It was there that she learned her father had died and that she had come too late. But it was not until she had walked into the Ulch home near Fulton that she was told of the death of her son. It is evident that Otto Calloway is not yet aware that his son was drowned. Mrs. Calloway has given no indication as to what she intends to do in the future.

Saturday, July 8, 1922

Mrs. J. B. BLACKETOR received a telegram Friday from Lima, Ohio announcing the death in that city of her sister, Mrs. George MILLER, formerly of this city. Further details are not yet available.

Emma Marie HOLLOWAY, 10 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Glen HOLLOWAY, of Mentone, died Friday at the home of William THOMPSON, north of Rochester. Heart trouble, from which she had suffered for some time, caused her death. She was staying at the Thompson home where she received treatment for her ailment. Funeral services at the Methodist church here Sunday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at the Nichols cemetery.

Mrs. J. R. JOHNSON and Mrs. J. B. BLACKETOR have gone to Lima, Ohio, to attend the funeral of their sister, Mrs. Catherine MILLER, who died Friday noon.

Monday, July 10, 1922

Raymond C. JOHNSON was summoned to Arcadia Monday by the death at a farm home near there on Sunday of Mrs. EVANS, Mrs. Johnson's grandmother. Mrs. Johnson has been in attendance at the bedside of her grandmother for the past few weeks. Mr. Johnson left for Arcadia early Monday morning. He received word of the demise Sunday but did not receive any particulars.

Tuesday, July 11, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 12, 1922

Joseph KAMP, 13 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel KAMP, east of Akron, was instantly killed Tuesday evening when he was thrown from the horse he was riding. The boy's skull was crushed by the horse's hoof.
Young Kamp and an older brother were riding two horses to pasture at about eight o'clock Tuesday evening when the accident occurred. They were riding down hill at a rapid pace when the horse ridden by the younger boy stumbled throwing him off forward. The boy's skull was fractured by the flying hoof, which struck behind the ear. Death occurred instantly.
The father, mother, three brothers and four sisters survive.

Charles SNYDER, 54, died at his home in Fulton Wednesday morning at seven o'clock, a victim of tuberculosis and cancer from which he had suffered since early spring. He had been a life-long resident of Fulton and when he died was engaged in the butcher business. Surviving are the widow, three brothers and one son, Forrest SNYDER, at home. Two children are dead. Funeral services from the Fulton United Brethren church Friday afternoon at one o'clock. Rev. John MILLER in charge. Burial at the Fulton cemetery.

Mrs. John HATCH, Mrs. F. M. PALMER and Mrs. Orbie BRYANT attended the funeral of Frank GREGSON at Fulton last Friday. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, July 13, 1922

Mrs. Roy WOLFORD, of Tiosa, died Thursday morning at her home there following a long illness. Death was caused by tuberculosis. She was 27 years of age.
Miss Fannie [VanDUYNE] was born in Rochester township, June 8, 1885, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elias VanDUYNE, of Green Oak. She was married a number of years ago and for the past six years had made her home at Tiosa. The husband, father, two children, May [WOLFORD] and Fay [WOLFORD], and two brothers and two sisters survive. Funeral from the Tiosa Christian church Saturday at 10 a.m. Rev. HIATT in charge. Burial at Mt. Zion.

William F. SANDERS is in receipt of telegraphic communication from Omaha, Neb., to the effect that his brother, James SANDERS, well known here, died at his home there Tuesday. There were no particulars.

Friday, July 14, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. D. A. GREEK, Mr. and Mrs. Harry WAGNER, Mr. and Mrs. D. A. RALSTIN and Mrs. J. W. WILSON, of Peru, attended the funeral of Mrs. Catherine JACKSON in this city Thursday.

Saturday, July 15, 1922

Robert P. BRIGGS died at his home in Macy Wednesday afternoon, July 13 [sic], after many months' illness of heart trouble. He was born May 25, 1835, in Richland county, Ohio, and at the time of his death was 87 years of age.
He was a veteran of the Civil War, having entered Company D, 99th Ind. Vol. in August, 1862. He participated in the battles of Jackson, Mission Ridge, Resaca, Kenesaw, the siege of Atlanta and the battle of Fort McAllister, Ga. At Atlanta he was struck by a spent ball just over the heart.
October 21, 1855, he was married to Mary J. ELDER to which union was born nine children, two of whom are now deceased. Mrs. Briggs died and a number of years later he was married to Mrs. Rachel McCARTER. He leaves a number of children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and a great-great-grandchild.
The funeral was held in the Methodist church, conducted by Rev. J. B. SPARLING, Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment was in the Chapel cemetery, northwest of Macy.

Monday, July 17, 1922

Owen KITCH, formerly of Bourbon and democratic candidate for sheriff of Marshall county in the campaign of 1918, committed suicide by taking poison in the Marshall county jail Thursday night. He had been arrested at Niles, Michigan, and brought to Plymouth Wednesday night to face charges of failure to obey the orders of the court in regard to the support of his wife and young son at Bourbon.
Sheriff FRANKLIN and his wife retired after nine o'clock Thursday night. The negro from Culver who is confined in the jail went to sleep about that time. About ten o'clock the negro was awakened by the groans of Mr. Kitch who was apparently in great agony. The sheriff was called and it was quickly discovered that the prisoner was in alarming condition. A physician was called immediately. Kitch was unconscious at that time, except that he was able to mumble, "water." Steps were taken to relieve him, but little could be done and he died at about 11 o'clock.
The negro says that he was fumbling with his watch nervously in the evening and repeatedly took the back off and replaced it. It is believed that he had the tablets of poison in the back of the watch. From the violence of its effects, it is believed that the poison was strychnine.
A coroner's inquest was held Friday morning at 9 o'clock and a verdict of suicide by taking poison was returned.

Tuesday, July 18, 1922 to Wednesday, July 19, 1922

[no obits]

Thursday, July 20, 1922

Those from a distance who attended the funeral of Uncle Robert BRIGGS last Friday were Mrs. Ruth QUICK, Miss Esther QUICK and Orville QUICK, of LaPorte, John [BRIGGS] and Peter BRIGGS, of Forest, Ohio, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur McCARTER and son, Donald [McCARTER], of Logansport, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart HATCH and son and daughter, Elza SHAW and family, Mr. and Mrs. Roy NYE and son and daughter, of Peru and Albert BITTERS, of Rochester.

Friday, July 21, 1922

Miss Mary Amelia THOMPSON, of LaPorte, died at five o'clock Friday morning at the Woodlawn hospital here where she had been taking treatments since last Sunday. She was 83 years of age. Miss Thompson, who is an aunt of Harry STANTON, of LaPorte, had often visited in Rochester the Frank STERNER and H. O. SHAFER families and was well known. The body will be taken to LaPorte for burial Saturday.

A happy camping trip in northern Michigan came to a sorrowful end for the Mackey family Thursday noon when Mrs. Horace MACKEY died suddenly at a small lake near Alden, according to communications received by Rochester relatives.
Mrs. Mackey, who has lived in this community all of her life, was accompanied on the trip by her husband, Horace MACKEY, a sister, Mrs. Julia ORR, of South Bend and her brother, Dr. Oren DUNLAP, of Sedalia, Missouri.
The party left Rochester a week ago last Monday to be gone for two or three weeks. Their exact location at the time of Mrs. Mackey's death is not known by the Rochester relatives. Mrs. Mackey was in good health when she left here and the word of her death comes as a complete surprise. The cause of her death, nor the duration of her illness is not yet known. The body is expected to arrive in Rochester Friday evening.
Mrs. Lucy DUNLAP MACKEY, was born west of Rochester April 5, 1847. She was 75 years old when she died. She is survived by the husband, brother and sister who were with her at the death, and three sons, Merritt [MACKEY], Dr. Gleason MACKEY of Culver, Oren MACKEY, and two daughters, Miss Letta MACKEY, of South Bend, and Mrs. Mary HOFFMAN, of Rochester.

Dr. Lee CHILSON, of Bradentown, Florida, a former resident of this city, arrived in Rochester Thursday from Chicago where he had been called last Saturday by the death of his brother, Thadeus CHILSON, well known here where he had often visited. Dr. Chilson attended his brother's funeral and is here now for a short visit with friends.

Dr. Lee CHILSON, of Bradentown, Fla, came to this city last evening to spend the week end with friends. He was called to La Crosse, Wis., by the death of his brother and came on here.

Saturday, July 22, 1922

Funeral services for Mrs. Horace MACKEY, who died suddenly while on a camping trip in upper ;Michigan, were held Saturday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock from the residence, corner Monroe and Thirteenth streets, Rev. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body was brought

to Rochester Friday evening. The exact cause of Mrs. Mackey's death could not be determined, it was stated at the residence Saturday morning. She developed a throat affliction on her visit and it is believed that this coupled with the complications of advanced years caused the fatal illness.

Mrs. Sarah VALENTINE, age seventy-four, died at her home in Disko Friday as a result of burns suffered Wednesday night. Her clothing caught fire when she struck a match to find her way to the cellar. Her husband is in a serious condition from burns suffered while trying to save his wife.

Mrs. Mary HOFFMAN and daughter, Ruth [HOFFMAN], of Chicago, are in Rochester called by the death of the former's mother, Mrs. Lucy MACKEY.

Lucetta MACKEY was born April 7, 1846 near Portersville, Butler county, Penn. Her father, James DUNLAP and mother Clarissa STOUGHTON DUNLAP were of Scotch and English descent. She came to Indiana with her parents in 1854 and settled on a farm southwest of Rochester in the Bearss neighborhood.
During the winter of 1867, she united with the Rochester Presbyterian church under Rev. COOPER's ministry.
Lucetta DUNLAP and Horace MACKEY were married April 2, 1868. To them were born three sons and two daughters, Merrill MACKEY, of near Culver, Owen [MACKEY] of Whiting, Ind., Mary M. HOFFMAN, of Rochester, Letta [MACKEY], of Detroit, Mich., and Dr. Gleason MACKEY, of Culver.
Death occurred unexpectedly July 20th while away with the remaining members of her family, Dr. W. O. DUNLAP, of Sedalia, Mo., Mrs. Julia ORR, of South Bend, and her husband, Horace MACKEY.
Funeral was held at the home Saturday at 4:30 p.m., Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge.

Monday, July 24, 1922

Mrs. Sophia C. DEMONT, 74, died late Saturday night at her home on south Franklin avenue, a victim of pernicious anemia from which she had suffered for the past two years.
Sophia GRAY was born in Dark county, Ohio, July 12, 1848. She later moved to Michigan where she was married in 1872 to William DEMONT. They then moved to Marshall county and thence to Rochester in 1881 where they have since made their home. She was a member of the Christian church for the past 40 years.
Surviving are the husband, one son, Eugene DESMOND [sic], of Argos, one daughter, Mrs. Elmer GORDON, of this city, two grandchildren and two brothers, William GRAY, of South Bend and Peter GRAY, of Buchanan, Mich.
Funeral services from the Christian church Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. ASCHANHORT in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney SPOHN received word Monday morning of the death at Omaha, Nebraska, of their daughter, Mrs. Fay HANNUM, 20. They had received a letter Saturday saying that she was ill, but they did not know her condition was so serious. Her brother, Vern SPOHN, was with her at the time of her death and will accompany the body to Rochester for burial. Other survivors are Misses Pearl [SPOHN], Marie [SPOHN] and Gail SPOHN, and Fremont [SPOHN] and Frank SPOHN, all of Rochester.

[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.: Rosey Z. SPOHN, 1881-1948; Ulysses S. SPOHN, 1863-1936; Fay Etta SPOHN, 1903-1922]

Tuesday, July 25, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 26, 1922

Funeral services for Mrs. Fay HANNUM, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney SPOHN, who died in Omaha, Nebraska, will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the United Brethren church, Rev. McCOY in charge. Burial at Citizen's cemetery. The body arrived in this city Wednesday.

Thursday, July 27, 1922

John ZANER, 61, died in a dentist's chair at the office of Dr. J. C. HAY at Silver Lake, Wednesday afternoon. Death was due to heart disease, and physicians declare it was brought on by fear. Mr. Zaner went to the dentist's office to have a tooth extracted. He died as the dentist was preparing to extract the tooth.

Friday, July 28, 1922

Mrs. K. W. SHORE went to Logansport Thursday having been called there on account of the death of her cousin, Chas. RANNELLS.

Saturday, July 29, 1922

Wayne Reed GRAHAM, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon GRAHAM, who live on the Charles GOULD farm south of Rochester, died early Saturday morning of complications. Funeral services from the home Monday, Rev. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Harriet REED, of Lafayette, is here, called by the death of her grandson, Wayne Reed GRAHAM.

Mrs. H. B. THOMPSON and E. A. RANNELLS and family went today to Logansport to attend the funeral of their relative, Charles A. RANNELLS.

Monday, July 31, 1922

Daniel JOHNSON, retired farmer, despondent over his failing health committed suicide at about noon Sunday at his home on the corner of Fulton avenue and Third streets by shooing himself thru the heart with a revolver. The body was found by his wife, Mrs. Lois JOHNSON upon her return from morning church services. He was 67 years of age.
Johnson, who was born and reared in Richland township, where he lived until about 10 yeas ago, when he retired and moved to Rochester, had been in ill health for the past six or eight years.

He suffered from an affliction of the heart that caused him severe pain.
That he had contemplated suicide some time previous to the actual taking of his life was evidenced by the fact that some time ago he purchased a revolver, which he kept about the house. The family at one time considered removing the weapon, but delayed action for fear that it would arouse his suspicion.
Sunday morning he arose as usual and when Mrs. Johnson made preparations to go to church, he suggested that she had best stay at home. Observing nothing out of the ordinary, Mrs. Johnson did not take his suggestion and went on to church, returning at near one o'clock in company with her sister, Mrs. Fred AGSTER.
Mrs. Johnson went into the house and noticing that her husband was not in his accustomed position on the front porch, proceeded thru the house until she came to the bathroom where she saw her husband lying face down in a pool of blood.
Fearing that he had suffered a hemorrhage she called to Mrs. Agster and the two returned to him, to find that he had shot himself thru the heart with a revolver, which was lying beside him. Neighbors, it was learned later, had heard the report of the gun at about noon, but attributed the exploion to a motor car.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Lois JOHNSON, and two sisters, Mrs. Fred AGSTER and Mrs. Robert WALTERS, of Richland township. A child died in infancy. Funeral services at Richland Center church Tuesday afternoon, the procession leaving the Rochester residence at one o'clock. Burial at Richland Center.

Freemont SPOHN, who has been absent from his duties at the Hamlett and Karn market on account of the death of his sister, Mrs. Fay HANUM, returned to work this morning.

Tuesday, August 1, 1922

Dwight PAINTER, a young hardware merchant from Lafontaine, drowned at Silver Lake Friday afternoon about five o'clock. Mr. Painter and wife and another young couple had gone there that afternoon to spend a day or two. Mr. Painter was swimming and had gone out to a floating raft. While on the raft he remarked to other swimmers that he was not a good swimmer and that he did no know whether he could make it back to shore. He started and got within ten feet of the diving board shen he cried "Help" and suddenly went down. Swimmers were on the spot in an instant thinking he would come to the surface again, but he did not.

Dr. and Mrs. V. E. BOOHER have returned from Amboy, Ind., where they were called on account of the death of Mrs. Booher's mother.

Wednesday, August 2, 1922

Loris Merline TUBBS, four-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merle TUBBS, died early Wednesday morning at the home of her parents at 1014 South Elm street. Death was caused by diphtheria. The parents and a brother survive. Funeral services Thursday morning at 10:00 o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Russell SAGE, 30, a former resident of Loyal, where he was well known, died last Friday in - - - - [not legible], where he had lived for the past year, according to word received by his mother, Mrs. Sarah SAGE. Death was caused by typhoid fever, altho it was first believed that he was suffering from ptomaine poisoning. The mother, widow, one daughter and a brother survive. The body has been sent to Rensselaer for burial.

Thursday, August 3, 1922

The funeral of Dan JOHNSON, of Rochester, was held here Tuesday afternoon. - - - RICHLAND CENTER ITEMS.

Friday, August 4, 1922

Mrs. Edna FARRAR died Wednesday evening at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. YATES, three miles west of Argos. Mrs. Farrar was a former resident of this city, the residence being on South Monroe St.
For three weeks pior to her death she was confined in the hospital at Plymouth. Death was due to blood poisoning and in the last month of her life she suffered intensely. She leaves besides her husband, Virgil FARRAR, four children, her parents, one sister, and three brothers, all of whom reside near the parents' home.
The deceased was the cousin of Mrs. Vesta KEMP and Mrs. Ed RAYMER, of this city. Funeral Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Burial at Argos.

Saturday, August 5, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, August 7, 1922

Word of a terrible tragedy to a former Rochester resident came to this city over the week end in news dispatches relating the particulars of an aubomobile accident at Cook, Indiana, Friday evening in which Ivan L. HARTMAN, Ford agent at Monticello, was fatally injured, a companion, Mrs. Neely WILSON, of Brook, Indiana, was instantly killed and two others, Mrs. Edwin CHILDERS, of Montocello, and Claude IRELAND were seriously injured, the latter perhaps fatally.
According to word coming from Monticello Monday morning the party of four were enroute to Hammond in the Hartman sedan. They were driving at a rapid pace, it is said, when they struck a moving New York Central freight train at a grade crossing at Cook. The train was hit with such a terrific impact that one box car was knocked off the track and the large sedan was completely demolished.
The injured parties were rushed to a hospital at Hammond where Hartman died from injuries. It was stated that his body was driven full of bits of glass and he is believed to have suffered internal injuries. Mrs. Wilson was killed outright. Ireland, former prosecuting attorney, and well known in Rochester where he has visited in company with Hartman and B. W. BRESEE, of Monticello, suffered severe scalp wounds and other injuries from which he is not expected to recover. Mrs. Childers, the fourth member of his party was not so seriously hurt and is expected to recover.
Mrs. Hartman, who has been staying at their lake cottage on the east shore here, was taken to Monticello late Saturday night. Her husband's body has been removed to Monticello where funeral services will be held Tuesday. The body is to be buried at the former home in Peoria Illinois.
The body of Mrs. Wilson was removed to the home in Brook.

Hartman is survived by the widow and three children, Idolle [HARTMAN], Eldrige [HARTMAN] and Donald [HARTMAN]. He moved to Rochester from Peoria about five years ago, forming the B. and H. agency here with B. W. Bresee, his partner. They remained in Rochester where they accuulated a host of friends until just three years ago when they removed to Monticello where they took over the Ford agency, establishing garages at Monticello and Monon.
It was reported here that Hartman and Bresee either had or were about to dissolve partnership. Hartman had built a cottage at the lake here and was expected by Mrs. Hartman Saturday to spend two weeks. She had been here for the past week or ten days with the three children.
Ireland, who is a prominent attorney at Monticello, is married as were the two women. All were of about the same age, near 40 years. Mrs. Wilson had two children a son, married, and a daughter 13 years old. Mrs. Childers had no children.

Raymond BERGER, 19 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Chris BERGER, of Bourbon, died here very suddenly Sunday afternoon just after he had been discharged from the Woodlawn Hospital where he had undergone an operation for appendicitis.
Berger's case had been diagnosed early and operated upon in sufficient time, altho his appendix was slightly infected, it was learned. Following the operation his convalescence had been entirely normal and Sunday afternoon his parents and sweetheart came from Bourbon to take him home. The entire party were extremely happy over his well-being and had started for the motor car for the trip to Bourbon.
Just as Berger was about to step into the car he was suddenly stricken and died almost immediately. Death was caused by an infected blood clot which had been turned loose in his circulatory system and on Sunday evicently reached a vital spot, presumably in the brain causing death similar to a "stroke." The body was taken to Bourbon.

Miss Irene CARSON, of Davenport, Iowa, who has been the guest of Mrs. Robert MOORE, was called home on account of the death of her uncle.

Tuesday, August 8, 1922

Martha Jane Elizabeth WOLF, year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy WOLF, passed away Monday evening at the Epworth Hospital at South Bend. She was born in Ashtabula, Ohio, August 2, 1921. She leaves to mourn her loss besides her parents, one brother, George Abraham [WOLF] and her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. A. STOCKBERGER and Mrs. H. E. WOLF. Funeral services Wednesday at two o'clock at the Talma Christian church. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester.

Wednesday, August 9, 1922

Arthur COPELAND, Fred LEITER, Harold VanTRUMP, Ike KLIEN and Frank SEMITT attended the I. L. HARTMAN funeral services Tuesday afternoon at Monticello. The body was removed to Peoria, Ill., for burial.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Gerry APT an infant child that lived but a few hours. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Thursday, August 10, 1922

Roy WILLIAMS went today to Royal Center to attend the funeral of Miss Alta LORNBACK, who died at her home in that place Sunday of typhoid pneumonia.

Friday, August 11, 1922

Claude IRELAND, is the third victim of the fatal automobile smash near Cook, to die from injuries received when L. L. HARTMAN, formerly of Rochester, drove his big sedan into a freight train at a high rate of speed causing the immediate death of Mrs. Neely WILSON, of Brooke, and the death of Hartman a short time later.
Ireland, who was ex-prosecuting attorney of the 39th judicial circuit, and a prominent Mason passed away at the St. Margaret Hospital, Hammond, early Thursday morning. He suffered a severe scalp wound and a fractured skull and never regained consciousness.
His body was taken to Monticello for burial. He is survived by a widow and two children. Mr. Ireland's mother resides at Winona Lake.

The body of A. J. ABBOTT, 51, who died Monday at his home south of Star City, was buried Wednesday at Grass Creek. He was born in Fulton county, but had lived the larger part of his life in Pulaski county.

Saturday, August 12, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, August 14, 1922

Oliver KISTLER, 55 years old, a farmer living near Royal Center, was killed and Frank CANTER, also a farmer slightly injured recently when the driver lost control of the machine and it plunged over a twenty-foot embankment and dropped into the Tippecanoe river near Monticello.

Mrs. Clara VanLUE, 63, wife of Milo VanLUE, died at 1:30 o'clock Monday morning at the farm home near Athens. She was born in Miami county September 29, 1858. Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 with burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Tuesday, August 15, 1922

Dr. William Newell NORRIS, youngest son of Samuel L. and Drusilla NORRIS, was born August 1, 1865, in Fulton county, Indiana, near the Ebenezer school house. While attending this institution he was a classmate of Dr. Leonard J. BABCOCK, of Rochester, Indiana. The close friendship formed between these men lasted through life. Although orphaned when ten years of age, Dr. Norris managed to acquire a thorough education.
After attending Normal at Terre Haute, Bloomington and Logansport, he taught seven terms of school in Fulton, Cass and Miami counties.
Next he began the study of medicine and surgery, graduating from the Louisville Medical College at Louisville, Kentucky, in 1894.
Dr. Norris at first practiced medicine and surgery at Twelve Mile, Indiana. He then went to

Miami and later to Indianapolis, where for many years he was chosen surgeon for the Brown-Ketcham Iron Works.
From Indianapolis Dr. Norris went to Chicago University where he specialized on the eye, ear, nose and throat. Locating at Nampa, Idaho, he became a specialist of note in this chosen field.
In November 1921, his health began to fail. In an effort to regain it he entered hospitals in Boise, Idaho; Denver, Colorado; Chicago, Illinois; Indianapolis; and Martinsville Sanaitarium.
On July 16, 1922 he returned to his former home in Indianapolis to spend his remaining years. However, on July 30th he was stricken with apoplexy which was followed by pneumonia, the two attacks proving fatal on August 4, 1922.
A private funeral was held at the home at 721 King avenue, Indianapolis, after which interment was made in the Crown Hill cemetery.

Wednesday, August 16, 1922

Mrs. Bessie EYTCHESON, widow of Charles EYTCHESON, died at nine o'clock Wednesday morning at the county infirmary of which she had been an inmate for the past year.
Mrs. Eytcheson, who was 41 years of age, had been suffering with a mental defection for some time. Her death was brought on by complications of the kidneys.
Seven children survive, Fred [EYTCHESON] and George EYTCHESON, of Rochester, Clyde EYTCHESON of South Bend and there are four children in an orphan's home. The body was removed to the Hoover chapel.
Funeral services later.

Thursday, August 17, 1922

[no obits]

Friday, August 18, 1922

Word has been received by relatives in Rochester late Thursday of the sudden death of Mrs. Alva MOGLE, of Terre Haute, who was reared in this community. Mrs. Mogle was aprominent club woman of the above city and was addressing a G.A.R. meeting shortly after lunch when whe suddenly dropped to the platform with a stroke of appoplexy. She was carried out but died a short time later. She [Minnie A. MILLER] is the daughter of Elias MILLER, of this city and formerly of the Prairie Grove neighborhood. She is also survived by a sister, Mrs. Bert CRAIG, of Rochester, and two brothers, Moses [MILLER] and William MILLER, of Kewanna. Her husband, Alva MOGLE, also prominent in Terre Haute, who survives her, is a brother of Charley MOGLE, of this city.

Saturday, August 19, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, August 21, 1922

Mrs. J. D. POWNELL, 56, died at nine o'clock Sunday evening at the farm home west of Fulton, a victim of paralysis. She is survived by her husband and one son, Lee POWNELL and two daughters, Mrs. Earl ROUCH and Mrs. Fred ROUCH.
Mrs. Pownell who was born in Fulton county, is a sister of Mrs. W. H. ROUCH, of Rochester, Mrs. Mahala NELLANS, the mother, Mrs. ROUCH, and four brothers, William NELLANS, at home, Francis NELLANS, of South Bend, Charles NELLANS, of Goshen, and Guy NELLANS, of Marshtown, are also survivors.
Funeral services from Fulton United Brethren Church Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. H. F. BUTLER, of Rochester, in charge. Burial at Fulton.

Tuesday, August 22, 1922 to Thursday, August 24, 1922

[no obits]

Friday, August 25, 1922

Mrs. Elizabeth STETSON died at 10:30 o'clock Friday morning at the home of her son, Frank STETSON, of this city, after a two weeks' illness due to influenza and old age. She was 85 years old.
Miss Elizabeth REAM, was born in Fulton county near the Salem church August 9th, 1837. She was united in marriage to Francis M. STETSON in 1852 who died in 1905. Eight children were born to this union, two having passed away leaving the following to mourn her loss: Mrs. John BANNISTER, Mrs. C. W. KLECKNER and George STETSON, of Logansport, Mrs. Arthur SUMMERS, of Kokomo, Oliver STETSON, of Goodland and Frank STETSON of this city.
She was a member of the Ebenezer Baptist church.
Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, August 26, 1922

Rev F. C. MOON conducted funeral services at Fulton over the body of Anna B. BIELSER, a former resident of Fulton, who died at Dayton, Ohio.

James BLACKBURN, former Rochester resident, died Thursday at his home in South Bend, a victim of cancer. The widow and a son, Roy [BLACKBURN], are among the survivors.

Monday, August 28, 1922

Word was received in Rochester Monday of the death at her farm home, two miles east of Talma, of Mrs. Joseph GRASS, well known Fulton county resident.

Tuesday, August 29, 1922

Willis MARTIN, of Memphis, Tennessee, died at his home there Monday evening, a victim of pneumonia and typhoid fever, according to word received here by his sister, Mrs. C. B. CARLTON. Martin's son, Curtis MARTIN and George MARTIN together with Rev. and Mrs. KRAUSER of Little Rock, Ark., were visiting here at the tie of the death. They left at once for Memphis.

The funeral services of Miss Lizzie GILL were held at the St. Ann's church at Kewanna, Tuesday, August 22, 1922, she having passed away at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank GILL. Lizzie had for years made her home in Logansport where she was employed at housekeeping. She had had poor health for some time, but it was not until this summer that she came home, where she gradually grew worse until death claimed her, Aug. 20, 1922. - - - GRASS CREEK ITEMS.

Mrs. Mary KOOM KUMLER and son, Roy [KOOM] [KUMLER?], came from Applegate, Mich., Saturday to attend the funeral services of the former's mother. - - - GRASS CREEK ITEMS.

Mrs. C. B. CARLTON went to Memphis, Tenn., last night, called there by the death of her brother, Willis MARTIN.

Wednesday, August 30, 1922

Wm. TETZLAFF and daughter, Ida [TETZLAFF], and Mrs. Frank GORDON and daughter, Ida [GORDON], went to Fulton Friday to attend the funeral of Miss Anna BIELSER.

Mr. and Mrs. Francis HEETER and daughter, Mrs. Fred ROWE, attended the funeral of Mr. John NEWELL, at Akron, Monday afternoon.

Thursday, August 31, 1922

George MOORE, 85, retired farmer, who lived practically all of his life in Fulton county, committed suicide late Wednesday afternoon by hanging himself in the barn at his home in Athens. The body was found by his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Frank MOORE at about five o'clock, 30 minutes after he had taken his life.
Mr. Moore had been in ill health for the past 20 years, suffering with shaking palsy. For the past few years his mind had grown feeble and while suicide had never been thot of at any time, his family had kept close watch over him.
Wednesday afternoon he went out to the barn and when he had not returned to the house, Mrs. Frank Moore started out to find him, fearing that something had happened to him causing him to remain away from the house longer than was his custom.
She found the body hanging from a beam in the barn. Life was already extinct. She called Dr. Archie STINSON, county coroner, who made a formal finding of suicide.
The old man had made a noose in a half inch rope, which he tied to a rafter, placing the noose about his neck. He then stepped off of a height of about three feet. He left no message.
George Moore was born in Ohio, moving to Fulton county with his parents in early life. He was very well known thruout the community and had farmed all of his life until failing health compelled him to retire. His son and Mrs. Frank Moore had made their home with him since the death of his wife about three years ago. He served in an Indiana regiment during the civil war.
Suviving are seven children, Frank [MOORE] and Ora MOORE and Mrs. Dora ROWE, of Athens, Mrs. Lloyd BRYANT, of near Athens, Omer [MOORE], of Ora, Edward [MOORE], of Elkhart and Ira MOORE, of Logansport.
Funeral services from the residence Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Friday, September 1, 1922 to Saturday, September 2, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, September 4, 1922

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, September 5, 1922

George O. HARTUNG, 48, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herman HARTUNG, died Tuesday morning at eight o'clock as the result of an apoplexy stroke which occurred Monday morning. He was ill just one day, having suffered the stroke on his birthday. He moved home but gradually grew worse until the end. George was well known to the people of Rochester, having spent most of his life in this city.
He was born at Ft. Wayne, September 4, 1874 and suffered the fatal stroke on his birthday. He moved here with his parents at the age of ten years. He was a member of the Lutheran church.
Two sisters and five brothers have passed on before him. He is survived by his parents, two brothers, Herman [HARTUNG], of Portland, ore., and Karl [HARTUNG], of this city.
Funeral Thursday at the home on South Main street, Rev. STEPPLEWORTH officiating. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, September 6, 1922

A large number of friends and relatives from a distance attended the funeral of the late Daniel FRY Thursday, held at Mt. Hope church,interment at Culver.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Culver Masonic Cemetery, Union Twp.:Daniel J. FRY, father, 1846-1922; Martha J. FRY, mother, 1853-1933.]

Thursday, September 7, 1922

Mrs. Lewis MARSHALL, 30 years of age, and residing on the William KERN farm, one and one-half miles northeast of Silver Lake, dropped dead Tuesday morning while milking a cow. It is supposed that death was due to apoplexy. Mrs. Marshall arose as usual early Tuesday morning and seemed to be in good health. She went about her work as usual and did not complain of feeling ill. While engaged in milking a cow she fell from the stool to the ground and died without regaining consciousness. She leaves a husband and two children, a boy and a girl.

Oliver MURPHY, of Peru, and known in this city, is dead at his home there. He was born at Deedsville and has three brothers surviving, they being Milton [MURPHY] and Nelson MURPHY and Amos MURPHY, of Akron.

Friday, September 8, 1922

Robert GILLILAND, 14, son of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben GILLILAND, of this city, died at the hospital Thursday evening about 7:30 o'clock as the result of a fractured skull, caused by being run over by an automobile Wednesday afternoon. The youngster never regained consciousness following the accident and gradually grew weaker until he passed away. The doctors had held out little chance for his recovery from the first.
Robert was injured when he attempted to get his dog "Shade" off the concrete road east of town when the animal was in danger of being run down. Running out from behind one car which had just passed the boy stepped directly in front of the car deiven by Arthur SALES and was struck down in an instant.
Robert Keith GILLILAND was born at Rochester, January 31, 1908 and has lived here with his parents all his life. He had just started in the fall term of school, when death overtook him. He is survived by his parents, two sisters, Mary [GILLILAND] and Alice [GILLILAND], and two brothers, Geiger [GILLILAND] and Billy [GILLILAND]. One brother passed on before him.
Funeral at the home on East Seventh street at two p.m. Saturday with Rev. FRALEY and Rev. BUTLER officiating. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, September 9, 1922

The sudden death of two of Fulton county's pioneers, almost within an hour, shocked the people of the community Friday night when they heard that Henry MOW, 79, had died about 4:45 p.m. of hardening of the arteries and that at six o'clock George W. GOSS, 69, had passed away from heart trouble. Both men had been ill for some time.

Henry MOW was a familiar figure in Rochester, he having spent most of his life here and near the city. He was at one time in charge of the County Farm and more recently had servved as deputy sheriff. His regular occupation during most of his life was that of a farmer but he retired several years ago and moved to town, his present residence being at 624 Jefferson street. About a year and a half ago he first became ill and gradually grew worse until the end. He was only recently confined to his home.
Mr. Mow was born in Richland township, June 1, 1847, the son of David and Elenor MOW. He was the oldest child of ten children and is the fourth one to die. He was a member of the Methodist church and of the I.O.O.F. and Dauhters of Rebekah lodges.
Surviving are Mrs. Mollie MOW, his wife, four sons, F. E. MOW, West Lebanon, Ind., A. R. MOW, Chicago, Robert D. MOW, Sikeston, Mo., Ray E. MOW, Richmond, two daughters, Mrs. Charles STURKEN and Mrs. Omer STEFFY, both of Rochester. Triplet sisters, Mrs. Unice ZEITERS, Trenway, Michigan, Mrs. Edith NEIISEL, Plymouth and Mrs. Emma MARTINDALE, Silver Lake, also surviving as do two other sisters, Mrs. Margaret COLLINS, Plymouth and Mrs. Eva SMITH, Logansport, and one brother, S. A. MOW, of Elwood.

The body may be viewed at the home Saturday evening from 6:30 to 8 o'clock and Sunday morning 8:30 to 9:30. Rev. F. O. FRALEY will preach the funeral services, assisted by Rev. W. J. NIVEN at the Methodist church. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2:30 at the M.E. church.

George GOSS was born January 19, 1853, in Fulton County, the son of Sebastian and Elizabeth GOSS. He made his home in this county all of his life. He was a farmer by occupation but more recently had moved to Rochester and lived. He suffered from heart trouble for about eight months before the fatal attack. he was a member of the Evangelical Church.
Mr. Goss was married twice, the first time to Susan COLLINS and to this union one son was born, Reynaldo [GOSS], now of South Bend who survives. Several years after the death [of his first wife] he married Mary PYLE, the wedding taking place June 17, 1880. They had one son, Lloyd [GOSS], of South Bend, who also survives. Seven grandchildren are living.
Funeral at the home on South Franklin Ave., Sunday afternoon at 2:30 with Rev. E. J. NICKELS officiating. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, September 11, 1922

Edwin C. MERCER, of this city, is in receipt of word from his son, [Fred] MERCER, now in Redlands, California, of the death there last Saturday of Mr. and Mrs. Fred MERCER'S son, Gerald four, who died after a two weeks' illness of bronchial pneumonia. Mrs. Edwin Mercer was in Redlands at the time of the death. Details were not available. It was stated, however, that burial would take place Monday afternoon.
Mr and Mrs. Fred MERCER moved to Needles, Arizona, about two years ago on account of Mrs. Mercer's health. They later moved to Needles, California, and thence to Redlands, where Mercer is employed on a fruit ranch. Mrs. Mercer's condition continues serious and grave fears are entertained for her ultimate recovery. Besides the parents, five other children, one an infant, survive.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles GOSS, Mr. and Mrs. Alf GOSS and Mr. and Mrs. Lon LOWE, of Columbia City, attended the funeral of George GOSS yesterday.

Tuesday, September 12, 1922

Mrs. Erwin ZORTMAN, who has been ill for the past year, passed away Saturday at two o'clock. --- FULTON ITEMS.

Wednesday, September 13, 1922

[no obits]

Thursday, September 14, 1922

Mrs. Irvin ZARTMAN died at her home southwest of Macy last Saturday aftern an illness of several years of paralysis. Besides the husband she leaves a number of children and brothers and sisters. The funeral was held at the Baptist church at Perrysburg Monday afternoon in charge of Rev. GOLDEN, of Denver, assisted by Rev. Irvin FISHER, of Mexico and Rev. F. C. MOON, of

Rochester. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Friday, September 15, 1922

[no obits]

Saturday, September 16, 1922

Joseph ABAIR, residing west of Argos, in the neighborhood of Santa Anna, died about 11:30 Thursday night, following the amputation of his arm at Woodlawn hospital, Rochester. Mr. Abair was badly hurt on Tuesday by having his left arm and hand badly crushed in an ensilage cutter with which he was working at the Walter SHIVERS farm. It is said his forearm was broken in three places, and his hand badly crushed. Mr. Abair was 60 years old, and is survived by his wife and the following children: Two daughters, Mrs. Clarence COOK, and Mrs. Wm. BELDON, and five sons, Joseph [ABAIR], Lloyd [ABAIR], Clarence [ABAIR], Russell [ABAIR] and Oscar [ABAIR]. Funeral services will be held at Poplar Grove church at two o'clock Sunday afternoon.

Monday, September 18, 1922

The body of Andrew PAULSON, a former resident of Rochester and a brother of the late William PAULSON also a former Rochester resident, will be shipped to Rochester for interment in the Mausoleum following short funeral services conductd by Rev. NICHOLS at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon, according to word received here Monday morning. Paulson died Sunday at his home in Gary, but further details were lacking.

Tuesday, September 19, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. P. J. STINGLY, Mrs. Lydia ELLIOTT and Miss Julia HOOVER, have returned from near Winamac, where they Monday afternoon attended the funeral services for Mrs. Isabelle CORBETT, widow of the late Joseph CORBETT, a Civil War veteran, and an aunt of Miss Hoover, who died at her farm home Saturday.

H. B. KUMLER and Miss Mae KUMLER have returned from Columbus, O., where they attended the funeral of Roy KUMLER.

Wednesday, September 20, 1922

[no obits]

Thursday, September 21, 1922

Mrs. Mahala NELLANS, 77, a long-time resident of Fulton county, died at seven o'clock Thursday morning at her home near Fulton of complications brought on by an accident 18 months ago, when she fell and suffered a fractured leg. Mrs. Nellans is survived by five children: Mrs. William ROUCH, of Rochester, William NELLANS, at home, Charles NELLANS, of Goshen, Francis NELLANS, of South Bend, and Guy NELLANS, of near Fulton. Funeral services will be held from the Fulton United Brethren church Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Burial at Fulton

cemetery.

Friday, September 22, 1922 to Saturday, September 23, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, September 25, 1922

Mrs. Hattie RYLE (colored) daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert RICKMAN, of this city, died at her home in Wabash Saturday. The body was brought to this city Monday for burial at the Citizen's cemetery.

Miss Rosemary CAMPBELL, 11 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Barch CAMPBELL, of Porter, Indiana, former residents of Leiters Ford, where they are well known, died Sunday following an automobile accident in which her skull was fractured. Miss Campbell was in a party motoring from Valparaiso, where they had been visiting, to Porter when the accident took place. She was born in Portland, Oregon, and is a niece of Attorney Charles C. CAMPBELL of this city. The body will be brought to Leiters for the funeral services at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning. Burial will be made at the [Leiters Ford] I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, September 26, 1922

Funeral services for Mrs. Mary SHAFER, wife of Israel SHAFER, were held at Argos Monday afternoon. She was the last of the aunts of Tully PONTIUS, of this city. He attended the funeral.

Charles MOSS, 56, of Lamar, Colo., died at three o'clock Tuesday morning at the home of his brother, Frank MOSS, of the West Side Hotel, a victim of cancer of the stomach from which he had suffered for two months. Moss was brought to Rochester by his brother last Thursday he having been under treatment in a Colorado hospital. He was born in Rochester, but moved to Colorado early in life and had remained there until taken seriously ill. He is survived by two brothers, Frank MOSS and Edward MOSS, of Chicago and one sister, Lulu MOSS, of Cleveland, O. Funeral arrangements have not been completed pending word from relatives in Colorado.

Wednesday, September 27, 1922

[no obits]

Thursday, September 28, 1922

Mrs. Myra ENGLISH returned to her home in Grand Rapids, Mich., after attending the funeral of her grandmother, Mrs. Mahala NELLANS.

Friday, Septpember 29, 1922

Word has been received here of the death at her home in Marion, of Mrs. T. W. THOMPSON, a sister of Foster HASLETT, of this city, and a former resident of Rochester, where she was born and reared. Mrs. Thompson is survived by her brother, Foster, of Rochester, Stewart HASLETT, of Gary, and a sister, Mrs. Laura PARKER, of Marion, and one daughter, Mrs. Grover MARKS, also of Marion. Mr. and Mrs. Haslett went to Marion to attend the funeral.

Saturday, September 30, 1922

Oren KELLY, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel KELLY, of north of Delong, and a soldier of the regular army, died at the home of his parents Friday afternoon about 2:30 the result of tuberculosis. He had been ill about 18 months and had been at home only 19 days when he passed away.
Kelly enlisted in the army following the Armistice and was sent to France and later to Germany. While there he was stricken with the flu and following the attack developed tuberculosis. He was sent to this country and placed in a hospital in Denver. The doctors at that institution realized that he could not live long and at his request allowed him to come home. The young man made the long trip alone, the first his parents knowing of it was when they received a telephone call from him at Rochester asking them to come and get him. He grew worse rapidly after reaching his home.
Oren Kelly was born in Johnson county and came to his present home with his parents about 12 years ago. He is survived by his parents three brothers and three sisters, all of whom excepting one live in this community.
Funeral Monday at two p.m. at the home with burial at the Leiters Ford cemetery.

Mrs. Myrtle APPLE, was found dead Thursday at her home on south Michigan street in Bourbon. She was lying on her face in a small pile of ashes on the floor, and had apparently been dead more than twenty-four hours.
It is presumed that she had bent over to rake ashes from the stove and in doing so forced blood to her head, producing a stroke of apoplexy, causing her death. Her age was 79 years.

Monday, October 2, 1922

William BAKER, six miles southwest of Rochester, received word from his wife, who is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward DEAN, in Illinois, that his three months old daughter had died suddenly Sunday morning. Mrs. Baker and the two daughters had been gone only a short time on their visit and details of the death were not available. Mr. Baker left Sunday to be with his wife.

Tuesday, October 3, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, October 4, 1922

Word has been received here of the death at his home north of Akron, of George COOK. Death occurred Tuesday evening as the result of a cancer of the stomach. Cook was well known in this community, where he had spent many years. Funeral services Friday afternoon at Palestine.

Word had been received here of the death at a sanitarium in St. Louis of Julius HOLZMAN, 40, son of Mrs. E. HOLZMAN, of Rochester, where he was born and reared. Death occurred a week ago last Monday. Mrs. Holzman went to St. Louis, accompanied by her son, Henry HOLZMAN, of this city, a brother of the deceased. Other survivors are Mrs. Ida WOHLGEMUTH, New York, Miss CLARA HOLZMAN, New York, Mrs. Bess LEVIN, New York and Lee HOLZMAN, of New York.

A number of relatives and friends from Indianapolis and Franklin attended the funeral of Oran KELLY which was held at the Kelly residence Monday afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh FENTERS, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence FENTERS, Mr. and Mrs. Frank FENTERS and daughters, Mrs. Rudolph SEE and Mrs. James WHYBREW, attended the funeral of Lafayette MURDEN at Peru Monday. Mr. Murden resided south of town for many years until last spring, when he went to the soldiers' home to live. He died at the Peru city hospital of senility and the funeral was held in one of the undertaking parlors in that city. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Thursday, October 5, 1922

Word was brought back to Rochester by James GAINER that his brother, Joseph F. GAINER, 83, of Long Beach, Calif., had passed away about three weeks ago. He had been ill for some time. Joseph Gainer will be remembered by many of the older residents of this city, he having made his home here in his younger days, but he had not been back for many years.

Friday, October 6, 1922 to Saturday, October 7, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, October 9, 1922

Jacob GARVER, 72, well known Richland township farmer, died Sunday afternoon at three o'clock at his farm home a victim of hardening of the arteries. He had been seriously sick only one week.
Garver, who came here from Marshall county 18 years ago, is survived by the widow, Mrs. Hanna GARVER, three children, John GARVER, and Mrs. Catherine SWIHART, of Marshall county, and Ethel GARVER of Wyoming and one brother, George GARVER, of Marshall county.
Funeral services at the residence Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. Burial at Plymouth.

Tuesday, October 10, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, October 11, 1922

The body of Jesse CARR, of South Bend, who died at his home in that city, has been brought to Rochester, where it may be reviewed at the Evangelical church Thursday between the hours of 12:30 and 1:30. Funeral services conductd by Rev. NICKELS will be held at the church at 1:30 o'clock with burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. Jesse Carr, who was a former resident of Rochester, was a brother Mr. Mrs. Mel HILL of this city.

Mr. John REINHOLD returned this week from South Dakota, where he went to attend the funeral of his brother. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Thursday, October 12, 1922

Ed KIMBLE, aged about 50, owner of the saw mill at Marshtown, was killed at four o'clock Thursday afternoon in an accident at the mill. Details of the accident were not available. A widow and four children survive.

Friday, October 13, 1922

Edward KIMBLE, of Marshtown, proprietor of the saw mill located in that community, was instantly killed at about three o'clock Thursday afternoon when his sleeve caught in a large belt and he was thrown into a huge flywheel on the engine which operates the mill. Mr. Kimble, long a resident of Marshtown, was 58 years of age.
The details of the accident are a little hazy, but it is believed that Kimble was thrown into the flywheel when his coat sleeve caught between the belt and the flywheel or pulley. He had been working underneath the belt when the accident occurred. His arm was broken when it was jammed between the belt and the flywheel and his neck was broken in the wheel itself, causing death immediately.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Sarah KIMBLE, four children, Tom KIMBLE, of near Fulton, Mrs. Lena MONTGOMERY, of Grass Creek, and Beatrice [KIMBLE] and Lester KIMBLE, who lived at home, and a stepson, Warren BEATTIE, of Marshtown.

Saturday, October 14, 1922

[no obits]

Monday, October 16, 1922

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Charles BROWN of near Macy, well known in this city, died Sunday according to word received here Monday morning.

Tuesday, October 17, 1922

John CLOUD died at his home in Macy Tuesday morning, Oct. 17, of a complication of diseases, at the age of 59 years, 11 months and 13 days.
He was the senior partner of the firm of CLOUD & SON, having been engaged in the mercantile business in Macy for many years.
In 1881 he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah FREELAND, and to this union two children were born, Otto [CLOUD] and Benjamin [CLOUD], the latter dying in childhood. Besides the wife he leaves one son, Otto, three grandchildren, Paul [CLOUD], Richard [CLOUD] and Virginia CLOUD and four brothers, Henry [CLOUD], of Rochester, James [CLOUD], of Arkansas, George [CLOUD] and Levi [CLOUD], of Peru.
At the age of 20 years he united with the Methodist church and lived an exemplary Christian life.
The funeral services will be held at the Macy M.E. church Thursday morning at 10 o'clock, conducted by the pastor, Rev. J. B. SPARLING, assisted by Rev. KENNEDY, of Marion, a former pastor and Rev. C. E. SCIFRES, pastor of the Macy Christian church.

Wednesday, October 18, 1922

John WILSON, of near Kewanna, died at his farm home Tuesday afternoon after a long illnss, due to a compliction of diseases. He was 80 years of age and had been a life long resident of Union township. He was a widower and a member of the McClung Post, G.A.R. Survving are a brother, Elisha WILSON, of Rochester, four sons, James [WILSON], David [WILSON], John [WILSON] and George WILSON, of Kewanna, and one daughter, Mrs. Earl CRANE, of Detroit, Mich. Funeral services at the residence Thursday, in charge of Rev. BENDER. Burial at Kewanna I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Daniel HALDERMAN, 72, of Roann, committed suicide Monday afternoon at his farm home just east of Roann by hanging himself to a rafter in his barn. He had just been married Wednesday of last week to Miss Ermie FLORA, daughter of Alexander FLORA, of Roann, and from the time of their marriage had been living with the Flora family.
Monday Halderman and his bride went to the farm, apparently very happy and Mrs. Halderman, missing her husband, started to look about the place, fearing he had met with an accident. His body was found hanging to a rafter.
Halderman, who was a well-to-do farmer, had no apparent cause for his act and left no word giving any reason. It is believed he was mentally unbalanced when he took his life. He is third member of his immediate family to commit suicide, two sisters having taken their lives.
The widow and two sons by a former marriage survive.

Frank [ROSS] and Ed ROSS of this city received word Tuesday of the death of their aunt, Mrs. Sarah ROSS, wife of Sam ROSS, a former resident of this city, which took place at her home in Valparaiso on Monday.

Thursday, October 19, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Ira MILLS attended the funeral of John CLOUD at Macy today.

Friday, October 20, 1922

Word has been received here of the death at her home in Poplar, Montana of Mrs. Alma POORE, wife of Henry POORE, and a daughter of Mrs. Caroline SALES of this city. Mrs. Poor had been a former resident of Delong, leaving that community for Montana about five years ago. There were no details contained in the message announcing the death, which was received by her brother, Arthur SALES. The body will be brought to Rochester for burial. The mother, husband, three brothers and one sister survive.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Leiters Ford I.O.O.F., Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Alma POORE, wife of Henry POORE, 1873-1922]

Saturday, October 21, 1922

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon for Mr. Edward KIMBLE, who was instantly killed when he was caught by a revolving belt on a saw and was thrown to the ground. - - - GRASS CREEK ITEMS.

Monday, October 23, 1922

[no obits]

Tuesday, October 24, 1922

Mrs. Mary Caroline HARDIN, wife of William HARDIN, died at 10:30 o'clock Tuesday morning at her home on west Fifth street, a victim of angina pectoris, from which she had suffered but five days. She was 61 years of age. Mrs. Hardin's illness was very sudden. She was seriously ill for a short time and then seemed to grow better, but suffered a sudden relapse, which ended in death.
Mary Caroline GREENSLADE was born at Livonia, Indiana, October 17, 1861, a daughter of William and Katherine GREENSLADE. She was married to William HARDIN, July 21, 1881, and had lived in Rochester for the past 18 years, moving to this city from Kewanna. She was a member of the Presbyterian church.
Surviving are the husband, four daughters, Mrs. Dennis STOCKBERGER, Rochester, Mrs. F. S. WILLOUGHBY, Kewanna, Mrs. Harry GARMAN, Akron and Mrs. Levi P. MOORE, Rochester, two sons, Max HARDIN, of this city, and Herbert HARDIN, of Chicago, one brother, H. E. GREENSLADE, and a sister, Nannie GREENSLADE, of Morgan Hill, Calif.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur SALES, Glenn SHANKS and Vesta KEMP attended the funeral of Mrs. Alma POORE at Leiters Ford yesterday afternoon.

Wednesday, October 25, 1922

Philo SULLIVAN, well known and prominent citizen of Miami county, died at 8:00 o'clock last evening at his home northwest of Denver following a week's illness. Death was due to an attack of pneumonia. Mr. Sullivan has been a resident of this county all of his lifetime and was about 66 years of age at the time of the demise. He is survived by the widow, Mary SULLIVAN,

and two sons, Claude [SULLIVAN] who is engaged in the contracting business at Cleveland, Ohio, and Elvin [SULLIVAN], of this city.

Thursday, October 26, 1922

Mrs. Margaret COOPER, of Tiosa, died Wednesday at 12 o'clock, according to word received here. Funeral services will be held Friday morning at 10 o'clock at the home with burial at Sand Hill cemetery.

Private funeral services for Mrs. William HARDIN will be held from the residence Friday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. Interment will be made at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, October 27, 1922

Mrs. John WELLER, Jr., 60, of southwest of Macy, died very suddenly Friday morning of heart trouble. She [Isabell TRACY] was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Smith TRACY and was born in Ohio. She is survived by her husband, a son, Russell [WELLER], and a daughter, Mrs. Vern SEVERNS, two brothers and three sisters. Funeral at the home Sunday, Rev. SPARLING officiating with burial at Plainview Cemetery.

George W. HARVEY, former resident of this county, died at his home in Potwin, Kansas on October 24th, from the effects of a stroke of paralysis. Besides two nieces who live near here and two half-brothers living in North Dakota, he is survived by one brother, Frank HARVEY, living east of Rochester, and one sister.

Saturday, October 28, 1922

Word has been received here of the death at his home in Marion last Sunday of Harry W. KIMBLE, a former resident of this city, where he was well known. During his residence here he was employed as foreman at the shoe factory. Funeral services were held Tuesday.

Word was received here Saturday by Mr. and Mrs. John DAMAS of the death of Mrs. Roy SCHNURR, at Phoenix, .Ariz., on October 25th. The body will be taken to LaCross for burial. Mrs. Schnurr was a former resident of this community, having lived on the John WAGONER farm prior to moving West for her health.

Monday, October 30, 1922

Peter METZGER, 70, well known farmer living south of Kewanna died at his home Sunday night after being ill for 36 hours from an obstruction of the bowels.
Mr. Metzger had lived in the Kewanna community nearly all his life and was widely known. He was born in Ohio, Nov. 6, 1852, the son of John and Mary METZGER. On Oct. 17, 1884, he married Miss Nancy St.CLAIR. He was a member of the Methodist church at Kewanna.
He is survived by his wife, four daughters, Mrs. Ethel HAINES, Peru, Mrs. Clarence GRAFFIS, Rochester, Nellie [METZGER] and Ruby METZGER who live at home.
Funeral Tuesday at M.E. Church, Kewanna, with Rev. REEDY officiating. Burial in the

I.O.O.F. cemetery at Kewanna.

Tuesday, October 31, 1922

Two elderly residents of Fulton county passed away Monday evening, Dr. J. M. MORRIS, 82, of Fulton, and Mrs. Hanna Elizabeth WILSON, 86, east of Rochester.
Dr. Morris, who has been a practicing physician in Fulton for many years, had been in ill health for the past few months. He became seriously ill some time ago, but his condition became so much improved several weeks ago that he was able to resume his practice. He suffered a relapse, however, about two weeks ago and death from old age and complications resulted.
The widow and three children, two sons and one daughter, and three grandchildren survive.

Mrs. Hanna Elizabeth WILSON, who had visited in this community often, and for the past two years has made her home in Fulton county, died Monday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John KEEBLER, east of Rochester, a victim of old age and complications. She had been an invald for the past year or more, but was seriously sick for but three weeks.
Four daughters, Mrs. KEEBLER, Mrs. Hiram PAWTERBAUGH, of Pennsylvania, Mrs. Roxie ARTLEY, of Kansas, Mrs. Billie EADLER, of Texas, and three brothers, Clell WILSON, east of Rochester, Pierce WILSON, Rochester, and David WILSON, Arkansas, survive.
The body will be shipped to the former home in Pennsylvania on Wednesday, where funeral services will be held.

Tura Dawn [MILLER], infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh MILLER, died Monday, October 30th.

Wednesday, November 1, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Jack VanDUYNE and son, Frank [VanDUYNE], attended the funeral of Margaret COOPER, at Tiosa, Friday. - - - MT. ZION ITEMS.

Mrs. Albert ROSS went to Huntington today to attend the funeral of A. L. ROSS, who formerly resided here. She will visit Mr. and Mrs. A. T. FENNIMORE before returning home.

Thursday, November 2, 1922

[no obits]

Friday, November 3, 1922

Mrs. Jennie Mae SHANKS died at six o'clock Friday at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Arthur SALES, a victim of Bright's disease and complications, from which she had suffered for about five weeks.
Mrs. Shanks was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. ABBOTT, of Pennsylvania, where she was born May 14, 1868. On August 18, 1888, she was united in marriage to J. N. SMITH, of Marion, Kansas. There were four children born to this union, three dying in infancy.

She was later married to P. L. SHANKS, of Pulaski county. There was one daughter born to this union. She moved to Rochester from Monterey about 14 years ago and has since made her home in his city. Two daughters, Mrs. Irene SALES and Miss Glenna SHANKS survive.

Word has been received here of the death at West Liberty, Ia., of Clarence MORRIS, an uncle of Arlie MORRIS, local grocer. Morris and D. S. MORRIS, father of Arlie Morris were injured in an automobile accident last Sunday. D. S. Morris is in a critical condition, said the dispatch from West Liberty.

Saturday, November 4, 1922

Hannah Matilda DuBOIS, 85, a life long resident of Fulton county, and well known over the entire community, died Friday evening at the home of her son, Thomas J. DuBOIS, near Green Oak, a victim of gall stones and complications from which she had suffered for but a short time.
She was born in Fulton county December 16, 1836, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. HOLCOMB and lived in the neighborhood of Green Oak and Wagoners all of her life with the exception of a short period spent in Cass county. Her husband, Willhelmus [DuBOIS], died about 11 years ago.
Surviving are two sons, Thomas DuBOIS and William DuBOIS, of Denver. A third son, Jonathan E. DuBOIS, preceded her.
Funeral services from the Horton chapel Sunday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Horton cemetery.

Samuel S. YODER died Friday morning at his home in Logansport. He is the brother of Mrs. Charles [KEPLER] and Mrs. James KEPLER of this city.

The funeral of Mrs. May SHANKS, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur SALES, Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. ASCHENHORT will have charge of the funeral. Burial in I.O.O.F. Cemetery.

Monday, November 6, 1922

Mrs. Madge BECKER, 22, wife of Virgil BECKER, died at four o'clock Sunday afternoon at her farm home east of Rochester a victim of tuberculosis from which she had suffered for about one year. Her death occurred just six years to the day after the death of her father, William CORBETT.
Madge CORBETT was born in Fulton county in July, 1900, daughter of William and Ida CORBETT. At the age of 17 she was united in marriage to Virgil BECKER. One child, a daughter, Margaret [BECKER], was born to this union. The survivors include the daughter, husband, mother and one sister, Mrs. Charles SALES, of Leiters.
Funeral services from the residence Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. NIVEN in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Leslie MIDDLETON, of Argos, was instantly killed early Saturday evening when he jumped from his automobile directly into the path of a southbound Lake Erie passenger train at a crossing at Plymouth. Middleton and Ray KAMP, also of Argos, were enroute from Argos to Plymouth

when they approached the crossing and saw the train rushing down upon them. Middleton jumped and his body was horribly mangled when it was ground to pieces under the locomotive. Kamp remained in the car, which was knocked to one side and escaped injury. Mr. Middleton was well known in this community. He had lived on a farm until the recent death of his wife, after which he and his three children had moved to Argos to live with his father, Tomley MIDDLETON.

Tuesday, November 7, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, November 8, 1922

Word has been received by Mrs. Ray OVERMYER, of Argos, of the sudden death of her brother, Vernon DINSMORE, of Los Angeles, California. The telegram stated that Mr. Dinsmore, a member of the Los Angeles police force, was on his way to the jail with a prisoner when he was shot and killed. Further particulars of the shooting and his death was not learned.
Vernon Dinsmore was 23 years of age and was the youngest son of Alexander DINSMORE, of Warsaw. The young man visited in Argos, Culver and Plymouth about four years ago and at that time he was a member of the United States navy. He had previously graduated from the Culver high school.
Those who survive are his young wife, his father, Alexander DINSMORE, of Warsaw, one brother, Arthur DINSMORE, of Indianapolis, and one sister, Mrs. Ray OVERMYER, of Argos.
The body will be shipped to Warsaw, Indiana, for burial.

Thursday, November 9, 1922

Mrs. Nettie Fern LOWMAN, wife of Frank LOWMAN, died at three o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ray MYERS, on East Ninth street, a victim of inflammatory rheumatism from which she had suffered for a period of four months. She was 50 years of age.
Mrs. Lowman was born near Mentone, February 2, 1872, and had lived in this community all of her life. She was a member of the Presbyterian church. Surviving are the husband, one daughter, Mrs. Ray MYERS, of this city, two sisters, Mrs. Hiram MORGAN and Mrs. William RICE of this city, and three brothers, George [HOLLOWAY], Henry [HOLLOWAY] and David HOLLOWAY.
Funeral services from the residence Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of D. R. MORRIS was held Thursday at the residence. - - - FULTON ITEMS.

Friday, November 10, 1922

Mr. and Mrs. Joe EGAN of Kentland came today to attend the funeral of Mrs. Frank LOWMAN.

Saturday, November 11, 1922

Mathias FELDER, of Plymouth, formerly of this city, died last night at his home in Plymouth. Rev. McCOY, of this city, will have charge of the funeral, which will be held tomorrow afternoon at Plymouth.

Mr. and Mrs. Perry LOWMAN and family of South Bend attended the funeral of Mrs. Frank LOWMAN today.

Monday, November 13, 1922

After taking a dose of medicine while sitting in a chair at his home, Dr. William Y. WELLS, 82 years old, of Laketon, prominent Wabash county physician, died of heart trouble. He had been in failing health for several years and had given up the practice of medicine after forty-seven years' service in the community. Dr. Wells was born east of Indianapolis.

Tuesday, November 14, 1922

Verl [B.] CONN, 19, died Monday at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew GEIER, of Grass Creek, a victim of tetanus, which resulted from an injury to his hand inflicted some time ago with a toy pistol. The boy's mother is dead and his father lives in Washington, he making his home at Grass Creek.

Word has been received here of the death Monday evening at the Soldiers' Home at Lafayette, of Mrs. Mary C. (Mollie) MYERS, a life long resident of this city. Mrs. Myers, who has been suffering from paralysis for the past few years, went to Lafayette two weeks ago. She suffered another stroke which brought about her death. Two sons, John [MYERS], of Detroit, and Edward [MYERS], of Warsaw, survive.
The body will be brought to Rochester Wednesday morning. Funeral services from the Hoover Chapel, Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, November 15, 1922

Mrs. Bernice W. LINDLEY, 41, wife of William E. LINDLEY, died late Tuesday afternoon at her farm home four miles north of Rochester a victim of rheumatism and complications from which she had suffered since last August.
Mrs. Lindley, who was born in Michigan, April 11, 1881, the daughter of B. L. and Eliza CUSHING, had lived in Michigan all of her life until her marriage two years ago with Mr. Lindey, who survives. There were no children.
Funeral services at the Church of God Thursday afternoon, Rev. A. T. ROWE, of Akron, in charge. Burial at Citizens' cemetery.

Enos HOWELL, 62 hears old, an inmate of the Old Folk's home at Mexico, committed suicide early Tuesday morning by cutting his throat with a pocket knife while in his room at the home. The man had been in ill health for several years and this is given as the motive for the action. The lifeless body was found by attendants at 5 o'clock covered with blood and sitting upright in a chair. Another inmate of the institution was sleeping in the room unaware of the tragedy that had taken place.

Thursday, November 16, 1922

Mrs. Apolina HAIMBAUGH, 88, widow of the late Henry HAIMBAUGH, of Newcastle township, practically a life long resident of Fulton county, died Thursday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ossie M. BLUE, of Mentone, according to word received by Rochester relatives. Death was caused by old age and complications. Mrs. Haimbaugh had suffered a stroke of apoplexy two weeks ago and gradually sank until death came. Surviving are two daughters, Mrs BLUE and Mrs. Allie HUTCHINSON and four sons, Jack HAIMBAUGH, south of Rochester, Len [HAIMBAUGH] and Obidiah HAIMBAUGH, of Newcastle township and Charles HAIMBAUGH of St. Joseph, Michigan. Funeral services from the Baptist church at Mentone Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Reverend BENDER, of Kewanna, in charge. Interment at Rochester mausoleum.

Elzie BURNS, 25, a former resident of this city, died very suddenly at his home in Muncie, where he was employed as an operator by the Associated Press on the Muncie Star, according to word received by Mrs. Mary WAYMIRE, with whom he had made his home here following the death of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James BURNS. Two sisters, Mrs. Lillian CRATMILLE, of Fort Wayne, and Cordis BURNS, of Idaho, and a brother, Jesse BURNS, who is in the navy, survive. Burns was a member of the A. E. F. during the world war and served on the front for nine months. He was a member of the F. O. E. of Muncie. The body will probably be brought to Rochester for burial.

Mrs. Harvey WAYMIRE went to Muncie today called there by the death of Elzie BURNS.

Friday, November 17, 1922

Mrs. Katherine J. MARSH, of Grass Creek, died Friday morning at the home of Dal BLACK where she had made her home recently, a victim of old age and complications. She was 87 years of age and had been ill for a long time. She had lived for many years in the Grass Creek neighborhood and was a member of the Baptist church. She was the other of eight children, all of whom are dead with the exception of one son, Frank MARSH, of Rochester, and Searing MARSH, of Grass Creek. Funeral services from the Marshtown Baptist church Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. Burial at Fletcher's Lake Cemetery.

Saturday, November 18, 1922

Mrs. Elizabeth HOOVER, 89, died Friday afternoon at two o'clock at the home of her son, R. P. TRUE, South Main street, a victim of old age and complications from which she had been invalided for the past 20 years. During the last months of her life she was confined to her bed as the result of a broken limb, sustained in a fall some time ago.
Mrs. Hoover was a pioneer resident of Fulton county. In her early years she was married to Pulaski TRUE after which she moved to Nebraska where her husband died two years later.
Returning to this community, she was later married to David HOOVER, who also preceded her. Following the death of her second husband she moved to Rochester and had since made her home with her son, who with another son, Sidney HOOVER, of Bristol, W. Va., survives.

Funeral services from the residence Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at Mount Zion.

Mrs. Arthur DEAMER, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, came last evening to attend the funeral of her grandmother, Mrs. Apolina HAIMBAUGH.

Mr. and Mrs. Walter BRUBAKER and family, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. HAIMBAUGH and Mr. and Mrs. Porter HAIMBAUGH will attend the funeral of Mrs. Apolina HAIMBAUGH at Mentone tomorrow.

Monday, November 20, 1922

Byron Charles [FLYNN], one-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson FLYNN, died Sunday at the home of his parents in East Rochester, a victim of pneumonia. Funeral services at the home Tuesday afternoon. Burial at Citizen's cemetery.

Miss Lucy TRUE has returned to Fort Wayne, having been here to attend the funeral of her grandmother, Mrs. Elizabeth HOOVER.

Mr. and Mrs. P. O. CORNELL, Miss Nettie MARSH, Mrs. L. C. BARKER and Mrs. Isaac BARKER attended the funeral of Mrs. Katherine MARSH at Marshtown yesterday.

Tuesday, November 21, 1922

Mrs. Arthur DEAMER returned today to her home in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, having been here to attend the funeral of her grandmother, Mrs. Apolina HAIMBAUGH.

Wednesday, November 22, 1922

The UNKNOWN MAN killed on the Erie railroad tracks last week was buried at Akron Wednesday afternoon. The body was found east of Akron by D. E. RAMSEY Tuesday while he was walking along the lines of the Indiana Pipe Line company.
The man had all the appearances of a tramp and had been seen on the streets of Akron the first part of the week. He was evidently walking from one town to another and was struck by a train early Tuesday morning. He was not identified and as he had only 60 cents on his person he was given a pauper's burial.

Mr. and Mrs. George MOTT were at Plymouth Thursday to attend the funeral of a relative.

Mr. and Mrs. Isreal KEIM, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. KEIM attended the funeral of Mrs. Rebecca KEIM at Danver Sunday. - - - GREEN OAK ITEMS.

Thursday, November 23, 1922 to Friday, November 24, 1922

[no obits]

Saturday, November 25, 1922

Samuel HEDGES, local tinner, received word Saturday of the death at 4:30 o'clock in the morning of his mother, Mrs. Susan J. RHINEHART, at her home in Gas City. Further details were not available.

Monday, November 27, 1922

Miss Sophia Margaret PETERSON, 56 died at 10 o'clock Sunday evening at the home of her sister, Mrs. John J. HILL, on West Fifth street. Miss Peterson's demise marked the end of a period of invalidism extending over many years. Funeral services from the residence probably at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

William HARRISON, for many years a grocer at Argos, died Thursday evening at a hospital in Fort Wayne, where he was taken last Tuesday. He had been ill for some time and it is thought his death was caused from cancer. he was about 55 years of age.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam HEDGES went yesterday to Gas City at attend the funeral of his mother.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe ANDERSON went to Argos today to attend the funeral of her mother, Mrs. Sam KAMP.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Maple Grove Cemetery, Walnut Twp.: Samuel D. KAMP, Aug. 25, 1865 - Dec. 6, 1936; Margaret E. KAMP, Mar. 6, 1872 - Nov. 25, 1922; Opal A. [KAMP?], 1910-1929.]

Tuesday, November 28, 1922

While completing arrangements for the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Susan J. RHINEHART, of Gas City, Sam HEDGES, of this city received a telegram from Clifton Forge, Va., announcing the death of his oldest sister, Mrs. Amanda J. GOFF in that city. Mr. Hedges said that his sister had been in ill health for some time and when she received the news of the mother's death succumbed from the shock.

Mrs. Curry EYTCHESON went to Argos Monday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Sam KAMP.

Mary C. SHRIVER, widow of the late Jesse SHRIVER, died at her home in Akron last evening of paralysis. Funeral services will be held tomorrow at Omega at 1:30.

Wednesday, November 29, 1922

Mrs. George MONTGOMERY, practically a life long resident of this community, died Tuesday evening at 7:40 o'clock at her home on south Jefferson street, a victim of pernicious anaemia from which she had suffered for many months. She was the widow of the late O. F. MONTGOMERY, well known Rochester attorney, who died a number of years ago. Mrs. Montgomery was 62 years of age.

Madge TAYLOR was born in Miami county June 4, 1860, the daughter of John and Susan TAYLOR. She moved to Rochester with her parents when she was but four years of age and had made her home here ever since that time.
On November 2, 1901, she was united in marriage to O. F. MONTGOMERY. There were no children born to this union.
One brother, Charles F. TAYLOR, of this city survives.
Funeral services will be held from the residence Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge.
According to the last request of Mrs. Montgomery her body will be taken to Indianapolis to be cremated and her ashes buried in the grave of her late husband.

Eric THRANE, an employe of the Johns-Manville Company, of Chicago, who was working with a gang of men in the basement of the Armour creamery plant in East Rochester, was electrocuted at about 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon when he came in contact with a high voltage wire. Thrane, who is about 30 years of age, had been working alone and was found lying behind some barrels with the line under his arm. He had been dead perhaps an hour before the body was discovered. He was found by Martin TONNESEN, a fellow employe. Thrane is married and has four children in Chicago. The body was taken to a local undertaking parlor and will be shipped to Chicago for burial.

Thursday, November 30, 1922

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, December 1, 1922

Raymond BELT, 85, died Friday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ben MULLICAN, 1122 south Monroe street after an illness of three weeks duration. Death was caused by old age and complications.
Mr. Belt's home was at Macy, but he had made his home in this city with his daughter for the past several months. Besides the daughter, the wife, Mrs. Amanda BELT, a brother, Cyrus BELT, and a sister-in-law, Mrs. A. C. MITCHELL, of this city, survive. Funeral services will be held Sunday.

Mrs. Fred PERSCHBACHER and son Frederick [PERSCHBACHER], motored to South Bend today to attend the funeral of Mrs. George PERSCHBACHER.

Saturday, December 2, 1922

South Bend, Dec. 2. -- Three are dead and three others are in a local hospital as the result of two crashes between automobiles and interurbans near here last night.
The dead are: John C. REESE, 40, and Mrs. John C. REESE, Climax, Michigan, Arthur PHOEBUS, 36, Argos. The injured are Mrs. Fred B. ZOOK and Fred C. ZOOK and their daughter, Helen [ZOOK] eight, of New Carlisle.
Mr. and Mrs. Reese were killed when the Zook automobile was struck near Lydick. Phoebus was driving a truck which was hit by a freight car, and died instantly.

Mystery still surrounds the manner of the death of Eric THRANE, of Chicago, who was electrocuted late Wednesday afternoon while working at the local Armour plant in East Rochester.
Wilson MONTGOMERY, of Chicago, came toRochester Friday to make an investigation of the matter for the Johns-Manville Company, for whom Thrane was working at the time of his death. Montgomery stated that so far as can be learned Thrane was probably shocked from a 110 volt electric light current and fell from a height of severl feet striking his head.
It is believed that he was stunned by the fall and retained his hold on the lamp cord and while lying on the damp floor the light current slowly electrocuted him while he was unconscious. There was a bruise on his head and a deep burn on his hand, which accounts for the conclusions reached by Montgomery.

Funeral services for Raymond BELT, who died here Friday afternoon, will be held from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ben MULLICAN, Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. FRALEY in charge.Burial at Five Corners.

Mr. and Mrs. David SWIHART attended the funeral at South Bend Sunday of Mrs. George PERSCHBACHER, who died there Tuesday evening. Mrs. Perschbacher was a former resident of Tiosa and Argos.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles KILMER, Mr. and Mrs. Levi YOUNG and Mrs. Tamor BAKER, will attend the funeral of Mrs. Mattie STIFFY at Argos tomorrow.

Mrs. Anna KILER, Mrs. Miles PERSCHBACHER and daughter, Medrith [PERSCHBACHER], Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon BAIR and Miss Almetta REED attended the funeral of Mrs. George PERSCHBACHER at South Bend yesterday.

Monday, December 4, 1922

Merritt A. BAKER, well known Rochester attorney, who lived in this city for more than 35 years, died Sunday afternoon at his home in Rock Island, Ill., a victim of paralysis from which he had suffered for fully a year, according to word received here Monday. Mr. Baker had been ill for so long a time, he had been able to retain his activities until very shortly before his demise when he suffered a sudden relapse.
Mr.Baker was born at Cobleskill, New York. He moved to Rochester in 1880 where for a time he taught school and later practiced law. He was at one time deputy county clerk under the late Henry WARD and also served as deputy prosecuting attorney. He was active in democratic political circles and a number of years ago made the race for mayor of Rochester.
About five years ago he left Rochester and moved to Rock Island where he was engaged in the practice of law up until the time of his death. He was an active member of both the K. of P. and Maccabbee lodges.
The widow, Mrs. Mary BAKER, and one son, Glen R. BAKER, both of Rock Island survive.
The body will arrive in Rochester Tuesday afternoon at 1:40 o'clock, at which time there will be graveside services at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The services, conducted by Rev. NIVEN, will be in charge of the Rochester lodge, Knights of Pythias.

Milbern HARRIS, 19 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert HARRIS, east of Bruce Lake, was instantly killed when he was caught under a falling tree in a woods on his father's farm at nine o'clock Monday morning.
Young Harris and his brother, John HARRIS, were in the act of felling a large tree when the accident occurred. John was chopping the tree when it started to fall and in so doing twisted on the stump so that it fell towards Milbern. John called to his brother, who started to run but stumbled and fell in the path of the falling tree.
The young man was crushed about the chest and both arms were broken. He died instantly.
He is survived by the parents, one brother and three sisters.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Moon Cemetery, Aubbeenaubbee Twp.: Wilfard C. HARRIS, 1860-1937; Elizabeth HARRIS, his wife, 1861-1932; V. Milbern HARRIS, their son, 1902-1922; John E. HARRIS, Feb. 25, 1894 - Sept. 13, 1974.]

Mrs. Claude BELT, of South Bend, came yesterday to attend the funeral of Raymond BELT.

Tuesday, December 5, 1922

A long period of suffering from a cancer on his lip was ended for Robert C. WALLACE when he died at five o'clock Tuesday morning at the Robert C. Wallace home on South Jefferson street. Mr. Wallace, who had suffered for more than a year, had been confined to his home for the past several months and was under the care of a special nurse after his condition became such that he could not care for himself. He was 74 years of age.
Mr. Wallace was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William WALLACE, pioneer residents of this community. In his early days he taught school and later became active in democratic political circles of the county, having served a number of years as deputy sheriff and later being elected to the office himself. During his later years he served as court bailiff.
One brother, Dr. William WALLACE, of Marion, and a half-brother, Dr. John WALLACE, of Chicago, survive. Mrs. Wallace died more than a year ago and one half-sister precedes him also.
Funeral arrangements are witheld pending arrival of the brothers from Marion and Chicago.

John [ARTER] and Frank ARTER went to Hammond yesterday to attend the funeral of Floyd ARTER.

Wednesday, December 6, 1922

Mrs. Fred MARTIN, about 28, of Akron, died very suddenly in that city Wednesday morning as the result of childbirth. She was a well known resident of the city and is survived by her husband and four children.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Akron Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Fred J. MARTIN, 1890-1954; Vera MARTIN, 1895-1922; Harry E. MARTIN, infant (no dates).]

Miss Cleotus NEFF of Peru came last evening to attend the funeral of Milburn HARRIS.

Thursday, December 7, 1922

Mrs. John KREIGLE, 73, died at three o'clock Thursday morning the result of a two years illness from gall trouble. She was born Sept. 28, 1849 and was married to John KREIGLE of this city on April 11, 1911. She had been married twice previously. Her husband is one of the old residents of the city who is known by practically everyone in town.
She has seven children living by her first two marriages all of whom with the exception of Mrs. Robert EWING of Montana will be here for the funeral. She had twenty grandchildren and one great-grandchild. She was a member of the United Brethren Church.
By her marriage to John FENSTMACHER there survive Mrs. Harvey ANDREWS, Armstrong, Ill., Mrs. Della GAMBLE, Chicago, W. B. FENSTMACHER, Hammond, John FENSTMACHER, Mentone, Mrs. Warren CUMMINGS, Rochester.
Funeral Saturday morning at 10 o'clock with Rev. H. E. BUTLER officiating. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. Fred MARTIN, of Akron, who died Wednesday morning will be held in Akron Friday at the Saints church.

Frank CATON, who has been at the Methodist hospital at Indianapolis for some time, died Thursday evening. His body was brought to his home place Friday. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the home and burial was at the Salem cemetery. - - - GRASS CREEK ITEMS.

Friday, December 8, 1922

Joseph Walter GANBEE, west of Athens, died early Friday morning at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James GANBEE, of Peru, a victim of heart disease and complications. Ganbee became ill a number of weeks ago and was being treated at his father's home when death came. He was 33 years of age. The parents, one son and the widow, Mrs. Velda M. GANBEE survive. Funeral services from the Akron Methodist church Sunday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Akron.

Saturday, December 9, 1922

In the passing of Mrs. Sarah KLINE on Monday evening another old settler and esteemed citizen is lost to the community. She possessed a wide circle of relatives and friends in and near Delong.
Sarah Ann MAHLER was born May 21st, 1854, and died December 4th, 1922, at the age of 68 years, 6 months and 13 days.
On December 30th, 1875, she was united in marriage to Frank M. KLINE, who survives her. Four children were the issue of this marriage, Bertha C. [KLINE], who is now Mrs. C. J. CORNELL. and lives in Bronxville, New York, Marie E. [KLINE], or Mrs. G. S. INGRAHAM, whose home is in Evanston, Ill.; Grover C. [KLINE], who is on the home farm, and Caroline V. [KLINE], now Mrs. L. E. JOHNSON, of Brewster, Minn. But one sister, Mrs. Martha SLONAKER, of Monterey, survives from her immediate family.
At an early age she united with the Methodist church at Leiters Ford and later was one of the charter members of the Reformed church; always an earnest and willing worker for her church, family and friends.

Since August she has failed rapidly in health. All that loving hands could do to relieve and restore her proved unavailing, pneumonia being the immediate cause of her death.
In her passing the husband has lost a faithful and cherished companion and the children a devoted and loving mother.
Funeral services were held at the Reformed church, Delong, on Thursday at 2:00 p.m., conducted by Rev. Charles E. TAPY, pastor of the Reformed church at Culver. Interment at the Odd Fellows cemetery at Leiters.

Monday, December 11, 1922

Melvin McINTYRE, 12-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey McINTYRE, one and one-half miles northeast of Burket, was instantly killed late Saturday afternoon while out hunting with two companions.
McIntyre was standing on a rock, about to make a shot, when his foot slipped and he fell to the ground. As he fell his gun was accidentally discharged and the shot penetrated his side causing almost instant death.
The three boys, one of whom was Walter HARD, had been hunting on a farm in Kosciusko county near where they reside when the fatal accident occurred.
Melvin McIntyre is survived by his parents, two sisters and three brothers.
Funeral services were held Monday afternoon from the farm house.

A. E. MOGLE, of Terre Haute, spent the week end in Rochester with his sister, Mrs. Ernest RIEMENSCHNEIDER and other relatives. Mrs. Mogle, well known in Rochester, died suddenly August 10th while making a political address in Memorial hall. Their only child, Mrs. Leila McNABB, had just completed her third trip around the world and had arrived at the European hotel in Singapore, where she learned of her mother's death.

Tuesday, December 12, 1922

Those who were here from a distance to attend the funeral of Mrs. F. M. KLINE were Mr. and Mrs. G. INGRAHAM and son, Garland [INGRAHAM], of Evanston, Ill., Mrs. Carrie JOHNSTON, of Brewster, Minn., Mr. and Mrs. Debolt KLINE, of Argos, Mr. and Mrs. William KLINE and Mr. and Mrs. John KLINE, of Culver, and Mrs. SLONAKER, of Monterey. - - - DELONG ITEMS.

Wednesday, December 13, 1922

Ed JEWELL has received word of the death of Silas C. JEWELL at Valley, Nebraska, on December 11th. Mr. Jewell was 88 years old and a former resident of this city.

John WANAMAKER, merchant prince of Philadelphia, who died Monday, once lived near Leesburg, Kosciusko county. The graves of his parents, Nelson and Elizabeth WANAMAKER, and a sister, who died at the age of three, are in the cemetery at Leesburg. John Wanamaker was about eighteen at the time and worked in a store at Clunette. It was said that a man offered him the management of a store at Leesburg, but that he declined, explaining it was too big a proposition for him.

W. L. MINTER went to Richmond Monday evening to attend the funeral of his brother, Eli MINTER, which was held Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Minter was 86 years of age. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mrs. Elizabeth ZIMMERMAN, of Fort Wayne, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. S. C. NORRIS, near Culver, Wednesday afternoon of scarlet fever, at the age of 65 years. Mrs. Zimmerman visited in Macy a number of times and was an aunt of Mrs. John BOOKWALTER. - - - MACY ITEMS.

Mr. and Mrs. R. D. MADDUX and Mrs. Nancy WARREN attended the funeral of the latter's brother's son, Melville McINTIRE, who accidentally shot himself Saturday morning. He was twelve years old, the youngest of a family of six children. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey McINTIRE, live near Mentone. The funeral was held at Burket Monday. - - - ATHENS ITEMS.

Thursday, December 14, 1922

Marion MOW went to Mishawaka today to attend the funeral of W. D. O'BLENNIS. Mr. O'Blennis formerly lived at Tiosa and is well known in this city.

Friday, December 15, 1922

[no obits]

Saturday, December 16, 1922

Lemuel CARRUTHERS, aged about 92 years, died at his home in Macy Saturday morning at 6:30 o'clock of senility. He was a member of the Macy M. E. church. He is survived by a wife and foster son, Emanuel CARRUTHERS. Funeral Monday at Macy M. E. church, Rev. SPALDING officiating.
[NOTE: Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Plainview Cemetery, Allen Twp.: Manual A. CARRUTHERS, 1856- (no d.d.); Rebecca CARRUTHERS, 1836-1925; Lemuel CARRUTHERS, 1832-1922

Carl [MORRETT], five year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce MORRETT, died at two o'clock Friday afternoon at the home of his parents on Franklin avenue, a victim of pneumonia, from which he had suffered for three weeks. An operation was performed less than a week ago, but the child failed to recover. Besides the parents, two sisters, Louise [MORRETT] and Lulu May [MORRETT] and a brother, Darwin [MORRETT], survive. Funeral services from the Christian church Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock with burial at Akron.

Monday, December 18, 1922

Word was received today by Mr. and Mrs. Levi YOUNG, of the death in San Diego, Calif., on December 8th, of Mrs. Lafe CONNOR, formerly of Rochester, she having been raised by Mr. and Mrs. Levi Young and spent her girlhood here.

George SHERBONDY, 88, died at nine o'clock Monday morning at his home on Jefferson street, a victim of bronchial pneumonia from which he had suffered for the past six or eight weeks, when he contracted a severe cold from exposure.
Mr. Sherbondy, who has lived here for the past five years, moved to Rochester from Silver Lake where he had made his home for many years. Besides the widow, Mrs. Mary Ellen SHERBONDY, two sons, Otto [SHERBONDY] and Bruce SHERBONDY, both of this city, and two sisters, Miss Laura SHERBONDY, at home, and Mrs. Anna POWELL, of Logansport, survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

Tuesday, December 19, 1922

Private services for the late George SHERBONDY will be held at the home on Jefferson street Wednesday morning at nine o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, December 20, 1922

[no obits]

Thursday, December 21, 1922

The body of Mrs. Lydia COLWELL, who died at her home in Warsaw, will be brought to Rochester Friday where funeral services will be held at the United Brethren church at two o'clock in the afternoon with burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Mrs. Colwell was a former resident of this city.

The death of George DOLLAR, [Jr.], age sixteen, at the home of his grandfather on a farm near Anderson recalls a tragedy at Macy, seven years ago, when George DOLLAR, crazed by the death of his wife, killed three members of his family, wounded his seven-year-old son, George [DOLLAR], Jr., and then went to the grave of his wife and killed himself. The youth, George, [Jr.], had carried two bullets imbedded in his skull since that time and then died from an injury to his brain caused by one of the bullets which had been touching the brain.

Mrs. Emma WILTROUT, aged 90 years, of Silver Lake, burned to death about eight o'clock Tuesday morning when the bathrobe she was wearing caught fire as she was attempting to renew the wood fire in her room. The flames enveloped her and she ran through a hallway to the kitchen, followed by her daughter, Mrs. Harriett WILTROUT, and Harry HERENDEEN, their chore boy, both of whom made frantic efforts to tear the burning robe from the terrified woman.
The boy, realizing that their efforts were in vain, ran to the school building nearby and summoned help. S. F. McKRILL, janitor of the building, and Merzel SMITH, instructor in the school, quickly ran to the Wiltrout home, a short distance away, but when they arrived found Mrs. Wiltrout near death with all the clothing except her shoes, burned from her body. She was leaning over a table, having fallen against the kitchen stove, and a deep gash was cut in her forehead. Her entire body was horribly burned and she died within ten minutes after the arrival of Mr. McKrill and Mr. Smith.

Friday, December 22, 1922

Mrs. Julia SHAFER, a life long resident of Akron, died at her home there Thursday afternoon, a victim of old age and complications. Three daughters, Misses Josephine [SHAFER], Elva [SHAFER] and Ida SHAFER, all at home, survive. Funeral services from the Akron Christian church Saturday.

Forrest BENNETT, of Mishawaka, was here Wednesday to attend the funeral of his father, N. E. BENNETT. - - - KEWANNA ITEMS.

Saturday, December 23, 1922

Mrs. Mary JONES, wife of Charles JONES, of the Burton neighborhood, died Friday morning at the home of her son, Charles JONES, Jr., after a long illness. Death was caused by gangrene. Mrs. Jones was born in Ambia, July 10, 1870. She had lived in this county about a year. Six children survive.

Word was received here Saturday morning of the death at her home near Delong of Mrs. Albert KESSINGER, well known in Rochester where she had been employed by Peter STINGLEY in former years.

Mrs. J. C. TRAN, of Mishawaka, formerly Mrs. Jennie CLEMANS, widow of the late Harley CLEMANS, of Rochester, died at her home in Mishawaka Friday following a long illness, according to word received here Saturday. The body will be brought to Rochester. Funeral services are to be held at Mt. Hope United Brethren church Sunday afternoon. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.
[NOTE: Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Hoover's Cemetery, Henry Twp.: Harley CLEMANS, Oct 7, 1871 - Dec 9, 1914; Jennie COOPER CLEMANS, his wife, March 11, 1879 - Dec 22, 1922.]

Monday, December 25, 1922

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, December 26, 1922

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 27, 1922 to Saturday, December 30, 1922

[papers not on 1922 microfilm]