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FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1923

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1997

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 

 


Rochester Sentinel

1923

Tuesday, January 2, 1923

Mrs. Anna B. BECK, 58, wife of John BECK, died late Saturday afternoon at her home one-quarter mile east of Sand Hill, a victim of Bright's disease, from which she had suffered for many months. She was the mother of eleven children, four of whom preceded her. Surviving besides the husband are three sons, Loris [BECK], Tom [BECK] and George BECK, and four daughters, Mrs. Roy HALDERMAN, Mrs. Carrie OVERMYER, Mrs. DILLMAN and Mrs. BALDWIN. Funeral services were held Monday at the Sand Hill church, Rev. KENYON, of Richland Center, in charge. Burial at Reichter cemetery.

Wednesday, January 3, 1923

Omar Benton DOWNS , 64, died at the county farm Tuesday afternoon at 3:15 o'clock after a three weeks illness. He suffered from hardening of the arteries and neuritis which developed into paralysis.
Mr. Downs was a life long resident of this community. He was born in Fulton county February 11, 1857. He was married, but separated and divorced from his wife when their two children were young.
Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Frank ROSS of this city and Mrs. Edward HALEY, of Peru, two sisters, Mrs. Martha McKEE and Mrs. Katie EDMENSTER, of Peru, and two brothers, Charles DOWNS, of Wabash and Frank DOWNS, of Winamac.
Funeral services from the Hoover chapel Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
The body may be viewed at the Hoover chapel Thursday morning.

Elmer [METZGER] the 14 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Dan METZGER of Goshen, died in that city Wednesday afternoon according to the word received here by Mrs. Jack CHAMBERLAIN, sister of the boy. The Metzgers formerly lived here and have many relatives living here. It is thought that the boy died of diphtheria but this is not definitely known.

Thursday, January 4, 1923

Mrs. Elizabeth Martha AULT, widow of the late Joseph AULT, who died two years ago, died at 7:30 o'clock Thursday morning at the home of her son, Fred AULT, about six miles west of Rochester, after an illness extending over a period of nine months. Death was caused by cancer. She was 48 years of age.
Elizabeth Martha CROMER was born in Fulton county August 21, 1854, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew CROMER. She had been a life long resident of Fulton county. She is survived by three sons, Fred [AULT], Clyde [AULT] of near Green Oak, Lon [AULT], of Culver, one sister, Mrs. Marjorie SHOWLEY, of Bruce Lake, one half-brother, Theodore CROMER of Peru and two half-sisters, Mrs. George SMITH, of Oklahoma, and Mrs. Simon SMITH, of Ft. Wayne. Four children preceded her.
Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, January 5, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, January 6, 1923

Leatha [KILE], 11 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray KILE, of this city, died Friday evening in a hospital at Fort Wayne where she had been taking treatments for some time. She became ill at Christmas time. She died from an attack of pneumonia. Mr. Kile has gone to Fort Wayne and is expected to return at once with the body. Besides the parents, three brothers, Charles [KILE], Foster [KILE] and Stanley [KILE] survive.

Monday, January 8, 1923

Funeral services for Leatha [KILE], daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. Ray KILE, from the residence Monday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Burial at Kewanna.

The body of Mrs. Floyd ESTABROOK, who dies Saturday at her home in Minneapolis, arrived in Rochester Monday afternoon. She [Carrie D. BLACKETOR] was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James BLACKETOR, of this city, and is survived by the husband and two children. Funeral announcement later.

Tuesday, January 9, 1923

Funeral services for the late Mrs. Floyd ESTABROOK, whose body was brought to this city following her death last week at her home in Minneapolis from an attack of scarlet fever, was held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the graveside, I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, January 10, 1923

Jeff BURKETT died at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at his home in Akron, a victim of cancer of the stomach from which he had suffered for the past eight months. He was a brother of Mrs. W. A. CARTER of this city. Funeral services from the Akron Christian church Friday afternoon at one o'clock. Burial at Macy I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, January 11, 1923
Mrs. Jane JEFFRIES, 56, wife of E. E. JEFFRIES, and a former resident of this city where she was well known, died Wednesday evening at her home in Mishawaka following a stroke of apoplexy, according to word received here. Besides the husband, two sons and four daughters, she is survived by one brother, William BALL, of this city and two sisters, Mrs. Jesse WOLF and Mrs. Angie WOLF. Funeral services from the home of her son, Howard JEFFRIES of Mishawaka Saturday morning with burial at Sycamore Chapel, northeast of this city.

Friday, January 12, 1923

Frederick [HARMON], Jr., week old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick HARMON, died Friday morning at nine o'clock a victim of acute indigestion.

Mrs. Vernie [T.] [Trella Fern MILLER] SEVERNS, 36, died Friday morning at 4:30 o'clock at her home northwest of Macy, according to word received here. Death was caused by complications. Besides the husband, her father, John MILLER, Jr., one brother, Russel MILLER and two children, Dorothy [SEVERNS] and Dale SEVERNS survive. Funeral Sunday afternoon at two o'clock from the Macy M.E. church, Rev. STARLING in charge. Burial at Plainview cemetery.

Saturday, January 13, 1923 and Monday, January 15, 1923

[no obits]

Tuesday, January 16, 1923

Asbury ELLIOT, 63, a well known farmer living near Gilead, died at 4:30 o'clock Monday afternoon the result of paralysis. Mr. Elliot had been ill for some time and his death was not unexpected, as he sank gradually until the end. He is survived by a wife and four children.

John [HARTER], the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. William HARTER, who live west of Akron, died Tuesday morning at three o'clock following an illness of pneumonia. Besides the parents he is survived by three sisters and one brother.

Wednesday, January 17, 1923 to Friday, January 19, 1923
[no obits]

Saturday, January 20, 1923

Mrs. Julian F. TRAVER a former resident of this city, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. Wm. DEDRICK at Wabash, Ind., this morning. She was about 84 years old. The funeral will be held Monday at 10:30 from the U.B. church at Grass Creek. Burial in the Grass Creek cemetery.

Monday, January 22, 1923

Andrew BLAISDELL, well known Henry township farmer living two miles southeast of Akron, died at his home Saturday following a long illness, according to word received here.
[NOTE: Ambrose BLASDEL, 1853-1923, buried in Akron Cemetery. - Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Henry Township.]

Tuesday, January 23, 1923 and Wednesday, January 24, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, January 25, 1923

Mrs. Frank E. HENDERSON formerly Miss Turla Arema McKEE, who was born and reared in Fulton county where she is very well known, died January 19 on the Kentland farm owned by Governor Warren T. McCRAY where she made her home. The husband and 10 children and several brothers and sisters survive. She was an aunt of Mrs. Howard COOK, of this city before striking Rodeffer. [sic ???]

Two well known women of this community, both of whom reached advanced years and both practically life long residents of the county, died Thursday.
Mrs. Martha McKEE died at 8:30 o'clock Thursday morning at her home at 1231 College avenue and Mrs. Lenora A. CLYMER died Thursday morning at the home of her son, Harry CLYMER, of Newcastle township.

Mrs. Martha McKEE, who was 77 years of age, had been in ill health for the past year suffering from heart complaint. She was born in Jennings county, Indiana, but had lived here since she was 13 years of age, moving here with her parents, George and Anne DOWNS.
She was married 54 years ago to David Sylvester McKEE, who preceded her. One son, Frank McKEE of this city survives.
Funeral services from the residence Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Word was received here Thursday morning of the death at the home of her son, Harry CLYMER, near Talma, of Mrs. Lenora A. CLYMER, widow of the late Dr. Newton J. CLYMER, well known Rochester physician. Mrs. Clymer had lived in this community for more than 50 years and had spent fully 20 years of her life in Rochester.
She moved to the home of her son, Harry, following the death several years ago of her husband. Besides the one son, Harry, another son, George CLYMER, of Peru, and one daughter, Mrs. Mahlon HAIMBAUGH, of Denver, Col., survive.
The body will be brought to Rochester for funeral services and burial but definite arrangements have not yet been completed.

James Paul [CLELAND], four weeks old son of Mr. and Mrs. Herman CLELAND, well known Rochester township farmer, died at the farm home of his parents at 10 o'clock Wednesday evening. Besides the parents, four brothers, Louis [CLELAND] George [CLELAND], Joseph [CLELAND] and Glen [CLELAND] and one sister, Belva [CLELAND], survive. Funeral Friday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, January 26, 1923

Word has been received here of the death at her home in Chicago of Mrs. Abigail HALL, aged 105 years, the mother of Mrs. W. F. WHEADON, of this city. Death occurred Wednesday. Three other children besides Mrs. Wheadon survive. News of her death came as a surprise in spite of her advanced years as she was believed to have been in excellent health.

William BRINKMAN has been called to Cincinnati, Ohio on account of the death there Thursday evening of his mother, Mrs. Fred BRINKMAN. Details were not available. Besides Mr. Brinkman four other sons and one daughter survive. One son and two daughters and the husband preceded her.

Mrs. Delilah E. NELSON, wife of Samuel NELSON, and a life long resident of Fulton county, died Friday morning at eight o'clock at the Nelson farm home seven miles east of Rochester a victim of influenza from which she had suffered for two weeks.
Bsides the husband, five children, Chloe [NELSON] and Mary NELSON, at home, Clarence [NELSON] of Rochester, Lee [NELSON] of Fulton and Naaman [NELSON] of Fulton county, three sisters, Mrs. Kelsey RICHARDSON and Mrs. Martin BARKMAN, of Rochester and Mrs. Bert WILSON, of Chicago, and two brothers, Charles STAHL of Rochester and Clint STAHL, of California, survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, January 27, 1923

Lafayette, Ind., Jan. 27 -- The body of Miss Henrietta ORR, age thirty-three, who was killed in an automobkle accident near Rob Roy, Fountain county, Thursday, was brought to the home of her mother, Mrs. Rosella ORR, in West Lafayette, Thursday night. The other women injured in the accident, Mrs. Mabel RAWLES and Mrs. Herman KUMMINGS, are recovering.
Mrs. Kummings told how the three women had spent the night at her home and had started for Covington in Mrs. Rawles' automobile, leaving at 4 a.m. to get there before 6, in order to talk to a contractor who is building a new home for Mrs. Rawles. They were driving thirty-five miles an hour when the car skidded on an icy turn in the road and rolled down a high embankment.
Miss Orr lived with her mother, who keeps a student rooming house. Besides her mother, Miss Orr is survived by a sister, Mrs. Orville KLENDWORTH, of Saratoga. The funeral was held Saturday
__________

Miss Henrietta ORR is well remembered in Rochester, where she had spent the greater part of her life. She was born in this city and was educated in the Rochester public schools and was also a student of the Rochester Normal University. She was the daughter of the late J. N. "Doc" ORR, who died on a farm west of this city a number of years ago.
Miss Orr was married to Quincey VANDERGRIFT some years ago, but they were divorced about a year ago and her maiden name restored to her. There were no children.

Among the out of town people here to attend the Mrs. Martha McKEE funeral Friday were Mrs. F. F. TISHLINE and son of Detroit, Mrs. Villa McKEE, Mrs. Laura McKEE and daughter of Michigan City, Mrs. Frank DOWNS of Winamac, Mr. and Mrs. Charles TARKINGTON, Mr. and Mrs. John EDMINISTER of Peru.

Monday, January 29, 1923

Word has been received in this city of the death at Twelve Mile on Thursday of Miss Minnie REED, who was the postmistress of that place. She is survived by the mother and three sisters.

Word has been received here of the death at his home in San Jose, Calif., of Jerry LEITER, 84, a former resident of Kewanna, and well known in this county. One brother, W. J. LEITER of this city and two sisters, Mrs. Margaret BENNETT, of Kewanna and Mrs. Will BIDDINGER of Tiosa, survive.

Rochester friends are in receipt of word of the death Saturday at Ashland, Ohio of C. B. WHITE a former resident of this city. Whe he lived in Rochester, White was the local agent for the then Wells Fargo Express Company. He was the express agent at Ashland, where death occurred.

Monday, January 30, 1923

Funeral services for Mrs. Delilah NELSON were held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the Methodist church with interment at the Mausoleum. Among those from out of the city who attended were Mrs. G. K. WILSON, of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Frank NELSON, of Kokomo, Ora NELSON, of Logansport and Mrs. Edward REGAS, of Elkhart.

Mrs. Fred MERCER died Tuesday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William WILSON, a victim of tuberculosis from which she had suffered for several years. Two years ago she moved to the West for her health, moving finally to California where she remained until January 17 when she was brought home in a dying condition.
She had been a life long resident of Fulton county. She was born at Leiters Ford and was married in January 1909 to Fred MERCER, who with the parents and five children, Clarabelle [MERCER], Julia [MERCER], Lois Imogene [MERCER], Wilson [MERCER] and Cecil [MERCER] survive.
Funeral arrangements later.
[NOTE: Fred S. MERCER married Bertha G. WILSON, Jan 6, 1909. - Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983.]

Mrs. Perry WINTER died at her home near North Mud Lake Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock, after a several weeks' illness from a complication of diseases. She was 41 years of age and is survived by the husband, four children, William [WINTER], Vera [WINTER], Urbine [WINTER] and Ella [WINTER]; a mother, Mrs. Eva WARNER of Macy and a number of sisters and brothers. She was a member of the Macy Methocist church.
Funeral arrangements not made at this time.

Wednesday, January 31, 1923

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. WHEADON have returned from Chicago where they attended the funeral of her mother, Mrs. Abbie B. HALL, 105. Mrs. Hall's son, Marcus M. HALL, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 72, died on the day following his mother's death, it was learned upon the return of the Wheadons to Rochester.

Mrs. Hall was born in Holden, Mass., March 20, 1818. She was one of a family of 12 children of Nathan and Annie HASTINGS.
When 23 years of age (1841) she married John Sidney HALL.
They lived in the East until 1857 when they came to Batavia, living here a short ime and moving to Aurora in the following year. Six children were born to this union, four in the East and two of Aurora. Three children are now living. Mr. Hall died in March 1901 at the age of 82.
Mrs. Hall lived in Aurora with her oldest daughter, Mrs. Abbie BRUNDAGE until in 1918 when she moved to the home of her third daughter, Mrs. Susie BARTH, of Chicago, where she died.
If Mrs. Hall had lived until March 20, she would have been 105 years of age.
Her last son died of heart trouble.

Funeral services for Mrs. Fred MERCER Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the Methodist church. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, February 1, 1923

Funeral services for Clarence McMILLAN, 23, who died at his home in Chicago, will be held Friday afternoon at the Baptist church in Fulton. McMillan was a nephew of Mrs. Oscar CORNELL, of this city.

H. O. COVEY, 45, night telegraph operator in Fulton, dropped dead of heart failure at about six o'clock Wednesday evening at the home of A. S. ZABST where he roomed. He had been in his room and was called for the evening meal. Saying he would return in a moment, he passed on out of the house. When he failed to show up again Mr. ZABST went out into the yard and found him lying out there dead. Death was pronounced due to heart failure. Covey had been a resident of Fulton but a short time and it is not known what relatives survive nor what disposition will be made of the body.

Friday, February 2, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, February 3, 1923

Herbert W. DRAKE, 31, a grandson of Mrs. Mary DRAKE of this city, and himself a former resident of Rochester, died late Friday afternoon at the Illinois Training hospital in Chicago following a three weeks illness. He was stricken with a severe attack of appendicitis, and failing to give the matter his immediate attention, the appendix was ruptured previous to an operation just three weeks ago.
Herbert Drake was born in Logansport, October 21, 1891 a son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin DRAKE They moved to Rochester when he was young and he spent the greater part of his life in this city. His mother died 17 years ago.
Drake was a printer by trade having spent some time in the employ of the Rochester Sentinel. He later moved away and was employed in various places over the country, but during the greater part of his absence from Rochester he worked in Chicago.
Surviving are the father and step-mother, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin DRAKE of Tracy, California, one brother, Fred [DRAKE] of Chicago and two sisters, Mrs. Mabel HAYS, of Marion and Mrs. Edna GRAY of Tulsa, Okla.
The body arrived in Rochester Saturday afternoon.
Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, February 5, 1923

Eunice Marie SNEARLY MAXWELL, 25, died Sunday at the M. E. hospital in Indianapolis a victim of tuberculosis and complications, according to word received here by her sister, Mrs. Orbra TAYLOR.
Mrs. Maxwell, who was born near Roann, was well known in this community where she had spent practically her entire life. She was married at Akron June 30, 1922. Prior to her marriage she had been an instructor of French in the schools at Lebanon.
Surviving are the husband, parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. SNEARLY, of Roann, two brothers, Dr. G. E. SNEARLY of Goodal, Ia., and L. C. SNEARLY of Ft. Dodge, Ia., and one sister, Mrs. TAYLOR of this city.
Following funeral services at Indianapolis the body will be shipped to Akron and thence to the home of the parents where funeral services will be conducted by Rev. BENDER, of Marion with burial at Gaerte cemetery, south of Akron.

Word has been received here of the death at South Bend of Mrs. Etta WALTERS, 56, wife of Wesley WALTERS. Death occurred in a hospital in South Bend and was the result of an attack of bronchial pneumonia. Mrs. Walters was a former resident of Richland township, but had lived in South Bend recently. Besides the husband, two daughters and two sons, three sisters, Mrs. Henry STEERING, Mrs. Bert FLETCHER and Mrs. Frank RITTER, all residents of this community, survive.
The body was shipped to Rochester. Funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock from the Richland Center church with burial at Richland Center.

M. C. JONES, 76, a former resident of Rochester, died Sunday morning at five o'clock at the home of his sister Mrs. W. C. MORRIS, at Huntington where he had made his home for some time past. Death was caused by cancer of the stomach. His wife, Mrs. Laura TEETER JONES, to whom he had been married in Rochester in 1903, died eight years ago. Two sisters and one half-brother survive. There were no children. Jones had been employed as a tower leverman on the Erie railroad at Huntington.

Tuesday, February 6, 1923

Mrs. Marion PORTER died Tuesday afternoon at her home on South Bancroft avenue. Death came suddenly. Mrs. Porter had been ill with pneumonia, but was believed well on the way to recovery when she suffered a relapse.

Virgil G. FARRAR 32, died Tuesday at his home in Argos a victim of pneumonia. He was the son of L. B. FARRAR of this city and was born in Akron, January 7, 1891. He was married in 1912 to Edna YATES and was a farmer by occupation. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock at the home of Fred HOOKER, Marshall county.

Funeral services for the late Herbert DRAKE, who died last week in a Chicago hospital following an appendix operation, will be held Wednesday from the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Mary DRAKE, South Main street, Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery. The father, Benjamin DRAKE, of Tracey, Calif., arrived in this city Tuesday afternoon.

Wednesday, February 7, 1923

Mrs. Lucy SMITH, 19, died early Wednesday morning at the home of her husband's parents east of Rochester, following a two weeks illness. Death was caused by pneumonia, which attacked her shortly after she had moved with her husband to South Bend where they had planned to make their future home.
When she became ill in South Bend she was removed to the Smith farm home and there passed away.
Lucy BECKER was born in Fulton July 8, 1904, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry BECKER. She was educated in the public schol of the county and moved with her parents several years ago to near Rochester where she had lived until her marriage last summer to Orville SMITH.
Surviving are the parents, the husband, one sister, Mrs. Russell WOODS, South Bend, and three brothers, Lee [BECKER], Walter [BECKER] and Virgil BECKER.
Funeral at the Baptist church Friday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. NIVEN in charge.

Mrs. Stella PORTER, 52 who died suddenly Tuesday afternoon, was the victim of some unknown conplications, according to members of her family who said that before they could possibly realize it she had passed away. She was born in Fulton county August 16, 1870 and had been a life long resident of the community.
On September 30, 1890 she was united in marriage to Marion PORTER. There was one child, a daughter, Mrs. Hannabel COPLEN, who preceded her. Surviving, besides the husband, are four sisters, Mrs. Sampson CLAYTON, of Rochester, Mrs. Perry MOON and Mrs. O. E. RICHARDSON, of Logansport and Mrs. Otho BAKER of Lata Calif., and three brothers, Frank YOUNG, Logansport, John YOUNG of South Bend and Charles YOUNG of Perry, Ia., and one grandson, Porter COPLEN. Funeral Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Christian church, Rev. SMALL in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, February 8, 1923

The death of Mrs. Virgil C. FARRAR last August and of Virgil C. FARRAR at Argos on Tuesday of this week, made orphans of four children ranging in age from three to ten years.
The cause has a duplicate in that of the deaths in corresponding months of Mr. and Mrs. Earl HERTZEL, also of Argos, except that the latter parents leave three instead of four children.
Mr. and Mrs. Lee MILLER, of this city, have taken the second of the Farrar children, little Harold [FARRAR], seven years old, into their home and are doing all they can to make life pleasant for the bereft little fellow, who is making a splendid showing in his school work in the Lincoln school where he is now enrolled.

Friday, February 9, 1923

Reverend Henry L. KINDIG, former pastor of the Rochester Methodist church, and well known in this city, died Thursday night at the M. E. hospital in Indianapolis, according to word received here. Funeral services from the Hall Place church at Indianapolis Monday afternoon.

Saturday, February 10, 1923

Mrss Fanny CRABBS, 44, died at six o'clock Saturday morning at the CRABBS farm home three miles west of Rochester, a victim of influenza, acute pneumonia and heart failure. She had been ill less than a week when death resulted.
Miss Fanny Olive CRABBS was born in Ohio, October 2, 1878, a daughter of Martin B. and Helen CRABBS, both of whom preceded her. She moved with her parents to Fulton county about 30 years ago where she had since made her home.
Surviving are two brothers, Don [CRABBS] and Carl CRABBS, with whom she lived, and two other brothers, Albert [CRABBS], of Ohio and Frank CRABBS, of near Argos and two sisters, Mrs. Fred COOK, of Culver and Mrs. Joseph CRABBS of Wisconsin.

Mrs. Beulah ROWE, 28, died Friday at two o'clock at her home two miles northwest of Fulton, a victim of influenza from which she had suffered for four weeks. She became ill while visiting relatives in Kentucky. She had been a resident of Fulton county about one years, since her marriage in January of 1922. Funeral services will be held from the Baptist Temple at Fulton Monday or Tuesday.

Monday, February 12, 1923

Mack MOON, aged 68, well known Peru stock buyer and a brother of Rev. F. C. MOON, of this city, died at his home at Peru Sunday from injuries sustained in an automobile accident in that city recently in which a broken rib punctured his lung when his car was struck by a machine driven by Donald REED, of Peru. The widow and two daughters survive. Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock from the Peru Baptist church.
Donald Reed was arrested following the accident and assessed a fine of $25 upon conviction of violating the traffic laws. It was said in Peru following the death of Mr. Moon that no further charges will be preferred against the young man.

Mrs. Hester COLLINS FRUSHOUR, aged 74, died at two o'clock Monday morning at her home on West Thirteenth street, a victim of old age and complications. She had been in poor health for some time prior to her demise.
She was born in Ohio May 28, 1847, and moved to this community early in life, having been practically a lifelong resident of the city. She was married to Captain James COLLINS, who preceded her. There were no children.
She later married J. H. FRUSHOUR, who with a brother, Abner J. BARRETT, of this city and one sister, Mrs. Arlie LEAVELL, also of Rochester, survive.
She was a member of the Relief Corps and the Rochester chapter O.E.S.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Maude DUVALL, 29, wife of Bert DUVALL died Sunday afternoon at her home near Culver a victim of influenza, brought on by complications. She was born at Talma, May 19, 1893, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey COPLEN. Survivors are the husband, one sister, Mrs. Frank COLLINS of Tiosa, two brothers, Grover COPLEN of this city and Allie COPLEN, Etna Green, and one half-brother, Charles PRIMMER.
Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock from the Pleasant Valley church, burial at Reichter cemetery.

Funeral services for Miss Olive CRABBS at the farm home west of Rochester, Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock, Rev. KESSLER in charge. Burial at Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Israel KEIM died late this afternoon at his home near Green Oak, after an illness of several days with the flu. Mr. Keim is the father of William [KEIM] and Charles KEIM south of the city.

Tuesday, February 13, 1923

James VanDIEN, 33, of Chicago, died at six o'clock Monday evening at the home of his father, Richard VanDIEN, southeast of this city, a victim of tuberculosis from which he had suffered for several years. Prior to moving to Rochester to the home of his father he had been a patient at the Healthwin sanitarium of South Bend.
James Van Dien was born in Rochester May 25, 1889. He spent his boyhood days in Rochester where he received his education. In his later years he was employed in Chicago where he made his home.
Surviving are the father, the widow, Mrs. Lillian VanDIEN, two sisters, Mrs. Al CARTER, of South Bend, and Mrs. James TERRY, LaPorte, and five brothers, Alf [VanDIEN], Bert [VanDIEN], Burdette [VanDIEN] of This city, Roscoe [VanDIEN], of South Bend and Cyrus VanDIEN, of Woodstock, Ill.
Funeral arrangements later.

Funeral services for Isreal KEIM, 84, who died Monday afternoon at his home near Green Oak, will be held from the church at Green Oak Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. Burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.
Israel Keim was born in Miami county March 18, 1839, a son of Samuel and Elizabeth KEIM. He removed to Fulton county in 1874 and on November 1, 1865 was married to Elizabeth COOK, who with two sons Charles [KEIM] and William KEIM, both of near Green Oak and five grandchildren and one great-grandson survive.
Mr. Keim had been a farmer, but retired several years ago on account of failing health. He was a member of the McClung Post, G.A.R. having served in the civil war.

Wednesday, February 14, 1923

Funeral services for James VanDIEN at the home of his father, Richard VanDIEN, southeast of Rochester, Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, February 15, 1923

Hiram N. TROUTMAN, 77, died Tuesday at his home in Kewanna. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the Christian church there and during the sermon his wife, Mrs. H. N. TROUTMAN, aged 70, passed away, a victim of tuberculosis. Three children, Hal TROUTMAN and Mrs. Leroy GARNER, of Kewanna, and Charles TROUTMAN of Gary survive.
[NOTE: Hiram M. TROUTMAN married Mollie N. WYRICK Nov 14, 1869 - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983. Obituary of Hal P. TROUTMAN, reports that he was the son of Hiram and Mary A. WEIRICK TROUTMAN, The Sentinel, Rochester, Indiana, Monday, January 17, 1966]

Mrs. George SHAFFER died at her home in Argos Monday night. She was well known in this vicinity. She was the mother of Lou SHAFFER, well known throughout Marshall county. The funeral services at Argos Wednesday.

Friday, February 16, 1923

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. CLINGENPEEL have returned from Argos where they attended the funeral Thursday of Betty Ellen [MOWIZER], six months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph MOWIZER, well known here.

Saturday, February 17, 1923

Roy BOWERSOX, 41, a Chicago street car conductor, died at his home in Chicago Friday evening according to word sent back asking what disposition should be made of the body. His fathher, Jefferson BOWERSOX, of Aubbeenaubbee township, immediately completed arrangements for having the body sent to Rochester. Pending arrival here, particulars regarding the death were not available.

Word has been received here of the death Friday at the home of her son, Elmer Coplen, near Argos, of Mrs. Sarah COPLEN, well known pioneer resident of Fulton county. She was the widow of the late VanHuren COPLEN and is survived by two sons, Elmer [COPLEN] and Wilson COPLEN, of Argos. Funeral services Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at Talma.

Word reaches here from San Jose, Cal., that Jerry LEITER, whose death was detailed last week, has left by his will his $10,000 home with all its contents to his niece, Miss Alma BENNETT, who has been his attendant and secretary for fifteen years. The will will be probated in court at San Jose on Feb. 23, when it will be known what share of his $150,000 estate will go to the relatives in Fulton county.

Mrs. Pearl PATTON, aged 43, died late Friday night at the hospital here where she had undergone an unsucessful operation for the removal of an abcess. She had been ill little more than a week and her death came as a distinct shock.
Mrs. Patton, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry FEECE, was born in Indiana February 14, 1880. She had been a resident of this community practically all of her life.
Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Fred FOGLESONG, of Rockford, Ill., Miss Josephine PATTON, who made her home with Mrs. Foglesong and Miss Mabel PATTON at home and two

sons, Robert [PATTON] at home, and Harrison PATTON of South Bend, and a sister, Mrs. E. A. RANNELLS, of Fulton.
Funeral services from the Hoover chapel Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, February 19, 1923

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. A. P. THORNE at her home in Berwyn, Illinois on Saturday. Mrs. Thorne was niece of Mrs. A. H. ROBBINS, of this city, and had visited here last October.

Tuesday, February 20, 1923

Mrs. Laura E. DICKERSON, aged 58 years, wife of Wilber DICKERSON, died three o'clock Tuesday morning at the Dickerson farm home in the Burton neighborhood, a victim of double pneumonia. She had only been ill a week, and was critically ill but for a few days.
Laura E. HOLSTON was born at Chambersburg, Ind., January 23, 1865, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas HOLSTON. She was married February 9, 1887, to Robert H. JOHNSON, from whom she was later separated. On December 24th, 1910, she was married to Wilber Dickerson. She had been a resident of Fulton county for the past eleven years.
Surviving are the husband, two children by the first marriage, Charles W. JOHNSON, of Riverside, Mich., and Mrs. Guy HUNTER of Loyal, one brother, John HOLSTON, of Advance, and two sisters, Mrs. James BEACH, of Winthrop, and Mrs. Joseph GRIFFITH, of Boswell.
Funeral services from the Burton church Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, February 21, 1923

Mrs. Joseph BYBEE of Mentone died at her home there according to word received here Wednesday. She was an aunt of Frank BRYANT of this city who was called to Mentone following the demise. Mrs. Bybee was well known in this community.
[Joseph BYBEE, 1852-1937; Lydia BYBEE, his wife, 1855-1923 - both buried Mentone Cemetery. - Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Cemeteries, Franklin Township.]

Thursday, February 22, 1923

Mrs. Mary Jane DAVIS, widow of the late John DAVIS, and formerly a resident of this community where she was well known, died Tuesday at Marion, according to word received here. She was 83 years of age. Surviving are one brother, John BELL, of Bedford, and a half-sister, Mrs. Nera MERCER, of South Bend. Funeral services were held at Marion Thursday morning.

As correct details of the life of Mrs. Joseph BYBEE, who died Wednesday at Mentone could not be learned, today her obituary is given in this issue.
Lydia C. BYBEE was a daughter of Conrad and Sarah HAIMBAUGH, and was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, March 4, 1855, and passed away at her home in Mentone, Wednesday, February 21, 1923, as a result of paralysis.
Her parents moved to Kosciusko County, Indiana, when she was about six years of age. In 1864 the family moved to Fulton County where she resided continuously until about two years ago, except for a period of three years spent in Colorado for the benefit of her son's health.
She has been a member of the Baptist Church since seventeen years of age and was always a most faithful and ardent worker in all church activities. In 1872 she was united in marriage with Joseph BYBEE and to them were born two children; a daughter who died in infancy and a son, Rudy [BYBEE] who preceded her to the beyond, fourteen years ago.
She leaves surviving, her husband, Joseph BYBEE, two grandchildren, Mildred [BYBEE] and Elma BYBEE, Mrs. Rudy BYBEE, and seven brothers and sisters, Susan TOWNSEND, Henry J. HAIMBAUGH and Thomas R. HAIMBAUGH of Mentone, Mahlon E. HAIMBAUGH, Denver, Colorado, Dora B. GERST, Albany, New York, John R. HAIMBAUGH and Linnie ROGERS of Rochester.
Funeral services Friday, February 23, 1923 at 2:00 p.m. from the Mentone Church.

Friday, February 23, 1923

Frank O. MARTIN, 68, of Fulton, dropped dead following an attack of acute indigestion at his home there at 10:30 o'clock Friday morning, according to word received here by his sister-in-law, Mrs. Elizabeth WARE.
Mr. Martin, who was a life long resident of Fulton, conducted a blacksmith shop at Fulton. He had been subject to attacks of extreme illness recently and had been informed by his physician that he could not continue to survive them. One of the attacks visited him Friday morning while he was at work. He hurried to the house, but had not sooner reached the house than he dropped over dead.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Ella MARTIN, one son, Harvey MARTIN, a brother, Edward MARTIN, of Fulton, and a sister, Mrs. Anna POLEN.
Funeral arrangements later.

Edward BUJAHN, 81, years of age, died at the home of G. VEDDERS Sunday of pneumonia. The funeral was held Tuesday at Logansport and interment in the Mt. Hope cemetery. He had lived the most of his life in the Marshtown neighborhood making his home with the Vedder family.

Among those from Rochester who went to Mentone Friday to attend the funeral of Mrs. BYBEE were Sheriff and Mrs. Harley KOCHENDERFER and Mr. and Mrs. Sam ARTER.

Saturday, February 24, 1923

Word has been received here of the death at his home in South Bend of Rex OSBORNE, son of Link OSBORNE of this city, and a former Rochester resident. Details regarding the death were meagre. It was stated that he dropped dead suddenly Thursday night. The body will be brought to Rochester for burial Monday. A brother, Roy OSBORNE, resides at Hammond.

Questioned Saturday concerning the reported death of his wife, Benjamin DRAKE, who returned Sunday to his home in California after attending the funeral of his son, Herbert DRAKE, declared that so far as he knows there is nothing to it. He did say, however, that when he left the West, Mrs. Drake was seriously ill.

G. G. ADAMS, aged 53 years, died at his home Thursday, February 15, at 4:00 p.m. He was born in Letcher county, Kentucky, December 25th, 1869, and spent 51 years of his life in Kentucky was well known throughou the state.
He moved to Akron, Indiana, in January 1921, where he spent the remainder of his life.
He had been a member of the Masonic order for 25 years, being a charter member of the Torrent Lodge 711, F. & A. M., Torrent, Ky.
His wife, Mrs. Lucinda ADAMS, and one son, Jackson ADAMS, still survive. Besides these he leaves four brothers, Thomas [ADAMS], Henry [ADAMS] and Soloman [ADAMS], Kentucky, and Wessley ADAMS, Ohio. Two sisters, Mrs. George CAUDILL and Mrs. Elizabeth STALLARDS. He had been a sufferer of diabetes for three years.
The body was taken to Torrent, Kentucky, where it will be placed in the Adams cemetery. Funeral services will be held at the Baptist church.

Monday, February 26, 1923

Word has been received here of the death at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harold HOOVER, of Detroit, of O. K. GROVE, former resident of this city. It is known that Mr. Grove had been ill during the greater part of the winter, but aside from the fact that the body is expected here Tuesday morning, other details were not available.

The body of Rex OSBORNE, who died in South Bend Friday, was brought to Rochester Monday morning and the burial followed shortly afterwards in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. W. C. [Matilda C.] HOSMAN, wife of the well known druggist of Akron, died at her home Sunday at one o'clock in that city the result of diabetes and the "flu." Besides her husband she leaves one son, Kendall [HOSMAN], 16 years of age. Funeral Tuesday at 1:30 at the Methodist church with burial at the Akron cemetery.

Columbus CONNOR, about 60, of Gary, died Sunday according to the word received in telegram to Mrs. Frank BEERY, his sister, who lives near Leiters Ford. Mr. Connor, who was a batchelor and formerly was engaged in the butcher trade here. More particulars will be given later. The body will be brought to Rochester for burial.

Wilber DICKERSON, 55, whose wife, Mrs. Laura E. DICKERSON died last Tuesday following a severe attack of influenza and complications, gave up his struggle against an illness of pneumonia, which kept him away from his wife's funeral last Thursday, and died Sunday afternoon of the same ailment. Dickerson, who was born in Hoopeston, Ill., February 21, 1868, was married there about 12 years ago, moving to the Loyal neighborhood shortly after where he had since resided. One sister, Mrs. Ella WHITAKER, of Hoopeston, Ill., survives. There were no children.

Tuesday, February 27, 1923

Funeral services for Orange K. GROVE, who died Monday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harold HOOVER, will be held Thursday morning at 10 o'clock from the Hoover chapel, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. The Rochester lodge, F. & A. M. will conduct services at the Reichter cemetery near Tiosa.
Mr. Grove was born in Ohio in 1844 and was 78 years of age at the time of his death, which was caused by old age and complications. He lived for some time in Talma and moved to Rochester about 30 years ago where he lived until he moved to Detroit recently on account of failing health.
Surviving are three brothers, Robert GROVE, Chicago, Gilbert GROVE, Albion, Mich., and S. Y. GROVE, of Talma, and six daughters, Mrs. HOOVER, Mrs. George WARD, Oakland, Calif., Mrs. Don DuBOIS, Rochester, Mrs. Ray MOORE, Richmond, Mrs. Everett STONER, South Bend and Mrs. Lee YOUNG, Birmingham, Ala.

The body of Columbus CONNOR who died at Gary, arrived in Rochester Monday evening for burial. Connor is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Arnold BURCH and Mrs. Frank KILMER, of Los Angeles and Mrs. Frank BEERY, of near Leiters and one brother, Lafe CONNOR, of Los Angeles. The body arrived in Rochester Monday evening for burial here.
Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Hoover chapel, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, February 28, 1923

Byron [Omer] WALLACE, eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles WALLACE, of this city, who has been seriously ill for the past six weeks, died shortly after eight o'clock Tuesday evening at the hospital, a victim of pneumonia and complications.
The boy was stricken with an unusually severe attack of influenza, which subsequently developed into pneumonia. Three operations were necessary to remove the congestion in his lungs.
Byron Wallace was born in Rochester, November 27, 1914. He is survived by the parents, one brother, George [WALLACE], Jr., and a sister, Betty Lee [WALLACE], aged nine weeks.

Irwin REISH, 58, of Plymouth, who for the past three years has been associated with Frank SHEPPARD in this city, died at 8:30 o'clock Wednesday morning at his home in Plymouth after an illness of several weeks, according to word received here. Reish had been accustomed to driving back and forth between Rochester and Plymouth. The widow and two daughters, Mrs. Frank SHEPPARD of this city and Miss Fern REISH, of Plymouth, survive.
No further details were available.

Mrs. Joseph HARDING, formerly of this city, is dead at Gary, according to a telegram received here today. The deceased was the widow of the late Joseph HARDING and the mother of Charles COBLENTZ of Gary and of Rev. Hugh (Pat) EMMONS of South Bend. The funeral services will be held Friday at the United Brethren church at two o'clock, Rev. Noah McCOY officiating. Burial in the Emmons lot at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, March 1, 1923

Henry AULT, aged 96, Fulton county's oldest citizen, died at his home on west Eighth street Thursday morning at 5:20 o'clock, a victim of senility. Mr. Ault, a veteran of the Civil War, who was born in Ohio, October 30, 1826, and had been a [citizen of this] city since 1863, had been fairly active in recent years despite his advanced age, retaining well all of his faculties except his hearing, until this winter when he became confined to his home. He was not really ill, but continued to sink from day to day until death finally overtook him.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Lucy AULT, to whom he was married 13 years ago, three daughters, Mrs. Geo. ADAMS and Mrs. William BAILEY of Fulton county and Mrs. Frank BARCUS of this city and one son, Joseph AULT, of Warroads, Minn. His first wife died July 19, 1902.
Henry Ault was born in Belmont county, Ohio in 1826. He learned the trades of carpenter and millwright early in life, following this trade for a number of years.
In 1854 he removed to Huntington county, Indiana and enlisted at Indianapolis with the boys in blue of Company H, Forty-seventh Indiana infantry. This regiment was attached to the army of the Potomac. After 13 months of active service he was discharged from field duty on account of disability, and transferred to the hospital service, acting as hospital steward at Camp Wycliffe, Ky. By order of the division surgeon he was given command of Hospital No. 2 at Louisville, Ky., and later was placed in charge of the convalescent corps, returning home with some of "the boys."
Henry Ault was married in 1849 to Susanna FRECK, a native Fairfield county, Ohio and a daughter of Joseph FRECK, a farmer of German descent. Their children were, Eva, wife of William J. BAILEY of Leiters Ford, Mary H., wife of George ADAMS, north of Rochester, Joseph F. [AULT], former resident of this city and Lilla, wife of G. F. BARCUS, of this city.

Mrs. Pauline GODFREY BOZARTH, aged 73, wife of Jasper BOZARTH, died at 8:30 o'clock Thursday morning at her home on North Jefferson street following an attack of paralysis.
Miss Pauline GODFREY was born on April 11th, 1850. She was married in Middletown, New York to Charles LINK in her early days and in 1907 was married to Jasper Bozarth. She moved from Michigan City to Rochester 35 years ago. She was a member of the Eastern Star lodge and the Presbyterian church.
Surviving are one sister, Mrs. Katherine McDOWELL, Dickertown, N.Y., four nephews and five nieces, including Mrs. William HOWARD of this city.

Peter EHLINGER, 58, a former resident of this city, who moved to Peru two years ago where he conducted a cigar store, died at his home there Thursday morning following a two weeks illness, according to word received here. He is survived by two children, Bud EHLINGER and Mrs. Effie MOORE, of Peru, two sisters, Mrs. Kate HAUENSTINE, of Toledo, and Mrs. Mary McLETTERS, of Ney, O., and four brothers, John [EHLINGER], of Ney, O., Frank [EHLINGER] [sic], of Camden, Mich., Nicholas [EHLINGER] of Onsted, Mich., and Frank EHLINGER [sic], of Rochester. The body will be taken to Logansport.

Friday, March 2, 1923

Funeral services for the late Henry AULT will be held Saturday afternoon at two o'clock from the residence, Reverend Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Funeral services for Mrs. Jasper BOZARTH Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock from the Presbyterian church. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, March 3, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, March 5, 1923

Argos, Ind., March 5. -- W. G. GOODWIN, father of Mrs. Jacob Martin, dropped dead in the workshed about eleven o'clock Saturday while splitting kindling. He was 90 years old and one of the oldest residents of Walnut township, having come to that community in 1852. His wife died some years ago and he was making his home with his daughter, Mrs. Wash HORN. There are two other daughters, Mrs. Etta HUGHES, of South Bend, and Mrs. Jacob MARTIN, of Argos.

Tuesday, March 6, 1923

Mrs. Rinda ROBBINS, widow of the late Harrison ROBBINS, died Monday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John ZEINER, Franklin Park, Ill., according to word received here. Her death came following a paralytic stroke suffered last week. She was 70 years of age.
Mrs. Robbins had been a former resident of Rochester where she spent the greater part of her life. She moved away from Rochester to the home [of her] daughter following the death of her husband several years ago.
Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Minta HOLEMAN, of this city, and Mrs. Charles PIERSON, of South Bend, two brothers, Marian CARTER, Detroit, and B. A. CARTER, Whiting, two daughters, Mrs. ZEINER and Mrs. James THRUSH, of Knox, and one son, Ausma ROBBINS of South Bend.
The body was brought to Rochester Tuesday. Funeral services from the residence of Mrs. Minta Holeman, Ninth and Jefferson streets, Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at Citizen's cemetery.

Martin V. KEPLER, 77, died at his home here at 11 o'clock Monday evening a victim of old age and complications. He had been a resident of this city for many years and was well known over the entire community.
Martin V. Kepler was born in Preble county, Ohio, October 11, 1845, a son of Jonothan and Rebecca KEPLER. When he had reached the age of eight years he moved with his parents to Miami county.
On March 12th, 1867 he was united in marriage to Martha Jane HOOVER, who preceded him. To this union was born seven children, three of whom are dead.
Surviving are three sons, Charles K. [KEPLER] and James F. KEPLER, of this city, Jonothan L. KEPLER, of Swayzee, one daughter, Mrs. Rebecca WOLFRED, of Logansport, four sisters, Mrs. Mary BAINE of Michigan City, Mrs. Julia YIKE, Rochester and Mrs. Margaret STAUFFER of Mexico and Mrs. Elizabeth BAINE, of Missouri, nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild.
Funeral services from the home of his son James Kepler on Fourteenth, Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, March 7, 1923

Mrs. Niss PACKER received word Wednesday of the death of her brother, Ira BARNHART, which occurred at seven o'clock Tuesday eveing at his home in Gainesville, Texas as a result of a severe attack of pneumonia. Mr. Barnhart was born and reared in this community where he is well known.

Benjamin BRUCE, aged 77, a life long resident of Aubbeenaubbee township and a former treasurer and commissioner of Fulton county, died Monday at his home near Bruce Lake, a victim of old age and complications. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 1:00 o'clock, Rev. D. R. COBLE in charge.
Benjamin Bruce was born on the Bruce farm where he spent all of his life, October 12, 1845, a son of Jacob BRUCE. He took up the occupation of farming, which he followed all of his life.
On October 1st, 1868 he was united in marriage to Mary Jane MOON. To this union were born four children, one of whom, Mrs. J. A. MISNER and the widow and one grandchild survive.
In 1890 he was a successful candidate on the democratic county ticket for treasurer and served one term, refusing to make the race a second time. A number of years later he was elected county commissioner serving one term in this office also.

David O. WALLACE, 69, well known Rochester, Richland and Culver merchant, died at 3:30 o'clock Wednesday morning at his home in this city following an illness of four years. Death was caused by complications.
David Wallace was born in Fulton county May 2, 1854. About 45 years ago he was united in marriage to Rebecca CONGER, who with the three children, Dee WALLACE, Mrs. Madge MYERS and Mrs. Lula WALLACE SCHOONER, the latter of Plymouth, one brother, George WALLACE of this city and a sister, Mrs. Ella CAMPBELL, of Hammond, survive. Mr. Wallace was engaged in business in Rochester, Culver and Richland Center during his life.
Funeral arrangements later.

Thursday, March 8, 1923

Those from out of town to attend the funeral of Mrs. Clarinda ROBBINS were Mr. and Mrs. Jim THRUSH and son, James [THRUSH], of Knox, Mr. and Mrs. John ZEHNER and son, Harold [ZEHNER], of Franklin Park, Illinois, Mr. and Mrs. Ansma ROBBINS, of South Bend, B. F. CARTER, of Pendleton, Mo., George CARTER of Indianapolis, Mr. and Mrs. Charles PEARSON and Mrs. Catherine BELT, of South Bend, and Mr. and Mrs. M. F. CARTER, of Detroit, Michigan.

Clarinda CARTER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George W. CARTER, Sr., was born August 4, 1849, near Rochester, Ind., and died March 5, 1923 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. F. ZEHNER, at Franklin Park, Ill., aged 73 years, 7 months and 1 day.
She united with the Baptist church where she remained a faithful member until death.
The 15th day of December, 1872 she was united in marriage to Harrison ROBBINS, who with three children preceded her in death. Surviving are three children, A. G. J. ROBBINS, South Bend; Mrs. James THRUSH, Knox, Ind.; and Mrs. J. F. ZEHNER of Franklin Park, Illinois. Surviving also are three sisters, Mrs. James MARTIN, Mrs. Mintie HOLEMAN both of Rochester, and Mrs. PEARSON of South Bend; four brothers, B. F. CARTER, Pendleton, Mo., G. W. CARTER, Indianapolis, M. F. CARTER, Detroit, Mich. and B. A. CARTER of Hammond, Ind; two grandchildren, Harold ZEHNER and James THRUSH.
The funeral was held from the home of her sister, Mrs. Mintie Holeman, in charge of the Rev. N. McCOY of the local United Brethren church assisted by Rev. W. J. NIVEN. Interment being made in the Citizens cemetery.

Friday, March 9, 1923

Jefferson PFAFF, 82, well known in Rochester having made hundreds of business trips here as a traveling salesman, is dead at his home in Noblesville. He was one of the oldest traveling salesmen in Indiana having been on the road for 40 years. He married a sister of Mark [KILLEN] and Harry KILLEN both formerly of this city. He is the grandfather of Miss Rosemary PFAFF a noted young singer of New York City.
He served three years in the Civil War as a member of Company A, 101st Indiana volunteer infantry. He was at times engaged in business in Indianapolis, Noblesville, Westfield, and Rochester. The funeral was held Friday afternoon.

Saturday, March 10, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, March 12, 1923

Jefferson BOWERSOX, aged about 73, died Saturday at his farm home near Leiters Ford following a severe attack of influenza. Mr. Bowersox, who had been a resident of this county for many years, was well known in the community. Surviving are the widow [Mary BOWERSOX], two sons, Roy [BOWERSOX[ and Frank BOWERSOX, and two daughters, Mrs. Mattie POORMAN and Mrs. Ida BRUGH. Funeral services from the Saint's church at Leiters Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock. Burial at Leiters cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. A. W. HAINES of Rockfort, Ill., mother of Mrs. O. M. HENDRICKSON of this city, took place in Rockford Saturday afternoon. Mrs. Haines died on Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Hendrickson were both present when the end came. She is survived by her husband, four daughters and one son. Mrs. Hendrickson remained in Rockford to be with her father while Mr. Hendrickson has returned home.

Tuesday, March 13, 1923

Mrs. Carrie Jeanette PLOUGHE, age 34, years, wife of Verne PLOUGHE of Peru and a former resident of Rochester, died at 10:30 o'clock Monday morning at the Dukes Hospital, following an illness of some weeks duration. Mrs. Ploughe had been in inmate of the hospital but a few days, however. Death was attributed to tuberculosis of the bowels.
The funeral services will be held from the Methodist church Wednesday morning at 9:45 and will be in charge of the Rev. TINKMAN, pastor, assisted by Dr. Harry NYCE. Later the body will be shipped to Kempton, Ind., where interment will be made.

Wednesday, March 14, 1923

Fletcher STONER, aged 78, pioneer resident of Akron, and one of Fulton county's wealthiest citizens, died Tuesday night at 10:30 o'clock at his home in Akron following an illness of a year's duration. Death was caused by complications.
Fletcher Stoner was born in Ohio on December 13, 1844. In 1862 he moved to Akron where he engaged in the saw mill business. During his life in Akron he was prominent in business activities and was engaged in the stock buying business for years.
He was one of the founders of the Akron Exchange Bank in 1891 and served as president of the institution for a period of twelve years. He owned the elevator at Akron also and left a $100,000 estate, $70,000 of which had been divided among his children. During his life, it is estimated, he gave $10,000 to the Akron Church of the Living God. About $8,000 he gave to the church was a duplicate of that raised at a camp meeting of the church at Yellow Creek Lake. He was at all times active in prominent business enterprises of his community.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Maryett STONER, two sons, H. D. STONER, of Akron, and Norman R. STONER, of this city, and one daughter, Mrs. Frank HALTERMAN, of Akron. Another daughter, Mrs. Delta HIRE, died in 1914.
Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at two o'clock from the Church of the Living God at Akron.
[NOTE: Fletcher STONER, Dec. 13, 1844 - March 13, 1923; Maryett BLACK, wife of Fletcher Stoner, March 7, 1851 - May 25, 1939; both buried in Akron Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Henry Township.]

Thursday, March 15, 1923

Mrs. Ed VAWTER and Mrs. Bert VAWTER have received word of the death of Albert ARMSTRONG at San Antonio, Texas. Mrs. Armstrong is a sister of the Rochester residents. Death occurred Wednesday evening.

Word was received here Thursday morning of the death at the home of her son, Glen CHAPMAN, of Mrs. George CHAPMAN, mother of Earl CHAPMAN, of this city. Mrs. Chapman, who was 71 years of age, died following an illness due to heart failure. Another son, Earnest CHAPMAN, of Columbia City and four daughters, Mrs. Omar THOMPSON, Peru, Mrs. Charles MILLER, Ft. Wayne, Mrs. Frank STONER, South Whitley and Mrs. Daniel WOLF, South Whitley, survive.

Friday, March 16, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, March 17, 1923

Mrs. Margaret COLLINS, 71, practically a life long resident of Rochester and widow of the late Orlando COLLINS, died Saturday morning at the home of her sister, Mrs. Tobias HELSEL, of Plymouth, following a short illness. She had been making her home with her sister for the past two or three years. Surviving are one [?] brother, Delbert COLLINS, Schuyler MOW of Star City and four sisters, Mrs. HELSEL, Mrs. Eunice ZEITERS of Trebary, Mich.; Mrs. Eva SMITH of Logansport and Mrs. Emma MARTINDALE of Silver Lake. Funeral services will be held at Plymouth Monday afternoon at one o'clock. The body will be brought to Rochester for burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Lunetta A. CAULK, 72, died Friday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles MULLICAN, at Macy, a victim of senility. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Udiah FORBES and was born at Burns, N.Y., April 22, 1850. Her younger days were spent at Decatur, Ill., and Peru, Indiana. She is survived by her daughter and one son, Harry P. CAULK, of Santa Monica, Cal., and one sister, Mrs. Arthur ELLIS, of Peru. Funeral services will be held from the Methodist church at Macy Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. J. B. SPARLING in charge. Interment at Plainview cemetery.

Martin KING, 62, well known Fulton county farmer, committed suicide by hanging himself in his barn at his farm home six miles southwest of Rochester early Friday evening. The body was found by Mrs. King and her daughter, who feared something of the sort might happen. Mr. King left no note explaining his action nor had he at any time prior to the act intimated that he contemplated taking his life.
The theory advanced however concerns the alleged theft of some turkeys recently. King had ten or twelve turkeys which were supposedly stolen by Enos R. SCHELL, now of LaPorte, who at that time lived just across the field from King.
King learned that Schell had sold the turkeys and went before the grand jury with this information. Schell was arrested and gave bond for his appearance in court later. This case is now pending. But in the meantime according to the statement made by Schell, the turkeys actually wandered into Schell's place and he sold them not knowing who owned them. When he did learn whose turkeys they were, he said, he paid King the price for which he had sold them. King was censored by his neighbors for the action he took against Schell and is believed to have brooded over this.
Another probable cause for his suicide was the fact that he has been in ill health recently. After suffering an attack of influenza he experienced considerable difficulty with an abscess on his left hand, which required lancing on five different occasions. The trouble with the hand not only caused him great pain, but practically left him a cripple and incapacitated him for work about the farm.
Prior to the suicide King had gone about his usual routine and had eaten the evening meal as he always did. After supper he went out to the barn and shortly after Mrs. King and her daughter followed him. They found his body hanging in the barn and summoned aid, but life was extinct before they made their gruesome discovery.
Martin King was born in Illinois September 5, 1860. In his early years he moved to Peru

where he was married and 22 years ago he moved to the farm near Rochester where he had since made his home.
The widow, three daughters, Misses Minnie [KING] and Lucile KING, at home, and Mrs. Harriett WESTWOOD, west of Rochester, one granddaughter, and two sisters survive. Two sons are dead.
Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, March 19, 1923

Mrs. Charles RHODES, of Tippecanoe, died Saturday at the hospital here. The body was removed to Tippecanoe for burial.

Mrs. Edward LANDIS, aged about 50, died early Monday morning at the Woodlawn hospital. She has been a resident of Akron for many years. The husband and two children survive.

Tuesday, March 20, 1923

Word has been received here of the death Monday at LaJunta, Colorado of Mrs. Price O'DELL, aged about 45, a former resident of this city. Mrs. O'Dell moved to Colorado recently on account of failing health. Besides the husband, several children survive.

Wednesday, March 21, 1923

Gilbert KANE, about 55 years of age, well known farmer living east of Fulton, died at his home Tuesday afternoon after a long illness the exact nature of which is not known. He was a resident of the community for many years. He had been confined to his home for more than a year. He is survived by a wife and two sons, Cecil [KANE] and Donald [KANE] all of whom were at the bedside when the end came.

H. C. NORRIS, aged 73, a former resident of the Green Oak neighborhood, died late Tuesday evening at his home in Nettleton, Ark., according to word received here by his half-sister, Mrs. C. B. JEWELL, of this city. Death was caused by old age and complications. Mr. Norris is well remembered in this community where he spent many years. He left here for Arkansas in 1889. Surviving are the widow and three children, Edward NORRIS, of Detroit, Roy C. NORRIS, of Nettleton and Mrs. Cora DUNCAN, of Nettleton. Funeral services will be held at Nettleton on Friday.

Thursday, March 22, 1923

The body of Mrs. Price O'DELL, 46, who died at La Jaunta, Col., arrived in this city Thursday afternoon. The body was taken to the home of her mother, Mrs. Isaac KERSEY of Kewanna, where funeral services will be held Friday. Besides the mother and husband, three sons, Isaac [O'DELL], Carl [O'DELL] and Elmer O'DELL and two sisters, Mrs. Young McCAY and Mrs. Arthur SHOWLEY, both of Kewanna, survive.

Friday, March 23, 1923

Mrs. Gladys CUNNINGHAM, 22 years of age, died at six o'clock Friday morning as the result of burns received Tuesday morning when her clothing caught fire as she was building a fire in her home on South Jefferson street. Her body was very severely burned in the accident and no hopes were entertained for her recovery especially in view of the fact that she inhaled some of the flames that enveloped her.
Mrs. Cunningham [Gladys NEWCOMER] was a life long resident of Rochester. She is survived by the husband, Edward CUNNINGHAM, two children, Robert [CUNNINGHAM] aged two years and Edna [CUNNINGHAM] aged four months, two brothers, one sister and the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles NEWCOMER of this city.
Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the United Brethren church, Reverend Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of the nine months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Willis H. HOLMES of near Akron was held Friday afternoon at the home. The child died Thursday after being confined with tubercular meningitis. The parents have no other children.

Saturday, March 24, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, March 26, 1923

Word has just reached this office of the death of Mrs. Thomas FREEMAN, 76, at South Bend. She was the mother of Mrs. G. C. CHANDLER, wife of the former Baptist minister here, and made many visits to this city. She was ill three weeks before she passed away. She was born in Shoreham, England, and in early life came to Toronto, Canada. Thirty-four years ago she moved with her family to South Bend She is survived by her husband, Mrs. CHANDLER, T. A. FREEMAN and Mrs. KAETZER, of South Bend.

Mrs. Ocea Jane KOCHENDERFER, aged 71, a life long resident of Fulton county, died Monday morning at the Woodlawn hospital following a long illness. Mrs. Kochenderfer was born in Fulton county February 7, 1852. She was the wife of Benjamin KOCHENDERFER, who with one brother, Francis GREGORY, one sister, Mrs. Willis TROUT, of Fulton and two step-sons, Sheriff Harley KOCHENDERFER and Joseph KOCHENDERFER, of this city, survive.
Funeral services from the Methodist church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Reverend F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.

Mrs. Adeline CONRAD, 73, died Sunday evening at her farm home in the Mt. Zion neighborhood, a victim of heart failure, from which she had suffered for the past two years. She [Adeline HUGHES] was born in Marion county, Ohio, in 1849, a daughter of John and Elizabeth HUGHES. She had been a resident of Fulton county for the past 35 years.
Surviving are the husband, David CONRAD, two sons, Madison CONRAD, of Fulton and John CONRAD and a daughter, Mrs. Emma FULTZ, at home and one brother, Jim HUGHES.
Funeral services from the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church, Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock.

Burial at Mt. Zion.

Word was received here Monday of the death at the home of her parents in Boise, Idaho of Marjorie Ann ENSIGN, 13 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank ENSIGN, formerly of this city. Death, which was caused by diabetes, from which she had suffered for the past two years, occurred at three o'clock Monday morning. The parents and two brothers, Lewis [ENSIGN] and Fredrick ENSIGN survive. She was born in Rochester September 7, 1915. Mrs. Charles PYLE accompanied by her two children, Mary [PYLE] and Margaret PYLE, left here Monday afternoon for Boise to attend the funeral. Mrs. Pyle was accompanied to Chicago by Mr. PYLE.

Tuesday, March 27, 1923

The funeral services for Mrs. Benjamin KOCHENDERFER will be held at the Methodist church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock instead of Tuesday as previously reported.

John Milton POFFENBARGER, well known resident of Fulton county, dropped over dead at his farm home west of Rochester, where he had lived for the past 35 years since moving to Indiana from Ohio, a victim of heart failure. He was 57 years of age.
Mr. Poffenbarger had been suffering from heart failure for the past eight years, but had been able practically all of the time to be up and about. He attended church as usual Sunday morning and went about his usual business Monday, apparently in the same state of health which he had been accustomed to for years. He was doing some chores about the house at five o'clock and was accompanied by Mrs. Poffenbarger and John Field, when without any warning he dropped over dead.
J. M. Poffenbarger was born in Ohio, July 10, 1865. He moved to this county thirty-three years ago, two years after his marriage to Julia HARDING. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Julia POFFENBARGER, one foster daughter, Mrs. Fred KING, of Fulton, two brothers, Clement [POFFENBARGER] and Hiram POFFENBARGER, of Dayton, Ohio, and a sister, Mrs. John KINDER, of Akron.
Funeral services from the Burton church Wednesday afternoon. Burial at Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Peter BAKER, well known Rochester carpenter, who had been a resident of this city for many years, dropped dead shortly before noon Tuesday at his home on West Eighth street, a victim of heart failure. Mr. Baker's health had been failing for several years and he had not actively engaged in his usual work, but that his condition was such as to cause his death was not suspected by his two daughters, with whom he lives.
He had been active Tuesday morning and was sitting on a couch in his home just before noon. He asked his daughter, Miss Bertha Baker, lwho was preparing lunch, if she could not hurry the meal a little as he had to go to Argos on business. She replied that she would and as she turned to him to make her answer, she noticed that his head started to droop.
She immediately stepped to his side just in time to catch him as he started to fall. Death came immediately. Mr. Baker would have been 70 years of age April 6th. He is survived by two daughters, Misses Bertha BAKER and Bess BAKER. His wife [Ellen BAKER] died a number of years ago.
Funeral arrangements later.

Wednesday, March 28, 1923

The funeral of Mrs. Ben KOCHENDERFER was held at the Methodist church at two p.m. today, Rev. Noah McCOY officiating. The singing was furnished by the ladies of the St. Johns class of which Mrs. Kockenderfer was a member.

Funeral services for Peter BAKER, who dropped dead Tuesday morning, will be held from the Presbyterian church Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge and the Rochester lodge I.O.O.F. assisting. The body may be viewed at the church between the hours of 1:00 and 2:30 o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The body of Miss Henrietta ORR, of Lafayette, a former resident of this city who was killed last winter in an automobile accident, arrived in this city Wednesday for interment in the mausoleum.

Thursday, March 29, 1923

[no obits]

Friday, March 30, 1923

Cadet S. M. GOLDMAN, of Chicago, dropped dead in the Culver Military Academy gynasium Tuesday evening. He was playing indoor baseball and came to bat. Before he struck at the ball he suddenly keeled over. Efforts to revive him with a pulmotor were fruitless. He was a member of the sophomore class.

Saturday, March 31, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, April 2, 1923

Mrs. Lydia LEITER, 80, well-known resident of this city, died at her home on West 8th street of pneumonia, at ten o'clock Monday morning, following a weeks illness. About a year ago she had suffered from a light stroke of paralysis and never fully regained her health. Last week she was taken sick and shortly afterward pneumonia set in.
She was born September 18, 1842 in Fulton county and May 16, 1861 she married Jacob LEITER, a prominent citizen of Kewanna. She was a lifelong member of the Methodist church.
She is survived by two daughters, Miss Jane [LEITER] and Miss Mollie LEITER and a granddaughter, Miss Katherine HUNNESHAGEN, who always made her home with her. Four sons also survive, Ulysses [LEITER], of Denver, Col., Levi [LEITER], of near Loyal, Ed [LEITER], of Kewanna, and Eli [LEITER], of Rochester.
Funeral arrangements later.

Ray SAVAGE, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel SAVAGE, well known Marshall county farmers, who live in Green township about seven miles southwest of Argos, was instantly killed at eight o'clock Saturday evening when his car was run down by a Nickle Plate freight train at the Argos crossing. Savage was driving his car across the tracks. The train, a heavy freight, had started away from the depot, but could not get under way.
The locomotive was backed up to get a new start and the caboose hit Savage's car and crumpled it underneath the heavy trucks. Savage is believed to have suffered a broken neck and his head was crushed by the impact. He died instantly.
He is survived by the parents, four brothers, Alvah [SAVAGE], Charles [SAVAGE] and Steven [SAVAGE] at home and a fourth in Illinois and three sisters, Nellie SAVAGE, at home, and Mrs. Anson OVERMYER, of Rochester, and Mrs. Roscoe STEVENS.

Tuesday, April 3, 1923

The funeral of Mrs. Lydia LEITER will be held Thursday afternoon at the Leiters Ford church at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY of the Methodist church officiating. Rochester friends of the deceased may view the remains at the home on West Eighth street between twelve and one o'clock. Word was received today from Ulysses LEITER, a son in Colorado that he would be here for the funeral.

Wednesday, April 4, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, April 5, 1923

Mrs. Sadie WILHELM, 60, a former resident of Rochester, died Wednesday afternoon at her home in Chicago of heart trouble and complications.
She was the widow of James WILHELM, who died here three years ago. She made her home with her son in Chicago following her husband's death. She was the daughter of John and Lorinda YOUNG and had been born and reared in Rochester.
Three sons, one daughter and two sisters, Mrs. Nellie FEECE, of this city, and Mrs. Allie McPHERSON, of South Bend, survive. The body will be brought to Rochester Friday for burial.

Edward OVERMYER, fourteen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Boyd OVERMYER, died Tuesday morning at the home of his parents west of Richland Center, following an attack of scarlet fever and diphtheria. Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday. The parents, three brothers, Raymond [OVERMYER] at home and Cliff [OVERMYER] and Roy OVERMYER, of this city, and three sisters, Leota [OVERMYER], Almeda [OVERMYER] and Esther OVERMYER, at home, survive.

Friday, April 6, 1923

Miss Susan BIDDLE, 78, a life long resident of this community, dropped dead suddenly at the home of her nephew, William DAVIS, east of this city Friday afternoon. She had been sick for a long time with a dropsical condition but her health Friday had apparently been as usual when she died.

Her niece, Mrs. Dolly DUCKER NORRIS, a neighbor, went to the Davis home Friday afternoon for a short visit. She found Miss Biddle sitting on the porch. They went into the house and Miss Biddle sat in a rocking chair and conversed for a few moments with Mrs. Norris when she suddenly dropped over and before Mrs. Norris could call Davis, who was not in the house at the time, Miss Biddle had died.
Miss Susan BIDDLE was born in Fulton county, March 29, 1845, a daughter of William and Rebecca BIDDLE. She was the last of a family of seven girls and one boy.

Dewitt Clinton STOWMAN, lifelong resident of Miami county, died at his home in Denver Thursday morning of heart trouble. Mr. Stowman was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles STOWMAN, pioneer residents of Jefferson township. The father died some years ago but the mother survives and continues to reside at the home farm north of Mexico.

Saturday, April 7, 1923

Funeral services for Miss Susan BIDDLE Sunday afternoon at one-thirty o'clock at the Athens church. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Miss Della WILHELM, of Chicago, has arrived in Rochester to attend the funeral services for her mother, Mrs. Sadie WILHELM. Miss Wilhelm is a former employee of the Rochester Telephone Company and is well known in this community.

Monday, April 9, 1923

Mrs. Sarah WERTZ, mother of L. L. Wertz of this city, died Sunday at her home in Anderson as the direct result of an attack of acute indigestion, altho she had undergone an operation for cancer four weeks prior to her death. She was 68 years of age.
Mrs. Wertz had been married in 1871 and was the mother of five children, one girl and four boys. Surviving are the husband, George WERTZ, and three sons, L. L. WERTZ of this city, Walter [WERTZ] of Anderson and Chancy [WERTZ] of Cleveland, O.
Mr. and Mrs. Wertz went to Anderson Monday morning to attend the funeral, date for which had not been set prior to their departure from Rochester.

Tuesday, April 10, 1923

Dashing under the gates at the Michigan street crossing of the New York Central railway at South Bend Sunday night cost the life of John MIRTES, aged 45. He went to South Bend three weeks ago from his home in Monterey, Ind., where he has a wife and three children, and has been employed at the Studebaker corporation plants.
Mirtes, who was identified from records available at the Studebaker factory and which answered his description, and after friends had called at the undertaking establishment, disregarded the lowered gates at the rail crossing as he hurried to his room. He had spent the afternoon homehunting, with the intention of removing his family to South Bend at an early date, it was said by his friends.
Mirtes was struck by the fast westbound express train as he stepped in its path and the body was hurled 60 feet. He was dead when the body was found by witnesses to the accident.

Harrison COPNER, aged resident of Peru, died at his home, 536 West Tenth street in Forest Park on Saturday evening at 8:15 o'clock following a lingering illness of dropsy. The deceased was born in Fulton county November 7, 1850, and was 72 years and 5 months of age. He was married October 28, 1875, to Josephine RANNELLS of Fulton county, who survives.

Susan BIDDLE, daughter of Rebecca and William BIDDLE, was born March 25, 1845, and died April 6, 1923, aged 78 years and 12 days.
She was born, reared, and she died on the same farm and in the same yard that her parents entered as pioneers in 1836.
When she was eight years old she joined the Methodist Church which was located on her father's farm. Later she joined the United Brethren Church and has been a faithful and constant follower of Christ and His teachings.
She taught in the public schools several years and was a teacher in the Sunday School until her health failed.
After the death of her younger sister, Nancy DAVIS, she gave up her teaching to rear her sister's infant son, William J. DAVIS. His kind and tender care has been a great comfort throughout her life.
Her mother, father, six siblings, and one brother have preceded her to their heavenly home. They were all Christians and were neither barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Wednesday, April 11, 1923

William SNYDER received word Wednesday morning of the death at his home in Walkerton of his brother, Samuel SNYDER, aged 74 years. Mr. Snyder himself is ill and could not go to Walkerton to attend the funeral.

Thursday, April 12, 1923

Paul [CARR], infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley CARR, died at the home of its parents, east of Rochester, Thursday afternoon following an attack of pneumonia.

Friday, April 13, 1923

Funeral services for Paul [CARR], infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley CARR, east of Rochester, will be held Saturday at two o'clock from the Christian church. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, April 14, 1923

James COSTELLO, aged 78, practically a life long resident of Fulton county, died last Thursday morning at the home of his son in Fargo, North Dakota, according to word received here. The body arrived at Kewanna Saturday. Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at St. Ann's Catholic church near Grass Creek. Burial at St. Ann's cemetery.
James Costello was born in Hamilton, Ohio, November 20, 1844, a son of Patrick and Ann COSTELLO. He came to Fulton county with his family in 1853, locating in Wayne township, and made farming his life work.

On October 3, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, 10th U. S. Infantry, and served in a half dozen or more major engagements of the Civil War until he received his discharge November 3, 1864.
In 1866 he was united in marriage to Anastatia HOYNES, who died in 1881. He lived in Fulton county until about a year ago when he went to live with his son. Among the survivors are three daughters, four sons, two brothers, George [COSTELLO] and John COSTELLO, both well known in this community, and a sister, Mrs. James DWYER of LaCrosse, Wisconsin.

James O. FRALING, 46 years old, of Miami township, Cass county, was the victim of a fatal accident about 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon when he fell from the roof of a house at the farms of his father-in-law, Eldon GREER, four miles northwest of Mexico, and sustained a fracture of the medical occipital lobe of the skull. Death occurred about two hours later.

Monday, April 16, 1923

[no obits]

Tuesday, April 17, 1923

Jonathan N. CRABBS, 74 years, well known Fulton county farmer, hung himself in the corn crib on his farm west of Rochester, Monday afternoon. The body was found by members of the family who had been absent from the house during the day.
Mr. Crabbs, who was planning to move to Rochester within the very near future, where he expected to undergo a major operation for the removal of hernia from which he had been suffering for some time, is believed to have committed suicide as a result of his ill health. He had, however, never at any time intimated that he contemplated taking such action.
Mrs. Crabbs and Mr. and Mrs. Floyd SHEETS, who rent the Crabbs farm, left the house Monday morning to be gone for the larger part of the day to attend a sale. Before leaving, Mr. Crabbs' lunch was placed on the table and when they returned about three o'clock they noticed that it had not been disturbed.
At first nothing was thought of this, as it was believed that he might have gone to Rochester on business, but a search was instituted and the body was found hanging in the corn crib. He had suspended a noose from a ring in the upper frame of the crib and apparently slumped forward off his feet. It is believed that he had been in this position for six or seven hours when he was found.
Jonathan Crabbs was born in Ohio August 26, 1848. He moved to Fulton county in 1895. His first wife died in 1915 and in 1918 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Emma HAYS, who survives. There are five children, L. E. CRABBS, of this city, Elmer [CRABBS] and J. M. CRABBS, of Chicago, Mrs. John PASCHALL, of Rochester and Mrs. Della MUTCHLER, of Plymouth, and two brothers, Rev. Cyrus CRABBS and Abraham CRABBS, of Fremont, Ohio.
Funeral services from the farm home west of the city Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Jonathan N. CRABBS, Aug 26, 1848 - Apr 16, 1923; Nancy N. CRABBS, his wife, Sep 19, 1847 - June 17, 1915; both buried Rochester, I.O.O.F. cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.]

Wednesday, April 18, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, April 19, 1923

Albert W. MYERS, 48, Spanish-American war veteran died at 11 o'clock Thursday morning at his apartment south of the court house, a victim of Bright's disease from which he suffered since last November. He had been a resident of this city for the past 15 years and was employed as foreman of the interlocking system of the Erie railroad where he had been employed for many years. Prior to his death he has been stationed at Binghampton, N.Y. He was born in Dark county, Ohio, February 26, 1875, and during the Spanish-American war was a member of Company I, 35th Michigan Volunteers. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Norah PARKER MYERS and six brothers, George [MYERS] and Jake [MYERS], of Greenville, Ohio, Joe [MYERS], of Tutweiler, Miss., Sheridan [MYERS] and Charles [MYERS], of Alexandria, Ind., and William MYERS, of Summittville. Funeral arrangements later.

Among the out-of-town people who attended the funeral of Jonathan CRABBS were James M. CRABBS and Mr. and Mrs. Elmer J. CRABBS of Chicago, Mrs. Della M. MUTCHLER and daughter Rae [MUTCHLER], of Plymouth, Rev. C. M. CRABBS of Toledo, Ohio, Nathanial MEAD and son Santy [MEAD], Luella DABLEY and son Haromon [DABLEY], Samuel MEAD and Mrs. Minnie MOORHOUSE of Fithian, Illinois, Mr. and Mrs. D. C HAYS of Ogden, Ill., Mr. and Mrs. F. A. MEEKER, Mr. and Mrs. Harold POWELL, Leo RAMSEY, Fred WHITECOTTON, Ora BRAUNELLER and Mr. OWENS of Peru.

Friday, April 20, 1923

Lawrence Luther MANNING, a former well known resident of this city, who went West for his health several years ago, died Thursday at his home in Denver, Colorado, a victim of tuberculosis, according to word received by Rochester relatives. He was 44 years of age.
L. L. Manning was born in Fairmount, Illinois, August fourth, 1878. He came to Rochester with his parents, L. V. and Armilda MANNING, in his younger days and took up his occupation of photographer. In 1898 he was united in marriage to Pearl MITCHELL, who, with three daughters, two brothers, and four sisters survive.
Mr. Manning was a member of the Rochester city council when he left this city, having been elected on the republican ticket. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias and Moose lodges.
The body will be brought to Rochester for burial. Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed.

Saturday, April 21, 1923

Mrs. D. N. BENNETT, of this city, has received word of the death of her father, William ROATH, at his home in Meridian, Idaho. Mr. Roath was a former resident of this city. His wife died last August.

Mrs. Isabella GOODWIN, wife of A. B GOODWIN, died at four o'clock Saturday morning at her home 435 East Ninth street, a victim of heart trouble, from which she had suffered for the past three years. She was 39 years of age.
Miss Isabella STEWART was born at McDonald, Pennsylvania, August 16, 1883, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert STEWART. She was married to A. B. Goodwin in Chicago November 7, 1903, moving later to Marion, Ind., and then to Rochester eight years ago.
Surviving are the husband, one daughter, Helen [GOODWIN], eight brothers, Joseph [STEWART], Samuel [STEWART], George [STEWART], Leo [STEWART], Robert [STEWART], Hugh [STEWART], James [STEWART] and Harry STEWART and three sisters, Mrs. Mary McWHINNEY, Gary, Mrs. Martha WALROTH, Ritta, Fla., and Miss Sadie STEWART, Los Angeles, Cal. She was a member of the Catholic church.
Funeral arrangements later.

Funeral services for Allen MYERS will be held Sunday afternoon from the Hoover chapel at two o'clock, Rev. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, April 23, 1923

William HOOVER, former resident of this city, and a brother of Jacob HOOVER, is dead at his home at Jasper City, Missouri, the word being received here Sunday evening. The deceased was 90 years old the 14th of last February. Jacob Hoover is now the only remaining child of the large family of ten children of Henry and Sarah HOOVER, who settled at Athens in 1832.

Rev. J. T. KEASEY, about 75 years of age, former well known United Brethren minister in Fulton couty, is dead at his home at Silver Lake the result of complications due to old age. He had been in poor health for some time and passed away Sunday morning.
Rev. Keasey occupied the pulpit at the United Brethren churches at Fulton, Grass Creek and in other locations during recent years. He is survived by two sons and one daughter. Funeral arrangements unknown.

Tuesday, April 24, 1923

Mrs. Charles STAHL, who has been suffering from an attack of paralysis for the past several months, died Tuesday afternoon at four o'clock at her home on the corner of Jefferson and Sixth streets.

Wednesday, April 25, 1923

Mrs. Mattie STAHL, 49, who died Tuesday afternoon at four o'clock was a victim of paralysis, from which she had suffered for the past eight months. She was born April 15, 1874 and had been a life long resident of this community.
On December 31st, 1894 she [Mattie CHAMP] was united in marriage to Charles STAHL, who with a son, Donald [STAHL] two half-sisters, Mrs. George SNADER, of Amboy, Ill., and Mrs. J. D. DuBOIS, of Logansport and a half-brother, Melvin CHAMP, of Twelve Mile, survive. Funeral services will be held from the residence on the corner of Jefferson and Sixth streets Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Interment at mausoleum.

Henry WORTHINGTON, 85, died at his home in Tiosa, a victim of paralysis and old age. He had been in poor health for the past year. He was a veteran of the civil war, having served in the 34th Indiana infantry. The widow, Mrs. Martha WORTHINGTON, survives There were no children. He was a retired farmer and had lived in this county for the past 47 years.
Funeral services from the Tiosa Christian church Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Burial at Sand Hill cemetery.

George [SMITH], five day old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. SMITH, died Tuesday at the farm home of his parents near Richland Center. Burial was held Wednesday at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Thursday, April 26, 1923

Funeral services for L. L. MANNING, whose body arrived in this city Wednesday, will be held from the Christian church Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. ASCHANHORT in charge. The body may be viewed at the church between the hours of 1:00 and 2:30 p.m., Friday.

Friday, April 27, 1923

Mrs. Paul SEACH, 22, who died in a hospital at Goshen of burns received Monday evening when her clothing became enveloped in flames, was a former resident of this city and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilber (Friday) CASTLE, of Rochester. She is survived by her husband and a daughter, Ruby [SEACH], the parents, two sisters, Carmen [CASTLE] and Gladys [CASTLE] and one brother, Joseph CASTLE, of South Bend. Funeral services will be held from the Linden Avenue Christian church at South Bend Saturday afternoon.

Mont CONRAD, a farmer residing about a mile south of Fulton, and a brother of John CONRAD, was fatally injured Thursday afternoon about two o'clock when a rock weighing more than a ton fell into a hole which Conrad was digging, in which to bury it.
The farmer was pinned beneath the rock. His lower limbs were crushed terribly and he died later while being taken to Logansport in an ambulance.
Conrad's son, Glenn, age about 17 years, was plowing in the field where Mr. Conrad was preparing to get the boulder out of the way. He did not see the rock topple into the hole onto his father but rushed to the scene a minute later when he noticed both his father and the rock out of sight.
The injured man was held fast under the weight for more than two hours while the son and neighbors, who were called, worked frantically to free him.
Mr. Conrad was conscious when extricated and talked coherently. When it was seen that he was so seriously injured, Dr. DILLMAN, Fulton, who was called, ordered him taken to the St. Joseph hospital at Logansport and an ambulance was called. The trip was only started when death came. The body was taken back to the home. Dr. Dillman states that the shock and pain of the injuries caused death.
Mort [sic] CONRAD was 48 years of age. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Ella CONRAD, one son, Glenn [CONRAD], two daughters Bernice [CONRAD] and Esther CONRAD, a brother, John CONRAD, a sister, Mrs. Emma FULTZ and the father, Daniel CONRAD, all residents of this county.

Funeral services will be held from the farm home south of Fulton Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. WHITESELL in charge. Burial at Fulton cemetery.

Saturday, April 28, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, April 30, 1923

Mr. and Mrs. Charles MacVEAN, of this city, were called to Batavia, N.Y., Sunday on account of the death in that city Saturday of her father, Fred WALTERS, a former resident of Rochester. Mr. Walters had been in ill health for the past two years, but further details were not received here. Mr. Walters moved to this city several years ago, purchasing the local greenhouses of John SHELTON. Later he turned the Rochester business over to MacVean and went to Batavia, N.Y. Funeral services will be held Tuesday at Batavia.

Miss Ella Marie RIDDLE, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. RIDDLE, of Tiosa, died Saturday at the home of her parents a victim of heart failure, from which she had been ill for the past three months. She was 19 years of age.
Miss Riddle was born in Fulton county October 21, 1903 and had received her education in the public schools of the county. She is survived by the parents, four brothers, Rev. E. M. RIDDLE, Bryan, Ohio, Raymond [RIDDLE] and Charles RIDDLE, of Tiosa and George RIDDLE at home and four sisters, Mrs. Linas BORTON and Mrs. Harry COOPER, of Mentone, and Misses Bertha [RIDDLE] and Mable RIDDLE, at home.
Funeral services from the Tiosa Brethren church Tuesday afternoon at two-thirty o'clock. Burial at Reichter cemetery.

Joseph CARR, 58, a former resident of Fulton county, where he was born and reared, committed suicide by shooting himself Sunday at his home in Wolcott, according to word received by relatives in this city. He had been married, but he and his wife were separated. A son survives. The body will be brought to Athens where funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock.

Tuesday, May 1, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, May 2, 1923

Mrs. Homer KESSLER Wednesday received a telegram to the effect that Marcia Ann [KESSLER], eight months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Homer KESSLER, had died at their home in Slater, Col.

Henry L. HARSH, 44, died at noon Wednesday at his home 1224 South Elm street after a short illness. He was born October 6, 1878, and was a widower, his wife, Cora B. HARSH having preceded him. Funeral services will be held from the residence Friday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. McCOY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, May 3, 1923 and Friday, May 4, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, May 5, 1923

The body of John McMAHAN, five year old son of William McMAHAN, of this city, killed when an interurban car struck the automobile in which the two were riding near Forsyth, Illinois Friday afternoon was brought to Rochester for burial Saturday evening. Mr. McMahan, who is lying in a hospital at Decatur, will not be able to accompany the body owing to his injuries and Hugh McMAHAN will remain with him.
Those who came with the deceased were Katherine McMAHAN, a sister, Miss Mildred McKINLEY with whom the children lived at Decatur, Otto [McMAHAN] and Pat McMAHAN. Others who arrived from Illinois are Tom McMAHAN, Mr. and Mrs. John SCHAFF and Mrs. Hugh McMAHAN. The funeral will be held at the home of the boy's grandmother, Mrs. John McMAHAN on S. Main Street Sunday afternoon at 2:30, Rev. F. O. FRALEY officiating.
Mr. McMahan was resting easy Saturday morning according to word from Decatur, but the doctor was still undecided as to whether he had any internal injuries or not. Due to the fact that the patient had been suffering considerably from rheumatism for some time previous the physicians could not determine whether his pain was from the disease or from other causes. However, the next 24 hours will determine whether or not he was injured internally, the doctor said.
X-ray photographs taken Friday evening showed that no bones were broker nor were there any fractures, but Mr. McMahan was cut about the face, hands and knees, all of which necessitated stitches to close them.
John William [McMAHAN], the five-year-old son, was killed instantly when the automobile was hit by the interurban as he was hurled a short distance against a nearby gravel car. It is thought that his neck was broken as there were no cuts and practically only one bruise.
Mr. McMahan had not been working for some time owing to his illness and had spent part of the morning and taken dinner with the McKinley family at Decatur, where his children were staying. After dinner he took his son and drove to Forsyth where the McMahan Brothers' Construction Company's unloading station is located and looked over the work. About 1:30 he started for the McKinley home crossing the tracks near the works. A switch line built to bring in gravel was occupied by several freight cars which hid the nearby parallel interurban line from view. The driver, however, proceeded slowly, being in second speed, but the interurban approached at a terrific rate and caught the car before the driver could get it off and carried it for 200 feet down the track. Mr. McMahan was thrown clear and about fifty feet away. When picked up he still had the steering wheel in his hand, the post having been broken off. The boy was dead when aid reached him.

Monday, May 7, 1923

Mrs. John SCHAFF, Wenona, Ill., Mrs Hugh McMAHAN and Pat McMAHAN of Bloomington, Ill., Miss Mildred McKINLEY and Katherine McMAHAN of Chicago, Ill., and Frank [WAGONER] and William WAGONER of South Bend were among the out-of-town people here to attend the funeral of John William McMAHAN.

Tuesday, May 8, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, May 9, 1923

Miss Opal MANNING, 20 year old daughter of Mrs. Pearl MANNING, died at noon Wednesday at the home of her mother on Jefferson street following a long illness. Death was caused by tuberculosis.
Miss Manning with her sisters and mother had just returned from Colorado two weeks prior to her death following the death of her father, L. L. MANNING who died April 19th of the same disease. She had been a life long resident of Rochester, but had moved West with her family about three years ago for her health. She was educated in the Rochester city schools and was a graduate of the Rochester high school in the class of 1920.
Surviving are the mother and two sisters, Misses Mildred [MANNING] and Velma MANNING.
Funeral arrangements later.

Mrs. Lola CLAY, 66, a life long resident of Fulton county, died at 12 o'clock Wednesday morning a the home of her daughter, Mrs. Archie WILTSHIRE, of Macy. Death was caused by asthma and complications from which she had suffered for the past year. She [Lola HOOVER] was born in this county December 10, 1856, a daughter of Jacob and Rebecca HOOVER.
Surviving are the husband, Finley CLAY and three sons, Edward CLAY, of Loyal, Roy CLAY, of Rochester and Martin CLAY, of Chicago.
Funeral arrangements later.

Albert CASE, who came two weeks ago from his home in Topeka, Kansas to visit his brother Dr. A. CASE, of Akron, died at eight o'clock Tuesday evening at his brother's home of acute dilation of the heart.
The body will be taken to Topeka for burial.

Thursday, May 10, 1923

[no obits]

Friday, May 11, 1923

Funeral services for Miss Opal MANNING will be held Sunday afternoon at the Christian church at 2:00 o'clock. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, May 12, 1923

Mrs. Lydia A. SHONK, aged 81 years, died Friday at the home of her son, William SHONK, northwest of the city following an illness since last November. Death was caused by old age and complications.
Mrs. Shonk was married to David SHONK in Pulaski county 59 years ago, moved to this county three years following her marriage and had since made her home in this community. Her husband preceded her. One son, 10 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren survive. Two daughters are dead.
Funeral services from the Methodist church Sunday afternoon at three o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Word was received Saturday of the death at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harold HART, in Chicago, of Isaac ABRAMS, aged about 90 years, who formerly made his home in this city. Further details regarding the demise were not available.

The body of Miss Opal MANNING, whose funeral will be held Sunday afternoon, may be viewed by friends at the home at 612 Jefferson street, between the hours of nine and two.

Monday, May 14, 1923

Mrs. Mary ORR, 71, died at two o'clock Sunday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Roy PLETCHER, a victim of heart failure and dropsy from which she had been seriously ill for the past few months.
Mrs. Orr was born in Marshall county January 28, 1852. She had lived here for the past 35 years. In 1871 she was married to Charles PHILLIPS, who died and in 1884 she was united in marriage to Charles S. ORR, who also preceded her. She was a member of the United Brethren church and the Women's Relief Corps.
Surviving are one son, C. O. PHILLIPS, of Keddie, California, a granddaughter, Mrs. Ruth GERTRIE of San Mateo, Calif., a daughter, Mrs. Minnie PLETCHER, Rochester, a granddaughter, Miss Ruth PLETCHER, and a grandson, Robert SWINEHART, of this city.
Funeral services from the home at 412 Fulton avenue Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Clarissa DOWNS, 84 years of age, died suddenly early Sunday morning of heart failure from which she had suffered for the past five weeks. She had been but slightly ill during that period and was able to be about the house as usual. Sunday evening, after she had retired for the night, it was found that she became short of breath and she died just after midnight.
Mrs. Downs was born in Jennings county, Indiana, near Seymour, June 24, 1839. In 1857 she was married to Leonard DOWNS and about 5 years ago they moved to Rochester where she had made her home. Her husband, a veteran of the Civil War, died about 36 years ago. She was a member of the Christian church.
Surviving are one son, George DOWNS, of this city, a brother, Chas. ROCKEY, of Seymour, and two half-sisters, who reside in Indianapolis.
Funeral services from the Christian church Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. SMALL in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Lewis RAWITSCH, of Chicago, who underwent an operation at the hospital here last week, died Sunday. The body was shipped to Chicago for burial.

Tuesday, May 15, 1923

Three deaths in his family within a short time was the sad fate of Lewis RAWITSCH, whose wife died Sunday at the hospital here following a recent major operation. Mr. and Mrs. Rawitsch, who live in Chicago, came to Rochester a short time ago when her condition became such that an operation was deemed necessary to save her life.
While in this city, Rawitsch was summoned to Chicago on account of Mrs. Rawitsch's mother's death and he had no sooner returned to his wife's bedside in this city when he was again called away by the death of his own mother. It was while attending his mother's funeral that he received word that his wife had died in Rochester.

Zeta Viola GREATHOUSE, three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles GREATHOUSE, was drowned Monday afternoon when she fell into a cistern at the home of her parents in Wabash, where she was playing with some other children.

Wednesday, May 16, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, May 17, 1923

Noah H. KERSEY, aged 69 years, died at his home, 1301 Bancroft avenue, Thursday morning, a victim of heart failure. He had suffered with his heart for a number of years, and had been seriously ill for more than a year.
Noah Kersey was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, July 18, 1862, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron KERSEY. He had lived in Rochester during the greater part of his life, and was well known in the community.
The widow, Mrs. Neoma KERSEY, and two sons survive.
Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at two o'clock from the Prairie Grove church. Burial at Kewanna I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, May 18, 1923

The funeral services for Noah KERSEY will be held from the Prairie Grove church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock instead of Saturday as previously announced.

Saturday, May 19, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, May 21, 1923]

William Jefferson LEITER, pioneer resident of Fulton county, who came here with his parents in a covered wagon in 1854, died at his home on West Eighth street Saturday evening following a long illness, which had confined him to his home for a number of weeks. Death was caused by old age and complications. He was 83 years of age.
Mr. Leiter was born in Seneca county, Ohio, April 17, 1840. Five years later his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John LEITER, Jr., started westward and took up a homestead on the south bank of the Tippecanoe river near where Leiters now stands. The ford at the river here was given its name by Mr. Leiter's parents who built a rude shanty there shortly after arriving. They simply placed four posts in the ground and nailed the boards on them.
Later they constructed a second and more permanent home, building it of Tamarack logs. For many years it was known as the Tamarack Hotel and here Mr. Leiter as a young man worked on the farm helping to clear the land and make it tillable. He attended the district school and later went to Valparaiso College and upon returning spent several years teaching school in this vicinity. He was married on December 27, 1805, to Ellen A. HICKMAN, who was born in 1841 in Fulton county.
On January 21, 1877, along with Clark HICKMAN he took over the Potawatomie Mills in Rochester, which stood where the Erie Elevator is now located. Water power from the old canal was used and the mill soon became one of the best and largest in Northern Indiana. Frederick PETERSON later on bought out Mr. Hickman and the mill then went under the firm name of LEITER and PETERSON. In 1896 the building burned to the ground and for some time afterwards Mr. Leiter was interested in the bank which grew into the U. S. Bank and Trust Co. In 1898 he erected another elevator on the site of the old one and since that time has been active in charge until a few months previous to his death. Altogether he was in the grain business 46 years.
He was always active in other affairs being a lifelong democrat and as such served on the school board several terms and as many years on the town board. He was actively identified with the Methodist church in Rochester for nearly half a century. He first joined the church sixty-five years ago. He was a trustee of the church when the location was changed from Main street to its present location at Jefferson and Seventh streets. As a trustee he helped erect the building preceding the present one, the dedication of which occurred in 1881.
He remained a trustee with the present edifice and took an active part in its erection in 1917. Regretting to give up the old structure in which he had worshipped so long, nevertheless he gave hearty support to the new movement and was well satisfied with the results in the present beautiful and commodious structure. He had his regular seat which he occupied in the old and in the new, and was always present as long as health permitted. For twenty years he taught a class in the Sunday school without a break. No interest of the church was without his support.
Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Leiter, two of whom, Clyde [LEITER] and Leslie [LEITER], with their mother preceded the deceased. Those who survive are William C. [LEITER], Fred [LEITER], Delia [LEITER] and Mae [LEITER] of this city; Charles [LEITER] of Los Angeles, Cal, and Mrs. Jennie GREENSTREET, of Louisville, Ind. Three brothers, Eli [LEITER], Franklin [LEITER] and Jeremiah [LEITER], have passed on and one sister, Mrs. Lydia BIDDINGER, of Tiosa, one half-sister, Mrs. Margaret BENNETT, of Kewanna, and one half-brother, John [LEITER], also of Kewanna, survive.
Funeral services at the Methodist church at 2:30 Tuesday afternoon, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge, with burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

In respect to their fellow tradesman, the DENISTON ELEVATOR and the FARMERS' COOPERATIVE ELEVATOR will both be closed from one until four Tuesday afternoon.

Tuesday, May 22, 1923

Presley COLWELL, of Three Rivers, Michigan, Rev. and Mrs. A. T. BRIGGS, LaPorte, Mr. and Mrs. Gross BURKETT, Huntington, John GREENSTREET, Louisville, Ind., Mr. and Mrs. Frank BIDDINGER, Gas City, W. H. HAUCK, Mrs. Etta LEITER and Mr. and Mrs. Donald LEITER, of South Bend, were among the out-of-town people who attended the funeral of W. J. LEITER Tuesday.

Wednesday, May 23, 1923

John "Froggy" BICK, aged 61 years, well known in this community where he had often visited his brother, William BICK, farmer residing near Rochester, was instantly killed at Plymouth Wednesday morning when he was struck by a Vandalia passenger train at a crossing. Bick was somewhat of a rover and at the time of his death was making his home in Plymouth. The body was to be brought to Rochester for burial Wednesday afternoon.
Surviving are one daughter, Dolly BICK, whose place of residence is unknown, two brothers, John [BICK] and Andrew BICK, the latter of Barberton, Ohio, and a sister, Mrs. Laura NELSON, of Indianapolis.

Eddie BRUBAKER, aged 60 years, a former resident of Rochester, died Tuesday morning at the Epileptic home at Newcastle, according to word received here by his brother, Claude BRUBAKER, who left Wednesday morning for Newcastle to bring the body to Rochester for burial. The mother, Mrs. Samuel BRUBAKER, of Hammond, two brothers, Claude BRUBAKER, of this city, and Harry BRUBAKER, of South Bend, and two sisters, Mrs. Dell SIDMORE, of Michigan, and Mrs. Goldie THRUSH, of Hammond, survive.

Thursday, May 24, 1923

Funeral services for the late Eddie BRUBAKER, who died Tuesday at Newcastle, were held Thursday afternoon at Richland Center. Burial at Richland Center.

Funeral services for the late John BICK, who was killed at Plymouth Wednesday when struck by a Vandalia train, will be held Friday from the United Brethren church at Athens. Burial at Athens.

Over exertion during a golf match on the hilly links at Peru Wednesday, followed by a long ride through the cold air after becoming extremely warm and a hearty meal later in the evening, are believed responsible for the death from heart failure of John B. HOOVER, well known Rochester undertaker and furniture dealer, who was found dead in his furniture store early Thursday morning. He was 54 years of age.
Mr. Hoover had enjoyed his customary good health and so far as could be learned had never complained of his heart, which must have been affected, however, by his exertions Wednesday at Peru.
In company with several companions, Floyd [VanTRUMP] and Carl VanTRUMP, he went to Peru where he played golf strenuously thruout the day. Returning to Rochester in the evening, the party ate a hearty meal and a little later left his friends and apparently went to his furniture store.
Hoover was in the habit of stopping in his place of business in the evening and working on his books or some other work about the store. It is believed that while so engaged he fell ill and went to the upper floor of the store to lay down. It was here that his body was found by Ora FOSTER, an employee of the store, when he opened up for business Thursday morning.
Physicians were summoned and they in company with Coroner HAIMBAUGH, pronounced death due to heart failure. The body was removed to the Hoover chapel.
Funeral arrangements will be made later.
John B. HOOVER was born in Rochester, December 30, 1868, a son of Christian and Margaret HOOVER, deceased.
He was educated in the public schools of Rochester and later became associated with his father in the furniture and undertaking business.
About 30 years ago he was united in marriage to Miss Jennie BUTLER, who with a son, Tom HOOVER, a sister, Mrs. M. O. REES, of this city, and a foster sister, Miss Trude HOOVER, survive. Two half-brothers, George [HOOVER] and Charley HOOVER, and a half-sister preceded him.
Hoover was probably one of the best known business men in this section of the country. His father, Christian Hoover, had been engaged in business in Rochester continuously over a period of 65 years and John Hoover took over the furniture and undertaking business left by the father at his death several years ago.
He was always an extremely active man, in spite of his advanced years and was very popular among his numerous friends. He was known as an expert sportsman and spent considerable time in hunting and fishing and more especially in later years during the season at playing golf.
Among other activities were his acts of charity, which though little known to the public, were of great extent in the community. He was always willing to lend a helping hand to a friend. He was a member of the Eagles lodge and a staunch supporter of the G.O.P.

Friday, May 25, 1923

Funeral services for the late John B. HOOVER, who died suddenly Wednesday night of heart failure, will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Presbyterian church, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. The body has been placed in the Hoover home on the corner of Jefferson and Sixth streets where friends may call. Interment will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Those from out of town who attended the funeral of E. F. BRUBAKER were: Mrs. Allie BRUBAKER and daughter, Mrs. H. B. THRUSH, of Hammond, Mr. and Mrs. Fred SIDMORE, of Jackson, Mich., Harry BRUBAKER, of South Bend, Mrs. Lewis FORE, of Mentone, Mr. and Mrs. Tilman BRUBAKER, of Plymouth, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. BRUBAKER, of Twelve Mile, and Mr. and Mrs. Jacob BRUBAKER, of Fulton.

Saturday, May 26, 1923

James H. RUNNELLS, a resident of Fulton county for the past 68 years, died at nine o'clock Saturday morning at his farm near Richland Center, a victim of heart disease and complication from which he had suffered for the past 15 weeks. He was 73 years of age.
Runnells moved to this county in 1855 and took up the occupation of farming early in life. Of late, however, his health was such that he was forced to retire. Surviving are two sons, Frank RUNNELLS, of Peru, and Bert RUNNELLS at home, two brothers, four sisters, three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, May 28, 1923

Among the out-of-town people here to attend the funeral of John HOOVER were Mr. and Mrs. Warren BUTLER, of Logansport, Minor BUTLER and son, Harold [BUTLER], of Toledo, Ohio, Mr. and Mrs. John BUTLER, of Roann, Byron TODD, Wm. SIMLER, land Fred GREABER, of Indianapolis, A. L. MURRAY, of Chicago, Chester ZIMMERMAN, of Warsaw, Chas. ALLEN and Mr. and Mrs. Chas. TARKINGTON, of Peru, S. Y. SAVAGE, of Macy, Wm. EASTERDAY, of Akron, Mr. and Mrs. Major WEIR, of Peoria, Ill., Frank DITMIRE, of Fulton, and Luther BUTLER, of Smith Grove, Kentucky.

Austin Freemont PIERCE, well known Rochester jeweler, who moved here and established his business little more than a year ago, died suddenly early Sunday morning following a stroke of apoplexy. He was 60 years of age.
Mr. Pierce had been in good health, apparently, and was in his place of business until late Saturday evening, conversing with his friends as usual. That he had been worried about his condition, however, was evidenced by the fact that he had recently spoken to his son, Silas Pierce, about purchasing a lot in the cemetery at Milvord, Ill., for himself. He said at that time that he wanted to make the purchase so that his family could be prepared for his demise and that he feared dying in just such a manner because two sisters and a brother had passed away in the same way.
Mr. Pierce became ill at about four o'clock Sunday morning. Mrs. Pierce was with him for a time and left for a moment. When she returned she noticed that his breathing was labored and at about six o'clock he passed away quietly.
A. F. Pierce was born March 31, 1863 at Roberts, Ill. He had been engaged in the jewelry business in different places for many years. About a year ago he moved to Rochester from Gibson City, Ill., when he established his business here in which his son Homer Pierce was interested. While only in Rochester for a comparitively brief space, he acquired numerous friends and business acquaintances and his loss is deeply felt in the community. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen lodges.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Mary L. PIERCE, two sons, Homer [PIERCE], of Rochester, and Silas E. PIERCE, of Milford and one daughter, Miss Mary Edith PIERCE, at home.
Short funeral services were held from the residence her Monday afternoon at 12:30 o'clock, Revs. F. O. FREELEY and D. S. PERRY, of this city, and Rev. JOHNSON, of Milford, Ill., in charge. The body was taken to Milford, Ill., for burial.

Funeral services for James RUNNELLS were held from the home near Richland Center Monday afternoon at two o'clock.

Tuesday, May 29, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, May 30, 1923

[no paper - holiday]

Thursday, May 31, 1923 to Saturday, June 2, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, June 4, 1923

Casius Clay CISSEL, 63, a resident of this city for the past seven years, died at noon following a stroke of paralysis about a week ago. He had suffered a previous stroke two years ago. Mr. Cissel was a retired minister of the Methodist church and is survived by the widow, two sons, Earl CISSEL of Goshen and Eldrew CISSEL of Frankfort, one daughter, Mrs. E. A. KENNEDY, of Peru, and a brother, Harry CISSEL, of Millroy, Ind. The funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock at the residence, Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT in charge. The body will be taken to Fountain City, Ind., for burial.

Isaiah HOOD, 74, a very prosperous farmer of the Kewanna neighborhood, died Monday afternoon at Woodlawn Hospital here after bleeding to death from an accidental shotgun wound. Mr. Hood was alone in a field at the time he shot himself and was found later by relatives with his arm practically torn off. He was brought to this city in a dying condition and passed away about 2:15 as the result of a hemorrhage. He was hunting groundhogs at the time the accident occurred and it is supposed that he was leaning on the gun when it was accidentally discharged.

Tuesday, June 5, 1923

Funeral services for Robert F. BURNS, 20 year old son of Mrs. Emma BURNS, of Akron, who died Sunday evening at the home of his sister, Mrs. Norval [G.] BALL, of Rochester, were held Monday afternoon at the Nichols cemetery near Akron. Burns died Sunday following a short illness. Death was caused by pneumonia. He was born in Akron November 11, 1902. Surviving are the mother, and three sisters, Mrs. BALL, Mrs. Allen DICKERHOFF, of Akron, and Mrs. Ruth TARISHO, of Elkhart.

Funeral services for C. C. CISSEL were held Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock from the residence on Eighth street, Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT in charge. The body was shipped to Fairmount, Ind., for burial.

Mrs. Rebecca Emily HETZNER, 77, died Monday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Loy Ross, a victim of heart failure, from which she had sufferd for the past two years. She had been bedfast for one week.
Rebecca E. BAILEY was born in Belmont county, Ohio, June 6, 1845, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John BAILEY. Early in life she moved with her family to Columbus, Ohio, where in 1863 she was united in marriage to Michael HETZNER, who preceded her.
A few years after her marriage she moved to Peru, where they made their home until 20 years ago when they moved to a farm near Leiters Ford. About seven years ago she moved to Rochester and recently has made her home with her daughter.
Ten children were born in this marriage, all of whom survive. They are William [HETZNER], Toledo, Frank [HETZNER], Denver, Harry [HETZNER], Fred [HETZNER], Edward [HETZNER] and Dave [HETZNER], Ft. Wayne, Mrs. Mary SCOTT, Elkhart, Miss Emma HETZNER, Athens, Mrs. Frank DAVISSON and Mrs. Loy ROSS, Rochester, and one sister, Mrs. Theodore MARCY, of Indianapolis.
Funeral services from the Ross residence, Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. HERMAN in charge. Burial will be made at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, where the W.R.C. will be in charge.

Mrs. Elizabeth EBER, aged 79 years, died at four o'clock Monday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Archie B. MILLER, of this city. Death was caused by senility. She had been ill for only a week.
Mrs. Eber moved to Fulton county from Miami county 43 years ago with her husband, Lewis EBER, well known farmer, who died 23 years ago. During the past 10 years she made her home with her daughter.
Surviving are six daughters, Mrs. MILLER, Mrs. Joseph HOFFMAN, Akron, Ind., Mrs. P. A. HANS, Oakland, California, Mrs. L. E. FELDER, Rochester, Mrs. Charles PONTIUS, Kalkaska, Michigan and Mrs. J. W. FELDER, Bethel, Alaska, and two sons, Charles EBER, Rochester, and L. F. EBER, Macy, Ind.
Funeral services from the residence of Charles EBER Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. DAVIS, of Loyal in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, June 6, 1923 to Friday, June 8, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, June 9, 1923

Mrs. Christinia THOMPSON, 79, a pioneer of this community, passed away at the Thompson home place on the road to Richland Center, Friday noon, the result of paralysis. She was ill only four days.
She was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, and came with her parents to Starke county about 50 years ago. Later she married James THOMPSON in September, 1872, and came to this county shortly afterwards where they made their home. Her husband died about a year ago.
Funeral Monday at 10:30 at the Richland Center church, Rev. KENYON in charge. Burial in Richland Center Odd Fellows Cemetery.

Two aged farmers of Fulton county passed to another life Friday night and early Saturday morning. Levi ROUCH, dying early Saturday at the farm home, a mile west of Fulton, while Henry SANDS, 74, died Friday night at the county farm.
Levi ROUCH, who was 83 years of age, died very suddenly following an attack of heart failure. He had started to arise for the day and was sitting on the edge of his bed about to dress himself. As he sat there he became suddenly ill and fell over dead before aid could reach him.
Mr. Rouch had been a resident of Fulton county for the past 50 years, spending all of that time on his farm near Fulton. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Fianna ROUCH, who was with him at the time of his death, two sons, Nelson ROUCH, west of Fulton, and Ira ROUCH, of Logansport, and one daughter, Mrs. Oliver MARTINDALE, west of Rochester.

Henry SANDS, a life long resident of Fulton county, was born in Richland township March 4, 1846. He was a farmer and lived in and around Tioosa all of his life until two years ago when he moved to the county farm on account of failing health. He was a bachelor and is survived by two brothers, John SANDS, of Tiosa, and George SANDS, of Wisconsin.
Funeral services from the residence of George DICK, of Tiosa, Sunday afternoon at one o'clock. Burial at the Reichter cemetery.

Monday, June 11, 1923

Miss Elva SHAFFER, well known Akron spinster, died Saturday at the home of her sister, Miss Josephine Shaffer at Akron, following a long illness. Death was due to diabetes. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon. Two sisters, Miss Josephine SHAFFER and Miss Ida SHAFFER, of Chicago survive.

Luella J. [ZIMMERMAN], two day old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arva ZIMMERMAN, near Rochester, died at the home of her parents Friday. Burial was made at the I.O.O.F. cemetery Monday afternoon.

Tuesday, June 12, 1923

Cecil SPARKS, 28, an overseas veteran of the World War, died at three o'clock Tuesday morning at his home in Fulton. He had been gassed while serving in the A.E.F. in France and since returning to Indiana had been confined for the past six months in a sanitarium at Rockville, returning home only a week prior to his death.
Two years ago he was elected postmaster at Fulton, but was succeeded shortly after by Hugh HENDERSON owing to the fact that he was physically unable to attend to the duties.
Cecil Sparks was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Newton SPARKS and leaves besides his parents, three sisters and two brothers.
Funeral arrangements later.

Wednesday, June 13, 1923 to Tuesday, June 19, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 20, 1923

George B. MARTINDALE, 84, well known farmer living four miles south of Rochester, died at his home Tuesday night at 11 o'clock, following a short illness. Death was due to complications the result of old age. His condition had been serious since Sunday.
Mr. Martindale lived in Fulton county for the last 50 years coming here from Miami county. He was born March 22, 1839 and on July 24, 1864 he was united in marriage to Angeline COOK who died five years ago.
He is survived by one sister, Lucy STONE, of Marshall County and seven children, Albert [MARTINDALE], Oliver [MARTINDALE], Dallas [MARTINDALE], Byron [MARTINDALE], Clara [MARTINDALE], Ada Alta [MARTINDALE] and Ewing [MARTINDALE]. Three children have died, Elmer [MARTINDALE], Charles [MARTINDALE] and Florence [MARTINDALE].
Funeral at the Christian Church, Rochester with burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Time to be announced later.

Thursday, June 21, 1923

Funeral services for the late Geo. MARTINDALE Friday afternoon at two o'clock from the Rochester Christian church. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, June 22, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, June 23, 1923

Elias MILLER, aged Union township farmer, who was well known over the county and especially in the neighborhood of Kewanna, died Friday night at the home of his son, William Miller, west of Kewanna, a victim of old age. He was 88 years of age and had been blind for the past few years. The widow, two sons, William [MILLER] and Mose MILLER, east of Kewanna, and one daughter, Mrs. Bert CRAIG, of Rochester, survive. Funeral services will be held Monday at Kewanna.

An uncontrollable temper, which led to a family quarrel combined with poor health culminated in the death at 7:30 o'clock Friday evening of James Perry HILL, 54, who committed suicide by shooting himself thru the brain with a 32 calibre automatic revolver.
Hill, who resided near the old college, south of the city, and was a well known thresherman, had been gone from the home all day, returning at five o'clock in the evening. He ate his evening meal and during the course of the meal became incensed at the manner in which his step-son, Robert TIMBERS, had plowed a field of corn during the day.
One word led to another, Mrs. Hill taking the part of her son and Hill finally upset the dining table and stormed out of the house in a rage, declaring that he would "fix himself." Mrs. Hill then went to the front yard where she was crying when Hill apparently returned from the barn where it is believed he secured his revolver from the automobile.
He returned to the front yard where he took Mrs. Hill by the arm and said, "Well, are you coming?" She did not reply, but thru herself to the ground. A moment later she heard the shot of the revolver and upon raising herself and looking about saw that he was lying on the ground.

Mrs. Hill said that at first she believed he had merely shot to frighten her, having often threatened to take his life, but that on closer inspection she saw the bullet wound in the side of his head just above the left ear where the shot was fired.
She ran into the house and secured water and a towel and after calling to the neighbors, attempted to stop the flow of blood. Helmus DuBOIS, a neighbor, who was picking cherries and from the tree had seen Hill fall to the ground after the shot and other neighbors came running and medical aid was summoned.
Hill was taken to the hospital where he died at 7:30 o'clock. He had shot himself at about 5:30 o'clock. The bullet passed through the head from above the left ear to the center of his forehead. He was unconscious at all times following the shooting until he reached the hospital when he asked for water.
James Perry HILL was born near Bucyrus, Ohio, June 15, 1869, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Valentine HILL. When five years of age he was taken by Zefimiah BEALL, west of Rochester, and had since made his home in and around Rochester.
February 27, 1911 he was united in marriage to Clora GOLTRY, his first wife having died. Besides the widow, one daughter by his first wife, Mrs. John HEMMINGER, of Plymouth, four step-children, Mrs. Athel ELBY, South Bend, Mrs. Yola TUCKER, Marion, Mrs. Mary HARSH, Mishawaka and Robert TIMBERS at home, one brother, William HILL, of Ohio, and two sisters, whose place of residence is unknown to Mrs. Hill, survive. Mr. Hill was a veteran of the Spanish-American war, having served in Cuba with the Eighth Ohio Volunteers.
Funeral services Sunday at 2:30 from the residence, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

William Arthur ERVIN, two year son of Andrew J. ERVIN and Mrs. Dessie COLLIER, died at 3:30 o'clock Saturday morning as the result of having swallowed a quantity of carbolic acid. The child lived with his mother, who is separated from the father at the farm home of Beverly LYNCH, of Newcastle township.
While playing about in the yard at about four o'clock Friday afternoon the baby found a bottle of carbolic acid in a trash pile, which he swallowed. Medical aid was called at once, but death came about 12 hours later.
The body is to be taken Sunday to Fairland, Shelby county, for burial.

Monday, June 25, 1923

Four residents of Rochester and Fulton county died over the week end. Mrs. Elise HUDTWALCKER, of this city, Joseph HOWARD, of this city, Eileen McDOWELL, of Athens, and J. J. STOCKBERGER, of Ft. Wayne, practically a life long resident of Fulton County.
Mrs. Elise HUDTWALCKER, widow of the late Emil HUDTWALCKER, died at her home 1130 Franklin avenue at 5:30 o'clock Sunday morning following an illness of six weeks. Death was due to paralysis. She was 61 years of age.
Elise D. J. COHRS, daughter of Franz and Elise COHRS, was born in Hamburg, Germany, August 19, 1861. She was the eldest of seven children, three of whom, with her parents, preceded her.
In 1890 she came to America and on March 22 of the same year she was united in marriage to Emil HUDTWALCKER, of Rochester, at New York. They lived on a farm south of the city until

1906 when she moved to the home on Franklin avenue.
To this union five children were born, one son, Emil [HUDTWALCKER] and a daughter, Thurmelda [HUDTWALCKER], having died in February, 1900. Two sons, Horatio E. [HUDTWALCKER] and Rudolph E. [HUDTWALCKER], and one daughter, Mrs. Ellene JOYCE, one brother, Julius COHRS, and two sisters, Mrs. Constantine TAACKES and Mrs. Otto TAACKS [sic], the latter of Hamburg, Germany, survive.
Funeral services from the Baptist church Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Joseph HOWARD, a resident of this city for many years, died very suddenly Monday morning, a victim of old age and complications. He had not been suffering and his health Sunday appeared to be excellent, when his son, Harry Howard, of Akron came for a visit.
Sunday night he retired as usual and died early Monday morning having become ill during the night. He was 57 years of age.
One son, Harry [HOWARD] and a daughter Mrs. William ANDERSON of the Loyal neighborhood and the widow, Mrs. Mary HOWARD, survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

Word was received here Monday morning of the death at his home in Ft. Wayne of John J. STOCKBERGER, 68, former well known resident of Fulton county. Mr. Stockberger was born and reared near Tiosa where he lived the greater part of his life until removal to Ft. Wayne about 15 years ago. Death was caused by bright's disease. The widow, three [daughters] and one son survive.
The body will be brought to Rochester where burial services will be held from the Methodist church Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. F. O. FRALEY will be in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Eileen McDOWELL, two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Z. M. McDOWELL, of Athens, died Sunday morning at six o'clock following an attack of measles, from which bronchitis developed. The parents, three brothers and one sister survive. Another child preceded her.
Funeral service will be held at Athens Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at the Mt. Hope cemetery.

Tuesday, June 26, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 27, 1923

Mrs. Gladys I. FRESHOUR, 25, wife of Noah FRESHOUR, died Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock at her home at 215 north Jefferson street, a victim of pulmonary tuberculisis from which she had suffered for some time. She had been confined to a hospital in Chicago since last January and had moved to this city only last Monday.
Gladys I. BECHTOL was born in Kewanna September 15, 1897. Following her marriege she lived in Chicago until removed to Rochester just prior to her death. The parents, William H. and Jessie BECHTOL, the husband, a daughter and two sisters, Goldie BECHTOL, of Hammond, and Mrs. Fred YEAZEL, of this city survive.

Funeral services Friday afternoon at 2:30 from the United Brethren church, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Gladys S. FRESHOUR, 1897-1923, buried at Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.]

Thursday, June 28, 1923 to Saturday, June 30, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, July 2, 1923

Mrs. Elizabeth MOORE, wife of Lewis MOORE and a resident of Rochester for 15 years, died at 11 o'clock Sunday evening at her home in Kokomo, according to word received by Rochester friends Monday morning. Death was caused by cancer from which she had suffered for 18 months. Two sons, Raymond [MOORE] and Oscar MOORE, both of Kokomo survive. Funeral services at the Kokomo Christian church.

Tuesday, July 3, 1923

Mrs. Maria CLEMANS, 73, died Monday evening at the home of her son, Solomon Clemans, of near Macy, a victim of gall stones from which she had suffered for several years. She is survived by two sons, Solomon [CLEMANS] and Newton CLEMANS, of Fulton, four daughters, Mrs. E. W. FENNIMORE, of Macy, Mrs. Ethel SMITH, of Pleasant Hill, Mrs. Gladys COFFING, of Wagoners, one brother, John NICHOLDS, of near Sevastopol, and a sister, Mrs. Emma LYONS, of Mentone. Funeral services from the Macy Christian Church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. C. E. SEIFRES in charge. Burial at the Plainview cemetery, Macy.

Wednesday, July 4, 1923

[no paper - holiday]

Thursday, July 5, 1923 to Saturday, July 7, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, July 9, 1923

Joshua McDOUGLE, farmer living northeast of Fulton, who died Friday, was buried at Metea Monday following the funeral services at Fairview church. He is survived by two sons, William [McDOUGLE] and Frank [McDOUGLE], and two daughters.

Mrs. Mary EATON, 62, living in Newcastle Township, died Monday morning at her home, the result of an extended illness due to the hardening of the arteries. She had been seriously ill for three weeks.
She was the wife of Isaac EATON and came here 22 years ago from Kosciusko county. She was a member of the Baptist Church. She is survived by her husband, one son, Artie [EATON], and one grandson.

Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at Mentone with Rev. BENDER officiating. Burial at Mentone.

Gerald [GRANDSTAFF], the fourteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John GRANDSTAFF, was instantly killed Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock while shocking wheat in a field on the Ben WILSON farm four and one-half miles northeast of Chili. He was a cousin of Mrs. Orbra EMMONS, of this city, and was well known here.
The boy, in company with his father, was working at the time, placing the sheaves of wheat in the shock and they were but a short distance from each other when the bolt of lightning struck the lad on the shoulder, ranging downward and into the ground through the limbs and leaving a deep burn in its path.
The clothing was burned and torn and the shoes of the boy were literally torn from his feet. The father was badly stunned from being in close proximity to the bolt of lightning but soon recovered. The boy was one of a number of children in the family and had graduated from the common school of Richland township this spring.

Mrs. Minerva Jane SHRIVER, 68, of Akron, died Friday night at her home following an illness of some duration. She was born June 20, 1855 in Ohio and came here some time ago. Her husband was Elias J. SHRIVER who preceded her. The couple had nine children. Funeral was held Sunday afternoon with burial in the Akron I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Harold REDD, 16 year old son of Mrs. Frank ELLIS, living three miles south of Fulton, committed suicide early Sunday morning in the barn at the family residence by shooting himself with a shotgun. No one heard the report and it was several hours later that his body was found by a young brother. It is thought that he killed himself about four o'clock.
It becomes known, following his death, that the young man had forged several checks on the Fulton State Bank all of which amounted to about $100. This had been called to the attention of his parents by Howard FRAIN, cashier, but they had said nothing to him about it as yet hoping that the boy would make good the shortage. It is thought that he brooded over his misstep and seeing no way out he shot himself. However, according to Fulton residents he gave no indications of worrying and this might not have been the motive.
It had been the custom of the youth to sleep in the haymow on warm nights. Saturday night, however, after spending the day in Logansport he went to the bed in the house. Later he arose, dressed and went to the barn, undressed himself and lay down in the hay clad only in his underwear. Sunday morning when he did not appear his mother sent one of her boys out to awaken him and the little fellow came back shortly saying that, "Howard is up in the haymow and bleeding." She went to the barn and found her son dead.
He had evidently placed the muzzle of the gun against his side and by reaching out with an iron bar had pulled the trigger. The bar was alongside the gun when he was found. The full charge took effect in his heart and death was probably instantaneous.
Howard had the reputation of being a good boy and no one suspected that he was in any trouble. He was a member of the Christian Endeavor of Fairview Church. He is survived by his stepfather, Frank ELLIS, his mother, formerly Mrs. Dolly REDD, and seven brothers and sisters. His father, Joe REDD, had died several years ago.
Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

Tuesday, July 10, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 11, 1923]

The funeral of Harold REDD, Metea high school youth who committed suicide at his home south of Fulton Sunday morning, was held at the Metea Baptist Church Tuesday afternoon. Rev. WESTPHAL was in charge of the services. Burial took place in the Metea cemetery.
Unknown to the youth, the step-father and mother had made arrangements to cover the loss caused by the boy's activities, they state. According to the step-father, Frank ELLIS, the boy had been working on neighboring farms until about three weeks ago when he returned to his home. On Friday morning of last week the lad was placed at work hauling wood from the woods on the Redd farm to the house. Upon his return with the first load he informed the mother that there were many ripe respberries in the woods and the mother and other children went to pick them.
After hauling the second load and during the absence of the mother, Harold unhitched his team and after changing clothes went to Logansport on the Rochester bus, passing that place about eleven o'clock. It was that afternoon that the mother was first informed of his activities, the step-father states. An official from the Fulton bank came to the home and informed her. That evening after Mr. Ellis returned home from work at the Obenchain-Boyer company, he and the mother went to Fulton and made arrangements to refund the money lost. Harold failed to return that night or the next day. When Jack, the older brother, arrived home at 11:30 Saturday night he was in his bed.
Harold was seen in Logansport by Bethlehem township acquaintances. He is known to have purchased a box of shotgun shells. The box was found at the home on Sunday with two shells missing. The two missing were those placed in the double barreled shotgun used by the lad.
Mr. Ellis states that when the family arose Sunday morning a portion of Harold's clothes were found in the house. The mother was of the opinion that the lad might be asleep in the barn and sent a younger child to the upper portion of the bank barn to learn of he was there. The child returned and informed the mother that Harold was asleep on a bunch of hay in the driveway of the second floor. About 8:30 the mother went to the place to awaken the child and made the gruesome find. Neighbors were summoned and the coroner notified.
Mr. Ellis states that with two additional checks arriving at the bank yesterday the boy's forgery activities had netted a sum of $90.00 including the $35 note which was due Saturday.
It is said that the boy and his stepfather often differed on matters about the farm.

Joseph William HUFF, 60, a farmer, died Monday afternoon at his home west of Kewanna, the result of a complication of diseases of which he had been ill for some time. He came to that section about 14 years ago from Flora. He is survived by his wife, Martha [HUFF]. The funeral was held at Kewanna, Wednesday afternoon.

Thursday, July 12, 1923 to Friday, July 13, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, July 14, 1923

William SNYDER, Sr., 72, well known farmer living near Mt. Zion, died last night about eight o'clock at his home. Death came as the result of a cancer of the stomach from which he had suffered for the last eight months. He lived in the Mt. Zion community for the last fourteen years, having come there from Deer Creek.
Mr. Snyder was born December 15, 1860, the son of Mr. and Mrs. William SNYDER. He is survived by his wife, three daughters, Mrs. Lilly UTTR, of Deer Creek, Mrs. Minnie McDANIEL, of Logansport, Mrs. Mary HESS, of Logansport, two sons, James [SNYDER], of Linn, Ind., and William H. [SNYDER], of Rochester, one daughter, Mrs. Nora DAVIS and a son Roy [SNYDER] both of whom preceded him in death.
Funeral Monday at 12 o'clock at the residence with Rev. D. S. PERRY officiating. Burial at Deer Creek.

Mrs. Clista PALMER, a sister-in-law of Elias MAXWELL, and well known in this community, is dead at her home at Richmond. Her death was caused by heart trouble. She was 76 years of age. Funeral Sunday at Macy at two o'clock.

Monday, July 16, 1923

The worst tragedy to occur in the community in years took place at Lake Manitou about nine o'clock Monday morning when Harry TALBERT, owner of the new hotel at Long Beach, shot and killed his wife, Lenora [TALBERT], and then turning the pistol on himself fell lifeless across her body where lay at the roadside. Death was instantaneous to both. Talbert was 42 years old and his wife 29. Her parents are Indianapolis people.
The killing was witnessed by several people who live in the neighborhood. The scene was on the dirt road which leads from the Barrett concrete highway, where the large United States Tire sign stands back of the Lee Miller cottage at the lake.
Talbert and his wife had been estranged for some time and just a few weeks ago she sued him for divorce. She had been living for a few days in the Rannells cottage along the same road and was moving her furniture from her husband's hotel to the J. E. BRYANT cottage nearby when the shooting occurred.
Dee SHEETS was driving the truck which contained the furniture and had just driven up to the Bryant cottage and started unloading it when Talbert suddenly drove up in his car and got out. Mrs. Jane ABBOTT came out of her house next door and watched the affair. Talbert seemed angry and demanded to talk to his wife. She was afraid and said she did not want to talk to him. She then turned and sent her adopted daughter, Lauretta [TALBERT (?)], about five years old, down the road to the Elmer FOLKER cottage, telling her to get Mrs. Folker, her friend, and have her come at once. This Mrs. Folker did and met the two as they came quarrelling down the road.
Mrs. Folker sensing trouble attempted to talk to Talbert and at the same time to lead his wife towards her cottage. They had only gone a short distance when Talbert suddenly grabbed Mrs. Talbert while she screamed for the police. Then quickly and without warning the incensed man grabbed a pistol from his pocket placed it against the back of the woman's head and fired. Without a second's delay he put the gun against the side of his own head and pulled the trigger. Mrs. Folker said that at the first shot Mrs. Talbert fell to the road while she held her hand. Talbert fell across her body and the gun dropped from his hand. Mrs. Folker then started for home but collapsed a short distance away where her husband found her.

The two bodies were left in the road just as they lay for a half hour or more until Dr. Dow HAIMBAUGH, coroner, arrived and took all of the evicence. The gun, a 38, was found to be fully loaded with two exploded cartridges. No other evidence of value was found on either body. Coroner Haimbaugh's verdict was "she murdered by being shot in the head, he a suicide."
Talbert and his wife had quarreled violently before, it is understood and when she sued for divorce, he believbed that she was doing this so that she might go back to live with her first husband, Walter SIPE, on employee at the Vine CURTIS Meat Market. It is thought that he became so worked up over this thought that he was insanely mad when he arrived at the cottage and that the act while partly premeditated came as the result of a violent insanity.

Tuesday, July 17, 1923

That the murder of his wife and the killing of himself was premeditated by Harry TALBERT came to light Tuesday when it became known that he purchased the pistol with which he did the shooting just last Saturday.
Albert GOLDING, proprietor of the Rochester Bargain Store says that on last Thursday Talbert came into his place of business and asked if he could buy a revolver there. Golding offered to get him one and at Talbert's directions wrote an order for the .38 calibre pistol and two boxes of shells from a Chicago house. Talbert was insistant that the order be marked rush as he seemed anxious to get the gun quickly. It later developed that Talbert went to the telegraph office and wired the Chicago firm to rush the order. When on Friday the package did not arrive, Talbert had Golding to wire the house.
Saturday morning the gun arrived at Golding's store and he called the Talbert Hotel and by the irony of fate Mrs. Talbert answered. Not caring to tell her what was in the box he informed her that "the package for Mr. Talbert had arrived and for him to come in and get it." She delivered the message as shortly afterwards the hotel owner came into the store and got the gun.
He examined the pistol and in front of Golding loaded it and then waving it in the air said, "this gun is going to do some work soon," and went out.
Monday morning about the same time the crime was committed at the lake a second pistol with three boxes of cartridges came to Golding. This came about as the result of the Chicago firm interpreting the telegram as two sepraate orders.
Talbert also gave other indications that he intended to end it all by the fact that on Sunday he dismissed all of his guests from his hotel and refused to take in any more. Friends who visited the place say that they found him playing his player piano and that the tune was "It's All Over Now."
The body of Mrs. Talbert was shipped to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick GREATER at Indianapolis Tuesday morning bor burial. The funeral of Harry Talbert will be held at the Hoover Chapel at 2:30 Wednesday afternoon with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, July 18, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, July 19, 1923

Mrs. Jennie MACKEY BALDWIN, a life long resident of this city, died Wednesday evening at her home on South Franklin Avenue following a long illness. Death was caused by cancer and complications. She was 70 years of age.
Mrs. Baldwin was born in Rochester July 1, 1846. In 1870 she was united in marriage to James Wm. MACKEY, who died in 1880. In 1890 she was married to George BALDWIN, who also preceded her. Surviving are three children, Joseph [MACKEY] and Luella MACKEY, of this city, A. E. MACKEY, of Los Angeles, Calif. A daughter, Daisy [MACKEY], is dead. She was a member of the Methodist church and the Women's Relief Corps.
Funeral services from the residence at 1418 Franklin Avenue Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Revs. F. O. FRALEY and D. S. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: James W. MACKEY and Levinah J. SINKS were married December 27, 1870. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983.]

Levi SHOEMAKER, 72 well known Newcastle township resident, died at his home in Talma at five o'clock Wednesday evening following a long illness. He had been sick of a complication of diseases since last fall.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Phebe SHOEMAKER and three brothers, two of whom reside at Silver Lake and the other at Warsaw. There are no children.
Funeral services from the Talma Christian Church Friday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Reichter cemetery.

Calista M. SQUIRES, daughter of Wm. and Polly BAILEY SQUIRES, was born near Macy, September 24, 1845 and passed away from this life at the home of her daughter, in Richmond, Indiana, at the age of 77 years, 9 months and 10 days.
She was married to Samuel O. COLLINS March 18, 1886. To this union was born two children, Parke COLLINS who died at the age of three years and Mrs. Etna PALMER, with whom she had made her home the last three years.
October 1, 1900 she was married to Henry PULVER who died seven years ago at their home northeast of Macy.
She leaves to mourn their loss a daughter, Mrs. Charles W. PALMER, who tenderly cared for her in her last illness, two grandchildren, Dora F. McCARTER, of Macy and Jesse Clark PALMER, of Richmond, two great-grandchildren, Warren G. [McCARTER] and Betty Jean McCARTER, of Macy, three nephews, whom Mrs. Pulver reared to manhood, namely Eli P. SQUIRES, of Battle River, Minnesota, and Nathaniel F. SQUIRES, of Macy, also a sister, Mrs. Charlotte E. HUDSON, of Peabody, Kansas.
For years she was a member of the Macy M.E. Church uniting with the church during the pastorate of Rev. A. J. CAREY.
The funeral was held at the home of Mrs. Alva McCARTER of Macy Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock conducted by Rev. J. B. SPARLING assisted by Rev. C. E. SEIFRES pastor of the Christian Church. Mrs. Orbie BRYANT and Mrs. Hurd BRIGGS sang "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere" and "Hours of the Soul." Interment in the Plainview cemetery west of Macy.

Friday, July 20, 1923 to Saturday, July 21, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, July 23, 1923

Joseph CHAPMAN, 87, well known retired Rochester merchant, who had been in business in this city over a period of many years, died late Saturday afternoon at the county farm where he had been an inmate since February 17, 1917. Mr. Chapman had become ill last winter with an attack of influenza, which he appeared unable to overthrow. Complications developed and death finally relieved him of his sufferings. The widow, who lives at Anderson, and from whom the deceased had been separated is the sole survivor. Short funeral services will be held at the I.O.O.F. cemetery Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. J. W. NIVEN in charge.

Tuesday, July 24, 1923

S. J. (Jack) PETERS, aged about 60, and a former resident of this community, is dead at his home in Dodge City, Iowa, according to word received here. No details regarding his demise or funeral arrangements have been received, practically all that is known being the fact that he had been ill for several years.
Mr. Peters moved away from Rochester eight or 10 years ago. He had lived here the greater part of his life and was always engaged in the music business. For a time, however, he lived in Chicago. The widow, Mrs. Stella PETERS, an adopted daughter and two brothers, W. C. PETERS, also of Dodge City and Robert PETERS, of Knox, survive.

Wednesday, July 25, 1923

Emanuel WAGONER, 74, retired farmer, a life long resident of Fulton county, died at his home just east of Rochester at 3:30 o'clock Wednesday morning after an illness of two years.
Mr. Wagoner was born in Ohio, January 2, 1849, the son of Jacob and Rebecca WAGONER, who moved to Fulton county when he was but one year old. In 1876 he was married to Mary ZACHMAN, who with one daughter, Mrs. Merrit BERKHEISER and a foster daughter, Mrs. Ernest McCALL and three brothers, Joseph [WAGONER], of Hemlock, Mich., Frederick [WAGONER], of Dayton, Ohio and John WAGONER, of Rochester, survive.
Funeral services from the Evangelical church Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. HERMAN in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, July 26, 1923

Philo N. QUICK, 90, one of the oldest citizens of Fulton county, died at the home of his son, Hubert QUICK, just west of the city at 10 o'clock Thursday morning, as the result of complications due to old age.
Philo N. Quick was born on the 7th day of December, 1832 in Holmes county, Ohio, the son of David and Margaret OLIVER QUICK, he being one of six children, all of whom have preceded him. He with his parents came to Whitley county, Indiana at the age of 21. He was united in marriage with Hannah T. PACKER April 29th, 1855. To this union was born eight children, five

of whom died in infancy and son, Milton QUICK having passed away 13 years ago. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Edgar McCARTER, of near Fulton and one son, Hubert QUICK, of near Rochester and 13 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.
In the fall of 1868 he and his family moved to Missouri where they resided until 1870 when they came back to this county where he has resided ever since. He was a member of the Christian Church.
Funeral services at 2 o'clock Saturday at the Macy Christian Church Rev. C. E. SEIFERS in charge, burial at the Macy cemetery.

Friday, July 27, 1923 to Monday, July 30, 1923

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 31, 1923

Mrs. Mary PENDLETON, widow of Charles PENDLETON and T. E. MOORE, died Sunday night at 11 o'clock at the home of her sister, Mrs. Mark JACKSON, near Richland Center, a victim of complications. She was 55 years of age and had been an invalid of several years. Mrs. Moore was born and lived all of her life in Fulton county. Two sisters, Mrs. JACKSON and Mrs. Thomas TRIMBLE and a brother, William MARTINDALE, of South Bend, survive. Funeral services from the Richland Center church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Richland Center.

Wednesday, August 1, 1923

Herbert SEASE, the man who murdered R. H. DAVIDSON, former citizen of Leiters Ford, is dead. He was electrocuted at the state penitentiary at Little Rock, Ark., on last Thursday after having twice passed the date set for his death. A newspaper story of his death gives the details as follows:
"As the first beams of light shot over the hills of Arkansas today, the soul of Herbert Sease, 'The man who would not die,' passed from his body in the death room of the state penitentiary here.
"Outside his cell two Salvation Army leaders chanted a death dirge, 'My Soul's Going to Rise Again, My Soul's Going to Rise Again.'
"Sease, electrocuted for one of the most brutal murders in the annals of Arkansas criminal history, twice lived through the date set for his death and contended until the last inute that the big voltage of an electric chair would NOT hurt him because, he declared, 'The Lord has promised that I shall not die.'"

Six years of suffering for L. N. BAIR came to an end Tuesday evening at 10:40 o'clock when he passed away at his home on east Ninth St. He became afflicted with a severe attack of hardening of the arteries six years ago. An infection in his leg resulted and it was found necessary to amputate. Four years later the other leg became infected in a like manner and it, too, was amputated. Death followed two years after the second operation. He was 74 years of age.
Lewis N. BAIR was born in Marshall county, December 20, 1848. He was a farmer during all of his active years. About 47 years ago he was married to Martha ELLIS, who died 17 years ago.

On December 24, 1909 he was married to Amanda HISEY, who with two children by the first marriage, E. C. BAIR, of Culver and Mrs. George PEEPLES, of Whiting, four sisters, Mrs. Joel STOCKBERGER of this city, Miss Amanda BAIR and Mrs. Ida C. NORTH, of South Bend, and Mrs. J. C. CORMICAN, of Walkerton, one brother, E. S. BAIR, of this city, and six grandchildren, survive. He had lived in and around Rochester for the past 15 years.
Funeral services from the United Brethren church Thursday, August 2 at 2:00 p.m., Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at Jordon cemetery in Marshall county.

Thursday, August 2, 1923

Mrs. Barbara E. BRYANT, 72, well known resident of Fulton county, died at eight o'clock Wednesday evening at her home seven miles east of Rochester. She had been ill for five weeks when she suffered a stroke of paralysis. She was the widow of Albert W. BRYANT and was born in Medina, Ohio, March 15, 1861, the daughter of Joseph and Barbara WIDEMAN. Surviving are one daughter, Florence BRYANT; two sisters, Ida [WIDEMAN] and Evelyn WIDEMAN, and five brothers, William [WIDEMAN], Henry [WIDEMAN], Joseph [WIDEMAN], James [WIDEMAN] and Albert WIDEMAN. Funeral services from the residence Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock. Burial at Nichols cemetery.

Friday, August 3, 1923 to Tuesday, August 7, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, August 8, 1923

Mrs. Richard BURRELL, of this city, received word of the death Wednesday morning at his home in Decatur of her father, William BLACKBURN, 87, who died following his second paralytic stroke two weeks ago. The widow and three children survive. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

Thursday, August 9, 1923

Charles Brackett MOORE, who was born, reared and spent his entire life in this community, died at three o'clock Thursday morning at his home on West Eleventh street, a victim of paralysis from which he had suffered for two years. Following his first paralytic stroke he was stricken with several other slight attacks, the last coming about two weeks ago when he entered his final illness. He was 74 years of age.
Charles Brackett Moore was born in Rochester in September 1848, the son of George and Rebecca MOORE. He was a photographer by profession but retired from active work a number of years ago.
Surviving are two children, Louise MOORE, of Michigan City and Mrs. Cornelia BLUE, of Huntington, who has been here recently caring for her father, and Frank MOORE, of this city. Mrs. Moore died three years ago.
Funeral services later.

Mrs. Nancy RINER, 73, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George IGO near Roanoke Tuesday, according to word received here. The body is to be taken to the home of her son, Raymond RINER, near Mentone Thursday. Funeral serfvices will be held at the Baptist church there Friday afternoon. Four children survive, Hugh RINER, of Argos, Ray RINER, of Mentone, Mrs. IGO and Mrs. L. LICHTENWALTER, of this city.

Twenty-four years ago George YOUNG suddenly disappeared from his home in Culver leaving a wife and an unborn child. Not so much as a post card or a rumor has reached Culver since that time to indicate where Young may be. He either met a sudden and mysterious death or left for parts unknown and started life over again severing all connections with the past.
Whether alive or dead he will be declared legally dead at the next term of Circuit court if the application of the son, now grown to manhood is granted. Action is filed in Circuit court this week by Oscar W. YOUNG, through his attorney, H. A. LOGAN, asking that the missing father be declared dead and an administrator appointed to take charge of the estate valued at perhaps $500.

Friday, August 10, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, August 11, 1923

Funeral services for the late Chas. MOORE were held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the home, West 11th street, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Interment in the mausoleum.

Arzella Imoene [sic] MONESMITH, four months old daughter of Oscar and Nettie MONESMITH, died Friday at the home of her parents near Delong after a short illness. Funeral services from the home Sunday afternoon.

Monday, August 13, 1923

[no obits]

Tuesday, August 14, 1923

Henry MOONSHOWER, practically a lifelong resident of Fulton county, died at nine o'clock Monday evening at his home southeast of Athens, a victim of cancer. While having retired from active life for the past few years, Mr. Moonshower was apparently still in good health until last Thursday when he became ill and sank gradually until the end. He was 76 years of age.
Henry Moonshower was born in Stark county, Ohio, October 15, 1847. He moved with his family to Fulton county, Indiana, early in life and has since made his home on the Moonshower farm near Athens.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Mary MOONSHOWER, two sons, Lewis MOONSHOWER, Erie Agent at Athens, and Ralph MOONSHOWER, of Huntington, and one daughter, Miss Clara MOONSHOWER, of South Bend.
Funeral services from the farm home Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock, Rev. Noah McCOY

in charge. Burial at Rochester.

Word was received here Tuesday afternoon of the death Tuesday morning at his home in Oakland, Calif., of Kline W. SHORE, former well known resident of this city. No details regarding his demise were contained in the brief dispatches from his family to relatives in this city. Funeral services and burial will take place in Oakland Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. The widow, Mrs. Mary C. SHORE, one daughter, Mrs. George AUGHINBAUGH, also of Oakland, and a brother, Talbert SHORE, of San Diego, Calif., survive. While in Rochester, where he had lived practically all of his life, Mr. Shore had been engaged in the grocery business. He retired about six years ago and moved to California where he had since made his home.

Wednesday, August 15, 1923 to Thursday, August 16, 1923

[no obist]

Friday, August 17, 1923

Wilson Van Buren FLYNN, 46, died at his home in East Rochester Thursday evening, about seven o'clock, as the result of asthma. He had been ill for two years and had gradually grown worse until the end. Of recent years he had been an employee at the Rochester Bridge Company.
He was born in Fulton County April 23, 1877 and lived in this community all of his life. He was the son of Lemuel and Rebecca FLYNN. Twenty years ago he married Miss Omma KOCHEL who survived him. He was a member of the United Brethren church.
Besides his wife he is survived by four sons, Lemuel [FLYNN], Daniel [FLYNN], William [FLYNN] and David [FLYNN], two daughters, Leora [FLYNN] and Sylvia [FLYNN], two brothers, Frank [FLYNN] and Lee [FLYNN] of Rochester and one sister, Mrs. William GOOD of Marion.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2:30 at United Brethren church with Rev. McCOY officiating. Burial in Citizens cemetery.

In the midst of the sunshine of life comes shadows; when hope should have sat queen of all, today there seems to be but disappointment. To our mortal vision there seems but despair, darkness, but we ask ourselves, is this so? and out of the surroundings that are weighted with our many questions a most beautiful ray of divinest light shines for us all. . . . . While relatives and friends have sustained a loss almost beyond compensation there is restored to heaven that which is heaven's own.
So passed the life of Henry MOONSHOWER, son of Benjamin and Catherine MOONSHOWER. He was born in Stark County, Ohio, Oct. 15, 1847. In the year, 1855, he immigrated to this county with his parents being but eight years of age, where he grew to manhood. On November 4, 1869, he was united in marriage with Mary BECKER. About thirty-five years ago, they moved on the farm where he passed away. Here by diligence and perseverence and the help of his faithful companion he hewed out of the trees and stumps a home where he reared his family.
After an illness of short duration, while accompanied with much pain, he was very patient, while life slowly ebbed away and on the evening of August 13, 1923, he passed quietly away, aged 75 years, 9 months and 28 days. He was of a family of ten children.

Saturday, August 18, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, August 20, 1923

Mrs.. Susan JOHNSTON, wife of "Posey" JOHNSTON, a life long resident of this community, died at noon Sunday at her home just east of Rochester on the Akron road following a long illness. Death was due to intestinal trouble and complications. She had suffered several strokes and had been in poor health for the past two years.
Mrs. Johnston was born in Miami County, May 1, 1858 and was one of four children born to Mr. and Mrs. James SHIVELY also of Miami County. In 1881 she was united in marriage to Henry H. JOHNSTON of Rochester where she lived until 15 years ago when they moved to their country home east of the lake. To this union was born seven children five of whom preceded her in death.
Mrs. Johnston is survived by her husband, the well known dog fancier, two children, Mrs. Dell WRIGHT and Mrs. Glen BRYANT, of this city and a brother Leander SHIVELY, of Wisconsin. Another child is dead.
Funeral services from the home Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, August 21, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, August 22, 1923

Mrs. Clinton [Margaret Ellen McCLURE] JONES, of Argos, sister of Mrs. George DUDGEON, of this city, died Wednesday at her home in Argos. Funeral services will be held at two o'clock Friday at Richland Center.

Thursday, August 23, 1923

The body of Doctor G. P. KIDD, 76, was found in the yard north of his home in Roann Tuesday morning by his daughter, Mrs. Mabel CHANDLER, and Mrs. Nancy Marie MOONEY and his son-in-law, Charles MOONEY.
Monday at midnight, Mrs. Chandler, a daughter living at the Kidd home, went to her father's room to look after him. Dr. Kidd was not in bed, and thinking he might have gone to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Marie Mooney, Mrs. Chandler went there to look for him. He was not found there.
Mrs. Chandler returned to the Kidd home where they discovered that Dr. Kidd's medicine case was gone. Thinking he might have been called out and did not have time to tell them they discontinued the search until about 1:30 when Charles Mooney, a son-in-law, came to the house.
Upon closer search they found the medicine case and knew that the doctor was probably about the house. At 2 o'clock the body was found in the yard, north of the house. He had probably been dead several hours, due to a stroke of apoplexy.

Friday, August 24, 1923 to Monday, August 27, 1923

[no obits]

Tuesday, August 28, 1923

Professor Lamont DAVIDSON, 60, well known in this city where he lived for several years, passed away at 10 o'clock Monday evening at his home in Plymouth, a victim of cancer of the stomach from which he had suffered for a long time. He had been bedfast for the past two months, according to word received here from Plymouth Tuesday morning.
Professor Davidson was one of northern Indiana's well known musicians. He came to Rochester from Jeffersonville, his former home, about 15 years ago and was engaged as director of the Citizen's band. While making his home in Rochester, Professor Davidson besides giving music lessons, organized a boy's band here and also organized a band in Akron. A number of years ago he moved to Plymouth where he had been similarly engaged.
He is survived by a sister, Miss Elizabeth DAVIDSON, who made her home with hime, and one brother, Sante DAVIDSON.
Short funeral services will be held from the Bunnell chapel at Plymouth Tuesday evening after which the body will be taken to Jeffersonville for burial.

Mrs. Lavina GILBERT, widow of the late Jonas GILBERT, died at six o'clock Tuesday morning at her home in East Rochester following a long illness. Death was due to old age and complications. She was stricken with a severe attack of influenza four years ago during the epidemic and never completely recovered. She was 70 years of age.
Mrs. Gilbert was born in Senaca county, Ohio, March 18, 1844. She moved to Fulton county with her parents when she was 11 years of age and had since made her home here. In 1862 she was united in marriage with Jonas Gilbert. There were eight children born to this union, seven of whom survive. In 1887, her husband, a retired farmer, moved to Rochester and died in 1903. She was a member of the Methodist church.
Surviving are seven children, Mrs. Joseph HUNTER, Mrs. George DOWNS, Charles GILBERT, Mrs. Madge RICHTER, of this city, Mrs. Thomas WILSON, of South Bend, Mrs. Bud WAKE [?] of California and Mrs. Frank FUREY, of Cincinnati and two sisters Mrs. Geo. RARICK and Mrs. Sarah HUNTER. Funeral arrangements later.

E. P. SNYDER, 52, lifelong resident of Kosciusko county, died early Monday morning at his home in Mentone, of pneumonia, following an illness of about a year. He is survived by his wife and the following children: Dr. H. C. SNYDER, of Milford; Paul B. SNYDER, of Warsaw; Mrs. Dora RABER, of Grass Creek; Mrs. Mervel KRATZER, of Urbanna and James SNYDER, at home.

Wednesday, August 29, 1923

Funeral services for Mrs. Lavina GILBERT will be held at the residence Friday afternoon at two o'clock, burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Judd MESSERSMITH, a former resident of Argos, who has been employed as a watchman in Chicago, was killed in that city last Monday, according to word received here. The body was taken to Argos Wednesday where the funeral services and burial took place.

Thursday, August 30, 1923 to Saturday, September 1, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, September 3, 1923

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, September 4, 1923 to Wednesday, September 5, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, September 6, 1923

Mrs. Noah SIMMONS, 77, died Wednesday night at her home in Fulton as the result of being burned two weeks ago, when an oil stove exploded. She had lived at Fulton for the past ten years having come there from Twelve Mile. She was a member of Skinner's Church at Twelve Mile.
She is survived by her husband, three brothers, two sisters and several step-children, all living away from Fulton. The time and place for the funeral have not yet been determined but Rev. COOK, of Alexandria will officiate with burial at Twelve Mile.

Friday, September 7, 1923 to Saturday, September 8, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, September 10, 1923

Benjamin HOLLOWAY, 76, well known Fulton county resident, who spent many years at Akron, but who of late years had been making his home in Citronella, Ala., died Sunday afternoon at two o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frank ARTER, of Talma, with whom he had been visiting for the past few weeks. He had been ill for several weeks. Death was due to old age and complications.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Eliza Jane HOLLOWAY, who was with him at the time of his demise; three daughters, Mrs. ARTER, Mrs. William THOMAS, Chicago and Mrs. A. C. TEETER, Villageville, Ill., and three sons, Guy HOLLOWAY, Citronella, Ala., Max HOLLOWAY, Oklahoma, and Dan HOLLOWAY, South Bend.
Funeral services from the Arter home at Talma Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock, Rev. FLORA, of Flora, in charge. Burial at Nichols cemetery.

Word has been received here of the death Saturday noon at her home in Chicago, of Mrs. A. R. SMITH, formerly Mrs. James R. CARTER, of this city, who is well known here. She was about 60 years of age and had been ill for a short time, death coming suddenly. Mrs. Ed. FELZER, of near Rochester, is a daughter. The body will be taken to Bourbon for burial.

Tuesday, September 11, 1923

Josiah ZARTMAN, age 69, dropped dead at eight-thirdy Tuesday morning at his home in Macy. Besides his wife [Daisy E. ZARTMAN] he leaves two sons, Dewey [ZARTMAN], at home, and Walter [ZARTMAN], at Kokomo and one brother, Adam ZARTMAN, of this city.

Kokomo, Ind., Sept. 11. -- Frank DILLON, who was killed near Plymouth August 30, by Deputy Sheriff Garland BOGARDUS, was positively identified as John BURNS, of Martinsville, a fugitive from justice from Morgan county since 1920.
H. F. STOUT, deputy sheriff, and Bogardus, were in Kokomo yesterday evening after a trip to Martinsville, in which definite information was secured which removes all doubt as to Dillion's identity. On October 8, 1920, according to documents in the possession of Deputy Stout, a warrant was issued for the arrest of John BURNS, Commodore BURNS, the father; and Iva [BURNS], the wife of John Burns. It was alleged that the three were operating a still at a place called Pea Ridge in Morgan county. When the posse reached the Burns' home, John Burns leaped over a cliff into a valley below and escaped. Commodore Burns came out of the house with a shotgun, but the officers got the drop on him and he surrendered. He and Iva Burns were placed in the Morgan county jail and held for $3,000 bond each. The warrant for Burns' arrest has been kept by the sheriff of Morgan county ever since, and a $5,000 bond was set upon him by the judge of that county. This original warrant is now in Deputy Stout's possession.
Burns went to Donaldson, Marshall county, shortly after, and when his wife was released she joined him. Deputy Stout has been in touch with Alexander LONG, Burns' uncle by marriage, and learned that Long received a letter from Burns saying that he was working for a man named Frank DILLON, and that his mail should be sent in the name of Frank Dillon. Mrs. Long was also in receipt of a letter recently from Mrs. Iva BURNS, asking that her brothers, Ike [FERRIN] and Gibe FERRIN, be summoned to Kokomo as "John" had been shot up.
Police officers and officers in the sheriff's office at Martinsville have told Deputy Stout that Burns was a dangerous man.

Mrs. Mable SHERIDAN, 22, was burned to death at her farm home, two miles north of Kewanna, Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock when the house caught fire in some manner not fully determined at a late hour Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. Sheridan, wife of Michael SHERIDAN, was alone in the house with her niece, Imogene OVERMYER, four years old, when the fatal accident occurred. According to rather incoherent stories told by the child, Mrs. Sheridan evidently had poured kerosene on an open fire in the cook stove with an explosion resulting.
By the time help arrived, the house was in flames and Mrs. Sheridan was burned to death. The fire, however, had not gained such headway in the house but that practically all of the furniture was saved. The house was burned to the ground.
Mrs. Sheridan was formerly Miss Mable JOHNSON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Schuyler JOHNSON, of near Kewanna. She had just been married last spring. The husband and parents survive.

Mrs. Mary Ann PRILL, 72, a resident of Fulton county for the past 55 years, died at her farm home northwest of Athens at 10 o'clock Monday evening following a two months illness. She suffered with congestion of the lungs and complications.

Mrs. Prill was the widow of the late John PRILL. She was born in Tipton county, July 16, 1851, and was a member of the Dunkard church. Surviving are a son, Ray PRILL, one daughter, Mrs. Pearl MIKESELL and two step-daughters, Mrs. Irene ELKINS, St. Joseph, Mich., and Mrs. William GARNER, Rochester.
Funeral services from the Mt. Hope church at Athens Thursday, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Wednesday, September 12, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, September 13, 1923

Word was received here Thursday of the death, Wednesday, at her home in Kokomo of Mrs. Jane McKINSEY, 75, a former resident of Leiters Ford and well known in this community where she had often visited of recent years. She is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Casper BUTLER, of Kokomo; a son, Sherman McKINSEY, of Grand Forks, Dakota; three grandchildren, Terrance [BUTLER] and Emerson BUTLER, and Mrs. Jane WASMUTH, of Huntington and one sister, Mrs. Jesse BIDDINGER, of Leiters Ford. Funeral services from the home at Kokomo Saturday afternoon.

The funeral of Mrs. Michael SHERIDAN of Kewanna will be held Friday afternoon at two o'clock at the Reform church near Kewanna with burial in the Bruce Lake cemetery.

Joseph ZARTMAN, aged about 70, was found dead in his barn at his home, two miles north of Macy, early Tuesday morning. He had had several attacks of heart trouble but did not seem to be very ill. A number of his uncles and cousins died suddenly with heart failure. He was married to Daisy POWELL who with three children Mrs. Freda MARTIN, of Tyner, Walter ZARTMAN and Dewey ZARTMAN, survive him. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made. He was a member of the Macy M.E. church.

Friday, September 14, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, September 15, 1923

The funeral of Mrs. Josephine BEALL, 83, who died at Michigan City Friday noon will be held at the Christian church Sunday afternoon at 2:30. The body was brought here from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Phillip DEMONT in that city to Rochester, Saturday evening and taken to Mrs. Tamer BAKER's home. Mrs. Deal had suffered previously from several paralytic strokes and a final one proved fatal.
Mrs. Beall was a pioneer of Fulton county having moved to Michigan City when she became an invalid. She was born in LaPorte County February 8, 1840, and came to this county with her parents when she was seven years of age and settled on a farm south of the city. She married Thomas BEALL, March 16, 1856, who owned a meat market here and they established their home on South Monroe street where she lived until two years ago. Mr. Beall died 20 years ago.

She is survived by two children, Thomas [BEALL], of Chicago, and Mrs. Mary DEMONT and several grandchildren.

Monday, September 17, 1923

John M. QUIGG, 91, one of Rochester's oldest citizens, who has made his home in this city for the past 50 years died at his home here Sunday evening at 6:30 o'clock following a long illness. Death was due to old age and complications. He had been bedfast since last July.
John M. Quigg was born in Logan County, Ohio, February 12, 1832. He moved to Rochester nearly a half century ago where he was married for the second time to Margaret Jane TRUE. His first wife preceded him as well as his only child. There were no children by the second marriage and Mrs. Quigg, the widow, is the only survivor.
Funeral services at Presbyterian Church at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Rev. PERRY officiting.

Miss Mary STINSON, 57, died Sunday morning at the home of her sister, Mrs. Martha BARNES, of Gary where she had spent the past five years. Death followed a severe stroke of paralysis.
Miss Stinson had been a life-long resident of this community until five years ago when she went to Gary to make her home with Mrs. Barnes. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James STINSON, deceased, and had followed the nursing profession. She is survived by her sister and two brothers, Webb STINSON, of this city, and Keed STINSON, of Seattle, Washington.
Funeral services Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the residence of her brother, Webb Stinson, 147 Fulton avenue; Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. Burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wayne [NICKELL], two weeks old son of Earl and Lorleen NICKELL, died Monday morning. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon with burial at I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, September 18, 1923

Sidney MOON, former well known resident of Rochester, died at four o'clock Tuesday morning at his home in Portland, according to word received here by his brother-in-law, L. B. WALTERS. Mr. Moon died following a stroke of paralysis. He was about 79 years of age.
Mr. Moon was at one time a school teacher in this city where he had many friends. He was sheriff of Fulton county and was later named State supreme court reporter. He had not lived here for a number of years.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Minnie MOON, two sons, Albert MOON, of New York, and Lee MOON, of Portland, and a daughter, Mrs. Bell SWARTZ, also of Portland.
Following funeral services at Portland the body will be brought to Rochester where graveside services will be conducted at the I.O.O.F. cemetery Thursday morning at 11:30 o'clock.

Wednesday, September 19, 1923

Betty Gene [BRYANT], year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Guy BRYANT, corner Elm and 13th streets, died at 12:30 o'clock Wednesday at the home of her parents following a short illness, which started Sunday. Death was caused by a severe attack of tonsilitis and croup.

Thursday, September 20, 1923 to Friday, September 21, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, September 22, 1923

Ralph QUERRY, 32, of Decatur, Illinois, died at the St. Margaret's hospital in that city Thursday evening following a major operation. Death was caused by a complication of diseases. He was at one time a resident of this city, having spent more than a year in Rochester when he aided in the construction of the mausoleum and was well known in the community. In 1912 he was married to Miss Carrie PAINTER, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sant PAINTER, of this city. Shortly after their marriage they moved to Decatur where they have since made their home. During the war Querry served 18 months overseas. The widow, Mrs. Carrie QUERRY and a sister, Mrs. S. J. BRUCE, of Indianapolis, survive. Funeral services Sunday afternoon at Argenta Ill.

Monday, September 24, 1923

Daniel CONRAD, 74, well known Fulton county farmer, who had lived in this community for nearly a half century, died Sunday night at his home north of Mt. Zion, a victim of paralysis. He had been in good health until last Monday when he suffered a severe stroke and his decline was rapid.
Daniel Conrad was born and reared in Ohio. More than 40 years ago he moved to Fulton county where he had since made his home. He was a farmer during his entire life.
Two children, John CONRAD and Mrs. Emma FULTZ survive. Mrs. Conrad died about six months ago and about six weeks following her death a son, Madison CONRAD, of Fulton, was killed at Fulton when a large stone rolled into a hole he was digging and crushed him beneath it.
Funeral services from the Mt. Zion church Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. Burial at the Mt. Zion cemetery.

Tuesday, September 25, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, September 26, 1923

Word was received here Tuesday of the death in California where he has been making his home of Elden WALTERS, 27, a former resident of Fulton county. Walters is a graduate of Purdue university and lived in this community until he left school. He is the son of Arthur WALTERS, of the Prairie Grove neighborhood.

Thursday, September 27, 1923 Friday, September 28, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, September 29, 1923

Walter D. WELCH, of Bourbon, conductor on the Pennsylvania night switcher was picked up at the west yards, near Fifth street at Plymouth, by a special train at 10:30 Thursday night. The train had slowed down by order from the station, when the fireman saw the body of a man lying in the north track. The train stopped and the crew picked up the body and brought it to the station, where it was recognized as the conductor of the switch train, who was working at the west yards. The skull was crushed by a wound across the forehead four inches long.
There was another bruise on the side of the head, a wound on the face and in one eye, but no bones were broken and there were no wounds on the body except a bruise on one arm. The patient was breathing, but unconscious.
Welch was taken to the hospital where he breathed until 3 o'clock Friday morning but never regained consciousness.
The wife [Lillian M. WELCH] was notified at Bourbon and came at once and was with her husband until he passed away. He was about 52 years of age.
No one knows how the accident occurred, but it seems probable that he was hit by the east bound local passenger train due to leave Plymouth at 8:44. The train that picked up the body was a special train and was preceding the 10:12 train.

Monday, October 1, 1923

Floyd H. GABY, 37, a former resident of this city, died Saturday noon at 12:30 o'clock of typhoid fever following an illness of three weeks, at his home in Mishawaka. He had been a resident of Mishawaka for the past four years.
Surviving are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wellington GABY, Royal Center, and his wife, Mrs. Iva GABY. He leaves four children, Mrs. Blanche FOOR, Mishawaka, Esther [GABY], Lee [GABY] and Glenn [GABY], at home, one brother, Daniel [GABY], of Argos, and four sisters, Mrs. Jennie LOUDERBACK, Star City, Mrs. Esther ULCH, Kokomo, Mrs. Helen STULTZ, Logansport, and Dora NETHERCUTT, of Culver.
He was born in Pulaski county, Oct. 11, 1885, and came to Mishawaka in 1919 from Argos. He was married in Rochester to Miss Iva SAYGERS, January 20, 1905.

Webster STINSON, well known Rochester resident, died late Saturday night at his home on north Fulton avenue, a victim of paralysis. He had suffered a stroke some time ago, and while he had made partial recovery, never regained his full strength. A few weeks ago he suffered a relapse and gradually sank until the end.
Webster Stinson was born in Ross county, Ohio, September 10, 1860, a son of James and Martha STINSON. He was 63 years old at death.
On April 20, 1882 he was united in marriage to Miss Hattie E. GOULD, who with five daughters and one sister, Mrs. Martha BARNES, of Gary, and a brother, K. D. STINSON, of Seattle, Washington, and eight grandchildren, survive.
During his many years of residence in Rochester, Stinson traveled until he was forced to retire from active business life by failing health.
Funeral services from the residence Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, October 2, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, October 3, 1923

Mrs. L. M. BABCOCK died Tuesday evening at five o'clock at Mayo Brothers sanitarium at Rochester, Minnesota, according to word received by Rochester relatives. She was a resident of Britton, South Dakota, but had formerly lived in Rochester where she was well known and had many friends. She was the mother of Mrs. Kent SIBERT, east of the city, and a sister of Mrs. Voris LOWE, Mrs. John DOWNS, of South Bend, and Marion PORTER. Mrs. Sibert left this city Monday to be at the bedside of her mother and was with her at the time of her death.

Thursday, October 4, 1923

Mrs. Levi SNYDER, 55, a former resident of Rochester, died Wednesday evening at her home in Fort Wayne following an operation for appendicitis, according to word received here Thursday morning. She had been ill less than a week.
Mrs. Snyder, who left here about 15 years ago, was born at Monterey. She is survived by her husband, one son, Carl [SNYDER], of Ft. Wayne, and a daughter, Mrs. Cleo RUBY, of Ft. Wayne, and one brother, Howard RANNELLS. Mr. Snyder at one time owned a restaurant in Rochester and was the agent for the Singer Sewing Machine Co. Word of her demise was received by Mrs. Mary HOWARD.

John SHARPE, 45, a former resident of Rochester, and a son of Mrs. Geo. BARKMAN, of this city, died Thursday morning at his home in South Whitley, of injuries receivesd when his team of horses ran away on Wednesday. He is survived by the mother, wife and four children.

Friday, October 5, 1923

George SPURGEON, 50, who lives northwest of Tippecanoe, dropped dead Thursday afternoon just as he was leaving the Bourbn fair. Several Rochester people were present and saw him fall to the ground. Spurgeon was crippled and the only support of his aged mother. There were no other relatives.
[NOTE: See Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Walnut Twp.: George W. SPURGEON, Feb. 18, 1869 - Oct 4, 1923, buried in Walnut Cemetery]

Saturday, October 6, 1923

Mrs. Rebecca CAMPBELL, 82, widow of the late Christopher CAMPBELL, died late Friday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George VanKIRK, of Kentland, according to word received here Saturday morning.
Mrs. Campbell had been a life long resident of Aubbeenaubbee township. Several months ago she went to Kentland to visit her daughter where she became ill. Death was caused by old age and complications. Her husband, well known Leiters resident, died in 1904.

Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. VanKIRK, Mrs. William YELTON, of Leiters, and Mrs. U. S. LEITER, of Albion, Mich., and three sons, Charles C. CAMPBELL, of this city, Barch CAMPBELL, of Hobart, and Albert CAMPBELL, of Portland, Oregon.
The body has been taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. William Yelton, of Leiters, where funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Burial at Leiters.

John W. MARONEY, well known Wayne township farmer, died suddenly Friday afternoon at his home three miles south of Kewanna, a victim of acute indigestion.
Mr. Maroney, who was 70 years old, had been suffering with a cancer for some time, but his health was as usual Friday and he was engaged in his usual pursuits about the house when he suddenly complained of pains in his stomach.
He went to bed and before a physician could be summoned he had passed away. Death came at five o'clock in the afternoon.
County Coroner HAIMBAUGH was called to make a verdict in the death, and while it was first believed that he had died of paralysis or apoplexy from a blood clot, this was found to be not true and a verdict of death by acute indigestion was returned.
The widow and two children, a son and daughter, who were with him at the time of his death, survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

Monday, October 8, 1923

[no obits]

Tuesday, October 9, 1923

Horace LONG, 64, one of Rochester's best known characters, died Monday night at the home of his sister, Mrs. W. D. FRALEY at Battle Creek, Mich., according to word received here Tuesday morning. The body is to be shipped to Rochester Thursday morning for burial. Short graveside services, conducted by Rev. W. J. NIVEN, will be held at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Horace Long was the son of the late Mrs. M. Adalaide LONG, who died about three years ago. He had been a life long resident of Rochester where he was very well known. His health had been poorly of recent years and he had made his home with his sister for some time prior to his demise. Mrs. Fraley is the sole survivor.

William H. BECRAFT, well known Fulton county farmer, who had lived in this community for near 40 years, died at five o'clock Tuesday morning at the farm home of his daughter, Mrs. George NORRIS, several miles north of Rochester on the Michigan road.
Mr. Becraft, who was 83 years old, had suffered a stroke of paralysis less than a week ago, died as a result of the stroke. He was born in Ripley county, Indiana, and had always been a farmer. Of late years, however, he retired on account of failing health. Mrs. Becraft died in 1918.
Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. NORRIS; Mrs L. M. BRACKETT, of this city; Mrs. John FULTZ, north of Rochester, and Mrs. William BRUBAKER, of Rochester.
Funeral services from the Norris home Thursday afternoon at one o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Frank MILTON, 75, retired farmer, died at eight o'clock Monday evening at the farm home of his son, John MILTON, just south of the Pendleton bridge, northwest of the city. Death came as the result of heart disease, with which he had suffered for some time. Mr. Milton had been a resident of this county only two years, having moved here with his son from Burket. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Sarah MILTON, the son and one daughter.

Wednesday, October 10, 1923 to Saturday, October 13, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, October 15, 1923

Mrs. Ida Etheleen TRIMBLE, 62, died at 11:55 o'clock Saturday night at her farm home near Richland Center after a long illness. Death was due to paralysis.
Mrs. Trimble had been a life long resident of Fulton county. She was born May 22, 1861, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse MARTINDALE. On Christmas Day, 1879, she was united in marriage with Tom TRIMBLE.
Surviving are one son, Chalmer TRIMBLE, of Plymouth, Mich.; five daughters, Clara QUIVEY, Argos; Mrs. Mattie REED, Argos; Mrs. Merle COOK, Culver; Mrs. Ethel ADAMS, Rochester, and Mrs. Marie WERNER, of Richland Center; one sister, Mrs. Martin JACKSON, Richland Center, and a brother, William MARTINDALE, also of Richland Center.
Funeral services at Richland Center Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. RHINEHART in charge. Burial at the Richland Center cemetery.

Mrs. Frank AKER, 60, died Sunday night at her home in Dayton, Ohio, a victim of heart disease, according to word received here by her sister, Mrs. Geo. V. DAWSON. Her husband and two children, Caroline [AKER] and Cheffea [AKER], survive. Mr. and Mrs. Dawson left here Monday morning for Dayton to attend the funeral services on Tuesday. Mrs. Aker had often visited her sister in this city and was well known.

Tuesday, October 16, 1923
[no obits]

Wednesday, October 17, 1923

Joseph SLICK, well known Union township farmer, died Tuesday afternoon at his home in Kewanna, a victim of cancer. He had been ill for the past five years. He was 84 years of age.
Joseph Slick was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, May 3 1839. He moved to Fulton county in 1856 and in March 1865 was united in marriage to Pauline HUNNESHAGEN, of Logansport, who preceded him.
In August 1861 he enlisted in Company A, 26th Indiana Volunteers and was discharged from service in 1862 on account of illness. He entered the service again as a sergeant in Company E, 87th Indiana Infantry and was promoted to first lieutenant. In March 1865 he entered the service for the third time and served one year.
Mr. Slick commenced teaching school in District 6, Union Township in 1856 at $10 per month. He taught for several years. At the time of his death he had accumulated considerable property and was vice president of the First State Bank, of Kewanna.
Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Etta TEETERS, at home, and Mrs. Jesse DuBOIS, of Oakland, Calif., and two granddaughters, Milered [TEETERS] and Jesse TEETERS.
Funeral services from the home in Kewanna Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

Mrs. Harold SMITH, 21, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur BACON, of Akron, died Wednesday morning at her home west of Mexico, a victim of diphtheria. She had been ill but a few dayus. She was a former resident of Macy, where she graduated from the high school and leaves a host of friends. Surviving are the parents, her husband and a baby a few months old.

Thursday, October 18, 1923

Word was received here Thursday of the death of Mrs. Dora RUDY, of Lima, Ohio. Mrs. Rudy is the cousin of Mrs. Vernon BARKMAN, who with her husband will go to Lima Friday to attend the funeral.

Friday, October 19, 1923 to Saturday, October 20, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, October 22, 1923

Mrs. Julia FENSTERMACHER, 85, pioneer resident of the community, died at the home of her son, Ora, on south Monroe street at 1:30 Monday morning. She had been seriously ill for about a week. Death was due to complications resulting from old age. She was one of the well known residents of the town and her death will be mourned by a large number of friends.
Julia FENSTERMAKER was born July 10, 1838 at Fairfield, Ohio, the daughter of William and Polly FENSTERMAKER and died at the age of 85 years, three months and twelve days. Her maiden name was the same as that of her husband's with a slight difference in spelling. She married Enoch FENSTERMACHER who preceded her in death. Two sons were born to this union, Ora [FENSTERMACHER] and Al [FENSTERMACHER], both of whom survive and live in Rochester. One granddaughter, Helen FENSTERMACHER, also survives. She was a member of the Presbyterian church.
Funeral at the Ora Fenstermacher residence Tuesday with Rev. D. S. PERRY officiating. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Arnold BURCH, of San Demis, Calif., who formerly lived here, died October 16th at his residence there and was buried at Glendora, California. Mrs. BURCH is a sister of Mrs. Frank BEERY, of Leiters Ford. [See Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton Co. Ind. Marriages, 1836-1983: Florence B. CONNER m. Arnold BURCH, Sept. 9, 1876; Jennie CONNER m. Frank L. BEERY, Dec. 25, 1879.

The baby daughter, Mary Louise [SHAMBARGER], of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel SHAMBARGER, of Macy, passed away Sunday evening after a few days illness of diphtheria. She was one month old. A short service was held at the home Monday afternoon with Rev. C. F. SCIFERS officiating. Burial was made in the Plainview cemetery.

Miss Susan KESSLER, about 75 years of age, living southeast of Fulton, was buried Sunday at Fulton. She had been a resident of the place where she died for about 45 years.

Tuesday, October 23, 1923

Word has been received here of the death of William PENCE on Monday at Minneapolis, Minn., of bronchial asthma. He was 82 years of age. He was born Sept. 25, 1841, and lived at North Manchester until a year ago when he went to live with his son, A. W. Pence, at Minneapolis, who survives him. The body was brought to Rochester Tuesday afternoon.
Surviving are the son, A. W. PENCE, a daughter, Mrs. Frank RICHARD, of Gary, four half-sisters, Mrs. Al K. KOFFEL, of Fulton, Mrs. John OLIVER, Mrs. T. STINSON and Mrs. Neal LOWE, of this community.
Funeral at 2:30 Wednesday at the Hoover Chapel.

Wednesday, October 24, 1923

The funeral of the late William PENCE, who died at Minneapolis, will be held at the Hoover Chapel Thursday afternoon at 2:30. It was stated in the Sentinel that the funeral would be Wednesday but this was an error. In addition to the others named, Mr Pence is survivced by a half-sister, Mrs. John LOWE, and his step-mother, Mrs. Mary PENCE.

Frank DuBOIS, 74 years old, a farmer living one and one-half miles southwest of the city, died at his home at 7:30 Tuesday evening, death being the result of a complication of diseases.
Mr. DuBois had lived in this county for more than fifty years and was well known throughout its borders.
Francis M. DuBOIS was born in the Green Oak neighborhood, November 1, 1847, and had he lived he would have been 74 years of age the first day of next month. He was the son of Henry M. and Rachael DuBOIS, and lived in this county with his parents until he was past eighteen years of age when the family moved to Missouri. It was while on their way from Indiana to Missouri that the mother of the family was taken. After 13 years residence in the latter state the family returned to Cass county where they made their home at different times for seven years.
On November 30, 1882, he was married to Margaret J. WHEATLEY, and leaving Cass county they made their home in New York for the following two years, after which they returned to this county where they have since made their residence.
They were the parents of six children, one who died in infancy, and J. Deyo [DuBOIS], of Logansport; Henry M. [DuBOIS], of South Bend, and John H. [DuBOIS] and George N. [DuBOIS] of this city, all of whom survive.
Besides those in his immediate family he is survived by two brothers, Henry M. DuBOIS and Jonathan D. [DuBOIS], and two sisters, Katherine [DuBOIS] and Mary [DuBOIS], all of whom live in the Green Oak neighborhood, and six grandchildren. Preceding him in death are two brothers, Wilhelmus [DuBOIS] and George W. [DuBOIS], and one sister, Mrs. Ruth CORBIN.
Funeral will be held from the family home on the Wm. RANNELLS farm, southwest of this city at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. W. ASCHANHORT in charge. Interment will be made in the Mud Lake Chapel cemetery.

Thursday, October 25, 1923 to Saturday, November 3, 1923
[no obits]

Monday, November 5, 1923

Mrs. Clara Ellen HARTMAN, 70, widow of the late Benjamin HARTMAN, died at 1:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Estil BEMENDERFER, on south Main street. Death was caused by cancer of the liver from which she had suffered for some time although she had been bedfast only since Friday.
Mrs. Hartman, who was born in Ohio August 3, 1853, had been a resident of Rochester for the past eight years and for five years had made her home with her daughter.
Surviving are Mrs. BEMENDERFER, Mrs. Ed. JONES, and Mrs. Clyde TOWNE, of Rochester; Arthur HARTMAN, of Akron; Clyde HARTMAN of Detroit; Mrs. Bert MORGAN, of Marcellus, Ill.; Irvin HARTMAN, of Macy, and Vernon [HARTMAN] and Estil HARTMAN, of Flint, Mich.
Funeral services from the United Brethren church Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. McCOY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, November 6, 1923

Mrs. Anna WILSON, age about 50, died Monday at her home in Chicago, according to word received here Tuesday morning. She was the wife of Charles WILSON and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph BLOSER, of Kewanna. Her mother, husband and two sons survive. [NOTE: See Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Marriages, 1836-1983: Anna BALSER m. Charles H. WILSON, June 20, 1894.]

Wednesday, November 7, 1923

Ira G. BABCOCK, 76, a well known retired Fulton county farmer, died at 10 o'clock Tuesday night at his home 429 W. Sixth street, a victim of cancer from which he suffered for 11 months.
Mr. Babcock was born in Logansport and lived on a farm in Richland township for many years, having retired and moved to Rochester about 22 years ago. He was the son of Rev. Andrew and Anna BABCOCK, deceased, and was a member of the Baptist church.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Rebecca BABCOCK, two sons, Perry [BABCOCK], of Sheman, Mich., Ray [BABCOCK], of Fulton, one daughter, Mrs. Artie MILLER, of Rochester, three brothers, J. J. BABCOCK, Tiosa, A. E. BABCOCK, Waterman, Ill., and J. C. BABCOCK, Citronella, Ala., and three sisters, Mrs. Newt WALLACE, Richland Center, Mrs. William ANDREWS, Richland Center and Mrs. Arthur STURGEON, Greenville, Mich.
Funeral services from the residence Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. NIVEN in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Ella MOONSHOWER, daughter of Benjamin and Catherine MOONSHOWER, was born Aug. 3rd, 1853. After an illness of but a few days, accompanied with much pain which she bore with patience, while life slowly ebbed away, on the evening of Nov. 3rd, 1923, she passed quietly to rest. Aged 70 years, 3 months. On Nov. 3rd, 1873 she was united in marriage with Benjamin HARTMAN with whom she happily lived, until July 17th, 1918 when he was called home. To this union 11 children were born, two dying in infancy. Those left to mourn the loss of a kind mother are Arthur [HARTMAN], of Akron, Mrs. Ed. JONES, of Rochester, Ind.; Clyde [HARTMAN], of Detroit, Mich.; Mrs. Bert MORGAN, of Marcellus, Ill.; Irvin [HARTMAN], of Macy, Ind.; Mrs. Clyde TOWNE, of Rochester, Ind.; Vernon [HARTMAN] and Estil [HARTMAN], of Flint, Mich., and Mrs. Estil BEMENDERFER, of Rochester, Ind.; also 38 grandchildren.
Besides her home family she leaves one brother, Noah [MOONSHOWER], of Marion, Ind., one sister, Mrs. Robert HIATT, of California and a host of relatives and friends who mourn with these children and grandchildren who have sustained a loss almost unbearable. There is only restored to Heaven that which is Heaven's own. Mrs. Hartman gave her heart and life to the Lord Jesus a number of years ago and has demonstrated her sincerety by living a patient consistent Christian life. In the home and evdrywhere it was given her to serve she has done with a spirit of meekness and fidelity apparent to all.

Thursday, November 8, 1923

[no obits]

Friday, November 9, 1923

John H. HAMILTON, 80, died at 7:45 o'clock Friday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. P. H. MIKESELL, north Pontiac street, a victim of old age and complications. He had been a resident of this city for the past three years, moving here from Memphis, Mo. He was a retired farmer and a veteran of the Civil War. Three daughters, Mrs. MIKESELL and Mrs. Mary HILL, of this city and Mrs. John RUSSELL, of Memphis, Mo., survive. Funeral services will be held from the residence Sunday afternoon at two o'clock.

Saturday, November 10, 1923 to Monday, November 12, 1923

[no obits]

Tuesday, November 13, 1923

Mrs. Emma SMITH, widow of the late Marion SMITH, who lived for many years at Green Oak, died Monday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. FISHER, at Mexico, according to word received here Tuesday morning. Death was caused by paralysis. She had suffered a stroke last Sunday. She was also the mother of Cora SMITH, Fulton county farmer and Mrs. ZARTMAN, east of Rochester, and was the aunt of O. B. SMITH of this city. Funeral services from the Green Oak church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Green Oak.

Wednesday, November 14, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, November 15, 1923

George and Elizabeth FAULSTICH, an elderly couple residing just east of Monterey in Pulaski county, were instantly killed Thursday morning just before noon when they were struck by an Erie freight train just west of the pickle factory at Monterey.
Faulstich, who is a retired farmer, and his wife, who lives alone, were walking along the railroad track, picking up coal. They saw a train approaching from one direction and stepped onto the other track directly into the path of a freight approaching from the other direction.
They were struck squarely and knocked off the track and died almost instantly. The train did not run over their bodies and they were not badly mutilated. Both Mr. and Mrs. Faultsich were past 70 years of age. The bodies were taken to the Faulstich homestead.
They are survived by two sons, Charles [FAULSTICH] and Frank FAULSTICH, Pulaski county farmers and two daughters, Mrs. Henry REINHOLD and Mrs. Bert LONG, also residents of Pulaski county.
Mr. Faulstich was the brother of Albert FAULSTICH, of Fulton county, three members of whose family were wiped out in 1921 when their car was struck by an Erie train at Leiters. Mrs. Eleanor FAULSTICH, sister-in-law of George FAULSTICH and her children, Fred [FAULSTICH] and Bertha FAULSTICH were killed at that time. Side-curtains on their machine prevented them from seeing the approaching train.

Katherine CASTLEMAN, seven year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd CASTLEMAN, of the Burton neighborhood, died at the Woodlawn Hospital Thursday morning just as attending physicians were about to administer an anasthesia for an operation for the removal of tonsils. The girl was believed to have suffered from Bright's disease resulting from poisons sent out through her system from diseased tonsils. She was born in Fulton county February 1, 1916. The parents and one brother, Clyde Earl CASTLEMAN, survive.

Friday, November 16, 1923

The body of W. F. "Squire" DILLMAN, aged 57 years, former resident of Fulton and well known in that locality, was found Tuesday afternoon in a ravine near Battle Ground, where the Soldiers' Home is located. Dillman had been missing for six weeks. A veteran of the Spanish-American war, he had been an inmate of the home.
Dillman had committed suicide by shooting himself through the head with a revolver. No cause for the act could be learned. Burial was necessary immediately after the finding of the body as it was badly decomposed. The remains were discovered by two other inmates of the Soldiers' Home.
Dillman is survived by a sister, Mrs. Frank FISHER, of Fulton, and three brothers, two near Battle Ground and one at Stockdale.

Loren EDWARDS, 18, son of Frank EDWARDS, of Anderson, accidentally shot and killed himself while hunting at 8:30 o'clock Friday morning in a woods near Talma, where he was visiting his uncle Luther GREEN for a short time.
Young Edwards had gone out hunting with his cousin, Charley GREEN, 17, son of Luther Green. The Green lad was some distance away from Edwards when the accident occurred. Green said that he saw Edwards standing on a stump about to light a cigarette. He turned away and an instant later heard the report of the shot gun, which had been leaning against the stump upon which Edwards stood and apparently had slipped and been discharged as it fell to the ground.

The full effect of the shot took effect in Edwards' abdomen. He was rendered unconscious and died before he could be given medical attention and without regaining consciousness. He was taken to the home of Vernon SCOTT, nearby, where he died within an hour after he had been shot.
A verdict of death by accident was returned by Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH.
The boy's mother, who lives in California, and who has been seperated from her husband, with whom the boy lives, had come to Talma to visit her sister, Mrs. Luther GREEN and the boy was also visiting at the Green home at the time. The mother was not at the Green home at the time of her son's death, having gone to Mentone for a short visit with other relatives.
The body will probably be sent to Anderson for burial, although definite funeral arrangements had not been made known Friday afternoon. The boy and his parents are former residents of this community, having lived for some time in Argos.

Saturday, November 17, 1923

Funeral services for Katherine CASTLEMAN, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Loyd CASTLEMAN, will be held Sunday afternoon at the Burton church, Rev. Joe TODD in charge.

John W. SHIREMAN, 64, died last Sunday at his home in Akron, and Mrs. Drucilla EATON, 53, died on the same day at her farm home near Akron.

Monday, November 19, 1923

Adam P. COOPER, retired farmer and veteran of the Civil War, who came to Tiosa six years ago from the Soldiers' Home at Lafayette, died Saturday night at the home of Ezra LEEDY, of Tiosa, a victim of old age. He had been ill for three weeks. Little is known of the veteran who was blind and was cared for by the Leedys. He had been twice married, both wives preceding him. There are several children, brothers and sisters surviving but their names and places of residence were unknown. Funeral services from the residence at Tiosa Monday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. THOMAS in charge. Burial at Sand Hill cemetery.

Albert HUDDLESON, 57, died at his home east of North Mud Lake Sunday afternoon at 12:30 o'clock of Bright's disease. He is survived by a wife, a step-son and one brother. Funeral at the home Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock.

Mrs. Harvey WAYMIRE received word today of the death of her cousin, Robert BAKER, 30, of Lemoyne, Ohio, and his eight year old son Gerald [BAKER]. They were killed in an automobile accident Sunday. Mrs. Baker, and two children and his parents survive. Mrs. Waymire, who is a cousin, has left for Lemoyne to attend the funeral.

Tuesday, November 20, 1923 to Wednesday, November 21, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, November 22, 1923

Mrs. Harriett E. SWANGO, widow of the late William M. SWANGO, died Wednesday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Allen SAUSBE, just north of the city on the Monticello road. She was 64 years of age. Mrs. Swango was born in Shelby county, March 4, 1859, the daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth FALLIS. Funeral services from the Sausbe home, Friday, November 23. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. POWELL and family attended the funeral of Mrs. Powell's mother, Mrs. Lucy LEFFEL, at Ebenezer, Monday. -- Macy Items.

The death angel came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Loyd CASTLEMAN, Thursday morning at 8:45 and took their only daughter, Katherine [CASTLEMAN], age 8 years. She had been sick for a long time and bore her illness very patiently. She was a kind and loving little child and was loved by all who knew her. She was a member of the Burton Sunday school and also went to the Burton school. She will be missed by all who knew her, a voice they loved is still, a place is vacant to their home which never can be filled. -- Loyal Items.

Friday, November 23, 1923

Charles WILLIAMS, veteran of the Civil War, died Thursday night at his home near South Mud Lake after an illness extending over seven weeks. Death was caused by old age and complications. He is survived by the widow, two daughters, Mrs. Charles SOUTHERTON and Miss Myrtle WILLIAMS, two brothers, Ray WILLIAMS, of Rochester, and Frank WILLIAMS, of Macy, and three grandchildren.

Saturday, November 24, 1923

[no obits]

Monday, November 26, 1923

Stilla P. BAILEY, one of Rochester's most prominent business men and a resident of this city for more than half a century, died shortly after nine o'clock Saturday evening at his home on south Madison street. He had suffered a stroke of paralysis in the spring of 1921 and had been in failing health since that time. But recently he had been confined to his home with a bladder complaint and Saturday evening at nine o'clock had taken medicine for this affliction and appeared to be worse than for some time. Shortly after nine o'clock he complained of a pain in his arm and walked upstairs to his bed unassisted. A moment after he had retired, he died. Death was due to a blood clot in the lungs. He was 65 years of age.
Stilla P. Bailey was born in Hardin county, Ohio, February 2, 1858, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Elliott BAILEY. His mother is dead and his father in the meantime had re-married. In 1870 he moved to Rochester where he had since made his home. He was engaged in the lumber milling business for years and was active in democratic political circles all during his life.
In 1888 and 1890 he was elected to the office of town marshal and in 1902 and 1904 elected sheriff, serving two terms in each office of two years each. He was a popular candidate whenever he ran for offices and generally ran ahead of his ticket. In 1908 he established the "BAILEY

PLANING MILL" on east Eighth street where he continued in business for eight years, selling out his business in 1916. Later he engaged in the hardware business with his son in the firm known as "BAILEY & SON" and was active until the time of his last illness.
He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Essie BAILEY; the step-mother, Mrs. Caroline BAILEY; five children, Max BAILEY, Mrs. Robert SHAFER, Elliott BAILEY, Mrs. Hubert TAYLOR and Byron BAILEY, all of Rochester; two half-brothers, Simon [BAILEY] and Charles BAILEY, and one half-sister, Mrs. Stephen PARCELL, all of Rochester.
Funeral services from the residence, Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
The body may be viewed at the home Tuesday afternoon between the hours of 12 and two.

Tuesday, November 27, 1923

Funeral services for the late William HOOVER, 31, who died early Monday at the home of his mother, Mrs. Phillip LUDWIG, east of Fulton, will be held from the Mt. Zion church, Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Hoover, who formerly lived near this city, was a brother of Mrs. Hugh McMAHAN. The mother, Mrs. McMahan and four brothers, John [HOOVER], Fulton county; Ernest [HOOVER], Gilman, Ill., and Don [HOOVER] and Earl [HOOVER], of South Bend, survive.

Wednesday, November 28, 1923

[no obits]

Thursday, November 29, 1923

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, November 30, 1923

Word has been received here of the death Thursday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. May PULVER, of Knox, of Mrs. William COOPER, of Buckley, Michigan. Mrs. Cooper was a former resident of this city. Her husband died two years ago at the Woodlawn Hospital following an amputation of one limb. Four children, Clyde [COOPER], of Chicago; Claude [COOPER], of Buckley; Mrs. PULVER and Mrs. Lee GERALD, of near Knox; two brothers, David SULT, of Leiters Ford, and Geo. SULT, of Sherman, Mich.; and one sister, Mrs. John GRANT, of Warsaw, survive. Funeral services from the church at Richland Center, Sunday afternoon.

The funeral of Charles WILLIAMS, the Civil War veteran who died last Friday morning, was held at the M.E. church Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. J. B. SPURLING. The Peru post of the G.A.R. performed their rites at the funeral. Burial was in the Five Corners' cemetery. -- Macy Items.

Ronald SAVAGE, 28, grandson of Mrs. Susan SROUFE, who lives north of Macy, and the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James SAVAGE, of Ft. Benton, Montana, died of lung trouble in a sanitarium at Helena, Montana, last Thursday evening. Besides the parents he leaves a wife and a brother and sister. The cortege was expected to arrive in Macy Wednesday and the funeral to be held at the Christian church. Interment in the Plainview cemetery. -- Macy Items.

Saturday, December 1, 1923 to Tuesday, December 4, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 5, 1923

Benjamin MILLER and his son Otto MILLER have returned from Culver where, Tues., they attended the funeral services of the former's sister, Mrs. West CRABBS, who died there, Monday. Mrs. Crabbs was blind and had been an invalid for the past two years.

Mrs. Milkie ANDERSON, formerly Nellie HINES, of Wayne township, died at her home in Ambia, Ind., Monday, Nov. 26th., aged 43 years. The funeral was conducted by the Rev. Father BEAGLE, of Dunnington parish. The remains were laid to rest in the Anderson family lot at Hoopston, Illinois. Those attending the funeral from this locality besides the brothers and sisters of the deceased and their families were Frank MARONEY, Mrs. Margaret McDONOUGH, Miss Rosa O'BRIEN, Mrs. James WEASNER and Mrs. Christy HESLIN. Mrs. E. J. SEXTON, of Indianapolis, was also there. The Misses Catherine [RYAN] and Babe RYAN and Joe RYAN, of Chicago, were present.
Catherine Helena HINES was born July 22, 1880 at the old homestead at Kewanna, Indiana. She was married to Milkie ANDERSON, Thanksgiving Day, 1918. To this union was born one child, Julia Catherine [ANDERSON], age four. Besides her husand and child, Mrs. Anderson leaves to mourn her loss her mother, six sisters and three brothers as follows: Mrs. Addie FRUSHOUR, Lucerne; Margaret [HINES], at home; P. A. HINES, Kewanna; M. NOENTI, St. Mary's Notre Dame; J. A. HINES, Notre Dame; Mrs. Pat SINNOTT, Kewanna; Mrs. John QUATMON, Logansport; Mike HINES, Kewanna, and Mrs. Michael DOWNEY, Chicago. Besides the immediate family, Mrs. Anderson leaves two foster sons, James [ANDERSON] and Warren ANDERSON and one daughter, Nora ANDERSON, one foster brother, Victor Hines WIELAND and hosts of friends and relatives for her generous heart and cheerful disposition endeared her to all.

Thursday, December 6, 1923

Garl HUDDLESON died Monday at his home in North Manchester, following a stroke of paralysis. He was 82 years of age and is survived by a wife, son, and daughter. Funeral services from the home at North Manchester, Wednesday. Mr. Huddleson was a brother-in-law of Mrs. L. B. WALTERS, of this city, and formerly lived north of Rochester and near Delong. He moved to North Manchester about three years ago.

Friday, December 7, 1923

Harry GARBER, who was adjudged of unsound mind and held in the county jail here for some time, died Wednesday at the home of his brother, C. H. GARBER, of Bunker Hill, according to word received in this city. Garber was ordered sent to Long Cliff, but before he could be taken into the asylum, recovered to such an extent that he was given into the custody of his brother at Bunker Hill.

Mr. and Mrs. James D. SAVAGE and Mrs. Esther SAVAGE, of Ft. Benton, Montana, and Mrs. JERALD, of Columbus, Kansas, accompanied the remains of Ronald SAVAGE to Macy last week where the funeral was held at the Christian church Wednesday afternoon, Rev. C. E. SCIFRES officiating. The late Mr. Savage served in the U. S. Army for two years, and at the time of his death was in a sanitarium at Ft. Harrison, Helena, Montana. He was a member of the Christian church. --- Macy Items.

Saturday, December 8, 1923 Tuesday, December 11, 1923

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 12, 1923

Winfield BISHOP, 75, who formerly lived on a farm north of Richland Center, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. G. H. EATON, near Longdale, Okla., November 10, according to word received from Mrs. J. P. DURHAM, of Defiance, Ohio, who believes that the publishing here of the death announcement may be the means of locating Bennie BISHOP, his son and Miss NEWCOMB, a niece, who have not been heard from in years.
Bennie Bishop was reaised in the family of William A. DILLON, deceased, and the last that was heard from him was from Momence, Ill.
Winfield Bishop was born near Logansport, June 16, 1848. In 1870 he was united in marriage with Miss Catherine ARMSTRONG. There were four children, Bennie E. [BISHOP], James R. [BISHOP], Caroline E. [BISHOP], and Pearl [BISHOP]. The wife passed away June 2, 1882.
Mrs. G. H. Eaton, of Longdale, Okla., R.R. 2, asks that if any person knows the whereabouts of Bennie Bishop or Wallace PRICE they will please notify her.

Thursday, December 13, 1923 - Friday, December 14, 1923

[no obits]

Saturday, December 15, 1923

Harrison PATTON, 24, formerly a resident of this city and son of the late Mrs. Pearl PATTON, who died in Rochester last winter, died in a hospital at South Bend, Saturday, just before noon from injuries sustained in an automobile accident in that city, Friday evening.
Patton, who drives an American Railway Express Company truck, was working at his usual duties Friday evening when his truck was struck by a Ford coupe driven by A. E. SWEENY, of South Bend, in such a manner as to throw Patton onto the pavement.
He alighted on his head and sustained injuries about the back of the head and his neck, which rendered him unconscious. He was rushed to a hospital, but died Saturday morning without having regained consciousness.
Word of the accident was received in Rochester by his sister, Miss Mabel PATTON, an employe of the Van Trump Company.
Harrison Patton was born in Fulton county, December 12, 1899. He went to school in Rochester, graduating from the grade schools and later joined the army, serving during the World War during which time he spent 11 months overseas. He was a member of the 62nd Indian Infantry.

Upon his discharge from the army he moved to South Bend where he had been employed and where in 1922 he was married to Miss Ruby GIEST, of that city.
Surviving are the widow; three sisters, Miss Mabel PATTON, Miss Josephine PATTON, Chicago, and Mrs. Fred FOGLESONG, Chicago, and one brother, Robert PATTON, a student in the Rochester high school.
Few details regarding the accident and disposition of the body were available here Saturday. It was expected that the body will be brought to Rochester for burial, although funeral arrangements have not yet been made. The man responsible for the accident has made no statement and it is not known whether he will be held responsible for the death of the former Rochester boy.

Mrs. Helen CORNELIUS, 78, a pioneer resident of Rochester, who was born, reared and spent the majority of her life in this vicinity, died Friday at the home of her sons William and Harry Cornelius at Indianapolis, according to word received here. Mrs. Cornelius, who was the widow of the late A. D. CORNELIUS, had made her home in Indianapolis for the past 25 or 30 years. She is survived by three sons, William [CORNELIUS], Harry [CORNELIUS] and George CORNELIUS, all of Indianapolis, and two daughters, Augusta [CORNELIUS] and Minnie [CORNELIUS]. The body will be shipped to Rochester were graveside services will be held Monday morning at 11 o'clock at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Jacob CUNNINGHAM, 53, died Wednesday evening at his home in Fulton following an illness of two years. Death was caused by diabetes. Mr. Cunningham had been a life long resident of Fulton county. He was a farmer by occupation and is survived by the widow, Mrs. Linnie KLINE CUNNINGHAM; two sons, Lester CUNNINGHAM, Gary, and Edward CUNNINGHAM, Rochester; one brother and several sisters. Funeral from the Fulton Baptist Church Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. WHITESELL in charge.

Monday, December 17, 1923

Word has been received here of the death at her home in Medaryville where she was a senior in the high school, of Miss Sarah SANDIFER, 17, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William SANDIFER. She had been ill for a year. Death was caused by tuberculosis. Miss Sandifer was well known in this community where she had visited with relatives including Mrs. P. W. LOWE, Mrs. William BLACKBURN and James [DOWNS] and John DOWNS. She is survived by the parents and one brother, Bruce SANDIFER.

Miss Mabel [PATTON] and Robert PATTON and Theodore JOHNSON, of this city, went to South Bend where they attended the funeral services at the A. M. Russel chapel at two o'clock Monday afternoon for Harrison PATTON, who died as the result of an automobile accident last Saturday. Burial was made in the Riverview cemetery.

Mrs. Charles ROSS, 53, well known Rochester resident, died Sunday morning at 1:30 o'clock at the Woodlawn Hospital where she had recently undergone an operation for hernia. Death was caused by a sudden attack of heart disease.
Bertha E. OWENS was born in Fulton county, August 12, 1870, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert OWENS. She was married to Charles E. ROSS June 26, 1899, leaving her husband, two daughters, Mrs. Pearl WHITESIDE, of Indianapolis, and Ruth ROSS at home, two grandchildren, two sisters, Mrs. Clara CARTER, of Cleveland, O., and Mrs. Marion PORTER, of this city, and

two brothers, Harry OWENS, of Macy, and Foster OWENS, of Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis. She was a member of the King's Daughters, Daughters of Liberty, Daughters of Rebekah, the Women's Relief Corps, American Legion Auxiliary and the Presbyterian church.
Funeral services from the Presbyterian church, Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, December 18, 1923

The white plague took its third victim from the Manning family, of this city, within less than a year's time when Miss Leah Velma MANNING, 23, passed away at 11 o'clock Monday night at the home of her mother, Mrs. Pearl MANNING, 710 Jefferson street. Miss Manning was a victim of tuberculosis from which she had suffered for a considerable length of time.
Just eight months ago her father, the late Luther L. MANNING, died in Colorado where the family had moved several years ago on account of his health. Miss Velma [MANNING], Miss Opal [MANNING], Miss Mildred [MANNING] and Mrs. Pearl MANNING accompanied the body of the father and husband to Rochester for burial. At that time Miss Opal Manning was critically ill with the same affliction and died a few weeks following the demise of her father. The third death came with that of Miss Velma Manning.
Miss Manning was born in Sidell, Illinois, August 30, 1900. She moved with her family to Rochester in her early years and was educated in the public schools of this city, later moving to Colorado and then returning to Rochester. She is survived by the mother and one sister, Miss Mildred Manning, a student in the local high school.
Funeral services from the residence Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Jacob CUNNINGHAM was held Saturday from the Baptist Temple with Rev. WHITSEL in charge. -- Fulton Items.

Wednesday, December 19, 1923

E. L. POWELL and family attended the funeral of Henry LANDIS at Gilead Sunday.
-- Macy Items.

Thursday, December 20, 1923

George WEIR and wife went to Hammond last Friday to attend the funeral of Mrs. John WILHELM which was to be held on Saturday and they will visit relatives here before returning home. -- Richland Center Items.

Friday, December 21, 1923

Mr. and Mrs. Herb SHOBE, Mr. and Mrs. N. R. STONER and James COPLEN motored to Francisville today to attend the funeral of Orange SEVERNS.

Victor NEFF, of Argos, died almost instantaneously as he finished his day's work on the new high school building in Plymouth Tuesday evening. He suddenly complained of feeling ill and sat down. A physician was called but in an instant the man was dead. Heart failure is given as the cause of death.
The funeral at the home in Argos at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon.
Mr. Neff was about 55 years of age. He lived all his life in Argos and was known to every one. He had won a reputation as an excellent workman.
He is survived by the widow [Myrta C. NEFF] and three daughters and two sons as follows: Eloise [NEFF], Esther [NEFF], Margaret [NEFF], Henry [NEFF] and George [NEFF].

Saturday, December 22, 1923

Mrs. Gus COLLINS, 35, of Chicago, died at one o'clock Friday afternoon from injuries sustained in an automobile accident at Hammond at eight o'clock Thjursday night, according to word received by Miss Bess KEEL, of this city. Mrs. Collins, a former resident of Rochester and well known here, is a cousin of the Keels. Funeral services at Hammond, Monday.

Monday, December 24, 1923

Mrs. Rebecca J. SANDERS, 83, widow of the late Thomas J. SANDERS, died late Saturday night at the home of her son Henry Sanders, Richland township farmer, a victim of paralysis. She suffered her first stroke a year ago.
Mrs. Sanders was born in Columbia county, Ohio, November 12, 1840, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry BILGAR, who died when she was but 12 years of age. In 1866 she was united in marriage to Thomas SANDERS, who died in 1921. There were seven children born to this union. Surviving are four sons, Henry [SANDERS], Daniel [SANDERS], Amos [SANDERS] and Charles SANDERS, 10 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
Funeral services from the church at Richland Center, Monday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Richland Center.

A J. SLUSSER, who spent a number of years in Rochester, where he was well known, died at his home in Macy at 9:30 o'clock Sunday morning, a victim of old age and complications. He was 73 years of age and had been ill but 10 days prior to his death.
Surviving are the widow, one daughter, Mrs. William NORRIS, of Rochester; Charles SLUSSER, of Peru, and Otto SLUSSER, of Macy. Mrs. Slusser is a sister of Mrs. Lee MILLER, of this city.
Funeral services from the home at Macy, Wednesday afternoon.

Word has been received of the death at the Old Soldiers' Home at Lafayette, of Mrs. Rebecca TALLY, widow of the late Reuben TALLY, who died about 20 years ago. Mrs. Tally was a resident of Rochester until about two years ago when she moved to Lafayette. The body will be brought to Rochester where funeral services will be held Wednesday at two o'clock at the Evangelical church. Burial at the I.O.O.F. Cemetery.

John SNODGRASS, well known in Rochester, died at his home east of Macy, Saturday night, a victim of cancer of the stomach, according to word reaching here Monday morning. He was 54 years of age. The widow, one brother and a sister survive. Funeral services from the home, Tuesday.

Tuesday, December 25, 1923

[no paper - holiday]

Wednesday, December 26, 1923

Christmas turned into a sad memory for the family of William ENGLE, of South Bend, whose son, Harry ENGLE, 14, was accidentally shot and killed while hunting near Kewanna Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock.
The boy had been presented with a 22 calibre rifle for Christmas, and on Wednesday morning the boy, with his father, William ENGLE, and a younger brother, William ENGLE, Jr., went to the home of William MEADE, three miles east of Kewanna, for a short visit. The Engle family had formerly lived in Logansport where they were neighbors of the Meade family.
The father and two sons went out into a field on the Meade farm and at about 10 o'clock the father shot a rabbit. Turning the gun over to its proud possessor, he started to skin the rabbit when he heard the discharge of the gun and looked around to see his son fall to the ground.
In some manner that could not be learned, as the lad never regained consciousness, the gun discharged and the bullet entered the lad's left temple.
He was rushed to the Meade home where medical aid was summoned but nothing could be done and he died within an hour after the accident. The body was taken to South Bend for burial. The father, mother, three brothers and two sisters, survive.
Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH, who was called to make an investigation, returned a finding of accidental death.

Charles D. ALSPACH, 41, well known in this community, died at five o'clock Monday afternoon at his home at Millark, southeast of Rochester, after a short illness. Death was caused by gangreen which resulted from the scratch of a chicken. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Bertha ALSPACH, and several children. Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock with burial at the Plainview cemetery at Macy.

John SNODGRASS, aged 54, died at his home one and a half miles east of Macy, Saturday night at ten o'clock after a year's illness from cancer of the stomach. He was born south of Macy, June 3, 1869. Besides the widow he leaves a sister and a brother. Funeral at the home Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock. -- Macy Items.

J. A. SLUSSER died at his home in the south part of Macy, Sunday morning at ten o'clock from complications resulting from the influenza which he suffered with several years ago. He was born in Putnam county, Ohio, January 23, 1850, and therefore was 74 years of age at the time of his death. He is survived by the widow, two sons, Otto SLUSSER, of LaPorte, and Charles SLUSSER, of Peru; one daughter, Mrs. Wm. NORRIS, of Rochester; a sister, Mrs. Sadie OVERLY, who resides near Peru; a number of grandchildren and a host of friends. Funeral services at the home Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock. Interment in the Plainview cemetery. -- Macy Items.

Thursday, December 27, 1923

Mrs. Tom SANDERS was buried in the Odd Fellows cemetery at this place on Monday of this week. Her funeral was preached at the Grand View Evangelical church. -- Richland Center Items.

Friday, December 28, 1923

David BUSENBERG, of Mentone, died Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the home of his son, Lawrence BUSENBERG, of Mentone. Death followed an illness of six weeks. ;His death was caused by Bright's disease. Mr. Busenberg was quite well known in Mentone having resided there for a number of years. He was 71 years of age.

Saturday, December 29, 1923

After a long year of suffering caused by leakage of the heart, John THOMPSON, of Akron, died Monday evening at eleven o'clock. He was five years and nine months old.
For more than a year, the lad has never lain down. He secured what little rest he could, by leaning up against a chair or was held in an upright position by his father. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at the Christian church, Rev. SPANGLER in charge.
The lad leaves a father and mother, three sisters and three brothers.

William K. BROWN, 58, a resident of this community for the past 42 years, died at 8:30 o'clock Saturday morning at his home east of the lake following a six months' illness. Brown, who was engaged as a day laborer, was a victim of carcinoma of the bowels. He is survived by the wife, Mrs. Ellen BROWN, from whom he has been estranged, and three sisters, Mrs. Sarah FUGATE, who lived with him, Mrs. Abby CONGER, east of Rochester and Mrs. Ella TAYLOR, of this city. Funeral services from the United Brethren church, Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Marie STARK, nine year old youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. John STARK, of Akron, died Thursday morning at 12:15, a victim of influenza. She took sick about eight weeks ago, the disease locating in her brain. She leaves two brothers and three sisters.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles RIFE and son Marvin [RIFE], Mrs. James MARSH attended the funeral of Mrs. Myrtle HUTCHINSON, of Onward, Friday. -- Fletchers Lake Items.

Monday, December 31, 1923

Henry PFEIFFER, 57, who gained the respect and admiration of the citizens of this community during his many years of residence in Rochester during which time he was associated with the BEYER BROTHERS poultry interests as general manager, died at 4:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon at his home, 136 Eel street, Logansport, following a sudden heart attack.
Mr. Pfeiffer has been in ill health for a number of months and he became stricken with a

severe attack of jaundice, which is believed to have been aggravated by financial reverses when, immediately after he first was confined to his bed with the illness, his condition grew worse until last week, when he appeared to be slightly improved. Thursday evening he suffered a relapse and death came suddenly Saturday afternoon. The blow was a severe shock to the family, following so closely upon the heels of his business difficulties.
Short funeral services were held at 11 o'clock Monday morning from the residence at Logansport in charge of Rev. PRESTON, of the Broadway Methodist church of that city after which the body was brought to Rochester where funeral services were held from the Methodist church at 2:30 o'clock conducted by Revs. G. E. CRAIG, of East Chicago, former pastor of the church, and Rev. F. O. FRALEY. Interment was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
Henry Pfeiffer was born in Gensungen, Germany, February 19, 1866, a son of George and Marie PFEIFFER. In 1881, at the age of 15 years, he came to the United States, with his sister Eliza PFEIFFER, who died in 1919 in Iowa. He located in Warsaw where he engaged in the poultry business with his half-brothers in the firm of BEYER BROTHERS.
In Warsaw he entered the high school and later continued in business, moving to Rochester in 1885 where he became general manager and controlled the entire Beyer Brothers interests.
In 1888 he was united in marriage to Miss Rhoda FOGLESONG, of Kewanna, who with two daughters, Mrs. Gordon MARTIN, of LaPorte; Mary [PFEIFFER]; two sons, Lucius [PFEIFFER] and Edward [PFEIFFER], of Logansport; two sisters, Mrs. Maria CARLSON, of Rochester, and Martha PFEIFFER, of Gensungen, Germany, and five half-brothers, J. E. [BEYER], J. F. BEYER, of Warsaw; C. C. BEYER, of Kendallville; Albert BEYER, of German Valley, Ill., and August BEYER, of Gensungen, Germany survive.
In 1914 he left the Beyer Brothers when that firm was sold out to Armour and Company and engaged in the poultry and produce business in Logansport, operating from Rochester until 1919 when he moved with his family to Logansport where he had lived until the time of his death.
At Logansport he reconstructed the large building on Erie avenue which housed the LOGANSPORT PRODUCE COMPANY and the offices of the PFEIFFER SALES COMPANY, from where he operated the MONTICELLO PRODUCE COMPANY, of Monticello and the GILMAN CREAMERY AND PRODUCE COMPANY, of Gilman, Ill., and prospered in business until a few months ago.
A boycott on eggs and poultry in New York, which knocked the bottom out of prices caused what his friends believed would have been merely a temporary downfall financially and in order to protect his creditors, he made an arrangement of his affiars in the First National and City National banks of Logansport, where it was stated that his financial difficulties could be settled speedily. However, he was forced to his bed with a severe illness two days after the assignment and remained in a critical condition until death relieved his suffering on Saturday.
Mr. Pfeiffer, prior to his financial difficulties, had accumulated a fortune and was well thought of by his numerous associates and friends. He was president of the National Association of Produce Dealers, a member of the Masonic and Knights of Pythias and Elk lodges, a member of the Logansport Rotary Club and the Methodist church.

David H. SECOR, 68, well known Henry township farmer, residing several miles west of Akron, died at his farm home Saturday, according to word received here Monday morning. He is survived by the widow. There were no children. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Methodist church at Akron. Burial at Akron.