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FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

 

 

 

 

 

FULTON COUNTY INDIANA

 

OBITUARIES

 

1924

 

 

 

Rochester Sentinel

and

The News-Sentinel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOMBAUGH HOUSE

700 Pontiac Street

Rochester, Indiana 46975-1538

 1997

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book cannot be reproduced without the express permission of Jean C. and/or Wendell C. Tombaugh, their heirs or assigns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made in the United States of America

 

 

 

 


Rochester Sentinel

1924

Wednesday, January 2, 1924

Edward S. KLINE, retired miller and resident of Mexico, Ind., died Monday night at 11:55 o'clock after an illness of one month's duration caused by paralysis. Funeral services will be held from the Baptist church at Mexico Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock and will be in charge of Rev. C. S. DAVISSON, of Rochester.

Marshall SMITH, 65, who moved from Rochester five years ago, died early Tuesday morning at his home in Bunker Hill, a victim of cancer from which he suffered for a long time. He was well known in the community, having lived for many years on a farm at the end of west Eleventh street, almost within the city limits. He is survived by three sons, Ed SMITH, of this city, and Noble [SMITH] and Grover SMITH, of Logansport, and four daughters, Mrs. Rose ISLER, Indianapolis, Mrs. Mabel LESTER and Miss Sheila SMITH, of Bunker Hill, and Miss Mary SMITH, of Galveston. Funeral services at Loree Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock. Burian at Rankin cemetery.

Among the persons from out of the city who were here Monday afternoon to attend the Henry PFEIFFER funeral service, were C. C. BEYER, of Kendallville, J. F. [J. E.?] BEYER, of Warsaw; H. O'KEEFE, of Chicago, secretary of the National Producers' Association, of which Mr. Pfeiffer had been president, Harvey BANTA, of Goshen, Carl CARLSON of South Bend, 12 members of the Logansport Rotary Club, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. FOGLESONG and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph FOGLESON, of Kewanna; Mr. and Mrs. Elmer BURTON, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. WYNN, and Mrs. Lavina WHITFIELD, of Lucerne.

A terrible accident saddened the usually happy New Year's advent for the family of Mr. and Mrs. Fred FENSTERMACHER, five miles northeast of Rochester, bringing as it did the death of their 20 months old son, Robert Owen FENSTERMACHER, who died Wednesday of burns sustained when he was scalded under a tub of hot water Tuesday morning.
Mrs. Fenstermacher was preparing to wash some clothes and had placed a washtub on a chair in the kitchen. She took a pail of scalding water from the stove and emptied it into the tub and stepped onto the back porch with the tub to fill it with cold water from the pump to cool her wash water.
The child was playing about the kitchen when the mother stepped out and in some manner, which will never be known, the little fellow caught hold of the tub and pulled it over onto himself.
The entire contents of the tub was precipitated over the baby, who was found pinned beneath the tub by Mrs. Fenstermacher when she returned to the kitchen a moment later.
Medical aid was summoned, but to no avail. The accident occurred shortly before eight o'clock Tuesday morning and the baby died soon after midnight of the same day. The child's body was horribly burned from the waist up and about half of its face also was scalded. The accident was made much more serious by the fact that the tub fell on top of the child and the stream from the scalding water was thus retained about its body.
Surviving are the parents, two brothers and three sisters.
Funeral services Friday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Pleasant Valley church.

Charles Davis [ALSPACH], son of Eli and Loretta ALSPACH, was born near Macy, Sept. 23, 1882, and passed away at his home northeast of Macy, Dec. 24, 1923, aged 41 years, 3 months and 3 days.
He was united in marriage to Bertha May BRYANT, Oct. 19, 1901. To this union two sons, John Raymond [ALSPACH] and Louise LeRoy [ALSPACH]. [sic] While at a young age, Mr. Alspach was bereft of his parents, after which he made his home for a number of years with his half-brother, John SAVAGE, who was the only near relative that he had. The funeral was held at the Macy M. E. church, Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 26, at 2:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. E. H. KENNEDY, of Marion. Interment in Plainview cemetery.

Thursday, January 3, 1924

Andrew J. RIDDLE, 57, died Wednesday evening at 6:30 o'clock at his farm home near Tiosa following a nervous breakdown sustained last fall, from which he had never recovered. He had been a resident of the community in which he lived for many years and was one of the prominent farmers of that section of the county. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Inez RIDDLE; four sons, Rev. E. M. RIDDLE, of Bryan, Ohio; Charles RIDDLE, at home; Raymond RIDDLE, of Tiosa, and George RIDDLE, principal of the Lincoln school of Rochester; and four daughters, Mrs. L. C. BARTON, of Mentone; Mrs. Harry COOPER, of Mentone, and Misses Bertha [RIDDLE] and Mabel RIDDLE, at home. Funeral arrangements later.

Word has been received here of the death of Joan Patricia [JAMISON], two months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs Claude JAMISON, of Willard, Ohio. Burial occurred Wednesday at Claypool. Mr. Jamison was a former resident of Rochester, having been employed by the Rochester Telephone Co.

F. D. HAIMBAUGH, postmaster of Muncie for the last eight years, died at his home there following an attack of heart failure. He passed away Wednesday evening according to a message from his son Paul [HAIMBAUGH] to Frank McCARTER of this city, who is a nephew of the deceased. Mr. Haimbaugh was well known in this community where he had often visited and was a prominent Democrat in his home city.
Mrs. Katharine McCARTER, of this city, Mrs. John FENSTERMACHER, of Fulton, and Mrs. Arthur LYNCH, of Chicago, sisters, survive. The funeral will be held at Muncie, Saturday afternoon.

Friday, January 4, 1924

Charles MYLER, who was formerly the owner of what is known as the Frank NEWBURN farm, southwest of Rochester, and who for a number of years past had lived on a farm near Doughlas, S.D., has just notified friends in this city of the death of his wife, who with her adopted son was struck and instantly killed by lightning early last fall. lHe is the sole survivor.

Funeral services for the late A. J. RIDDLE, Saturday afternoon at one o'clock from the Brethren church at Tiosa. Burial at Tiosa.

Saturday, January 5, 1924

Henry township lost one of her well known pioneer women Thursday night in the death of Mrs. Rachael PONTIOUS, aged 90, who succumbed at her home one mile south of Akron, following a long illness.

Monday, January 7, 1924

Word was received here today from Ralph FINNEREN, former Ford agent in this county, stating that his step-father, Edward FITZ, of Detroit, had died on Saturday. Mr. Fitz was well known in the community having visited here. Finneren is expected in this city within the next day or two.

Jesse BIDDINGER, well known Aubbeenaubbee township farmer, who lived in Fulton county for more than 60 years, died Sunday morning at 3:30 o'clock, a victim of old age and complications. He had been ailing for some time but his condition did not become alarming until a week before his death. He was 77 years of age.
Jesse Biddinger was born in Wabash in 1846. He moved to Fulton county when but 15 years of age and had lived on a farm near Leiters until a few years ago when he returned because of failing health and his advanced years, moving into Leiters where he resided at the time of his death.
He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Elizabeth BIDDINGER, four sons, Carl [BIDDINGER], of Rochester, Clyde [BIDDINGER], of East Chicago, Cleve [BIDDINGER], south of Leiters, and Lieutenant Don BIDDINGER, of Long Branch, N.J.; one daughter, Mrs. Clarence BINTON, of Star City; three brothers, Jonas [BIDDINGER], of Leiters; Peter [BIDDINGER], of Rochester, and William BIDDINGER, north of Rochester, and four grandchildren. One son, Clarence [BIDDINGER], preceded him.
Funeral services from the Saints church at Leiters Ford, Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. WILLIAM, of the Methodist church, of which he had been a member, in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, at Leiters.

Tuesday, January 8, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, January 9, 1924

Two highly respected pioneer citizens of Fulton county have passed away in the persons of Mrs. Alminia GORDON, widow of the late Adam GORDON, who died at her farm home near Tiosa, Tuesday afternoon at four o'clock and Henry HOWER, who died Monday night at 11 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Anna WILLIAMS, of near Mud Lake.
Mrs. Gordon, who was 72 years of age, was born in Ohio, January 29, 1851, moved to Fulton county with her parents in her early years and about 50 years ago was united in marriage to Amos GORDON, moving to a farm in Newcastle township where she has since made her home.

She is survived by two sons, Elmer [GORDON] and Roy GODRON, of Rochester; a daughter, Mrs. Curtis SMITH, of Wisconsin; three sisters, Mrs. William TAYLOR, of South Bend; Mrs. Cordelia RALSTON, of Fulton county, and Mrs. Angeline SULLIVAN, of Fulton county, and one brother, Lafayette DUMBAULD of near Tiosa. Two children are dead.
Funeral services from the Christian Church at Tiosa, Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock, Rev. THOMAS in charge. Burial at Richland Center.

Henry HOWER, 86, was a pioneer resident of Fulton county, having moved to the Mt. Olive neighborhood from Cass county in his early youth and living practically all of his life in that community. He is survived by four daughters, Mrs. WILLIAMS, at whose home he lived at the time of his death; Mrs. James DOWNS, south of Rochester; Mrs. Emma ENYART, of Plymouth, and Mrs. Lydia KNIGHT, of Miami county, and four sons, Charles [HOWER] south of Rochester, John [HOWER] and Samuel [HOWER] of Cass county and Joseph HOWER, of Wisconsin. Mrs. Hower died seven years ago.
Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock from the United Brethren church at Fulton, Rev. N. C. McCOY, of Rochester, in charge with burial at Fulton.

Thursday, January 10, 1924

Clinton BRODEY, 60, well known Fulton county farmer, resident north of Rochester, died at the hospital Wednesday following an operation last week for appendicitis. Born and reared in Marshall county, Brodey had two years ago moved into Fulton county. He is survived by the widow, one daughter, Miss Margaret BRODEY, at home, two brothers, Arley [BRODEY] and Harry BRODEY, and one sister, Mrs. Harry ROHER, of Marshall county.

Despondent because of ill health, George R. COLLINS, 60, well known Fulton county farmer, committed suicide by hanging himself at his farm home in the Mud Lake neighborhood where he had lived practically all of his life.
Born in this county April 5, 1863, a son of Solomon and Sarah COLLINS, he had followed the occupation of his father, that of farmer, he had become one of the well known men of the county.
Of late, however, his heart had failed and he was subject to high blood pressure. Apparently he became despondent.
At three o'clock Thursday afternoon, his son-in-law, who was at the Collins' farm at the time, went out to the barn not more than five minutes after Collins had left the house for the barn, presumably on an errand.
Arrived at the barn, Ream found Collins dead, hanging from a rafter by a leather strap. He had given no indication of his act at any time.
Surviving are the widow Mrs. Effie COLLINS, three daughters, Mrs. Murrell REAM, west of Rochester, Mrs. L. G. MILLER, Rochester and Mrs. Roy HATTERY, Deedsville and three brothers Jay COLLINS, of Mentone and Jake [COLLINS] and Burrel COLLINS, of Arkansas.

Friday, January 11, 1924

Funeral services for the late George R. COLLINS from the Green Oak church Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Mt. Zion cemetery.

George M. COSTELLO, 81, prominent Fulton county farmer, died at the St. Joseph's hospital at Logansport Thursday afternoon at four o'clock, according to word received here Friday morning.
Mr. Costello was the son of the late James and Anastasia COSTELLO. He was born and reared in Fulton county and for many years was a teacher in the public schools following his graduation from the Indiana State Normal university. He is survived by one brother, John W. COSTELLO, of Wayne township and one sister, Mrs. James DWYER, of LaCrosse, Wis.
The body was removed to the home of his brother near Grass Creek. Funeral services Monday at nine o'clock from the St. Ann's Catholic church at Kewanna. Interment at Grass Creek.

Saturday, January 12, 1924

Mrs. Estella TAYLOR, 59, wife of Charles TAYLOR, died at 9:30 o'clock Saturday morning at her home, corner Ninth and Jefferson streets, following a long illness. She had been in poor health for the past two years. Three weeks ago she suffered a stroke of paralysis and was confined to her bed, sinking gradually until she became unconscious about 60 hours prior to her demise.
Estella ALSPACH was born in Fulton county, south of Rochester, January 28, 1873, a daughter of the late Sylvester and Mrs. Marie ALSPACH, of this city.
In the early years she moved with her parents to Rochester, where she was educated in the public schools of the city. On September 2, 1890, she was united in marriage to Charles TAYLOR, of this city. To this union were born two sons, Orbra [TAYLOR] and Hubert [TAYLOR], both of this city. Surviving are the two children, the mother, the husband, one brother, Guy ALSPACH, of Rochester, and a sister, Mrs. C. M. HART of Salt Lake City, Utah.
Funeral services from the residence Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, January 14, 1924

Robert M. YELTON, age 88, one of the oldest pioneer residents of Fulton county, died at 11 o'clock Sunday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H. C. Walpe, in Peru. He had lived with his daughter in that city for 18 years. Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon from the Sharon church, near Leiters Ford. Interment will be in the [Moon] cemetery at that place.
The deceased was born at Greencastle, Ind., September 24, 1835, the son of David and Elizabeth FOE YELTON, but the family soon thereafter moved to Fulton county, settling near Leiters Ford, where the deceased was engaged at farming durng his entire active life. He was married on January 11, 1859 to Jane MONESMITH, who died August 13, 1903. They were the parents of eight children, of whom the surviving are: Mrs. H. C. WALPE, of Peru; William H. YELTON, of Leiters Ford; L. G. YELTON, of Ora, and Lon YELTON of Muskegon, Mich.

Tuesday, January 15, 1924

Thomas HERBAUGH, 73 well known bachelor farmer residing about three miles southeast of the city, died at his farm home at 11:00 o'clock Tuesday morning, victim of pneumonia. He had

been ill but a week. The deceased was born in Blackford county, Jan. 20, 1852, a son of Abraham and Sarah HERBAUGH. He came to Fulton county from Delaware county 54 years ago and had since made his home with his sister, Miss America HERBAUGH, near Rochester. The sister is the sole survivor. Burial is to be made at the Mt.Zion cemetery, Thursday.

Jack [STAHL], the three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Byron STAHL, passed away recently at Coffeyville, Kansas, according to the news received here by relatives. Byron is well known here, he being the son of Alvah STAHL who moved his family from here to the West several years ago. Byron and his wife are now on their way to Seattle, Wash., where they will make their home.

Wednesday, January 16, 1924

Joseph K. SENSIBAUGH, 8?, one of the pioneer farmers of Fulton county, died at one o'clock Tuesday afternoon at his farm home near Talma, following a four weeks illness. Death was caused by old age and complications. Born in Pennsylvania, March 29, 1835, he was brought to Fulton county by his parents when but a year old and had since made his home here. Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Lorena SENSIBAUGH, three daughters, Mrs. Sarah BAKER, Minneapolis; Mrs. Anna HUDSON, Warsaw, and Mrs. Myrtle CHAPMAN, Rochester; and four sons, Charles [SENSIBAUGH], Warsaw; Curtis H. [SENSIBAUGH], Washington; Elden [SENSIBAUGH], Argos, and Harry C SENSIBAUGH, Warsaw. Funeral services Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from Harrison Center church, near Warsaw.

Mrs. Vina WELER BRINEY, 46, wife of Melvidore BRINEY, died at her home near Richland Center Tuesday morning at five o'clock after an illness of more than a year. She had been a resident of Fulton county for a number of years, having moved here from Miami county. The husband and five children ranging in ages from three to 16 years survive. Funeral services from the Jordan church Thursday afternoon at two o'clock.

Thursday, January 17, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, January 18, 1924

Peter GOOD, 66, brother of Newton [GOOD] and Frank GOOD, of this city, died Friday morning at his home in Etna Green, according to word received here. Good, who is a carpenter by trade, was working on a church building a week ago Tuesday when he fell thru to the basement. He was taken to a hospital at Fort Wayne, lwhere not until two days later, it was learned that his neck is broken.
Physicians at Fort Wayne gave up all hope for his recovery and he was removed to his home, where death followed. The widow, one son, Theodore [GOOD] and three brothers, the two in Rochester and another brother, Samuel GOOD, of Walnut survive.
Funeral services at Etna Green, Monday.
Mrs. Elizabeth WARE received word of the death, at his home in Marion, of her brother, Leo ZABST, 45, who was a victim Tuesday morning to a severe attack of pneumonia. Funeral services were held at Fulton, his former place of residence and birthplace, on Friday. He is survived by his wife, six children, six sisters, Mrs. W. H. PEIRCE, of Peru, Mrs. Albert MEDARY, of Twelve Mile, Mrs. Charles HIATT, of Kewanna, Mrs. E. BARKER, of Fletchers Lake, Mrs. Audry

MARTIN, of Fulton, and Mrs. WARE, and two brothers, Abner [ZABST] and Ben [ZABST], of Fulton.

Miss Hattie BATCHELOR, 38, died at her home in Chicago Thursday morning, according to word received here Friday morning.
Miss Batchelor was the daughter of James BATCHELOR, former Rochester butcher and was born and reared in this city, where she was well known. She is survived by a sister, who lives in Chicago, another sister, Mrs. Chas. FULKERSON, of South Bend, well known here, and a brother, James BATCHELOR, of Wabash. The parents are dead.
Mrs. L. V. HUNT, who received word of the death, expected to hear regarding the funeral arrangements. It was expected that the body would be brought back to Rochester for burial.

Saturday, January 19, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, January 21, 1924

John H. MILLER, the well known retired farmer and stock man, died at 12:10 o'clock Saturday afternoon at his home at 251 West Main street at Peru, following a few week's illness with influenca. A short funeral service which will be private will be held at the House at 1:30 Monday afternoon. An hour later a public funeral will be held from the Brethren church at Mexico, Rev. APPLEMAN of South Bend officiating. The interment will be in Greenlawn cemetery, Mexico. Miller was a well known stockman who until a few years ago raised fancy cattle on a model farm northwest of Peru.

Everett Richard MILLER, five months old grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. DUDGEON, of Rochester, died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey MILLER, of near Burr Oak, Sunday evening at 8 o'clock. Death was due to spinal trouble which dveloped shortly after birth. Burial will be made in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. cemetery on next Tuesday at 2 o'clock. Rev. A. L. RINEHART will be in charge.

Elias VanDUYNE, 75, well known Green Oak blacksmith, dropped dead at his home in Green Oak at nine o'clock Saturday evening following a sudden attack of heart failure. He had been to the grocery store earlier in the evening and was apparently enjoying his usual health, which was good except that he had attacks with the heart at times. Death was almost instantaneous.
Born in Wabash county, January 4, 1849, the son of Josiah and Louisa VanDUYNE, he moved to Green Oak where he established a blacksmith shop following his marriage in 1870 to Miss Martha FAUROTE, of Twelve Mile, who preceded him in death. He had made his home at Green Oak for the past 50 years and was one of the well known men of the community.
Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. David KRATHWOHL, Rochester, and Mrs. Lula BURKETT, Green Oak; two sons, Franklin VanDUYNE, Mt. Zion, and Otto VanDUYNE, Washington; two step-sons, Edward FAUROTE, Macy, and Charles FAUROTE, Rochester, and three sisters, Mrs. Henry OVERMYER, Rochester, Mrs. Armilla HILAND, Winamac, and Mrs. Rebecca JOY, Wabash. Two daughters are dead.
Funeral at Green Oak Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. C. S. DAVIDSON in charge. Burial at the Mt. Zion cemetery.

Joseph A. DOOLITLE, of Peru, formerly an employee of the Nickle Plate and well known in this city, died at the Wabash hospital at Peru, Friday evening, according to word received here. He was a brother of Mrs. P. O. CORNELL, of this city. Burial took place at Peru Monday afternoon at two o'clock.

Tuesday, January 22, 1924

Charles GIBBONS, 50, well known Rochester boy, who was born and reared in Richland township and spent many years in Rochester, died early Tuesday morning at his home in Cleveland, according to word received here by his brother Sherman Gibbons, of this city.
Mr. Gibbons, who left Rochester for Terre Haute, where he was employed by the Holland Furnace Company, was later promoted and transferred to Cleveland where he has since made his home. Details of his death were not available, as it was not even known that he had been ill. It was thought, however, that the body would be returned to this city for burial.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Edna GIBBONS, two children, Paul [GIBBONS] and Lewis GIBBONS, one brother, Sherman GIBBONS and two sisters, Mrs. Carrie OVERMYER, of Rochester and Mrs. R. M. OSBORNE, of Argos.

Mrs. C. I. CLEMENS, 52, of Gary, former Rochester resident, died at her home in that city at 1:30 Tuesday morning following a six weeks' illness from stomach trouble.
Mrs. Clemens, whose maiden name was Mary ZEIGLER, was born and raised in the Fulton neighborhood but later came to Rochester. Here she met and married C. I. CLEMENS, who later on became surveyor. In 1912 they moved to Gary where they have resided ever since.
She is survived by four sons all living at home, her husband, her mother, Mrs. Charlotte GREY, of Huntington, a sister, Mrs. Eva LOWMAN, of Huntington, and a brother, Sgt. John ZEIGLER, of Wrightstown, N.J. Funeral at Athens, Thursday at 2:30 o'clock with Rev. N. C. McCOY officiating. Burial at Mt. [Hope] Cemetery there.

William ADAMS, 57, who had made his home in and around Rochester for the past 30 years or more, died late Monday night at the home of Salome MINTER on Madison street, a victim of Bright's disease.
Adams, who was the divorced husband of Mrs. Nettie JOHNSON, of this city, had been employed as a farm laborer practically all of his life. Last spring, when his health started to fail him, he moved into Rochester where he occupied rooms on north Main street.
On Friday of last week, he became seriously ill, and went to the Minter home where he was confined to his bed until death came Monday. His brother, Harry ADAMS, and a son, Lewis ADAMS, who reside at Vevay, Ind., were called to the bedside and arrived only a few minutes before he passed away. They are the sole survivors.
The body will be taken to Vevay Wednesday morning where funeral services will be held and burial take place.
Wednesday, January 23, 1924

The body of Charles GIBBONS, former Rochester resident, who died Tuesday morning at his home in Cleveland, is to arrive in Rochester for burial Friday. Complete funeral arrangements have not yet been made known.

Thursday, January 24, 1924

Funeral services for the late Chas. GIBBONS, who died Tuesday morning at his home in Cleveland, will be held at the Methodist church, Friday afternoon. The body will be taken direct to the church from the train, which is due in this city at 2:30. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, January 25, 1924

Marvin Gerald [ALDERFER], five months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Lee ALDERFER, died Thursday night at 10 o'clock at the home of his parents at Argos. Funeral services from Richland Center Saturday afternoon at two o'clock.

Mrs. Elmer COPLEN passed away at her home southwest of Inwood at six o'clock Wednesday morning, following an illness of nine days with pneumonia. She was 51 years of age and is survived by her husband and six children, three of them married and three living at home. Short services were held at the home at twelve o'clock on Friday after which the funeral services were held in the Christian church at Talma at 1:30. Talma was the former home of Mr. and Mrs. Coplen. Mr. Coplen is just recovering from a severe operation for the removal of gall stones.
[NOTE: Elmer COPLEN, 1867-1950; Frances A. COPLEN, his wife, 1872-1924; John COPLEN, their son, 1894-1898 - all buried in Reichter Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Newcastle Township]

George HILFICKER, 75, well known resident of Kewanna, is dead at his home there following an illness due to complications. He passed away Thursday morning. Mr. Hilficker had spent most of his life on his farm near Kewanna but a few years ago he moved to the town where he spent his remaining years.
He was born in Pennsylvania in 1849, the son of John and Elizabeth HILFICKER, being one of four children. While he was still young his parents moved to Indiana. At the age of 16 he enlisted in the army and saw activity for the two last years of the Civil War. Afterwards he remained in the regular army for five years, serving in the cavalry. In 1879 he married Miss Alice GORSELINE and two children were born to this union, Mrs. Althea GRAHAM, deceased, and John HILFICKER, of Kewanna. One brother, William [HILFICKER], of Dallas Center, Iowa, also survives.
Funeral services at the Baptist Church at 2:30 Saturday. Burial in the Moon Cemetery.
[NOTE: George HILFICKER, Co K 13 Ind Vol Cav, 1847-1924; Sarah A. HILFICKER, 1858-1939 - buried Moon Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Aubbeenaubbee Township.]

Mary E. CLEMENS, daughter of Daniel and Charolite ZEIGLER, was born at Fulton, Indiana, on the 30th day of November, 1871. She was married to Charles I. CLEMENS on the 26th day of December, 1895 Mrs. Clemens leaves to mourn her departure, a mother; one sister, who resides at Huntington, Indiana; one brother, who resides at Wrightstown, New Jersey; a husband, Charles CLEMENS, and four sons: Murrel [CLEMENS], Dean [CLEMENS], Kenneth [CLEMENS], and Robert [CLEMENS], and one granddaughter, Mary Elizabeth CLEMENS, all of Gary. Departed this life January 22, 1924, age 52 years, 1 month and 22 days.

Mrs. Clemens was a good neighbor, a faithful wife, and a lovable mother. She lived to exemplify the truths of the immortal Bryant in his matchless poem, entitled "Thanatopolis."
. . . . . . . . . .

Charles M. GIBBONS, son of James P. and Julia GIBBONS, was born near Richland Center, Fulton county, Indiana, May 7th, 1873. He departed this life at his home in Cleveland, Ohio, January 22, 1924, of heart failure.
He was a brother of W. S. GIBBONS, Gary, Ind., Ella GIBBONS OSBORNE, Argos, Carrie GIBBONS OVERMYER, Rochester, who are living and of James M. [GIBBONS] (twin brother) and Lydia GIBBONS, deceased.
He was united in marriage in 1890 to Edna HERSCHMAN, of Brook, Indiana. To this union were born Paul [GIBBONS] and Lewis [GIBBONS] who survive to mourn his departure.
He, since leaving Rochester, has lived in Madison, Wis., Chicago, Ill., Terre Haute, Ind., and Cleveland, O., occupying positions of trust and confidence. His business associates and many friends attest their high regard for his business virtues.
In early life he became a member of the Methodist church and remained always steadfast to the faith. His aim in life was to do the right at all times and his devotions to his family and their interests is to be admired as an ennobling virtue.
At the time of death he was supervising salesman and Division Manager for the Holland Furnace for the Buckeye Division with offices located at Cleveland, Ohio.

Saturday, January 26, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, January 28, 1924

Mrs. John RICHMOND was born near Crestline, Ohio, December 27, 1835. Her maiden name was Lucinda JORDAN, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry JORDAN. In the early morning of Monday, January 28th, 1924, she departed this life, after only a few hours' illness, at the home of her son, Charles Richmond, on Monroe street, Rochester. She had but recently passed the 88th milestone. Had she lived until the 26th day of March, she and her husband would have celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary, as they were united in marriage on that date in 1854, in Kosciusko county.
Three children have preceded her in death, Alice [RICHMOND] and Frank [RICHMOND] in early childhood, and besides a daughter, Mrs. Viola KESSLER. The two surviving sons are Charles [RICHMOND], of Rochester, and George [RICHMOND], residing at Ford Wayne. Surviving also are the husband, four grandchildren and one great-grandchild.
About forty-five years ago, Mrs. Richmond, at the same time with her husband, united with the Methodist Episcopal church. This was at Palestine, under the ministry of Rev. Madison SWADENER. For a long time Mr. and Mrs. Richmond resided at Mentone. Here they were faithful church members of the church and for years Mr. Richmond served as caretaker of the church building. Mrs. Richmond was a good keeper of her home where she rendered loving service as a wife and a mother during a long life. Besides her own children, she helped to rear six of the younger step-sisters and brothers, and also two of her brother's children.

Others besides found help and a place of refuge in their home. Each year during the twenty-two years of residence in Rochester, Mr. and Mrs. Richmond have gone back to the old cemetery and the church in Mentone on Decoration Day. They have many friends in both these towns, and for years in Rochester they have been held in high esteem as among the most upright and honored citizens. Here with her husband she united with the Grace Methodist Church where she continued a faithful and exemplary member until her death. Her long life has been marked by faithfulness, a distinction well won by years of loving service freely given to others in the home and the community.
Funeral services at the Methodist Church, Mentone, at 2:30 Wednesday. Brief services at one o'clock at home here at Rochester before leaving.

Mrs. Laura Ethel HOFFMAN, 27, wife of Dr. George Edgar HOFFMAN, Fulton county health officer and prominent Indiana alienist, died at her home on south Madison street at 4:30 o'clock Monday morning following an illness that had its inception at the time of the birth of her child 20 months ago. She suffered for some time with pulmonary trouble, which later developed into an affliction of the heart. Becoming bedfast 11 weeks ago, the end gradually came nearer until she passed away Monday morning.
Laura Ethel YODER was born near Denver, Miami county, August 16, 1896. She made her home on the farm with her parents, who now reside near Macy until her marriage June 28, 1920, to Dr. Hoffman, when she moved to Rochester where she had since made her home.
Surviving are the husband, one son, John Frederick [HOFFMAN], 20 months old, the parents, Mr. and Mrs. John YODER, one brother, Roy YODER, of Peru, and a sister, Miss Orpha YODER, at home. Funeral from the home Wednesday, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, January 29, 1924

Funeral services for Mrs. G. E. HOFFMAN, Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the United Brethren church. Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Clarence Barkdoll CHAMBERLAIN, 26, son of Jack CHAMBERLAIN, of this city and a former service man, died at 10:45 o'clock Tuesday morning at the Healthwin sanitarium at South Bend, according to word received here. He had been a patient at the hospital for more than two years, having contracted tuberculosis from being gassed in France during the war.
Born in Denver, Colorado, January 25, 1898, where his mother, Mrs. Elsie B. CHAMBERLAIN had gone for her health and later died, Clarence Chamberlain had lived most of his life in Rochester where he was a graduate of the high school.
He worked at the electrician's trade for some years and entered the service January 31, 1918 at Columbus, Ohio, where he was trained at the Columbus barracks and promoted from private to private first class and radio operator with Headquarters Company 39th Infantry, 4th Division.
He sailed May 19, 1918 and did radio and telephone work in the Alsne-Marne, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives, later being sent to Rolandseck, Germany, with the Army of Occupation and subsequently returned to the United States where he was discharged.
Surviving are the father, Jack CHAMBERLAIN, of this city, who was with him at the time of his death, and three brothers, Jerome [CHAMBERLAIN], of Peru, and Robert [CHAMBERLAIN] and Howard CHAMBERLAIN, at home. A brother and sister died in infancy.

It was expected that the body would arrive in Rochester late Tuesday afternoon. Funeral arrangements later.

Wednesday, January 30, 1924

Welden SISSEL, 15 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles SISSEL, died Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock at the farm home of his parents in the Whippoorwill neighborhood of an infection in the knee. He had been ill only since last Thursday. He had been a life long resident of Fulton county, having been born one mile east of Richland Center October 2, 1908. At the time of his death he was a sophomore in high school. The parents and two brothers, Robert [SISSEL] and Joseph SISSEL, at home, survive. Funeral from the Richland Center church Thursday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Richland Center.

Thursday, January 31, 1924

Funeral services for Clarence B. CHAMBERLAIN, who died at the Healthwin sanitarium at South Bend, will be held from the Presbyterian church Friday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. The American Legion post, of which Chamberlain had been a member, will conduct a military funeral and taps will be sounded and the last salute fired by the firing squad at the graveside.
Marvin Geral [ALDERFER], infant son of Leo and Gertrude ALDERFER, was born August 29, 1923, and departed this life January 24, 1924, aged four months and twenty-five days.
Little Marvin was in the home but a short time, but in this brief while his love won its way to the hearts of all the friends who came to know his sweet life.
Those who shall miss the little one so much are father and mother, a little brother, Herman L. [ALDERFER], four grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Dallas FLETCHER and Mr. and Mrs. Clinton ALDERFER, six great-grandparents and many other relatives and friends.
Funeral services were conducted at Richland Center Saturday at two o'clock by Rev. A. L. VERMILLION.

Friday, February 1, 1924

Samuel JOHNSON, 84, one of the pioneer residents of Fulton county who has lived on one farm in Henry Township in the Sugar Grove neighborhood practically all of his life, died at his farm home Thursday afternoon at three o'clock, a victim of old ag and complications. He had been ill for the past four years, but the critical sickness that resulted in death was but of short duration.
Born on the farm where he died January 2, 1840, Samuel Johnson followed the footsteps of his father, that of tilling the soil, which occupation he followed during his entire life. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served a little over four years in the 46th Indiana infantry. All of his life with the exception of these years, and two other years spent on a farm in the same neighborhood, he lived at the old JOHNSON homestead. He was married July 4, 1866, and to this union were born two children, Dora JOHNSON, of this city, and Arthur JOHNSON, of Peru, who with the widow, Mrs. Jemima JOHNSON and a brother, Enos JOHNSON also of Henry township, survive.
He was always active in the politics of his township and county, having held office as trustee on two occasions and having been a candidate for county commissioner on the republican ticket on two other occasions.
Funeral services from the home Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. J. W. NIVEN in charge. Burial at Akron I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Richard Lemuel [CESSNA], 28 days old son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto CESSNA, died Thursday at the farm home of his parents west of the city. Funeral services Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

Saturday, February 2, 1924

Henry MEHLING, 71, well known retired Fulton county farmer, who came to the Whippoorwill neithborhood with his parents from his birthplace in Sandusky, Ohio, when but an infant, died at nine o'clock Friday evening at his home one mile north of Rochester, after a long illness. Death was caused by anemia from which he had suffered for a number of years, but he had been bedfast only since last October.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Mary BEEHLER MEHLING, to whom he had been married more than 48 years, one daughter, Mrs. Charles BARKMAN, of the Whippoorwill neighborhood, one son, Milo MEHLING, at home, and a sister, Mrs. Katherine MILLER, of the Whippoorwill neighborhood.
Short funeral services from the home Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. KESSLER in charge. The last rites will be held at the Richland Center church with burial in the Richland Center cemetery.
J. Welden Porter SISSEL was born Nov. 2, 1908. Died Jan. 29, 1924; the age at death being 15 years, 2 months and 22 days.
He leaves to mourn their loss: Father, mother and grandmother; two brothers, Robert [SISSEL], age 13 and Joe [SISSEL], age 11; also a host of other relatives and friends.
Welden graduated from the common school at the age of 12, but his parents asked him to take the eighth grade work again because they thought he was not old enough to enter High School.
The next fall he entered High School and was this year a member of the Sophomore class. He was in good standing in his class and was therefore a member of the basketball team.
He was not a member of any church but read the Bible and trusted in God.
He was quite regular in his attendance at Sunday School and took an active part in the discussion of the lessons.
He never failed to say his prayers before retiring at night, and in answer to his mother's question on the morning before he died, he made the statements which cause us to feel that he believed in God and that he is safe in the fold. -- Rev. A. L. RINEHART.

Monday, February 4, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, February 5, 1924

Mrs. Nancy SANNS, 75, died Monday afternoon at four o'clock at her home in Tiosa, a victim of double pneumonia. She had been ill for some time. First single pneumonia developed and then the more complicated form of the disease came a week ago, resulting in her death. Mrs. Sanns was one of the well known women of Fulton county. She had resided in this county

practically all of her life. Surviving are the husband, John SANNS, and two children, William SANNS, of Akron, and Mrs. Vinie BECK, of Tiosa.
Funeral services from the Tiosa Christian church Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, with burial at the Reichter cemetery.

Wednesday, February 6, 1924

George MOW, 50, a life long resident of Rochester and well known to the many sportsmen who visit Lake Manitou during the fishing season, died Monday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. May RIDDLE, of Arcadia, according to word received here Wednesday. The body is expected to arrive in this city Wednesday evening when funeral arrangements will be completed.
Born in Rochester, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Adam MOW deceased, he had lived in this city all of his life. He suffered from locomoter ataxis for the past few years and was an ardent Izaak Waltonist until forced to desist from all activity by the nature of his illness. Three months ago he went to Arcadia to the home of his daughter where he died. Surviving are the daughter, a son, James MOW, of Logansport, one sister, Mrs. William LYNN, of Hollywood, Calif., and three brothers, Bert [MOW], John [MOW] and Zene MOW, all of Rochester.

Thursday, February 7, 1924

Funeral services for the late Geo. MOW, who died Monday at Arcadia, were held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from the Frank DAUGHERTY home on East Eighth street, Rev. H. E. BUTLER in charge. Burial was made at the Citizen's cemetery.

Friday, February 8, 1924

Mrs. Moses LOWER, 60, died Thursday at her home at Grass Creek, a victim of complications from which she had suffered for some time. She was well known in the community in which she lived and is survived by the husband, two daughters, Mrs. Therman HUFFMAN, South Bend, and Miss Ida LOWER, at home, and one son, Alfred LOWER, of near Grass Creek. Funeral services from the Grass Creek United Brethren church, Sunday morning. Burial at Grass Creek.

Word was received here Friday of the death Wednesday at her home in Lima, Ohio, of Mrs. Josephine SARPER, 86, mother of Mrs. J. A. DIXON, of the Mt. Zion neighborhood. Six daughters survive. Funeral services at Lima, Saturday morning.

Saturday, February 9, 1924

James J. BABCOCK, 81, died shortly after five o'clock Friday evening at the home of his daughter, Mrs. L. C. MEEK, of Tiosa, with whom he had made his home for the past two years. He is a former resident of Fulton county, but of recent years had made his home at Winona Lake. Mr. Babcock was a veteran of the Civil War and at one time had served as treasurer of Kosciusko county. Death was caused by cancer.
Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. MEEK, Mrs. J. RAY, Silver Lake, and Mrs. H. H. HORMAN, of Elkhart; two brothers, J. C. BABCOCK, Citronel, Ala., and A. E. BABCOCK, of

Waterman, Ill., and three sisters, Mrs. Willis ANDREWS and Mrs. Newton WALLACE, of Richland Center and Mrs. Arthur STURGEON, of Greenville, Mich.
Funeral services from the Meek residence Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Dr. PALMER, of Winona Lake in charge. Burial at the Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, February 11, 1924

Jacob MEANS, 43, of Indianapolis, died Sunday in the Methodist hospital at that city as the result of injuries sustained last Friday when he fell through into the basement in the undertaking establishment where he was employed, injuring his spine. Mr. Means, who was well known in Rochester where he formerly made his home, is survived by a widow, Mrs. Minnie MEANS, his parents, Charles MEANS, south of Rochester and Mrs. Jacob THOMAS, of Culver, three children, Deloris [MEANS], Franklin [MEANS] and Parkey [MEANS], at home and two sisters, Mrs. Louise MURRAY, of near Talma and Mrs. David CAREY, south of Rochester. Funeral services at Shelbyville Tuesday afternoon with burial in the Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, February 12, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, February 13, 1924

Word has been received here of the death at the Longcliff asylum at Logansport on Monday of Mrs. Anna HIETT SWITZER, wife of Rev. W. F. SWITZER, of Gary, former pastor of the Rochester M. E. church. Rev. and Mrs. Switzer spent seven years in Rochester where they have many friends. Mrs. Switzer's death followed a sudden attack of pneumonia.
Mrs. Switzer's maiden name was Sarah Ann HIETT. She was born Oct. 15, 1859, the daughter of the late John and Mary FRANCIS HIETT, a prominent and well known family of Sugar Grove, near Lafayette.
After the education received in the township school and academy, Mrs. Switzer attended DePauw and Purdue universities and also received a splendid education in music from the Cincinnati Conservatory. She was united in marriage to Rev. W. F. Switzer at the Hiett home, June 15, 1887.
Eight years following her marriage during which time her husband was in charge of the pastorates of Covington and Michigan City, Mrs. Switzer's health became impaired and she was for the remainder of her life a mental invalid. She was in her normal condition a woman of strong and striking personality. Her accomplishments made her most helpful to her husband.
The husband, with two daughters, Mrs. Edna HIETT BAKER, of Plymouth, and Catherine Davison SWITZER, of Gary; two grandchildren, Barbara Ann [BAKER] and Mary Catherine BAKER; a brother, Dr. G. W. HIETT, of Pittsburgh, Pa., and a sister, Mrs. J. S. McMILLAN, of Rock Harbor, Wash., survive.
The funeral services will be held at the M. E. church at Montmorenci, Thursday morning at 11 o'clock. The services will be conducted by Rev. P. K. DOUGHERTY and Rev. G. W. SWITZER.

Thursday, February 14, 1924

A most unfortunate situation came to light Thursday with the death of Miss Florence McPHERRON, 17 year old daughter of Mrs. Minnie McPHERRON, north of Richland Center, who died shortly after giving birth to a nameless daughter at 4:30 o'clock Thursday morning.
The girl, student in the Richland Center high school, forced to drop out of school when she was to become a mother. She is the daughter of a widow, who resides on a small farm attempting to educate her eight children. Miss McPherron became ill Wednesday evening and shortly after the birth of the child went into convulsions caused from uremic poisoning. One convulsion followed another, until death finally resulted.
Besides the mother and daughter, four brothers at home, Clarence [McPHERRON], Emil [McPHERRON], Harry [McPHERRON] and Edwin McPHERRON, another brother, Carl McPHERRON, of Minnesota, and two sisters, Miss Wilma McPHERRON, of Gas City, and Mrs. Mary WARNOCK, of South Bend, survive.
Funeral services from the Richland Center church Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Burian at Richland Center.

Friday, February 15, 1924

Mrs. Drusilla STRUCKMAN, 55, wife of William STRUCKMAN, died at 3:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the Struckman home three miles northeast of Rochester. Death was caused by a severe attack of erysipelas. She had been ill but one week prior to her death.
Mrs. Drusilla Struckman was born in Allen county, Ohio, May 5, 1868. She came to Indiana with her parents when but a child and had been a resident of Fulton county practically all of her life.
The husband, one daughter, Mrs. Ethel O. SMITH, near Rochester, two sisters, Mrs. Henry ENTSMINGER, Rochester, and Mrs. Martha LOLNAUGHT, Jackson, Michigan, and one brother, Samuel ARNOLD, near Tiosa, survive.
Funeral services from the Methodist church, Rochester, Saturday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, February 16, 1924

Mrs. John COOPER died Frday at the home four miles south of Bourbon from burns received Thursday evening when she used coal oil to start fire in the kitchen stove.
Oil was poured from the can into the stove. Coals ignited the coal oil and the fire found its way to the can and caused an explosion.
Burning oil was thrown about the room and over the clothing of Mrs. Cooper. She ran from the house and thinking that she might extinguish the fire. However, in a few seconds her clothes were about consumed. Her flesh was seared from the knees up. The hair was burned off and her face painfully burned.
The explosion set the house afire. The Bourbon fire truck made a run to the Cooper house. The firemen and neighbors succeeded in saving the house.
Mrs. Cooper was about 58 years of age. Besides her husband she leaves one son and three daughters.

Monday, February 18, 1924

Mrs. Nancy GREENWALD, 38, daughter of John LOWE, of this city, died at ten o'clock Monday morning at her home in Carmel, Ind. Death came as the result of child birth. She had been ill eight days.
Mrs. Greenwald was born July 31, 1886. She was married to Jake GREENWALD Feb. 10, 1906, and the couple had resided at Carmel for the last three years.
She is survived by her husband, her three small children, Mary Jane [GREENWALD], Billy [GREENWALD] and Bernice [GREENWALD].

Joe GORDON, 62, well known farmer living in the Whippoorwill neighborhood, died suddenly Sunday morning at 6:15 o'clock as the result of heart trouble and complications. He had been in failing health for the past six months due to leakage of the heart. Mr. Gordon, who came here eight years ago and moved onto a farm with his family, was well known in the community as well as at his former home at Indianapolis.
Joseph Ethelbert GORDON was born December 3, 1861 in Indianapolis and died at the age of 62 years, two months and 15 days. Most of his early oife was spent in that city. He was the son of George and Mary GORDON, deceased. During his younger days he was on the stage and spent several years with the Holden Players of this city and other companies.
He moved here from Pasco, Washington where he had been a hardware merchant and on August 6, 1903 he married Gladys ALEXANDER SMITH of this city. One son was born to this union, George [GORDON], who survives with the wife. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge.
Other survivors are four sisters, Mrs. Henry H. McCLAIN, Evanston, Ill; Mrs. Frederick HERRON, Mrs. Charles E. HOLLOWAY, Indianapolis, and Mrs. George ANDREWS, Brazil, Ind.
A short service was held Monday afternoon at the home and then the body was taken to Indianapolis for funeral and burial in the Crownhill cemetery.

Tuesday, February 19, 1924

Edna Irene BROCK, three months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Forrest BROCK, of south Elm street, this city, died at 8:45 o'clock Monday evening a victim of whooping cough. The baby had been ill about two weeks. Funeral arrangements later.

Wednesday, February 20, 1924

The body of Mrs. Nancy GREENWALD, who died Monday at her home in Carmel, Ind., was brought to the home of her sister, Mrs. Fred CARR, east of Rochester Wednesday. Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 at the Evangelical church with Rev. M. O. HERMAN in charge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thomas J. WARE, 73 years of age, and a retired farmer, died Tuesday at his home in Wayne township. Mr. Ware had been a resident of Wayne township all his life. He leaves a wife and several children.

Thursday, February 21, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, February 22, 1924

Harvey ROSE, 74, long resident of the Fulton community died at his home in that town Thursday morning at seven o'clock. Death came as the result of a stroke of paralysis which occurred about three weeks ago and with added complications. Mr. Rose sank gradually until the end. He had lived most of his life on a farm near Fulton but several years ago had retired and moved to town.
He was known as a perfect member of the U. B. Church of Fulton as he was very regular in his attendance. His wife died about six years ago. Two daughters and two sons survive
Funeral Sunday at two o'clock with burial in the Fulton cemetery.

Saturday, February 23, 1924

Mrs. Jane SARBER, a pioneer resident of Kosciusko county, died Thursday night at her home in Mentone after a long illness. She suffered several strokes of paralysis and had been confined to her bed for about six months. Mrs. Sarber was the widow of Dr. William SARBER, who practiced at Palestine more than half a century ago. She is survived by a step-daughter, Mrs. Allen BLUE, of Mentone, and Frank BARBER in the West; a niece, Mrs. Jonathan DUNKLE, of Kokomo.
[NOTE: Jane SNYDER SARBER, wife of Dr. W. E. SARBER, born in Fairfield County, Ohio, March 4, 1840, died February 21, 1924. Buried in Palestine Cemetery. Also in same cemetery, different row: William SARBER, died March 23, 1903, age 81y-8m-26d; and Eliza A. SARBER, wife of Wm., died February 28, 1888, age 60y-3m-23d. - Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Harrison Township.]
Mrs. Jonas MYERS, 84, lifelong resident of this city, passed away Saturday afternoon at three o'clock after a lingering illness brought on by complications, the result of old age. She was the mother of Mrs. Stilla BAILEY of this city and a son, John [MYERS], who lives in the West, and a foster daughter survive.

Monday, February 25, 1924

Mrs. Jonas MYERS, 84, a life long resident of Fulton county, died at her home on Jefferson street at three o'clock Saturday afternoon, the result of heart trouble and complications due to old age. She had been ill for eight weeks and her death was not unexpected.
Elizabeth Helen CLAYTON was born February 9, 1840, at Leiters Ford, the daughter of Joseph and Mary CLAYTON. On March 17, 1867, she was united in marriage to Jonas MYERS and the latter part of their lives was spent in Rochester. Mr. Myers died several years ago. She was a life-long member of the Methodist church.
She is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Essa BAILEY, of this city, a son, John J. MYERS, of Hill Crest, Montana, and a foster daughter, Mrs. C. T. BLACKBURN, of Cumberland, Md.
The funeral was held at the residence Monday afternoon with Rev. F. O. FRALEY officiating. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, February 26, 1924

Christian MAIER, 73, at one time employed at the Wholesale House died last Wednesday at St. Mary's Hospital at Oshkosh, Wis., was buried Sunday at Akron. Death was caused by cancer of the stomach and he had been seriously ill since November 1st. He lived at New London, Wis. Maier will be remembered by many local residents as he lived here with his family for seven years from 1890 to 1897 during which time he was well known citizen of Rochester, [employed by Michael's Wholesale Grocery] owned by J. P. MICHAEL and later by L. M. BRACKETT, on north Main street. He came from Texas after 21 years' service in the regular army and was active in the militia which had an organization here at that time.
He leaves three daughters, Mrs. Chas. STUART, of New London, Wis.; Mrs. Edward WARD, of St. Joseph, Mich., and Mrs. Gordon CLARK, of Chicago and one son, Edward MAIER, of Chicago. Many people from a distance attended the funeral.

Wednesday, February 27, 1924

Miss Katherine DuBOIS, 81, died Wednesday morning at her home near Green Oak after an illness of several days with complications of diseases.
The deceased was born in Fulton county on April 1, 1843 and all her life was spent in the near vicinity of her birth with the exception of 13 years that the family lived in Missouri. Miss DuBois has been in poor health for several months but her condition just became serious a few days ago. She leaves to mourn her loss one sister, Mary DuBOIS, and two brothers, Jonathan D. [DuBOIS] and Henry M. DuBOIS. One sister and four brothers have preceded her in death. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at two o'clock at the Mud Lake Chapel with Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT in charge. Burial will be made in the adjoining cemetery.

This month's issue of the house organ, "The Warm Friend," published by the Holland Furnace company, is dedicated to the late Charles GIBBONS, formerly of Rochester, who was a valued employee of that firm. In the booklet the salesman and the officials wrote praise to Mr. Gibbons and his work.

Nettie E. WHARTON, daughter of James and Martha THOMPSON, was born in Kosciusko county, Indiana, August 13, 1853 and died at her home near Kewanna, February 10, 1924. She was one of a family of eleven children, two brothers and four sisters still remaining.
She was united in marriage to Wm. M. WHARTON, July 6, 1871, and to this union was born ten children, the oldest, Charlie B. [WHARTON], being dead. The eight living are Roy [WHARTON] and Will [WHARTON], of Kewanna, Ind.; Orvil [WHARTON], of Argos, Ind.; Porter [WHARTON] and Vern [WHARTON], of Elkhart, Ind.; Harmon [WHARTON], Claypool, Ind.; Mrs. Mary BURDETTE, Denver, Colorado, and Gladus [WHARTON], at home, who together with the husband, twelve grandchildren and other relatives and friends remain to mourn their loss.
She united with the Christian church at Sycamore Chapel at an early age, but later transferred her membership to the Christian church at Kewanna.
She was of a cheerful disposition and endeared herself to all who knew her, always thinking of the happiness of others rather than herself. During the great suffering of her last illness she never complained but spoke with thankfulness of the care and love of her relatives and friends.

The funeral was conducted by Rev. H. F. BULGER from the Christian church in Kewanna and burial was beside her two children in Sycamore cemetery.

Thursday, February 28, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, February 29, 1924

Eber P. LYNCH, Newcastle township farmer, died Thursday, February 28, at his home, norotheast of Rochester. Aged 58 years, 4 months and 10 days.
The deceased was born October 10, 1865 and has spent the greater part of his life in this community. He was the son of William and Mary LYNCH.
Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, March 1, 1924

Jordon JONES, 90, died Thursday at his home in Culver. Mr. Jones is a brother of Mrs. Chas. IZZARD and an uncle of Omar and O. D. ROSS and Charles JONES, of this city. Funeral service was held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 at the Washington church at Culver. Mr. and Mrs. Chas. IZZARD, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. JONES and O. D. ROSS attended the funeral.

Monday, March 3, 1924

Hugh M. MURPHY, 17, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Edward Murphy, of this city, died Saturday night at 7:30 at the Healthwin Hospital at South Bend where he had been for over a year for treatment. Death was the result of tuberculosis. He had been ill for more than a year.
Late in the summer of 1922, Hugh, who was a popular young student in high school here had an attack of the influenza and later contracted pneumonia. His constitution was never strong and as the results of the illness he fell a victim of tuberculosis. At Thanksgivbing time, 1922, he was taken to Healthwin but he gradually grew worse until the end.
The deceased was the second son of Edward and Clara MURPHY. He was born in Rochester, Nov. 26, 1906 and lived here all of his life. His mother met a tragic death as she was fatally burned when her clothes caught fire from burning leaves. His father passed away a few years ago, the result of an abscess in his head. Hugh was a member of the Baptist church.
He is survived by only one member of his family, Robert [MURPHY], who is a student at Indiana university, at Bloomington. Other relatives surviving are Charles TRUE, of Rochester; Fred TRUE, of Chicago; Robert [MONTGOMERY], Guy [MONTGOMERY] Charles [MONTGOMERY] and Wilson MONTGOMERY.
The funeral was held at the Baptist church at two o'clock Monday afternoon with Rev. James W. NIVEN officiating. The burial was made in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery.

Mrs. Martha OLIVER, 91, a pioneer of the Akron community, died Sunday night at her home in that town at 9:30, the result of complications due to old age. Until the holidays just passed she had maintained her own home and had done all of her own work and was very active for her age.
She [Martha SIPPY] had lived in Akron or the vicinity since 1846 when she came there a young girl. She was well known all over the vicinity. Both of her grandfathers, Joseph SIPPY and Samuel HANE, were soldiers in ths Revolutionary Army under Washington, while her late husband, Robert [OLIVER], was a veteran of the Civil War.
Burial at the Citizens' Cemetery at Airon Tuesday at 2 p.m.

Tuesday, March 4, 1924

Mary Elizabeth [REED], 17 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert REED, Richland township, died at the home of its parents, Monday, March 3rd at 4:30 p.m., a victim of spinal meningitis. The child had been ill but three days and its sudden death came as a shock to the bereft parents. Besides the father and mother it is survived by an older brother, Robert Frederick [REED] and Mr. and Mrs. Howard REED, grandparents.

Wednesday, March 5, 1924

Thorntown, Ind., March 5. -- The Rev. Lafayette S. BUCKLES, aged 87, died at his home here Sunday. His death was due to a fall received three weeks ago. He was said to have been the oldest member of the Northwest Indiana Methodist Conference, and a charter member of the Battle Ground Camp Meeting Association.
The widow and a daughter survive. The funeral was held at the Methodist church here Tuesday afternoon. The Rev. George W. SWITZER, of West Lafayette, preached the sermon.
__________
Rev. Buckles was one time minister at the M. E. church in Rochester.

Thursday, March 6, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, March 7, 1924

Private funeral services for William TEETER will be held Saturday at 2 o'clock at the residence with Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The body will be reviewed from 11 to one.

Saturday, March 8, 1924

Mrs. Earl DANFORTH has received word of the death of her sister, Mrs. James WAMPLER, of Bloomington, Ind., which took place Friday. Mrs. Wampler was 32 years of age and death was caused by child birth. The husband and a daughter four years old survive.

Mrs. Margaret GROVES, 84 years of age, died Saturday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Wilbur EWING, west of Rochester, after an illness of five weeks due to old age and complications.
Mrs. Groves, [Margaret THOMPSON] who was the daughter of James and Martha THOMPSON, was born in Ohio on February 6th, 1840, and moved with her parents to Fulton county when four years of age. She was married in 1857 to Sylvester GROVES, who died five years ago. She was a member of the Sycamore Chapel Christian church, near Talma. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. EWING and Mrs. Frank COPLEN, and seven grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held Monday morning at 11:30 at the Sycamore Chapel.

Monday, March 10, 1924 and Tuesday, March 11, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, March 12, 1924

Mrs. Sarah Amanda DAGUE, aged 84 years, died Tuesday evening at 9:15 at her home, 1314 Franklin avenue, of old age and complications. She had been in failing health for a long time but had not been forced to bed until last Wednesday.
Mrs. Dague [Sarah Amanda MOWERY], who was born in Cass county in 1839, a daughter of Michael and Malinda MOWERY, was married to John W. DAGUE, deceased, in Cass county in 1864. They moved to a farm southeast of Fulton where they resided for 50 years. She had made her home in Rochester for the past seven years.
Surviving are three sons, Grant [DAGUE], Samuel [DAGUE] and William DAGUE, and one daughter, Mrs. Minnie FLASEL. A fourth son, Thomas [DAGUE], is dead.
Funeral services from the residence Thursday morning at 11 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at Bethlehem M. E. cemetery in Cass county.

Thursday, March 13, 1924

Mrs. John COOPER, former resident of this city, died at the Methodist Hospital at Fort Wayne early Thursday morning of bronchial pneumonia. She had been critically ill for some time. She was the mother of Mrs. Lyman GOULD and Mrs. August BEYER, both formerly of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Beyer were present when she died.
Funeral Saturday afternoon at 9:30 at the residence of Dr. Lyman GOULD at Fort Wayne.

Friday, March 14, 1924

[no obits]

Saturday, March 15, 1924

W. T. ANDERSON received word Wednesday that his only brother, M. L. ANDERSON had been stricken with apoplexy and had died while at work for the Erie railroad at Laketon. Funeral services were held Saturday.

Word was received here Saturday afternoon of the death in Long Beach, California, of Mrs. Dora DAVIS ROUCH, formerly of this city. The word came from the daughter, Mrs. V. H. KINNEMAN, of Long Beach, with whom Mrs. Rouch had been making her home. Mrs. Kinneman expected to arrive in Rochester with the body of her mother on Monday, according to the telegram, but aside from the fact that no further details were received. [sic] Three daughters, Mrs. KINNEMAN and Misses Josephine [DAVIS] and Mary DAVIS, survive.

Monday, March 17, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, March 18, 1924

Funeral services for the late Mrs. Dora DAVIS ROUCH, who died recently at her home in Long Beach, Calif., will be held from the Hoover chapel Friday morning at 10:30 o'clock, according to announcement made Tuesday following receipt of word as to the time of the arrival of the body from the West. Rev. F. O. FRALEY will have charge of the services and burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, March 19, 1924

Jacob G. SMITH, 72, died Tuesday afternoon at his home north of Mud Lake in Liberty township where he had lived for more than 50 years, following an illness of several years duration. Death came as the result of his advanced years and several paralytic strokes.
Born near Columbus, Ohio, Mr. Smith came to Indiana when 19 years of age and located near Chili, later moving to Fulton county where he had since made his home. About 48 years ago he was married to Rosetta BISH, who died about two years ago. Mr. Smith was a farmer and was a large stockholder and served as president of the bank at Macy.
Surviving are two sons, Lloyd SMITH, Rochester, Ira SMITH, Macy, and two daughters, Mrs. Harvey RHODEBUSH, Liberty township, and Mrs. Cort DuBOIS, south of Rochester.
Funeral services from the Christian church at Macy, Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Rev. SCIEFERS in charge. Burial at Macy.

Mr. and Mrs. B. F. FRETZ were called to Muncie Wednesday by the death at her home in that city Tuesday evening of Mrs. Esther FOUTS, 62, a sister of Mrs. Fretz, who was well known in Rochester where she had visited frequently. No details regarding the nature of her death were received here. Two sisters, Mrs. FRETZ and Mrs. Jemima SURSTENAU of Cincinnati, survive.

Thursday, March 20, 1924

[no obits]
Friday, March 21, 1924

Funeral services for Mrs. Dora DAVIS ROUCH, which was postponed Friday, will be held Saturday morning at ten-thirty at the Hoover Chapel.

Saturday, March 22, 1924

Miss Sarah A. WALTERS, 62, a resident of Fulton county from early childhood, died at 10 o'clock Friday evening at the home of her sister, Mrs. Charles BEEHLER, north of Rochester, following an illness of four weeks. Death was caused by carcinoma and complications.
Miss Walters moved to the neighborhood north of Germany with her parents when but a small child. At the time of her death she was living with her sister. She is survived by two sisters, Mrs. BEEHLER and Mrs. Ilvah KEEL, of near Tiosa, and two brothers, John WALTERS, of Rochester, and Charles WALTERS, North Manchester.

Henry HUFFMAN, aged sixty-five years, died at his home near Bruce Lake Tuesday morning after only a few days' illness. He suffered a stroke of apoplexy last Friday. He is survived by the widow, one son and three daughters. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon and the burial was at Logansport.

Monday, March 24, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, March 25, 1924

Dow R. TRENT, Denver undertaker, was killed last night while working on his hearse. He was looking around the motor for a leak in the gas line on the car. The leaking gasoline caught fire resulting in a terrific explosion. He was thrown into the wall of the garage which housed the hearse and his skull fractured, apparently killing him instantly. His body was found about 20 minutes after the explosion was heard. The gasoline tank was located under the bonnet of the car next to the engine. There were no witnesses of the fatal accident, but several burned matches about the car lead to the theory advanced that he had been looking for the leak. The car was badly damaged. He leaves a wife and three children.

Wednesday, March 26, 1924 and Thursday, March 27, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, March 28, 1924

[no obits]

Saturday, March 29, 1924

James Wayne HURST, retired merchant and farmer and former member of the board of Miami county commissioners, died shortly after the noon hour Friday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. T. FOWLER, 106 E. Third Street, Peru, following an illness of about twenty days duration.
The funeral services will be conducted from the Hurst farm residence at Macy at 1 o'clock Sunday afternoon and will be in charge of the Rev. C. E. SCIEFERS and the Rev. Robert SEILERS.
Interment will be made in the cemetery at Chili. The children who survive are Earl J. HURST, Eva May FOWLER, Scott J. HURST and Hurd J. HURST, of Peru, Blaine J. HURST, of Macy, Esther T. HAINES, of Indianapolis, Ruth M. QUICK, of Macy, and Nina M. RICHARDSON, of Indianapolis.

Russell JONES, son of Mrs. Mary JONES, of Dayton, Ohio, died in that city Saturday of leakage of the heart, according to word received in this city by his aunt, Mrs. J. L. BABCOCK. He is an ex-service man.

Monday, March 31, 1924

Mrs. Jesse THOMPSON, of Akron, dropped dead suddenly at her home there Saturday night at nine o'clock, a victim of heart failure, according to word received here. She was 30 years of age and is survived by her husband and five children. Death was pronounced due to heart failure by Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH, who was called to hold an inquest.

George FARRAR, 63, well known Macy resident, died at his home there Sunday morning at 8:30 o'clock following a stroke of paralysis suffered recently. Mr. Farrar, who was well known in Rochester, had lived in and around Macy since his birth in 1862.
He is survived by the widow and one son, William [FARRAR], of Macy, one brother, L. H. FARRAR, of Rochester, and five sisters, Mrs. R. L. MILLER, Mrs. C. F. OLIVER, Mrs. William NORRIS, of Rochester, Mrs. Frank WAITE, of Peru, and Mrs. Al SLUSSER, of Macy.
Funeral services from the home at Macy Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Macy I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, April 1, 1924

The body of Dale MORPHET, 12 years old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. MORPHET, who died in South Bend last Tuesday morning, was brought to Rochester for burial this morning. The funeral services were held at 10:30, interment in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
The Morphets formerly resided in this city, moving to South Bend several years ago.

Wednesday, April 2, 1924

Mrs. Ida PACKARD, former well known resident of Rochester, died Tuesday night at her home in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, of heart failure, according to word received here this morning. Death came very suddently, according to the meager details. She is survived by her husband, Daniel PACKARD, a son, Arthur CONES, her mother, Mrs. Mary FEISER, and a brother, Ed. FEISER, of Rochester.

Mrs. A. P. JENKS, 66, who died Tuesday evening at her home in Logansport, was the mother-in-law of Carl McCLUNG, of Cincinnati, Ohio, former well known resident of Rochester.

Thursday, April 3, 1924

Edward STREBE dropped dead suddenly at his home just south of Green Oak shortly before six o'clock Wednesday evening, a victim of heart failure. He had been in poor health recently, but his demise was entirely unexpected by members of the family. He was 52 years of age. Mr. Strebe, who had lived in the Macy neighborhood for many years, had resided in Fulton county only a year. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Ida STREBE, and seven children, Ruth [STREBE], Gladys [STREBE], Louise [STREBE], Luella [STREBE], Clifford [STREBE], Chester [STREBE] and Helen STREBE. One child is dead. Funeral services at Macy Friday afternoon at two o'clock.

Mrs. Lillian MILLER has returned home from Zenia, O., where she attended the funeral of William H. WATSON, pioneer of that city. Mr. Watson was a cousin of Mrs. Gideon MILLER of this city.

Friday, April 4, 1924

Mrs. Frances Virginia COOK, 77, died Thursday evening at 5:30 o'clock at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. William MOON, in Akron following an attack of heart failure. She had been a resident of Akron for the past 40 years, having moved there from Ohio, where she was born July 1, 1847. Two sons, Theodore COOK of Saginaw, Mich., and Roscoe [COOK], of Kansas, and four daughters, Mrs. John McCLUNG, Rochester, Mrs. Mina HAMMOND, near Akron, Miss Agnes COOK, of Bristol, and Mrs. Ethel BARRETT, of St. Louis, survive. Mr. Cook died about 15 years ago. A nephew, Earl COOK, of Bloomington, who was reared by Mrs. Cook, also survives. Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, April 5, 1924

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred NELSON, who live on the Jack MORRIS farm east of Akron, died Tuesday morning, a victim of pneumonia. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon.

Howard HARTMAN, a former resident of Akron, where he drove a milk wagon for years for Armour, died Tuesday afternoon at his home in Macy.
[NOTE: See Wednesday, April 9, 1924 issue of Rochester Sentinel. - W.C.T.]

Monday, April 7, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, April 8, 1924

Mrs. Mary WOODFIELD, 61, died Monday morning at her home in Toledo, Ohio, a victim of paralysis, according to word received by Rochester relatives. The body is to arrive in this city Tuesday evening and funeral services will be held some time Wednesday afternoon.
Mrs. Woodfield was formerly Miss Mary MOW, of Rochester. She spent her girlhood days in this community, but had lived in Ohio since her marriage. She is survived by the husband, two sons, Arthur [WOODFIELD] of Indianapolis, and Orville [WOODFIELD] of Toledo, and one daughter, Mrs. Stella BUSH of Toledo, three brothers John [MOW], Zene [MOW] and Bert MOW of Rochester, and one sister, Mrs. William LYNN of Hollywood, California, and one grandson, Frank BUSH. A brother died two months ago.

Norah I. UTTER, 17 months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harley UTTER, north of Rochester, died Monday morning following a short illness. Death was caused by pneumonia. Besides the parents, five brothers and sisters survive. Burial will be made at Mt. Hope cemetery Wednesday afternoon.

James A. MILLER, a pioneer of Argos, well known in the county and elsewhere as a teacher, journalist, agriculture student and politician, passed away at 10 o'clock Saturday evening at the Marshall County hospital after having been brought to that institution about six o'clock that evening suffering from trouble bordering on pneumonia.
He had spent the winter with his two sons in Illinois and returned to Argos on March 1 where he resumed residence in his house which was cold and damp. He caught a severe cold and has been suffering since that time.
The funeral was held at the Argos Methodist church at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning. Rev. A. E. BAGBY, the pastor, was in charge of the service. The burial took place at the Maple Grove cemetery.
"Uncle Jim" was 87 years of age, having been born near Newcastle, Pennsylvania, July 22, 1837. He was married three times.

Wednesday, April 9, 1924

John H. VOREIS, one of the oldest if not the oldest resident of Marshall county at the present time, passed away at his home two miles northwest of Culver at 12:30 Sunday morning, aged 94 years, 7 months and 27 days.

An April Fool joke started in Macy was the cause of considerable anguish in some homes and considerable trouble to the telephone operators in that town recently. On April 1st someone at Macy made the report that Howard HARTMAN, of Macy, had died. This was given to the Sentinel which carried the story in its next issue. As a result friends and relatives from near and far began calling into Macy to get the particulars and the operators were forced to work overtime. Mr. Hartman is still very much alive the Macy correspondent reports.

Thursday, April 10, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, April 11, 1924

Mr. and Mrs. Alex RUH went to Wabash Friday to attend the funeral services for his sister, Mrs. Mary TRUSS, widow of Silas TRUSS, who died Wednesday morning at the Lafayette soldiers' home. Burial was made in the Catholic cemetery at Peru.
Mrs. Truss was Miss Mary RUH and she was born in Peru. She has three surviving sisters: Katie [RUH], of Toledo; Bertha [RUH] of New Orleans and Mrs. Anna HOME of Peru. One brother, Elliott [RUH] [sic], is a durggist at Rochester.

Saturday, April 12, 1924

Delbert E. WRIGHT, 59, died at 2:30 o'clock Saturday morning at his home in Tiosa, a victim of cancer from which he had suffered all winter. Mr. Wright was one of the well known farmers of Richland township and had been a life long resident of the community in which he lived. He had retired from active farming for several years on account of failing health.
Surviving are the widow and one daughter, Mrs. George CONWAY, one brother, William WRIGHT, of Rochester, and three sisters, Mrs. A. C. FEISER, Argos, Mrs. George BELSIRS,

South Bend, and Mrs. Peter ZERBE, Tiosa.
Funeral services Monday afternoon at 1:30 from the United Brethren church at Tiosa with burial in the Reichter cemetery.

The body of Mrs. Tom BRYAN, a former resident of Henry township, who died in South
Bend, was brought to Akron Thursday. The funeral was held Friday at Mt. Hope.

Monday, April 14, 1924

Albert Ross DIERDORF, 65, died Sunday afternoon at the home of his niece, Mrs. Ida MATHEWS, of New Paris, Ind., according to word received here. Death was caused by paralysis following a stroke suffered two months ago. He was the youngest child of Isaac DIERDORF, of this county, and had formerly lived here. He is survived by two brothers, Wm. D. DIERDORF, of Athens and Isaac DIERDORF, of Hamilton, Mo., and one sister, Mrs. Kathryn HARTMAN of New Paris. He was a batchelor.

Tuesday, April 15, 1924

Mrs. Rebecca M. BARRETT, wife of Abner J. BARRETT, died at nine o'clock Tuesday morning at her home on the corner of Main and 10th streets, a victim of dropsy and heart failure, from which she had suffered for the past 10 years. She had been an invalid during all this time and for the past two years was in a serious condition. She was 74 years of age.
Born in Lincoln county, Ohio, December 8, 1849, she came to this community with her parents, Moses and Sarah JOHNSON, when but a child and had since made her home in Rochester.
On October 17, 1871, she was united in marriage to Abner J. BARRETT, who with two foster children, Miss Pearl BARRETT, at home, and John BARRETT, of Rochester and six nephews, Frank [ROSS], Ed [ROSS], William [ROSS] and Sam ROSS of Rochester, Claude CROCKETT, Stevens Point, Wis., and Charles PIERSTON, of South Bend, survive.
Funeral arrangements laters.

Henry PASCHALL, a life long resident of this community, died at 5:15 o'clock Tuesday morning at his home on the corner of Third and Fulton streets following a sudden attack of heart failure. While he had been in failing health for some time, death came unexpectedly as he had been able to be up and about as usual on Monday and took sick not more than an hour before his death. He was 83 years of age.
Henry Paschall was born in Richmond, August 6, 1840. He moved to Fulton county early in life and except for the time when he served throughout the Civil War in the 87th Indiana Infantry, always lived here. He was a farmer by occupation, but had retired on account of failing health.
Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Mary AUBRY and Mrs. Flora DAVIS, who had been taking care of their father and Mrs. Ermon ALLEN, of Hammond, and two sons, Carl [PASCHALL] and John PASCHALL, of Rochester. Mrs. [Rachel A.] PASCHALL died two years ago.

Henry MORGAN, well known resident of Mentone, died Saturday evening of anemia. The deceased lived in or near Mentone all his lifetime and had a wide circle of friends there. He was 71 years of age and is survived by his wife and twelve brothers and sisters.

Wednesday, April 16, 1924

Funeral services for the late Henry PASCHALL will be held from the residence, corner Pontiac and Third Sts., Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Funeral services for Mrs. Abner J. BARRETT, who died Tuesday morning, will be held from the residence, corner Main and 10th streets, Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, April 17, 1924

Mrs. Jennie A. PENRY, wife of H. A. PENRY, died at her home in Akron Wednesday evening, a victim of dropsy. She was 53 years of age and had lived in Akron for the past nine years where her husband conducted a bakery.
Mrs. Penry was born in Lafayette September 27, 1870. She is survived by the husband, two daughters, Mrs. Naomi MILLER, north of Akron and Miss Annabelle PENRY, at home, and son, Merrill [PENRY], at home, two grandchildren and seven sisters.
Funeral services from the Methodist church at Akron Friday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. WISEHEMEIER in charge, assisted by Rev. WERHLEY. Burial at Akron.

Cyril [ROUCH], three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence ROUCH, who live about four miles west of Fulton in Wayne township, died at 10 o'clock Wednesday evening of injuries sustained when he was kicked in the head by a horse at his father's farm at about three o'clock in the afternoon. The child was playing in the barnlot when the grandfather, Jesse ROUCH, drove a team into the yard. Mr. Rouch left the team standing for a moment and the boy attempted to walk behind the horses. One of the animals lunged out with its hoofs and the child was struck in the back of the head.
Medical aid was summoned and it was found that the child's skull had been fractured and he was suffering from concussion of the brain. The boy's condition continued to grow worse and he died at about 10 o'clock without ever having regained consciousness following the mishap. The parents, and one sister, Frances [ROUCH], aged six months, survive.
Funeral services will be held from the Bethel United Brethren church Friday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. Noah McCOY of Rochester in charge. Burial at Salem cemetery.

Leonard D. COOL, 38, well known farmer residing in the southeast portion of Liberty township, dropped dead suddenly Wednesday night at 10 o'clock, following a sudden attack of heart failure. He had been enjoying good health and Wednesday during the day was in Kokomo. Shortly after he had retired after returning home he was heard to groan and before his family could reach him was dead. The widow and two children survive. Funeral services at Perrysburg Saturday afternoon at two o'clock with burial at Mexico.
Mrs. Lillian GORDY VanDIEN, widow of the late James VanDIEN who died a year ago last February, died Monday at the home of her daughter, Mrc. C. C. LEONARD in Chicago, a victim of cancer from which she had suffered for the past two years, according to word received here. Mrs. VanDien was well known in Rochester where she had spent her early days although she had not actually lived in this city for many years. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Leonard, a child by a former marriage. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon in Chicago.

Friday, April 18, 1924

Robert Denzel McKEE, 18 year old son of Frank and Rosella McKEE, died Thursday night at the home of his parents on south College Avenue, a victim of tuberculosis and heart failure from which he had suffered for years.
The boy was born in Rochester July 19, 1905 and had lived here all of his life. He went to school until several years ago when he was forced to drop out because of failing health. He had been sick for a number of years and while not bedfast had suffered several severe attacks. The last attack came about five weeks ago when he was taken ill and forced to his bed. His condition gradually became worse until death came. Surviving are the parents and two brothers, Charles Frederick [McKEE] and Jas. Ruh McKEE.
Funeral services from the residence Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. J. W. NIVEN in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Thompson SMITH, 61, of Winona Lake, died at her home there Friday morning at 11 o'clock, according to word received here from her sister, Mrs. Clarence VIERS, who was with her at the time of her death. Mrs. Smith is well known in this community where she had often visited. She had been ill but a few days prior to her death, but had been in failing health since her home at Winona Lake had burned down. Mrs. Smith formerly lived in Mentone where her husband published the Tri-County Gazette. The husband, one son and one daughter survive.

Mrs. Alma IRELAND died Tuesday morning at her home in Madison, Wisconsin, a victim of tuberculosis from which she has suffered for the past year. She was thirty-five years of age and was born and raised in Mentone. Her husband Fred IRELAND, father, Willard TEEL, two brothers, Melvin [TEEL] and Low TEEL all of Madison, one sister, Mrs. Forrest KESSLER of Mentone, survive. The body was shipped to Rochester Friday and taken to the home of her sister in Mentone. Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at two o'clock at the Baptist church in Mentone.

Saturday, April 19, 1924

Word has just been received here of the death of Miss Cora RANNELLS, former resident of Rochester, which occurred at Los Angeles on Saturday, April 5th. Funeral services were held in that city a week later.
Miss Rannells during the latter years of her life had become a very earnest member of Mrs. McPherson's Church and she was a constant reader of the Bible. She suffered from three strokes of paralysis the last leaving her helpless and she gradually sank until the end. Five former Rochester people attended the funeral in addition to many others.

Monday, April 21, 1924

Rev. F. O. FRALEY was called to Knox on Sunday afternoon where he conducted the funeral services of Harry McCORMACK in the First Methodist church. This young man it will be recalled was a patient in the Rochester hospital for a number of weeks, having been injured during January in some dredge work near Bass Lake. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. McCORMACK living at Bass Lake, and died last Friday following an operation in the Lakeside hospital, Chicago.

Tuesday, April 22, 1924

Mrs. Harriet BAIR WALLACE died Monday evening at 11 o'clock at her home on east Ninth street following the birth of a child, Don Frederick [WALLACE] who also passed away. She was 36 years of age. Mrs. Wallace, who was born at Tiosa, July 21, 1888, was the daughter of Edward and Ellen BAIR of Tiosa, where she lived all of her life until her marriage July 24, 1923 to Harry O. WALLACE of this city.
Mrs. Wallace is survived by the husband, father and one brother, Mahlon BAIR, of Tiosa.
Funeral services from the Lutheran church at Tiosa Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. A. H. KECK, of South Bend in charge. Burial at the Reichter cemetery. The funeral cortege will leave the house in Rochester at 1:30 o'clock.

Mrs. May ARVEN, 24, wife of Elmer ARVEN, died at her home on Jay St., Monday evening at 9:30 o'clock following a very short illness. Death was caused by diphtheria from which she had suffered for not more than a week. Two children, one two years of age and the other but three months old, the husband and two step-sons survive.
Private funeral services from the residence Tuesday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, April 23, 1924

Micajah FREELAND, 82, died at his home in Macy Wednesday morning at 1:15 o'clock after an illness of several months from heart trouble. He was born at Johnsville, Ohio, but the greater part of his life was spent in this vicinity. For many years he was a member of the Methodist church and was well known as a devout Christian.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Nancy (BLACKBURN) FREELAND; one daughter, Mrs. Sarah CLOUD of Macy; one son, Rev. W. B. FREELAND of Wabash; three grandchildren, Otto CLOUD of Macy, Harold [FREELAND] and Miriam FREELAND of Wabash, and four great-grandchildren.
Funeral at the Macy Methodist Church Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Rev. J. B. SPERLING, assisted by Rev. C. E. SCIEFERS. Interment in the Plainview cemetery.

Thursday, April 24, 1924

James T. CLOUD, 76, formerly of Macy, died at 9 o'clock Tuesday nite at his home in South Bend, after an illness of 10 months with heart trouble. He was born in Tipton county Feb. 3, 1848, and came to South Bend from Faragould, Ark., about three months ago. He was married Oct. 30, 1873 in Wabash county, to Miss Mary Jane REED, who died March 10, this year.
Mr. Cloud is survived by eight children, Mrs. Charles GOOGLE and Isaac [CLOUD] and William CLOUD of South Bend, Mrs. Sadie RODGERS, Elwood, Mrs. Fred SHARP, Tipton, Mrs. Mary WIEAND, Royal Center, Bennie CLOUD, Cardwell, Mo., and James CLOUD of Yorkville, Ohio. Three brothers, Geo. [CLOUD] and Levy CLOUD, Peru, and Henry CLOUD of Rochester, also survive him.
Funeral services were held at 10 o'clock Thursday morning at Belle Center, Ind. Burial in the Belle Center cemetery.

Friday, April 25, 1924

Mrs. Elizabeth WARE, 72, died at seven o'clock Thursday evening at her home on south Main street following an illness of about four weeks. Death was caused by a severe attack of influenza.
Mrs. Ware [Elizabeth ZABST], who had been a life long resident of this community, was born May 6, 1851. She was the widow of the late James WARE and the daughter of Peter and Katherine ZABST.
Surviving are the mother, Mrs. Katherine ZABST, Fulton; one son, Lon WARE, of Huntington; two brothers, Abner [ZABST] and Benjamin ZABST, of Fulton, and five sisters, Mrs. Jennie PIERCE, Fulton; Mrs. Ella MARTIN, Fulton; Mrs. Susan MADARY, Twelve Mile; Mrs. Charles HIGHT, Kokomo; Mrs. Ida BARKER, Fletchers Lake.
Private funeral services from the residence Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery.

The three weeks old son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd WILDERMUTH died at the home of his parents Thursday night following an attack of pneumonia. The parents and one brother survive.

Saturday, April 26, 1924 and Monday, April 28, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, April 29, 1924

Mrs. Tressa WESTWOOD, a life long resident of Fulton county, died at 11 o'clock Tuesday morning at the farm home a mile west of Rochester after a very short illness. She had been taken with an attack of measles about two weeks ago and pneumonia developed, resulting in her demise. Mrs. Westwood was 47 years of age. She [Tressa LOVATT] was born in Fulton County August 28, 1876, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William LOVATT.
Surviving are the mother, Mrs. LOVATT, the husband, James WESTWOOD, and 10 children, Mrs. Flora MADARY, Mud Lake, Edith W. WESTWOOD, Mrs. Charles WAGONER and Benjamin [WESTWOOD], Mollie [WESTWOOD], Fred [WESTWOOD], Thomas [WESTWOOD], John [WESTWOOD], Ruth [WESTWOOD] and Robert WESTWOOD at home and one half-sister, Mrs. Hannah THOMAS.
Funeral arrangements later.

Elmer C. OLIVER, 46, well known Rochester township farmer, died at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday morning after an illness extending over a period of six weeks. Death occurred at the Woodlawn Hospital where he had been taken for treatment for a growth on his lung.
Elmer Oliver was born in Fulton county, October 2, 1878 and had always lived in this community. He was the son of Benjamin OLIVER, who with his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Mabel SEVERNS, of Green Oak, survives.
Funeral services from the farm home near Green Oak Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. DAVIDSON in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Word has been received here of the death of William WARNER of Wadsworth, Ohio, who was the husband of Mrs. Susan WELTNER WARNER, who formerly lived in Rochester where she is well known. Her former husband was at one time the pastor of the Rochester Presbyterian church.

Wednesday, April 30, 1924

The funeral of Elmer OLIVER will be held Thursday afternoon at two o'clock at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben OLIVER, corner of Fourteenth and Franklin avenue, instead of at his farm home.

Jacob GALBREATH died at nine o'clock Tuesday evening at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Glen OVERMEYER, of the Burton neighborhood. Death was caused by paralysis from which he had suffered for several years. He was 78 years of age and had been practically a life long resident of Argos and neighborhood. The daughter and one son, William GALBREATH, of Indianapolis survive. Funeral services from the Burton church at 1:30 o'clock Friday afternoon with burial at the Jordan cemetery near Argos.

Word was received here of the death Tuesday evening at her home near Twelve Mile of Mrs. Anna E. GREEN, 70, who was a victim of heart trouble. She is survived by the husband, Cornelius GREEN, two daughters, Mrs. Nellie CREEK of Hoovers station and Mrs. Delpha SHEPPARD, of Wisconsin, one son, Frederick [GREEN] at home and a brother, Peter J. STINGLY of Rochester.

Thursday, May 1, 1924

Word has been received here of the death of Zen FAGEN, 35, which occurred Wednesday evening at his home in Russell, New York. While details were not available, it was learned that Fagen was struck by a locomotive and instantly killed. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Merle FAGEN, who is a granddaughter of Mrs. Susan ALSPACH of this city, and one daughter. Fagen, who formerly lived in Marion, Ind., where he will be buried on Saturday, was the nephew of Levi YOUNG of Rochester. Mr. and Mrs. Young will attend the funeral
Sol BERGE, of Wabash, died at his home there Wednesday, according to word received here. He was the brother of Mrs. H. S. TRUE of Rochester. Mr. Berge was an undertaker at Wabash. Details of his demise have not bee received.

Friday, May 2, 1924

Theodore RILEY, well known Fulton county farmer, died at his home in the Sugar Grove neighborhood at 8 o'clock Friday morning following an attack of heart trouble. He had been sick four weeks prior to his demise. He was 64 years of age. Surviving are the widow and three children.

Saturday, May 3, 1924

Charles M. DAVIS, 68, retired farmer and prominent citizen of Akron, died at his home in that city shortly after midnight Friday after an illness of dropsy and heart trouble. Mr. Davis had been a farmer most of his life having been on a farm west of Akron for 30 years. Three years ago he retired and moved to town.
Surviving are his wife, two sons, John [DAVIS] of Fort Wayne and Walter [DAVIS] of near Akron, and one sister, Mrs. Jas. CURTIS of near Akron.
Funeral Monday at 1:30 at the Methodist Church with Rev. WERHLEY officiating.

Monday, May 5, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, May 6, 1924

Word has been received here of the death on May 3rd of Gail NYE, 16 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Gail NYE who live on R.R. 3 out of South Bend. The child died from the effects of kerosene swallowed two hours earlier. He was the grandson of Mrs. Grant NYE, formerly of Rochester.
The youngster secured the coal oil from a basin reposing beneath an oil stove for the purpose of catching the drippings. The parents were in another room and knew nothing of the fatal move until they found their son crying and in convulsions on the floor. He was hurried to the Epworth Hospital at South Bend but despite medical aid, shortly passed away. The child was born at South Bend, December 29, 1922. The parents and two brothers survive.

Mrs. Jemima A. JOHNSON, 77, died at seven o'clock Tuesday morning at her home in the Sugar Grove neighborhood southeast of Akron, according to word received here. Mrs. Johnson was born in Ohio but had lived on the Johnson homestead for the past 56 years. She was the widow of the late Samuel JOHNSON who died January 31 last. Mrs. Johnson had been ill for the past six months, having suffered several paralytic strokes. She is survived by two sons, Theodore JOHNSON of Rochester, and Arthur JOHNSON, who lived on the farm with her.

Ralph Everett SANDERS, nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Amos SANDERS of Akron, died at a hospital at Ft. Wayne Monday afternoon at 3:40 the result of a complication of diseases. The boy was taken to the hospital on Monday morning for special treatment but physicians there pronounced the case as hopeless, the disease having taken an acute form before it could be detected.
Ralph was quite a favorite among his schoolmates and leaves many relatives and friends to mourn his loss. He united with the Evangelical Church at Burton at the age of seven years.
Surviving are his parents and one sister, Thelma [SANDERS]
Funeral services at the Evangelical Church at Rochester Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock with Rev. M. O. HERMAN and Rev. KISTNER in charge. A short service at the home at two o'clock. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, May 7, 1924

Mrs. Fatima WALTER, formerly Miss Fatima SHELTON, well known in Rochester where she at one time made her home, died at her home in Western Springs, Ill., following an operation, according to word received here. Details regarding her death were not available Wednesday.

Thursday, May 8, 1924

Mrs. Daniel METZGER, 53, died at 4:30 o'clock Thursday morning at her home in Goshen following a four weeks' illness. Death was caused by quinsey and complications.
Mrs. Metzger, who was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jess EMMONS, deceased, was born and reared in Fulton county, having lived the greater part of her life in the neighborhood of Tiosa. She had moved to Goshen about 12 yearsd ago.
Surviving are the husband and 10 children: Mrs. Jack CHAMBERLAIN, this city; Mrs. Frank McKEE, Mrs. Martin HAZEL, Mrs. Carl AMSDEN, Miss Beatrice METZGER, Jess [METZGER], William [METZGER], Russell [METZGER], Forrest [METZGER] and Porter METZGER, all of Goshen. One son died about a year ago. Several brothers, including Dan EMMONS of this city, survive.

Friday, May 9, 1924 and Saturday, May 10, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, May 12, 1924

The body of the late John METZLER, 47, who died Sunday at his home in Omaha, Nebraska, is to arrive in Rochester for burial Tuesday, according to word received by Rochester relatives.
Mr. Metzler, who had been practically a lifelong resident of Rochester until 18 years ago, when he moved to Omaha, died following an operation last December. He was very well known in this community.
Surviving are three sisters, Mrs. Mary McCONN, Wabash, Miss Ella METZLER, Rochester, and Mrs. G. O. GRAHAM, Lincoln, Neb., and four brothers, Arthur [METZLER] and Herman METZLER, Rochester, Frank METZLER, Crown Point, and Max METZLER, Toledo, Ohio.

Tuesday, May 13, 1924

Tressa BLOOM WESTWOOD, daughter of Chas. BLOOM and Mrs. Mary BLOOM-LOVATT, was born in Rochester, Ind., Aug. 28th, 1875, and departed this life April 29, 1924. Aged 48 years, 8 months and 1 day.
On July 31st, 1890 she was united in marriage with James F. WESTWOOD, to this union ten children have been born, five sons and five daughters, all of whom still survive: Mrs. Flora MADARY, Mrs. Edith YARTER, Mrs. Nellie WAGONER, Mrs. Benjamin WESTWOOD, Mrs. Mollie COLEMAN, Thomas WESTWOOD, Frederick WESTWOOD, Ruth [WESTWOOD], John [WESTWOOD] and Robert WESTWOOD.
Mrs. Westwood has ever been a loving wife and helpmate to her husband, a loving and indulgent mother to her children. She leaves to mourn their loss, her mother, Mrs. Mary

LOVATT, her beloved companion, her ten children, one sister, Mrs. Hannah THOMAS, six grandchildren and a multitude of other relatives and friends.

Wednesday, May 14, 1924

Funeral services for the late John METZLER, whose body has reached this city, will be held from the Arthur METZLER residence on south Jefferson street Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. Jennie PIERCE, 67, widow of the late Dick LOWMAN and a former resident of this city where she was well known, died at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning at the home of her son Perry Lowman, of Mishawaka, according to word received here. Details were not available. Three sons, Perry [LOWMAN] and Frank LOWMAN of Mishawaka and Jesse LOWMAN of Michigan, survive.

An unidentified stranger, who had caused a disturbance in Athens by his peculiar actions, was shot and instantly killed at about 9:00 o'clock Tuesday evening about four miles east of Athens by Albert B. CHAMBERLAIN, night policeman. Chamberlain fired a bullet into or very close to the man's heart as the latter approached the officer with a small pocket knife threatening to take the life of Chamberlain.
The stranger, presumably a foreigner from his very broken English, first made his appearance in Athens at about six o'clock in the evening. He evidently had come down the Erie railroad tracks from the west and went to the old Rowe store on the street interesction and attempted to get in. The store has long since been closed and Walter CLEVENGER, passing by, said that the fellow was cursing and trying to force his way into the building.
A few minutes later he appeared in the Rowe store where he purchased a loaf of bread, paying for it with a nickle and five pennies. When he had left he stood on the outside for a minute and talked to himself, apparently in a rage and cursing about something.
His actions had attracted attention of people in the store and several of the young men followed him down the railroad tracks where he was seen to sit beside a box car on a siding just east of Athens and eat his bread and a piece of bologna.
The boys returned to the Rowe store and told Fred ROWE, owner, that the fellow was still talking to himself. Rowe summoned Sheriff KOCHENDERFER, who arrived at about 8:00 o'clock with Night Police "Bee" CHAMBERLAIN.
The authorities and several men in Athens started on a search for the man. Later two posses were organized, the sheriff leading one and Chamberlain the other.
Chamberlain, who was accompanied by Walter CLEVENGER, Dale RICHTER, Peter SAYGER, Charles McGEE and Lee MOONSHOWER, went east to the railroad crossing about four miles east of Athens, where the man was seen to leave the railroad and start north towards the Clem HAMMOND farm home.
Leaving the automobile Chamberlain started after the man on foot and called to him to halt; that he was under arrest. In the meantime Chamberlain had fired several shots into the air from his revolver to notify Sheriff Kochenderfer that the man had been located and also to try to intimidat the man into halting.
Finally, however, the stranger did stop and with a cloth sack in one hand, in which he carried his effects, and a pocket knife in the other, turned back towards Chamberlain, muttering: "Me kill police."
Chamberlain ordered him to halt, firing another shot at his feet and when the man failed to do so and continued to advance, the local officer, according to the statement of Clevenger who was close to him, said he would have to shoot him and fired point blank at the man. The fellow stood for a moment apparently dazed and then dropped over deat. He struggled after being placed in the car to be taken to Rochester, but it is believed that he died almost instantly.
The body was brought to Rochester where an inquest was held by Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH. He exonerated Chamberlain, pronouncing the shooting "self defense."
The man was well built, about 50 years old and weighed about 155 pounds. He was blind in his left eye, partially bald, had brown hair and a brown mustache. He was dressed in blue denim overalls, a blue shirt, an old overcoat and wore heavy work shoes. In a gunny sack he carried two ears of corn, a piece of bread and bologna. The only means of identification was an Erie time table with some illegible writing in one corner and a piece of paper containing the inscription "Clark and Jackson, Room 743," evidently the address of a "flop house" in Chicago. The body is being held for further investigation into the man's identity.
The shooting is the first instance of an officer killing a man in Rochester since 1884 when Tuck NEFF was shot while attempting to rob the Hoover furniture store.

Thursday, May 15, 1924

The identity of the crazed Italian who was shot and killed by Night Police "Bee" CHAMBERLAIN Tuesday evening east of Athens will probably always be a mystery, according to developments Thursday. Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH, who communicated with the Chicago police regarding the stranger, learned that the address the man carried with him was that of the Royal Italian consulate in Chicago, but inquiries there developed the fact that the consulate knew nothing of the man. It is believed that he carried the address merely as a memorandum. It is expected that the body will be kept here for a short time longer before being buried. In the meantime further verification of the man's state of mind was received from Loyal where it was said he acted as though demented, cursing people whom he met and threatening their lives. The man was known to Ed SHOBE of this city, but only by sight.

Friday, May 16, 1924

Two more reports have been forthcoming regarding the mysterious Italian shot and killed by Bee CHAMBERLAIN near Athens Tuesday evening.
One comes from Mrs. J. A. DIXON of the Mt. Zion neighborhood who has positively identified the man as one who was in her neighborhood on the first of the week causing similar disturbances to those he stated at Loyal and Athens.
This does not mean much, but the statement of Boyd HAYWARD of Akron that the man had spent two days in Akron affords the police a clue upon which to work. Hayward declared that the man slept in the basket factory at Akron and spent most of his time reading a Bible. He gave his name there as Hammond PETERSON and said he lived at Wabash. Authorities are investigating this report.

Funeral services for the late Mrs. Jennie PIERCE, who died at the home of her son Perry LOWMAN, of Mishawaka, were held at 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon at the United Brethren church, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, May 17, 1924

Mrs. Mary FENSTERMAKER, aged 77, died at eight o'clock Friday evening at her home in Fulton of a complication of diseases and old age. She had been ill for six months. Surviving are three sons and one daughter. The husband, John FENSTERMAKER, died 10 years ago. Funeral services from the Fulton United Brethren church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock with burial at the Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, May 19, 1924

Another clue as to the identity of the man shot and killed last Tuesday by Albert CHAMBERLAIN, night police here, came Monday morning when Harley McCROSKEY, who resides near the Salem church, said the man had been at his home at noon Monday. McCroskey said the fellow ate dinner there and told them his name, but they could not remember it. He told the local people that he was a German, had a brother farming in Illinois, but that he himself always worked in factories and was seeking employment. Investigation of the clue was started immediately when word was forwarded to the Chicago police to try to locate the brother in Illinois. At Wabash authorities knew nothing of the man called PETERSON, which practically killed the clue from Akron to the effect that the dead man came from that city.

Mary HAIMBAUGH, daughter of David and Margaret HAIMBAUGH, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, Sept. 23, 1846, and departed this life at Fulton, Indiana, May 16th, 1924, at the age of 77 years, 7 months and 23 days. At the age of seventeen she moved with her parents to Fulton county, Indiana, where she has since resided.
August 20, 1865, she was united in marriage to John A. FENSTERMAKER. To this union were born six children, four sons and two daughters. She was preceded in death by the husband, one son, Fred [FENSTERMAKER], and one daughter, Laura [FENSTERMAKER]. She leaves to mourn their loss, one daughter, Mrs. Orlando HORN of Talma, three sons, Zane W. [FENSTERMAKER] of Argos, Benton [FENSTERMAKER] of Fulton, and Ivan [FENSTERMAKER] of Niles, Michigan; nine grandchildren, one great-grandchild, and two sisters, Mrs. Katherine McCARTER, of Rochester, and Mrs. Arthur LYNCH, of Chicago; besides a host of other relatives and friends. At an early age she united with the Lutheran Church in Ohio, but at the time of her death, was a member of the U.B. church at Fulton, of which church she was faithful and attended as long as she was able. Always a devoted mother and a kind and helpful neighbor in time of need, she will be greatly missed. Although afflicted for some time, she kept a patient and cheerful disposition until the last.
Tuesday, May 20, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, May 21, 1924

John SMITH, 78, known in his home community as "Uncle John," died at Kewanna Wednesday noon of heart failure. He had been suffering from heart trouble for several weeks but it was not regarded as serious. he made his home with his daughter Mrs. W. H. GOHL and her husband in Kewanna and it was there that he died.
Mr. Smith was the oldest living naive of Union township, having been born on a farm near Kewanna in November, 1846. He was a farmer all of his life, having a place near that town, but had retired recently and moved to town. His wife died several years ago. He was a veteran of the Civil War, being a member of Company D 87th Indiana Infantry.
He is survived by a brother, Silas [SMITH], of near Bruce Lake and a sister, Mrs. Adolph HUNNESHAGEN of the same community, and by a daughter.
Funeral Friday afternoon at Kewanna. Burial at the Bruce Lake cemetery.
[NOTE: John SMITH, 1845-1924; Jemima SMITH, his wife, 1843-1919 - both buried Bruce Lake Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Union Township.]

Brief graveside funeral services were conducted Wednesday afternoon by Rev. W. J. NIVEN for the unidentified foreigner shot a week ago Tuesday by Night Police CHAMBERLAIN, at the Citizens' cemetery where burial was made. All clues leading to the establishment of the man's identity have so far proved false leads.

A complication of diseases due to old age caused the death early Wednesday of Mrs. Sarah D. CHAMBERS, life long resident of Macy and adjacent neighborhood.
Mrs. Chambers, who was 84 years old at the time of her demise, was born near Macy, Indiana. She was well known, she and her husband having owned for years the famous Chambers' Huckleberry marshes.
She leaves one daughter, Miss Myrtle CHAMBERS, at home, her husband having preceded her in death several years.
Funeral from the Macy Christian church, Friday at 2:00 p.m., Rev. G. E. SCIEFERS in charge. Burial in the Plainview cemetery.

Thursday, May 22, 1924 and Friday, May 23, 1924

[no obits]

Saturday, May 24, 1924

Mrs. N. C. McCOY is in receipt of word of the death of her sister, Mrs. Gorman HEETER, of Burnetts Creek. Funeral services will be held Sunday.

Monday, May 26, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, May 27, 1924

Dennis WERTZBERGER, 41, who had made his home in Rochester for the past two years prior to having been sent to the Longcliff asylum at Logansport for treatment, died at Logansport at 11 o'clock Tuesday morning, according to word received here. He had moved here from Decatur, Ind., his former home.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Mell WERTZBERGER, formerly Miss Mell REAM of Rochester, two children, Howard [WERTZBERGER] and Billie [WERTZBERGER], at home, the father, J. M. WERTZBERGER, of Decatur, two sisters, Della [WERTZBERGER], Marion, and Hattie WERTZBERGER of Decatur, and four brothers, Ed [WERTZBERGER], Elwood; Dal

[WERTZBERGER], Tulsa, Okla; Will [WERTZBERGER], Benton Harbor, and Clay WERTZBERGER, also of Oklahoma.
Private funeral services from the residence on south Pontiac street Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. ASCHANHORT in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Jeremiah L. EDGINGTON, 65, a life long resident of Fulton county, died at about 4:30 o'clock Tuesday morning at the farm home northeast of Leiters in Richland township where he had been born and spent all of his days. He died alone of heart failure, according to verdict of Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH, returned Tuesday morning following an inquest.
Mr. Edgington had been in ill health for the past five or six years, suffering from heart failure, and during the past year his condition had been serious. His daughter and Mr. Lee MARSHALL made their home with him and they were called to Plymouth Monday evening by the serious illness of a friend. When they returned at six o'clock Tuesday morning they found Mr. Edgington in bed, dead. From all appearances he had arisen early in the morning, dressed and built a fire and then, evidently suffering from an attack with his heart, had returned to his bed, fully dressed, where he died. He had been in his usual health Monday.
Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. MARSHALL and Mrs. Irvin WALTERS of Richland township, and a brother, Isaac EDGINGTON, also of Richland township. The wife, two sisters and a brother are dead.
Funeral services in charge of the Richland Center I.O.O.F. lodge of which he was a member, Thursday morning at 10 o'clock at Richland Center.

Wednesday, May 28, 1924

Gene McCLAIN, six year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. J. McCLAIN of Main street, Culver, was fataly injured at 10:30 o'clock Tuesday forenoon when she darted in front of a Ford sedan driven by Mrs. Lawrence WADE.
The little McClain girl was going to the school and dashed out onto the crosswalk near the front of the Culver school just as Mrs. Wade drove up. It all happened so quickly that Mrs. Wade could not avoid running down the little girl. She stopped the car quickly. Unfortunately one wheel rested on the little one when the car was brought to a stop which probably made it worse than if the car had gone farther. The little girl was crushed about the abdomen and it is believed that internal injuries to vital organs were inflicted. Medical attention was summoned but the child was past any help and passed away in 20 minutes.
[NOTE: Jean Eileen McLANE, 1917-1924, buried in Culver Masonic Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Marshall County Indiana Cemeteries, Union Township.]

Thursday, May 29, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, May 30, 1924

[no paper - holiday]

Saturday, May 31, 1924

The firing squad of the local post of the American Legion went to Kewanna Saturday afternoon to conduct the burial services of the late Chas. MOLLENCOPF of that town who died in a government hospital recently. Mollencopf was never discharged from the army, he being capacitated [sic] from the time of his active service.
[NOTE: Charles L. MOLLENCOPF, Aug. 4, 1897 - May 23, 1924 - Amer Leg 11-10-17; 5-28-19, Sarg QMC US, buried Kewanna I.O.O.F. Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Union Township.]

Mrs. Minnie ROBBINS, wife of Roy ROBBINS, died Friday at her home in Mishawaka, according to word received by Rochester relatives. Death was caused by blood poisoning. Mrs. Robbins had had a pimple on her nose, which she scratched with her finger. Blood poisoning resulted and death followed. Mrs. Robbins and her husband were borh former residents of Rochester where they were born and reared. Besides her husband she leaves three children, Rockford [ROBBINS], Francis [ROBBINS] and Bernice ROBBINS, and two brothers, John HILL of Rochester, and George HILL of San Diego, Calif., who is now visiting here. Funeral services are to be held on Monday.

Monday, June 2, 1924

Mrs. Sarah DURKES, 80, formerly a resident of Rochester, died at her home in Huntington this morning. She was living with her son, Henry DURKES. Two weeks ago she fell and suffered a fracture of her left hip from which complications developed. She was the mother of eight children. Surviving are Mrs. Frank GOTTSCHALK of Rochester, and Mrs. Catherine HENLEY, Huntington, Mrs. Mary GREGORY of Niles, Mich., Frank DURKES of Rochester, and Henry DURKES of Huntington. The body was brought to Rochester Monday afternoon for burial.

John COVER, 79 years old, died at his home two miles south of Macy Saturday night from cancer of the stomach. He was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, Dec. 27, 1845 and was a veteran of the Civil War, he and his father both volunteering. In February, 1872 he was united in marriage to Rebecca HAND who died April 12 1890, leaving three children. On April 8, 1893, he was married to Mary DEEDS, to which union a son, Victor, was born. Besides the wife he is survived by the four children, Mrs. Richard SEE, near Ebenezer, Samuel COVER of Logansport, Mrs. C. C. VanBUREN of Molson, Wash., and Victor COVER who lives south of Macy; four brothers, Frank COVER of Peru, Perry COVER of Denver, Jonathan [COVER] and James COVER of south of Macy; twenty grandchildren, several great-grandchildren.
The funeral was held at the Macy Christian church Monday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, Rev. SCIEFERS in charge. Interment in Plainview cemetery.

Tuesday, June 3, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 4, 1924

Mrs. Caroline LEITER, 82, died late yesterday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ambrose BURKETT of Huntington. She had been an invalid for years and was seriously ill for a week. Her husband was Rev. Franklin LEITER, who died some time ago. Mrs. Leiter was born in Pennsylvania, where she was married, moving to Leiters Ford, Indiana with her husband about 50 years ago. They were among the pioneer residents of Aubbeenaubbee township, where they made their home until about three years ago when Mrs. Leiter went to Huntington to live with her daughter. Another daughter, Mrs. Ida HARDING, also of Huntington, survives. Brief funeral services are to be held at the Burkett residence in Huntington Friday morning at eight o'clock, following which the funeral cortege will proceed by motor to Leiters Ford, the former residence, where funeral services will be conducted and burial will take place.

Funeral services for the late Mrs. Henry DURKES were held at 2:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon from the Evangelical church, Rev. HERMAN in charge. Burial was made at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, June 5, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, June 6, 1924

William Henry TAYLOR, 71, former well known resident of Rochester, who until a few years ago had made his home in this city where he was engaged in the real estate business, died Friday morning at his home in South Bend following a three months' illness. Death was caused by arterio sclerosis. Mr. Taylor was born in Pulaski county in 1853. When but a boy he moved with his parents to Marshall county where he made his home until moving to Rochester. During that time he was a farmer. On October 1, 1876 he was united in marriage to Miss Delilah DUMBAULD, who with four children, Dr. Harley W. TAYLOR of this city, Clyde TAYLOR of Bourbon, Mrs. Fred BABCOCK of South Bend, and Mrs. Furel BURNS of Mentone, survive. The body was expected in Rochester Friday afternoon. Funeral arrangements later.

The funeral for the late Mrs. William H. BRUBAKER of Twelve Mile, will be held from the church at Richland Center at 10 o'clock Sunday morning.
[NOTE: William H. BRUBAKER, 1854-1924; Caroline ZINK BRUBAKER, his wife, 1855-1924 - buried Richland Center Citizens Cemetery, Richland Township. - WCT.]

George DUDGEON, well known former resident of Richland township, is dead at his home in Twelve Mile, according to meagre advices received in Rochester Friday morning. Burial will be held at Richland Center Sunday afternoon, it was stated.

Saturday, June 7, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, June 9, 1924

Mrs. Caroline WILSON, mother of Dr. M. WILSON of this city, died Saturday night at her home in Hebron, according to word received from the local dentist, who has been with his mother during her last illness. Death was caused by old age and complications. Her husband died recently. Besides the son, one daughter, Miss Hattie WILSON, and a sister, Mrs. John SIGLER, survive. Funeral services at Hebron Monday afternoon at two o'clock.

William CLINGER, 45, died Sunday morning at his home in Fort Wayne, according to word received here. Death was caused by paralysis from which he had suffered for the past eight months. He was very well known in Rochestr, having spent his summers at the "Wayne" cottage in Fox Park at the lake for many years. The widow and a daughter, Virginia [CLINGER], survive. Funeral services at Ft. Wayne Tuesday afternoon.

Mrs. Dr. RICHARDS, 63, died at her home in Fulton Monday morning, a victim of high blood pressure and shingles. She had been ill but two weeks. Funeral services from the Baptist Temple at Fulton, Tuesday afternoon. Burial at Fulton.
[NOTE: John RICHARDS, M.D., 1846-1916; Eunice E. RICHARDS, wife, 1858-1924 - both buried Fulton cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Liberty Township.]

George W. SMILEY, four months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl SMILEY, died at the country home of his parents near Rochester Sunday afternoon following a four weeks' illness. Death was caused by a complication of measles, whooping cough and pneumonia. A sister and four brothers survive. Funeral services from the home Monday afternoon at 2:30. Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, June 10, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, June 11, 1924

With the sudden death of Frank BROWN, 50, of near Akron, Wednesday morning at his home, the state was forced to scratch from the bar docket a case against him on charges of the sale of intoxicating liquor.
Brown died very unexpectedly about ten o'clock when he went out to the pump at his home near Akron to get a drink. He was seen to fall over and was found to be dead when picked up. Death was caused from heart trouble. He had suffered with hemorrhages of the lungs. He is survived by one sister and one brother.
Brown, it will be remembered, was caught selling liquor at his home which was raided by the police and a quantity of intoxicants were found in the residence. He was arrested and later indicted by the grand jury and his case set for trial.

Thursday, June 12, 1924

Frank GARRETSON, 39, prominent Peru basket manufacturer, committed suicide by shooting himself through the heart with a shot gun at his home, 113 West Fifth street, late Wednesday afternoon. Ill health is believed to have caused Mr. Garretson to commit the act. Mrs. Garretson and her son, Bobbie [GARRETSON], were away from home at the time the husband and father killed himself. The body was found by Bobbie, who returned home from play shortly before 4 o'clock. Mr. Garretson formerly was in business at Roann but for some months ill health kept him from active business. Besides the widow two sons survive.

Henry Haimbaugh JOHNSTON, better known to his host of friends in this community as "Posey," died at 9:15 o'clock Wednesday evening at the home of his daughter Mrs. Della WRIGHT north of Rochester, a victim of acute Bright's disease and hardening of the arteries from which he had suffered for the past four months. He had been living with his daughter 11 weeks prior to his demise. He was 64 years of age.
"Posey" Johnston was one of the well known characters of Fulton county having lived here nearly all his life. He was born at Warsaw November 26, 1858, a son of John and Margaret JOHNSTON. For 22 years he was employed by the late Val ZIMMERMAN as a furniture salesman. It was his employer who gave him the nickname by which he was known for miles around. When he left the employment of Mr. Zimmerman he moved to a small farm a few miles east of Rochester where he engaged in the dog breeding business, specializing on the various types of bulldogs.
For years he drove a white stallion he called "Mack" and as he passed down the street he would shout to his friends: "All ready now." Full of wit and ever ready with a joking reply to remarks by his friends, he will be missed in the community that has known him for so many years.
He is survived by his first wife, Mrs. Bertha SCHRANDT, his second wife, having preceded him; two daughters, Mrs. WRIGHT and Mrs. Stella BRYANT of Rochester; 10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.
Funeral services from the Wright residence Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. J. W. NIVEN in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.
[NOTE: Henry JOHNSTON, 1858-1924; Susan JOHNSTON, 1857-1923; both buried in Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.]

Friday, June 13, 1924

Mrs. William BUSKIRK, Sr., died at the family home at Peru Wednesday following an illness of the past three weeks. The deceased was born in Wayne county, Ind., June 15, 1852 and her age was 72 years, 4 months and 28 days. She was united in marriage with William BUSKIRK, Sr., who with one son, William [BUSKIRK], Jr., and one grandson survive.
One sister, Mrs.Ella BROOKS, and three brothers, William SLUSHER of Rochester, Albert SLUSHER of Washington, and James SLUSHER of Peru, also survive. The funeral arrangements have not been completed at this hour.

Henry Haimbaugh JOHNSTON was born November 26, 1858 at Warsaw, Indiana, and passed away June 11, 1924, at the age of 65 years, 7 mo., and 16 days.
He was united in marriage in 1881 to Ella TIMBERS of Rochester, Ind., and to this union was born one daughter, Mrs. Bertha SHRANT of Marion, Indiana. [sic] In 1883 he was united in marriage to Susan SHIVELY, also of Rochester, Ind., she having preceded him in death ten months.
To this union was born seven children, two of whom are left to mourn their loss, Mrs. Stella BRYANT and Mrs. Della WRIGHT, both of Rochester, Indiana.
Besides there ten grandchildren and four great-grandchildren; two brothers, John C. [JOHNSTON] and Israel JOHNSTON, both of Rochester, two sisters, Mrs. Gertrude PRATER of Coalings, California, and Mrs. Maude POMEROY of Plymouth, Indiana, are left to mourn his death.

Saturday, June 14, 1924

"Oh, Sim!" With these last words, Frank BROWN, age 59 years, eleven months and twenty-eight days, dropped dead in his brother's Simeon Brown's arms at 11 o'clock Wednesday morning while en route to the pump in the yard of his home for a drink of water.
The deceased has been afflicted with lung hemorrhages and heart trouble for a long time, and heart failure was given as the immediate cause of the sudden death. He is survived by one brother, Simeon BROWN, of this city, and one sister, Rossetta RUSSELL of near Rochester.
Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Church of God, Rev. ESHELMAN officiating.

Monday, June 16, 1924 to Wednesday, June 18, 1924

[no obits]

Thursday, June 19, 1924

Roy SHANKS, former well known Rochester hardware merchant and motion picture show proprietor, who sold out his interests in this city and moved with his family to Plymouth about 10 years ago, died at his home in that city at 6:30 o'clock Wednesday evening, a victim of asthma and heart trouble from which he had been suffering for a number of years. He was 50 years of age.
Details regarding his life were not available either in Rochester or Plymouth as relatives could not be located. When he sold out his theatre interests in Rochester, Mr. Shanks took over the Star restaurant in Plymouth until forced to retire on account of ill health. He was a member of the Eagles and Knights of Pythias lodges.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Vena SHANKS, son, Victor [SHANKS], and a step-son, Edwin McMAHAN of Baker, N.C.
Funeral services will be held Friday at the Church of the Brethren at Plymouth, Rev. J. F. APPLEMAN in charge. Burial at Oak Hill cemetery in Plymouth.

Friday, June 20, 1924

Courtney ADAMS, 19, a life long resident of Fulton county, died at nine o'clock Friday morning at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred ADAMS of near Loyal. Death was caused by typhoid fever from which he had suffered for three weeks. Courtney Adams was born in Fulton county September 21, 1904. Since he had left school he had been working on his father's farm. Surviving are the parents, two sisters, Eunice [ADAMS] and Adie [ADAMS], and three brothers, Otis [ADAMS], Jesse [ADAMS] and Edward ADAMS. The body will be taken to Torrent, Kntucky for burial.
Wabash, Ind., June 20 - Authorities were probing into the death of George PARKER, 10, son of Irving PARKER, of Silver Lake, who was found dead there late yesterday in the front yard of his home with a discharged shot gun lying nearby and a note in his clothing reading:
"I am doing this because of poor health."
Because the lad was in good health the authorities were led to believe he was murdered and a vigorous search is being made for clues.

William H. BRUBAKER, 69, well known Fulton county farmer who has lived near Twelve Mile for the past 30 years after moving from his birthplace in Cass county, died at 8:30 o'clock Thursday evening following a two weeks' illness. He was united in marriage in 1882 to Miss Caroline ZINK. Surviving are three brothers, Eli B. BRUBAKER, Rochester; Jacob B. BRUBAKER, Macy, and Killman B. BRUBAKER, Plymouth, and one sister, Mrs. Lavina LOWMAN. Mrs. Brubaker died two weeks ago when he became ill. Funeral services at Richland Center Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

Mrs. Cynthia M. TOWNSEND, wife of Joel R. TOWNSEND, died at two o'clock Thursday afternoon at her home on the corner of Jefferson and 10th streets following an illness covering a period of six months. Death was caused by heart failure and complication. She was 67 years of age.
Cynthia M. BROWN was born in Rochester, September 4, 1856, a daughter of Elisa and Elizabeth BROWN, deceased. In 1889 she was united in marriage to Wendell SCHULER. To this union one child, Edward SCHULER, was born. Following the death of her first husband, Mrs. Schuler was married to Joel R. Townsend, who with the son, Edward Schuler, of Warsaw, one sister, Mrs. Newton IZZARD of Rochester, and a brother, Frank BROWN, of Warsaw, survive.
Funeral services from the residence Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge assisted by Rev. J. W. NIVEN. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Mrs. Minnie MENTZER of Mentone, who died last Tuesday, was held Thursday afternoon at the Baptist church here. Death was caused by cancer from which she had suffered for two years. She was well known in the Mentone community.
Mrs. Mentzer [Minnie BLUE] was born on the old Blue homestead August 31, 1878, where she grew to womanhood. On Sept. 14, 1904 she was married to Malone D. MENTZER and four children were born to this union, all of whom survive. Other surviving relatives are two brothers, two sisters. She was a member of the Baptist church in Mentone.

LaPorte, Ind., June 20. - The Honorable E. H. SCOTT, 82, former mayor of LaPorte, founder of the Niles and Scott company, nickled wheel manufacturer and who established the town of Munsing, Mich., a number of years ago, and who also filled the position of receiver for the old Indianapolis, Peru and Chicago railroad, dropped dead this morning, death resulting from heart disease. Scott was also a banker and was one of the wealthiest men in northern Indiana. His wealth is represented by large mining and agricultural holdings.
__________
Mr. Scott was well known in Rochester where he was at one time interested in the Rochester Gas and Fuel company. He also has farm holdings in Fulton county and made frequent visits in this community.

Saturday, June 21, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, June 23, 1924

Mrs. Elmer [sic] NORRIS, 74, life long resident of Fulton county, died Monday morning at ten o'clock at the home of her niece, Mrs. Albert MILLER of near Mud Lake after an illness of eight months with paralysis. She was born on November 14, 1850. Mrs Norris has been a resident of Rochester for the last 15 years, moving here from the Norris farm, east of the city. She was a member of the local Baptist Church. She was preceded by her husband, Noah NORRIS, several years ago. Surviving are two brothers, Merritt NORRIS and C. C. MURPHY. Funeral arrangements later.

John SANS, 80, well known Fulton county farmer, died at his home at Tiosa, Sunday, a victim of old age and complications. He was a veteran of the Civil War. Surviving are two children, a daughter, Mrs. John DECK, at Tiosa, and a son, William SANS, of Akron. Mrs. Sans died some time ago. Funeral services from the Tiosa Christian church Tuesday morning at 10 o'clockl. Burial at the Reichter cemetery.

Mrs. Nancy MEYER, and daughters Rose [MEYER] and Caroline [MEYER] attended the funeral of the former's nephew, Albert MURGEY in Wabash Sunday. Mr. Murgey who is well known here, died Thursday of malaria fever which he contracted last winter in the South.

Miss Lela SMOKER, aged 18 years, died suddenly at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles SMOKER, northeast of Macy, Saturday afternoon after an illness of an hour from convulsions. At the age of three years she was adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Smoker. The funeral was held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Pleasant Hill church, conducted by Rev. J. B. REEVES of Gilead, and interment was made in the Akron cemetery.

Tuesday, June 24, 1924

John BALL, 63, retired farmer of Roann, Wabash county, shot and killed himself Monday morning. He pointed a shot gun at his heart and pulled the trigger as his wife entered the room.

Wednesday, June 25, 1924

Mrs. Christina McCARTER, 71, died at 3:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon following a year's illness. She had broken her hip and in addition suffered several strokes of paralysis in addition to a heart complaint.
Mrs. McCarter [Christina CARR] was born in Fulton county, December 6, 1852, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben CARR, deceased. She lived here until 1882 when she moved to Wisconsin where she made her home for five years, later returning to Rochester.
On February 8, 1873 she was united in marriage to Frank McCARTER who died September 27, 1895. She was a member of the Evangelical church and is survived by one son, Fred McCARTER, Rochester; one daughter, Mrs. Theodore TEEL, near Rochester. Three children are dead. Funeral services from the home of her son Fred McCarter Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Burial at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Word was received here Wednesday of the sudden death of Amon ROHER, who was killed when he accidentally shot himself on a farm in Ohio where he was visiting. Few details were received by relatives concerning the accident. They were expecting the body home Wednesday afternoon.
Roher, who is about 53 years of age and lives near the county line in Richland Township, was helping with the work where he was visiting and on Tuesday evening he started back after the cows. He took a shotgun along saying he might get a rabbit. Later the cows came in alone and when search was made they found him dead with the discharged gun by his side.
He leaves one son, Lon [ROHER], and a daughter, Mrs. Allen LONG. Funeral notice later.

Thursday, June 26, 1924

Marvin E. BARNHART, 55, of Chicago, a brother of Henry A. Barnhart of this city, died at a hospital in Chicago, Wednesday evening about six o'clock, after a week's serious illness following an appendicitis operation. Mr. Barnhart suffered a relapse ten days after the operation and gradually became worse until the end. Tuesday word was received here that there was no hope for him to recover. He was well known in this vicinity where he once lived.
Mr. Barnhart was born and reared at Twelve Mile, the son of Rev. Elder Jacob and Mary BARNHART. He attended Rochester High School and later graduated from the law school of the University of Michigan. He took up the practice of law while a young man in the city of Chicago and some time ago resigned from his law firm to accept the position of assistant states attorney under Mr. Hoyne which position he held for eight years. When he died he was the Democratic nominee for Supreme court judge of the city of Chicago.
Mr. Barnhart married several years ago and leaves his wife, Lydia [BARNHART], one daughter and two step-children. Also surviving are Mrs. A. S. HOFFMAN of Macy, Mrs. Jacob LEFFEL of Pontiac, Michigan, sisters; George BARNHART of Twelve Mile and Henry A. BARNHART of this city, brothers. Mrs. Hoffman and his two brothers were with him when he died.
Funeral at the residence on Sherland Road in Chicago, Saturday afternoon.

Friday, June 27, 1924

John KOCHENDERFER, 75, well known in Rochester, having spent 35 years on a farm in Fulton county, died at his home in Pana, Ill., Thursday afternoon, a victim of dropsy and complications, according to word received here. He is survived by the widow, one daughter, one son, four sisters, Mrs. James ABBOTT and Mrs. Jay ABBOTT, Rochester, Mrs. Ella BURTON, Michigan, and Mrs. Sarah McCARTY, Twelve Mile and one brother, Frank KOCHENDERFER, Fulton county. Funeral services at Pana Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock. Burial at Pana.

Saturday, June 28, 1924 and Monday, June 30, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 1, 1924

Culver, July 1. - John WERNER of three miles northeast of this city, died Sunday from the effects of being overcome by heat some days previous. He had been stricken by heat several times previously and apparently was susceptible to this trouble.
He had been in bed 10 days before his death. He drank cold water after becoming over-heated and became violently ill during the recent warm period. He was working in the field when stricken.
The deceased is survived by a widow and three children, a son and a daughter at Indianapolis and a son at home.

Wednesday, July 2, 1924

Mrs. Leola FUNK, wife of Dr. N. E. FUNK, of LaPorte, died Tuesday evening at seven o'clock at her home in that city. She had been in Rochester for some time during her last illness, but had been taken home to die.
Mrs. Funk, who was 27 years of age at the time of her demise, was born in Rochester, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James A. TERRY. The Terrys were quite prominent people here. Death was due to cancer of the heart, from which she had suffered for several months. She leaves two small children, one boy two years old and a daughter five months old, the parents, the husband, two brothers, and a sister. She became seriously ill following the birth of her second child and never recovered.
The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon in LaPorte, the Rev. Dr. STEWART of that city in charge.

Thursday, July 3, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, July 4, 1924

[no paper - holiday]

Saturday, July 5, 1924

Mrs. Orpha Katherine YIKE, 33, wife of John YIKE, of east Rochester, died suddenly about 11:30 Friday evening, death being due to heart trouble.
Orpha MUSSELMAN, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marian MUSSELMAN, was born in Miami county, February 1, 1891 and lived there until she was sixteen years of age at which time she moved to Rochester where she resided until the time of her death. When she was seventeen years old she was united in marriage to John Yike who with four children, Anna [YIKE], Martha [YIKE], James [YIKE] and Betty [YIKE] survive. Her mother, Mrs. Marian MUSSELMAN also survives.
No funeral arrangements have been made.

Monday, July 7, 1924

Alpheus Lincoln ADAMSON, the postmaster at Akron, died at his home there Sunday morning, according to word received here. Death was caused by an attack of heart failure from which he had suffered for the past three months.
A. L. Adamson had been practically a life long resident of Akron. He was engaged in the real estate and insurance business there during the major portion of his business life and had taken over the management of the postoffice only a little less than a year ago.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs Minerva ADAMSON, two sisters and a daughter, Mrs. Brandt McKEE of Rochester. Funeral services from the Akron Methodist Church Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock with burial at Nichols cemetery.

Tuesday, July 8, 1924

Mrs. Grant HATCH, 48, died Sunday at her home in Whiting, a victim of anemia, according to word received here. She is survived by her husband and five children. Mrs. Hatch was a sister of A. E. BABCOCK, formerly of Rochester. Funeral services will be held from the Macy Christian church Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. C. E. SCIEFERS in charge.
[NOTE: Lillie J. HATCH, Jan. 12, 1866 - July 6, 1924; Grant E. HATCH, July 19, 1865 - Aug. 19, 1934 - both buried Plainview Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Allen Township.]

Mrs. Frank HOFFMAN is in receipt of word of the death at the home of her son in Portland, Oregon, of Mrs Frank A. JACKSON, wife of Mrs. Hoffman's brother. Mrs. Jackson lived in San Diego, Calif., but was visiting her son at the time of her death. She is survived by the husband, a former resident of Rochester and well known here, and three sons.

Wednesday, July 9, 1924 and Thursday, July 10, 1924

[no obits]
Friday, July 11, 1924

Clarence VEIRS received word Friday of the death of his brother, Chas. VEIRS, of Washington, D.C. Mr. Viers was about 50 years of age and lived with his sister, Miss Lutie VEIRS. Clarence Veirs left Friday afternoon to attend the funeral.

Saturday, July 12, 1924

Funeral services for Mrs. Mahala AILER of Mentone, who died at her home there Thursday morning, were held at the Baptist church in that town Saturday afternoon. She [had] been in failing health for the past several months and had been confined to her bed for five weeks. Her death was caused by heart trouble. She was about 70 years of age. Three step-children and two sisters survive.

Mrs. Mary DRAKE received word Friday of the death of her son's wife, Mrs. Ben DRAKE, which took place Friday at the home of her sister, Mrs. Lee FORRIS at Great Falls, Montana. Mrs. Drake has been ill for the past two years with cancer. She was about 38 years of age and besides her husband and sister, she leaves a son six years old.
Monday, July 14, 1924

Mrs. Cathrine WAGNER died at the home of her daughter, Mrs Geo. UHL, at Huntington Saturday night at 12 o'clock from a complication of diseases.
She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jonas CLELAND and was born east of Macy August 29, 1847, being one of the eleven children of whom two brothers, Alvin CLELAND, east of Macy, and Oliver CLELAND of Okomo, South Dakota, and two sisters, Mrs. Harriett CLELAND, east of Macy, and Mrs. Mary SWEBEL of Peru, survive her.
She was united in marriage with Andrew WAGNER, who preceded her in death twenty years ago.
She is survived by six children, Mrs. Catherine UHL of Huntington, Mrs. Mary STEMAN of Middlepoint Ohio; Jonas WAGNER, Warsaw; Joseph [WAGNER] and John WAGNER of Logansport, and George WAGNER who resides east of Macy on the CLELAND homestead. Also twenty-three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The remains were brought to the home of George Wagner, east of Macy, Monday morning. Funeral at Gilead M.E. Church Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Burial in the Gilead cemetery.

Charles ZARTMAN died at his home east of Fulton Sunday morning at 3:30 o'clock from an illness of heart trouble and arterial sclerosis which resulted in paralysis. He was confined to his bed for the past six weeks.
He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jackson ZARTMAN and was born in Perry county, Ohio, May 10, 1861, and was 63 years of age at the time of his death. He was one of ten children. One brother, Irvin ZARTMAN, southwest of Macy, survives him. On Nov. 6, 1886 he was united in marriage with Miss Mary BAKER to which union four children were born - Cloyd [ZARTMAN] and Voris ZARTMAN and Mrs. Mabel CLEVINGER, who reside near their parents, and Mrs. Gertrude ZABST, who with the wife survive him.
He was a member of the Fulton United Brethren church where the funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, conducted by Rev. MILLER of Lafayette, assisted by Rev. Cecil SMITH of Fulton. Interment will be made in the Plainview cemetery, near Macy.

James Thompson GAINER, one of the prominent citizens of this community, well known to all of his friends as "Uncle Jim" during his many years of residence in and near Rochester, died at 1:45 o'clock Sunday morning at his home on south Main street after a short illness extending over a period of but two weeks. Mr. Gainer had been in excellent health all of his life and was always very active for a man of his years until two weeks ago when he was stricken with an attack of shingles. This nervous affliction proved of a highly serious nature and complications developed which resulted in his demise. He was 82 years of age.
Born in Ohio, October 16, 1842, a son of Mr. and Mrs. James GAINER, deceased, he moved to this community early in life. He had been a farmer, living just south of Rochester and had also been engaged in the milling business with the late Jonas MYERS, in the grain business with Daniel AGNEW and the late William LEITER and Charley CRAFFY [?]. Of recent years he has been retired.
Mr. Gainer was the last survivor of Company F 87th Indiana, one of General Sherman's crack regiments in the Civil War. He enlisted here and was taken with other Fulton county recruits to a railroad center from where they embarked to the scene of the southern conflict. Mr. Gainer served three years with the outfit that suffered the heaviest casualties of any regiment in the war and which played a prominent part in the battles of Chickamauga and other major engagements in all of which the local man figured.
During his recent years, especially since the death of his wife, Mrs. Mary K. ELAM GAINER, to whom he had been married May 24, 1874, Mr. Gainer had played a prominent part in the affairs of the McClung Post, G.A.R., and was considered one of the best-versed men in Masonry in this part of the country. Just recently he had purchased a small automobile, which he had learned to drive and apparently was enjoying life to the utmost when he was stricken with his fatal illness. Since the death of his wife, he had made his home with a niece, Mrs. Mary HEDGES.
Surviving are three nephews and six nieces, Harry HEDGES, Sheldon Iowa; W. H. HEDGES, Kansas City; Frank B. GAINER, woodlake, Calif., Mrs. Nell FEE, Mrs. Anna L. HEDGES, Urbana, O.; Mary E. HEDGES, Rochester; Mrs. H. L. PILSBURY, and Marie [GAINER] and Nell GAINER, Long Beach, Calif.
Funeral services from the residence, north Main street, Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Interment in the mausoleum.

Tuesday, July 15, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 16, 1924

Mrs. Mary Susan McKINSEY died Wednesday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A. C. Bruce of Peru. Death came after five weeks' illness caused from cancer.
Mrs. McKinsey was 70 years old at the time of her death and lived in this city until five months ago when she moved to Peru to make her home with her daughter there.
She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. A. C. BRUCE, Peru, and two sons, Harlan [McKINSEY] of Kewanna, and Allen [McKINSEY] of Chicago.
The funeral will be held from the home of the daughter at 2:30 Friday afternoon.

Thursday, July 17, 1924

Mrs. Mary DUNLAP RICKEL, 78, died at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon at her home in Sevastopol, a victim of paralysis. She had been ill over a period of 20 years, suffering her fatal stroke about two months ago. Mrs. Rickel, who formerly lived in Rochester where she was well known, was the wife of George W. RICKEL to whom she had been married for 59 years and who with one son, Lloyd RICKEL and two daughters, Mrs Ed SARBER, Sevastopol, and Mrs. Charles BLACK of Sevastopol, survive. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at Sevastopol.

Friday, July 18, 1924

The young people of Rochester were saddened Friday morning by news of the death of Robert Leslie MOGLE, 16 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles MOGLE, who died at nine o'clock a victim of tuberculosis from which he has suffered since last May.
Born in Chicago, May 27, 1908, he moved to this city with his family when very young and had always been popular with his playmates. He was a member of the high school class of 1925 and was active in school work of all kinds up to the time of his last illness.
Surviving are the parents, one sister, Mrs. Charles A. DAVIS, and two brothers, Hubert MOGLE, of Chicago, and Everett MOGLE, of Stone Lake,Wis.
Funeral arrangements later.

Van P. GRIMES, well known Fulton county farmer, who had lived in the Mt. Olive neighborhood for the past 20 years, dropped dead suddenly at six o'clock Friday morning, a victim of heart failure from which he had suffered for a number of years. Mr. Grimes had started from the house to milk when he suddenly fell over and was dead before medical aid could reach him.
Surviving are three children, a daughter and two sons by his first wife and three half-brothers.

Saturday, July 19, 1924

Charles TRUE, 64, well known baker and citizen of Rochester, who had lived here all his life and was one of the pioneers of the community, died at his home, 948 Park St., Saturday morning at 1:30 of pneumonia. He had been ill about seven weeks. He had a wide acquaintance due to his long life here and he had traveled extensively in the West. He was one of the workmen who helped to build the Erie railroad when it was laid through here. At one time he lived at Silver Lake but following the death of his wife he moved back to Rochester.
Charles True was born October 16, 1860 in Rochester, the son of Jasper and Margaret TRUE, both deceased. On June 20, 1908, he married Effie Aldora MILLER of near Akron who died two years afterward. He was a member of the K. of P. Lodge No. 164 of Silver Lake and was also a member of the Methodist church of that town.
He is survived by two brothers, Melvin [TRUE] of this city, and Fred TRUE of Chicago, and one sister, Mrs. Chas. SHAW of Rochester.
Funeral Sunday afternoon at 1:30 at the Evangelical church with Rev. M. O. HERMAN in charge. Burial at the Long Pine cemetery near Mt. Zion with the K. of P. lodge conducting the ritual.

Monday, July 21, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, July 22, 1924

Chicago, July 22. - Relatives of Walter EASTERDAY, formerly of Logansport and Culver, prepared to take the man's body back there for burial. Easterday, known here for some months as Albert WALTERS, was shot to death early Monday by Rowland CAMPBELL, partner in the Campbell Hosiery firm, when Easterday was seen prowling about the concern's premises. Campbell said he thought the man might be attempting to enter the place. An inquest is planned for late today or tomorrow.

Wednesday, July 23, 1924

Word has been received here of the death of Rev. Oscar B. WELLS, 65, which occurred Tuesday afternoon at his home in Pittsburgh. Rev. Wells was the pastor of the United Brethren church in Rochester 20 years ago and has many friends in this city. It was he that built the present U. B. parsonage. Funeral services will be held at Silver Lake, Friday, July 25th.

Thursday, July 24, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, July 25, 1924

Dr. Galen MILLER, 28 years of age, a resident of Twelve Mile, died yesterday at the family residence, death being due to a case of mumps which he contracted as the result of having a tooth pulled.
He had practiced medicine but three weeks, having been graduated from medical college one year ago at Lima, Ohio, since that time. His father, Dr. L. C. MILLER, has been located in the vicinity of Twelve Mile for over thirty years.
Deceased is survived by his parents, a brother, Donald [MILLER], and a sister, Alma [MILLER]. No arrangements have been made for the funeral.

The relatives from a distance who attended the funeral of Mrs. Cathrine WAGNER at Gilead, Tuesday of last week were: James WAGNER and family of Warsaw, Joseph [WAGNER] and John WAGNER and families of Logansport, Mr. and Mrs. George UHL and family of Huntington, Mr. and Mrs. John C. STEMAN and family of Middlepoint, Ohio, Mrs. Mary SWEBEL of Peru, John [DIEHNAN] and P. L. DIEHNAN and their daughter, Mrs. Kelsey YEAGLEY of Akron. -- Macy Items by Grace Mullican.

Saturday, July 26, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, July 28, 1924

Noble HURST, 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hurd HURST of Peru, former residents of Macy, was drowned Sunday noon at Mud Lake while in swimming. The youth who would have celebrated his 17th birthday today, (Monday), was in the water at the time with a number of other boys while the table was being spread on the shore nearby for a family reunion dinner.
Noble, according to his friends, had dived off the spring board at the Mud Lake bridge and had swam a short distance when he turned to his companion, Robt. McKEE, and told him that he would have to have help as he was tired out. He did not seem excited and the other boy started to help him. The water where they were is about 18 feet deep. Young Hurst apparantly exhausted went under dragging his rescuer with him but for some reason or other loosened his hold and sank. Meanwhile the father, Hurd Hurst, who could not swim, from the bank seeing that something was wrong, obtained a boat and pushed rapidly to where his son went down. He said the body came to within two feet of the surface and then went down. Expecting it to come up again he waited but that was the last seen of the youth.
Leslie HENTGEN of Peru, who was undressing in a bath house nearby heard the commotion and hurried to the shore, dived in and searched for the body for several minutes. Finally he took the same course as the boy had and discovered it about where he went down and brought him to the shore. The Hurst boy had then been under about twenty minutes. Attempts at resuscitaton failed and later Ray COOK of this city arrived with a pulmotor which was used without avail. Dr. H. O. SHAFER of this city was also called but pronounced the boy dead.
The young man was a student in high school at Peru and was known here, being related to Mrs. Bessie HURST, of this city. Hurd Hurst is also well known here, he being the 11th district Republican chairman. There are two sisters, also surviving. Dr. Dow HAIMBAUGH, coroner, was called to the scene and pronounced death due to accidental drowning.

Tuesday, July 29, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, July 30, 1924

The funeral of Mrs. Angeline SULLIVAN, 79, who died Monday afternoon at her home northeast of Tiosa, was held Wednesday afternoon at the Lutheran Church in that neighborhood. Rev. KECK of South Bend preached the funeral and burial was at the Reichter Cemetery.
Mrs. Sullivan had been seriously ill for about six weeks from tumors and sank gradually until the end. She was well known in that community having been a resident there all of her life. She was a member of the Lutheran Church, having joined when she was 18 years old. Her husband, Michael SULLIVAN, died about ten years ago.
She is survived by two sons, Walter [SULLIVAN] and Michael SULLIVAN, both of whom live in the same neighborhood.

Thursday, July 31, 1924

The relatives who came to attend the Hatch reunion at North Mud Lake Sunday, which came to a sad ending soon after arriving when one of the relatives, Noble HURST, aged 16, drowned, were: Mrs. Dora HATCH of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. James HATCH and son Glen [HATCH] of South Bend; Mr. and Mrs. Elmer HATCH, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart HATCH, Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo LEEDY, Mr. and Mrs. Emerson LEFFEL and three children, Mr. and Mrs. Walter HUFF and two children and Mr. and Mrs. William FORTUNE and baby, all of Peru, Mr. and Mrs. Homer LACKEY and Mrs. Jeanette HATCH, south of Macy, Mr. and Mrs. Harry HATCH and Mr. and Mrs. F. M. PALMER and Mrs. Rebecca HATCH of Macy, Mr. and Mrs. Lee HATCH and family, Mr. and Mrs. Glen HURST and children and Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe HATCH and baby daughter, who reside west of Macy. -- Macy Items by Grace Mullican.

Friday, August 1, 1924 to Tuesday, August 5, 1924
[no obits]

Wednesday, August 6, 1924

Mrs. Elizabeth MORRIS, 88, of near Fulton, more familiarly known for years as "Grandma" MORRIS, died at her home one and a half miles southwest of that town, Wednesday morning after a lingering illness due to complications and old age. She had been in poor health all summer and had gradually become weaker. She had been feeble for some time before that and was almost blind. She was well known in community having resided there most of her life. Her husband, Eck MORRIS, preceded her in death.
Funeral Friday afternoon but the place was not designated, with burial at the Fletchers Lake Cemetery.

Thursday, August 7, 1924

James A. ALLISON, 65, prominent Fulton county farmer and a resident of Rochester and vicinity for more than 20 years, dropped dead Wednesday evening in South Bend where he was working on a teaming contract, according to word received by Rochester relatives.
The exact nature of Mr. Allison's death was not learned here up to Thursday afternoon as his son, John Allison, had not returned from South Bend where he expected to get the body and return to Rochester. John Allison went to South Bend Wednesday evening when he learned of the death, but they would not allow him to remove his father until a coroner's inquest could be held Thursday. That death was due to heart failure, however, there is but little doubt as Mr. Allison had been suffering from heart trouble for some time, although he had not been bedfast at any time.
Born at State Line, Indiana, September 4, 1858, Mr. Allison spent the greater portion of his life on a farm around Danville, Ill. He moved to Fulton county with his family 23 years ago and had lived around here since that time. Of recent years he had not farmed, but had been engaged in contracting work, operating a number of teams. Mrs. Allison died nine years ago.
Two children, a son, John ALLISON, of this city, and a daughter, Mrs. Porter HAIMBAUGH, south of Rochester, survive.

Logansport, Aug. 7 -- After lying unconscious for several hours at a hospital here, Lawrence BAIRD, 19, and Darvin BAKER, 17, injured last night in an automobile wreck that cost the life of Eunice INSLEY, 18, their companion, were reported not to have been seriously injured. Florence KERN, 17, another member of the party, was uninjured. The Logansport Press carries the following account of the accident:
Miss Eunice INSLEY, 18, living a mile south of Fulton, was killed, and Lawrence BAIRD, 19 and Darvin BAKER, 17, were severely injured Wednesday evening at 8:30 when the Overland touring car driven and owned by Baker, crashed into an Armour truck on the Michigan road three and a half miles north of Logansport.
Miss Insley suffered a fracture of the skull. She died before an ambulance could reach the scene.
Baker and Bair sustained bad cuts and bruises and are confined to the St. Joseph hospital in Logansport. Baird was rendered unconscious by a blow on the forehead but regained consciousness later in the evening. Baker suffered a number of bumps about the head and a deep cut on his right forearm.
Miss Florence KERN, 17, sitting in the front seat with Baker, survived the experience without a scratch.
All live in or near Fulton.
The two young couples left Miss Insley's home about 8 o'clock with the intention of going to Rochester, according to her parents, but soon after changed their plans and decided to visit Logansport and attend a picture show.
It was considerable of a mystery just how the car happened to crash into the truck and Baker was unable to tell.
The party was driving south at a speed, witnesses estimate, at from 25 to 30 miles an hour, in passing one truck, a one-ton Ford, belonging to the Armour Creamery at Rochester, the driver, Tom BALLENGER of Logansport, turned back into the road too quickly and the top of his car scraped the side of the truck, and second truck, a one-ton Federal, was about a hundred feet to the rear.
The touring car was coming in the middle of the road, according to Eugene ROUCH of Rochester, the driver of the second truck, and suddenly swerved directly at him. Rouch says he was already at the grass line of the right side of the road, a fact which the truck tracks substantiate, and could no nothing but put on his brakes.
The touring car struck the truck almost squarely head-on. The Insley girl was thrown from her position in the rear seat against the end of the board on the sidegate of the right side of the truck, the corner of the board striking her in the left eye and penetrating to the brain.
The touring car did not turn over, nor was the truck thrown from the highway. The lighter machine was practically demolished, however. It was in the center of the road after the crash and until lifted from the spot to allow traffic to pass.
The body of the girl victim had been thrown from the back seat of the car to half-way back on the truck where the head struck the topmost board of the sidegate.
Baker remained at the wheel. Miss Kern, with him, was thrown to the road through the windshield, shattered by the impact, and was not hurt. Baird, in the rear seat with Miss Insley, said he didn't know what happened nor what became of him afterward until he found himself in the hospital.
There is heavy traffic on the Michigan road in the evening, and it was but a few minutes until a number of machine loads of people were lending assistance to the injured. The Chase ambulance was called to make a fast run with the Insley girl to the hospital where it was thought there might be some chance of retaining any spark of life that might remain.

A second trip was made for the two boys.
Dr. J. H. REED, who was summoned to the hospital, found that the young woman had been dead some time before his arrival and stated death had probably taken place but a few moments after the crash. He administered to the two young men.
The body was removed to Logansport, and later taken to the undertaking establishment at Fulton.
The parents of the girl, Mr. and Mrs. Otho INSLEY, went to Logansport ed to visit Logansport and attend a . . . [sic]
Tom BALLENGER, living at 317 Fifth street, Logansport, was driving the Ford truck. His story and that told by Rouch were corroborated by motorists who were near the place at the time of the accident. The trucks were loaded with 84 cans of cream, en route to the Rochester quarters of the Armour creamery. Roy FOLLETTE, manager of the Rochester station, went to Logansport last night to make his investigation into the affair. Neither of the truck drivers were ordered held by Acting Coroner M. B. STEWART.
Ralph DELEPLANO, Logansport mail carrier, was among the first to reach the scene of the accident after the collision. He was driving south and said the touring car had passed him a short distance out, proceding at a speed declared to be less than 25 miles an hour. Dyrer McDOWELL, Logansport man, also was on the scene shortly after the wreck, and assisted in carrying the injured into a nearby farmhouse to await the arrival of the ambulance.
The rain which was falling heavily early in the evening, is thought to have been largely responsible for the accident.
The Insley girl is survived by her parents and one sister, Mrs. Ruth CRANE, living three miles north of Lucerne.
Darvin BAKER is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ollie BAKER, of west of Fulton. The family moved to that vicinity only a few months ago, from Michigan.
Lawrence BAIRD is the son of Mrs. William BAIRD, living in Fulton. Miss KERN is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John KERN of Fulton. Her father keeps a store there. The INSLEY family are former residents of Illinois. They moved to near Fulton about a year ago.
Dr. Stewart announced that he will hold his inquest Saturday morning at 9 o'clock in the office of Dr. J. J. STANTON of Logansport.

Friday, August 8, 1924

Funeral services for the late James A. ALLISON, who dropped dead of heart failure in South Bend Wednesday evening, were held Friday afternoon at two o'clock from the residence of John ALLISON, south Main street. Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The funeral of Miss Eunice INSLEY, 18, victim of the automobile wreck on the Michigan road three miles north of Logansport, Wednesday evening, will be held Saturday afternoon at 1:30 from the residence of the parents, Mr. and Mrs. O. M. INSLEY, one mile south of Fulton. Burial will take place in the Fulton cemetery.
Darvin BAKER, 17, driver of the touring car, and Lawrence BAIRD, 19, who were injured, were able to leave the hospital and return to their homes in Fulton.
Eugene ROUCH, driver of the truck which was struck by the touring car, will probably be exonerated of the blame when Acting Coroner M. B. STEWART gives his verdict. ROUCH, employed by the Armour company at Rochester, said following the accident that he would willingly have driven the heavily loaded truck into the ditch to avoid the collision had it been

possible for him to have done so. He said he was almost stopped when the crash came and previous to the mishap had been driving probably 18 miles an hour.
The coroner's inquest will be conducted by Dr. M. B. Stewart, acting coroner, Monday morning at 9:00 o'clock in the north court room. A private investigation will be made.

Mrs. Elizabeth MARSH, 87, died Thursday evening at her home on south Main street following a long illness. Death was due to old age and complications. Mrs. Marsh was the widow of the late James MARSH and was one of the well known pioneers of Fulton county.
Born at Plymouth, Indiana, June 30, 1837, Miss Elizabeth BEATTIE was united in marriage to James L. MARSH, June 4, 1854, and together they developed a large farm in Fulton county near Marshtown. They were the parents of eight children, three of whom are dead.
Mr. and Mrs. James MARSH moved to Rochester in 1906 to the residence on south Main street and it was there that he died, August 30, 1909. Mrs. Marsh was a member and a devoted worker of the Baptist church for more than 50 years.
Surviving are five children, Robert B. MARSH of New York, Mrs. Mollie BARKER of Rochester, Mrs. Hannah GOSS of Columbia City, and Misses Emma [MARSH] and Nettie MARSH, at home; 10 grandchildren, and 10 great-grandchildren; one brother, William BEATTIE, and a sister, Mrs. John McCAUGHEY.
Funeral services from the residence on south Main street, Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, August 9, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, August 11, 1924

Two little children are dead and two other children are suffering from severe injuries following one of the most terrible tragedies to occur in Miami county in years, which happened at 10:15 o'clock Saturday morning, when an automobile driven by a fourteen-year-old boy turned over one-quarter of a mile west of Denver, nine miles north of Peru.
The dead:
Byron SHOEMAKER, 8 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Glen SHOEMAKER, of Denver.
Rosanna SHOEMAKER, 3 years old, his sister.
The injured:
Lawrence BENEDICT, 14 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jay BENEDICT, of Denver, left thigh broken, severe cuts and bruises.
Ray BENEDICT, 13 years old, his cousin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward BENEDICT, of Denver, badly contused on all parts of body.
The little Benedict children had gone early Saturday morning with their father to the home of the latter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles SHOEMAKER, who live in the town of Denver. Later the little boy said that he "wanted to see the funny paper," so his father allowed him to take his little sister and start walking to their home, which is about one-fourth mile from the town proper.
When the little tots were trudging along the road toward their home a short distance out of the town, Lawrence Benedict, driving his father's Ford touring car and accompanied by his cousin, came along and perceived the little pair.

Lawrence had delivered the early edition of the Sunday papers to residents of Denver and was on his way home. Being through with his work, he stopped and took the little ones into his car to take them home. They were within a few hundred feet of the Shoemaker home when the tragic accident occurred.
The mother of the Shoemaker children, unaware that her babies were in the vicinity, heard the crash as the speeding machine jumped from the road and turned over in a ditch. She left her housework and rushed to the scene. There, amid a cloud of dust and smoke and lying under a twisted mass of wreckage, she found her babies - one dead and other dying. With a horrible cry she swooned, and there rescuers found her. Physicians express fears for her condition as a result of the terrible shock.
Dr. E. S. WAYMIRE and Omar BROWN, both residents of Denver, were driving near the scene in the doctor's car. They heard the collision and were the first to arrive at the tragic scene.
One wheel of the car was resting on the head of the three-year-old child. She was dead when Dr. Waymire picked her up. Her neck was dislocated.
The little boy's heart was still beating when the physician picked him up and carried him into the residence of his parents, but efforts to stop the flow of blood from his mouth, nose and ears were futile. His skull was fractured at the base of the brain, but he died from loss of blood in about five minutes after the accident.
Shortly after Dr. Waymire and Brown arrived a man named WILSON, who lives near the place where the tragedy occurred, came to the scene. They carried the bbadly injured and partly hysterical boys to their homes. The boy who was driving said that the front wheels buckled and threw the car into the ditch. The Shoemakers, who are well known farmers of the Denver neighborhood, have only one other child, a ten months old baby.

Kenneth PALMER, 23, son of Mrs. Nora PALMER, of Macy, died Saturday night in the hospital at Huntington as the result of burns sustained Friday morning, August 1, when he came into contact with a high tension electric light line while working on a transformer on a power line near that city. The young man, who is well known in Rochester, and who was an employee of the Northern Indiana Power Co., was severely burned about the feet and heart. It was stated by attending physicians that the burns about the heart were responsible for his death. He was so badly burned about the feet, however, that it was found necessary to amputate one of them a day or two after the accident and he probably would have lost the other had he lived.
Besides the mother, two sisters, Misses Miriam [PALMER] and Bernice PALMER, and one half-brother, Frank PALMER, survive. The body was taken to Macy for burial.

Tuesday, August 12, 1924

Royal Center, Ind., Aug. 12. -- Oliver M. HAND, 60, editor of the Royal Center Record for the past 28 years, died at the residence here Monday morning at 11 o'clock after three years' illness from Bright's disease and a stroke of paralysis which he suffered on June 2nd.
For the past two years Mr. Hand at various times had been confined to the Wabash Valley Sanitarium at Lafayette but the disease could not be cured and he was forced to undergo several years of suffering.
The stroke of paralysis on June 2nd rendered Mr. Hand unconscious for a period of eleven days and he never fully recovered his former health. Eleven days previous to his death Mr. Hand again lapsed into unconsciousness, but he recovered sufficiently before his death to recognize the members of the family shortly before he died.
Mr. Hand was born in New Albany, Ind., on October 1st, 1864, and a few years later his parents removed to Logansport. He received his education in the schools of that city. In 1878 Mr. Hand entered the employ of the Logansport Journal starting as a printer apprentice.
He was married to Mrs. Jeanie WOODWARD in 1886 and resided in Logansport for a number of years, being employed by other newspapers. Later he moved to Chicago where he accepted a position with the Chicago Post. Mr. Hand remained in the Post's employ for one year and then acted on other Chicago papers.
In 1896 Mr. Hand purchased the local newspaper from Rea and Thomas and has edited and published it since that time. Two sons have aided him during the latter years and they intend to continue the publishing of the paper.
Mr. Hand was an active member of the Northern Indiana Editorial Association, which was formed several years ago. During the past few years ill health had prevented him from participating to the usual extent. He was also the first president of the association.
He is survived by his wife, Jennie I. [HAND]; two sons, Jess [HAND] and Frank [HAND], and their families; two brothers, Sterry [HAND] of Remington, and Charles [HAND] of Logansport; one sister, Mrs. Emoline KIDD, residing south of Indianapolis.

The death of Mrs. Eliza COFFIN, life-long resident of LaPorte, occurred at 12:30 o'clock last Sunday at her home in that city, at the age of 84 years. She was the daughter of Benajah and Cynthia STANTON and was born July 10, 1840. In 1865 she was married to Griffin A. COFFIN. She is survived by her only daughter, Mary A. COFFIN of LaPorte. The funeral services were held at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the house, Dr. A. T. BRIGGS, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mrs. Coffin was a member, presiding. Mrs. H. O. SHAFER and Mrs. Frank STERNER of Rochester, went to LaPorte Tuesday to attend the funeral.

Wednesday, August 13, 1924

[no obits]

Thursday, August 14, 1924

Manila, Aug. 14. -- The attempt of Ira Clover SPARKS to sail from Honolulu to the Holy Land in a 24-foo5 sail boat is believed to have ended in his death.
Alone in a small boat Sparks successfully navigated the Pacific from Honolulu to Mindana. Five months ago he sailed from the east coast of Mindanao for Singapore.
Nothing more was heard of him until today when a report was brought in that his boat had been found deserted last week near Vamboanga in the lower part of the Philippine Islands.
Sparks is believed to have been murdered as dried blood was found on the little boat.
Sparks is a former resident of Culver and Peru, Indiana, and is well known in this section.

Logansport, Aug. 14. - Excitement over preparations for his first trip to Chicago, which he expected to make yesterday afternoon, is held responsible for the death from heart failure of Sylvester CRAGUN, 72, wealthy retired farmer, here at noon yesterday.

Friday, August 15, 1924

[no obits]
Saturday, August 16, 1924

Wabash, Aug. 16. - After an illness from kidney trouble of only a short time, Mrs. E. B. FORGEY, 78, died Thursday noon at her home, five miles north of Roann. She was practically a life resident of Wabash county and had lived for 16 years in the home where her death occurred.
She was Leah Katherine [HOOVER], the daughter of John and Rachel HOOVER, and was born December 26, 1844 near Hoover Ind. She was married to E. B. FORGEY, who after coming to this city conducted the French and Forgey Jewelry store in this city. Mr. Forgey died 7 years ago.
Mrs. Forgey was one of 10 children of whom there are left, Mrs. Ella TYSON of Logansport, John HOOVER of Kansas, Mrs. W. H. DENISTON of Rochester and Mrs. FERNALD of Logansport.
Funeral services were held Saturday morning at 11 o'clock at Roann, after which the body was taken to the Mt. Hope cemetery at Logansport for burial.
__________

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. DENISTON and Mr. and Mrs. A. L. DENISTON, of Rochester, attended the funeral.

Monday, August 18, 1924 and Tuesday, August 19, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, August 20, 1924

Josepb HOLLIS, 60, was kicked to death by a horse at his farm two miles west of Royal Center Tuesday afternoon about 2:30 o'clock. Hollis died about fifteen minutes after a fructious animal had planted its hoofs in his abdomen.
Hollis had been plowing a field on his place, the Arnold KISTLER farm on the Star City road, and when it started to rain he discontinued work and was unhitching the team from the plow preparatory to going to the house. He had walked back of one of the horses, which was known to be a bad actor and had kicked at him previously when it let go its rear feet, the hoofs striking Hollis in the revion of the stomach.
Hollis WILLIAMS, 12, a grandson was with him in the field. The lad ran to the house for help and Dr. E. R. IVEY was summoned when it was found that the injured man was unconscious and badly injured. Death took place before the physician arrived.
Dr. M. B. STEWART, of Logansport, acting coroner, was notified of the death and he started his investigation.
Hollis is survived by the widow, two daughters, Mrs. Tom MOSS and another at Huntington; five brothers, William [HOLLIS], John [HOLLIS], Frank [HOLLIS] and Jas. [HOLLIS], all of Boone township, and Thomas [HOLLIS] of Pine Village; two sisters, Mrs. Tom INSLEY and Mrs. Sam MINTHORN; four grandchildren. He had lived in Boone township practically all his life.

Dean TUCKER, eight year old son of Una TUCKER, died Monday at his home in Marion, according to word received by relatives in Rochester. The lad is said to have choked to death, although details of his demise were lacking Wednesday. The Tucker family formerly lived in Fulton county north of the Sugar Grove neighborhood. The lad is a grandson of Naaman NOFTSGER, east of Athens, who is a brother of Benjamin NOFTSGER of this city. The body has been taken to the Noftsger home. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Omega church with burial at Akron. One brother and the father survive.

Mrs. Charles MOGLE, 54, well known resident of Rochester, died suddenly Wednesday noon as the result of a shock following an operation for goitre. The operation was a serious one as the goitre was in an advanced stage. Her youngest son, Robert [MOGLE], a high school student, died of tuberculosis just a few weeks ago.
Mrs. Iva MOGLE was born four miles west of this city, April 26, 1869 and with the exception of a few years spent in Chicago, dwelt in the locality all of her life. She lived in Rochester for 30 years. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wesley GREEN and was a lifelong member of the United Brethren Church.
She is survived by her husband, Charles MOGLE; her mother, Mrs. Rachel GREEN; two sons, Hubert [MOGLE], of Chicago, and Everett [MOGLE], of Stone Lake, Wis.; one daughter, Mrs. Charles DAVIS, Rochester; one brother, A. B. GREEN, of this city, and two sisters, Mrs. Ella MOGLE, of this city, and Mrs. T. E. ROUCH, of Peru.
Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Thursday, August 21, 1924

Funeral services for Mrs. Charles MOGLE, who died at the hospital Wednesday, will be held Friday afternoon from the United Brethren church at four o'clock, Rev. Noah McCOY in charge. Burial at the Odd Fellows' Cemetery.

Friday, August 22, 1924

[no obits]

Saturday, August 23, 1924

Following the recommendation of the coroner of Cook county, Illinois, and the coroner's jury, Rowland CAMPBELL is held for manslaughter in connection with the shooting of Alvin D. EASTERDAY, son of the Culver undertaker. Suit for $10,000 damages is also being brought against Campbell and his concern for the support of the widow and children of Alvin Easterday.
Attorney W. O. OSBORN, of Culver, who is acting for the family, attended the inquest at Chicago. He reports that Easterday was absolved from blame at the inquest.
The story told by Campbell was that his store had been robbed on several occasions about the time of this incident and that he was on guard against another robbery in the middle of the night. Easterday stopped and looked in the window of the store and Campbell thought he was planning a robbery. He walked up to him and shoved a revolver up to his abdomen and commanded him to move on. He says that Easterday struck him a blow with his fist. Campbell then fired the fatal shot.
The place where the shooting took place was about four blocks from the Marshall Field store.

Some hotly contested criminal and damage cases are in prospect against Campbell. A large number of witnesses will testify that Alvin Easterday lived an honorable and straight-forward life.
Alvin Easterday, who was brought up at Culver, left there some years ago and has been located at Logansport until the last few years when he lived in Chicago. He was a cousin of Jack EASTERDAY, of this city.

Webb HILBOURNE, 49, died at 3:10 o'clock Friday afternoon at his home on the north shore of the lake following an illness that has held him in its grip since last January. Death was caused by a complication of diseases.
Mr. Hilbourne, who was born September 4, 1874 in Rhode Island, was the youngest of a family of 14 children, most of whom have preceded him in death. For 35 years he made his home in Chicago, working as a traveling salesman.
Last August he moved to Rochester purchasing and operating the "One Horse Grocery" where he made his home until his demise. The wife, Mrs. Lillion HILBOURNE, survives.
Brief funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon from the Hoover chapel after which the body will be shipped to Chicago for burial.

John Andrew [SMITH], five day old son of Mr. and Mrs. Admiral SMITH, died at nine o'clock Friday evening at the home of the parents at Wolf's Point.

Monday, August 25, 1924

Mrs. David VanMETER, 73, pioneer resident of the Fulton neighborhood, passed away at a hospital in Logansport Saturday night after a lingering illness from cancer. She had lived on her farm three miles west of Fulton for about 50 years and was well known in that community.
She came to Fulton county from Ohio where she was born and at a youthful age married William BUELL. He died about twelve years ago. Several years later she married David VanMETER, but they were later separated.
The only living relative known is Floyd McKINZIE, a nephew, who had maintained her 160 acre farm for her during the last few years and he will inherit her estate.
Funeral Tuesday at 1:30 at the Bethel U. B. Church. Burial in the Salem cemetery.

Tuesday, August 26, 1924

Two pioneer residents of Rochester and Fulton county passed to their rewards Monday night with the deaths of Newton M. IZZARD, 71, life long resident of Rochester, and Ancil B. TOWNSEND, 80, well known farmer who died at his farm home one mile east of Mt. Olive where he had spent all of his life.
The death of Mr. Izzard came as a severe shock to his family and the community as he had been enjoying excellent health up to the past two or three days and then he had merely complained of a minor ailment, thinking nothing of the fatal illness impending.
Mr. Izzard's death occurred some time during the night Monday or early Tuesday morning as he was found dead in bed at seven o'clock at his home on West 10th street. Death was due to apoplexy, according to pronouncement made Tuesday by Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH.
Born in Rochester, November 7, 1853, a son of Jabus and Marguerite IZZARD, Newton

IZZARD became one of the prominent cigar manufacturers of the city and was so engaged when he died. He was united in marriage to Miss Marnice RUHG, in 1874, who preceded him and was again married in 1894 to Mrs. Ida SMITH, who survives. Four daughters, Mrs. Effie STILLWELL, Mrs. Frank COLE, of Tulsa, Okla.; Mrs. Lee COLE and Mrs. Versa MILLS, of South Bend; a son, Fred IZZARD, of Tulsa; two step-sons, Guy SMITH, Rochester, and Lyman SMITH, of Indianapolis, and 10 grandchildren and great-grandchildren, survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

Ancil B. TOWNSEND, pioneer farmer of Fulton county, died at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday morning of a complication of diseases and advanced years. He had lived on the farm near Mt. Olive all of his life and was well known in the community.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Etta TOWNSEND; three sons, John TOWNSEND, of California; William TOWNSEND, of Danville, Ill., and Charles TOWNSEND, of St Louis; four daughters, Mrs. C. C. NYE, Mrs. O. W. DAGUE and Mrs. Clarence WERNER, of Rochester, and Mrs. John SENGER, of Logansport; one brother, Joel TOWNSEND, of Rochester, and a sister, Mrs. Lucy HARRISON, of Taber, Iowa. Funeral services later.

Wednesday, August 27, 1924

Funeral services for Ancil B. TOWNSEND will be held from the residence at two o'clock Thursday afternoon with burial in the Mt. Olive cemetery.

Thursday, August 28, 1924

Russell BARTS, 22, died at 6 o'clock Thursday morning at the city hospital in Peru from injuries received last Friday in an automobile accident near the Austin MAUS corner on the Peru road just north of Mexico.
Barts with his brother, Howard BARTS, and son, Pete [BARTS], three years of age, were en route to Peru last Friday when a Chicago couple, driving a heavy touring car, backed off the side road at the corner above mentioneed directly into the path of the truck.
The truck hit the car with great force and the two Rochester men and boy were injured. All three were taken to Peru where they received medical attention. Russell Barts was cut about the head and it is believed that it was this injury that resulted in his death. His brother and son received only minor injuries, consisting of cuts and bruises.
The truck was badly damaged in the crash; but the touring car that it struck was not damaged and the Chicago couple resumed their trip. The Chicago man declared that he had backed his car around in order to read a sign on a post and said that the truck was being driven at too great a speed to be stopped. The Rochester men declared that they were not driving fast.
Russell Barts was born in Plymouth February 3, 1902, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph BARTS, who now live in Fulton county north of Rochester. He is one of the firm of BARTS BROTHERS, who four years ago purchased the local fertilizer plant north of the city. Besides the parents, three brothers, Howard [BARTS], Ralph [BARTS] and Paul BARTS, a sister Miss Ruth BARTS, the widow and one son survive.
Funeral arrangements later.

John RICHMOND, 90, one of the oldest residents of Rochester and Fulton county, died at 12:30 o'clock Thursday morning at the home of his son, Charles Richmond, Monroe street, a victim of paralysis. He had been in good health until within the past six weeks when he started to show signs of failing and last Tuesday afternoon he suffered a severe stroke of paralysis, from which he could not recover.
Born in Shockton county, Ohio, August 10, 1934, John Richmond moved to Indiana early in life and spent most of his years in and around Mentone and Etna Green.
Twenty-two years ago, he retired from active business pursuits and moved to Rochester to make his home with his son. In January, 1924, his wife preceded him. Two sons, Charles RICHMOND, of Rochester, and George RICHMOND, of Ft. Wayune, survive.
Funeral services at Mentone Saturday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial at Mentone.

Funeral services for the late Thomas R. WILSON, who died from injuries received Wednesday when his car was struck by a train north of Kewanna, will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, from the Methodist church in Kewanna, with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, August 29, 1924

Funeral services for the late [Russell] BARTS, who died at Peru Thursday following an accident north of that city a week ago, will be held Sunday afternoon at Plymouth, the former home. Burial at Plymouth.

Francis H. (Frank) TURNER, 77, well known Rochester resident, who was a veteran of the Civil War, died at his home on the corner of 10th and Pontiac streets at 2:15 o'clock Friday afternoon, a victim of senility and a complication of diseases. He had been ill for some time and his demise was not unexpected by members of the family.
Mr. Turner, who was born in LaPorte, October 20, 1847, enlisted from there during the Civil War and served three years and eight months. During his life he was married twice, both wives having preceded him. In his active years he followed the trade of harness maker, but of recent years he had been inactive in a business way. The majority of his life was spent in Rochester.
Surviving are three daughters, Misses Isabelle [TURNER], Nona [TURNER] and Marie TURNER; two sons, Ray [TURNER], of Rochester, and Samuel TURNER, of Centerville, and one brother, Burdett TURNER, of Union Mills.
Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, August 30, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, September 1, 1924

[no paper - holiday]

Tuesday, September 2, 1924

Mrs. L. J. DOYLE, 22, formerly Miss Norine DOUGLAS of Rochester, died August 20th at her home in Louisville, Ky., of blood poisoning according to word just received by friends in this city. Mrs. Doyle was the daughter of Mrs. Cora DOUGLAS. She had just had an operation for appendicitis and was recovering nicely when she contracted blood poisoning from a pimple that became infected. She had lived in Louisville for the past four years.

Howard Nichols LYON, six-year-old son of Mrs. Eva LYON, of this city, died Saturday at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. David GOOD, east of Rochester, following an extended illness. Death was caused by a tumor at the base of the brain. The child was born in Mentone, February 11, 1918, the son of Fred and Eva LYON. The parents and grandparents are the sole survivors.
Funeral services were held from the Good residence Monday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. F. O. FRALEY in charge. Burial was made at Mt. Hope cemetery.

Elisha H. WILSON, 76, one of the well known farmers of this community, died at eight o'clock Monday evening at his home southeast of this city following a stroke of paralysis. He had been ill for a year when he suffered this first stroke and two strokes following resulted in his demise.
Mr. Wilson was born in Pennsylvania November 30, 1847, one of a family of nine boys and three girls. He moved to Indiana with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom WILSON and had lived around Rochester practically all of his life.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Louise WILSON, one son, Tom WILSON, a daughter, Mrs. Louise BOELTER, of Chicago, and two grandchildren.

Thomas STUDEBAKER, 24, of Kokomo, Indiana, was drowned Labor Day, at Dayton, Ohio. No particulars of the accident could be learned at press time today. The young man is a cousin of C. M. STUDEBAKER, Huntington Grocery Co. salesman, who lives in Fulton.

Mrs. Rachel SLUSSER died at the home of her daught er, Mrs. William NORRIS at Rochester Saturday after an extended illness of heart trouble caused from influenza several years ago.
She [Rachel SLUSSER] was born in Iowa Feb. 27, 1858, but most of her life was spent near Macy. Her husband, J. A. SLUSSER, preceded her eight years ago. She is survived by two sons, Otto SLUSSER of LaPorte; Carl SLUSSER of Peru; and Mrs. Maude NORRIS, of Rochester; twelve grandchildren; one brother, L. B. FARRAR, of Rochester; four sisters, Mrs. C. F. OLIVER, Mrs. R. L. MILLER and Mrs. Betty NORRIS, of Rochester; and Mrs. Frank WAITE, of Peru.
The funeral was held at Slusser's home Monday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock conducted by Rev. J. B. SPARLING. Interment in Plainview cemetery at Macy.

Word was received in Rochester late Tuesday afternoon that Charles MacALLENY, 24, of Aurura, Ill., whose neck was broken when he dived into the Tippecanod river Sunday, had died at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. He was unmarried.
__________
What had started out to be a very pleasant week end vacation turned out disastrously for Chas. MacAlleny, 24, of Aurura, Illinois, Sunday afternoon when he sustained a broken neck while

diving into the Tippecanoe river at the Adams grove, northwest of Rochester.
MacAlleny, who with some other Aurora people had been visiting with Mr. and Mrs. George METZGER, northwest of the city, had gone to the river for a swim with his friends.
He apparently thought the water deeper than it actually was for he dove into a shallow spot and struck his head.
His friends pulled him out of the water in an unconscious condition and medical aid was summoned from Rochester.
Attending physicians declared that his neck was broken and he was taken to the hospital at Argos for treatment. His entire body is paralyzed and it is only with great difficulty that any signs of life can be observed at all. Little hopes are entertained for his recovery, it was learned Tuesday morning, although every possible effort is being used to save his life. He was to be placed in a cast Tuesday afternoon following further X-ray examinations of his injury.

Wednesday, September 3, 1924

Pauline [MUTCHLER], the four year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard MUTCHLER, of east of Kewanna, and a granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam MUTCHLER, of Rochester, is dead today of a bullet wound in the forhead received from a rifle held by Arthur HYLAND, her eight year old cousin. The lad had found the rifle in a corn crib where it had been hidden. He believed it to be out of order. Pauline is survived by her parents, two brothers and three sisters. She was born in Fulton county March 26, 1920.

Funeral services for the late Elisha WILSON from the residence southeast of Rochester Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. W. C. ASCHANHORT in charge. Burial at Citizens' cemetery.

Irvin ZARTMAN, 66, one of the prominent farmers of Liberty township, died at his home near Fulton at four o'clock Wednesday morning following a long illness. The exact cause of his death was not learned, for, although he had been in ill health for some time his demise was very sudden and unexpected. He had been a resident of Liberty township since boyhood, moving to Indiana from his birthplace in Ohio.
He is survived by three sons, Verl [ZARTMAN], Omer [ZARTMAN] and Ray ZARTMAN. Two wives preceded him. Funeral services will be held at Macy, but the time has not yet been announced.

Funeral services for the late George EMMONS, 76, well known Newcastle township farmer, who died at his home near Talma Sunday night, were held at Talma Wednesday afternoon.

Mrs. Dorothy REINKE, of Peru, died Tuesday night at Woodlawn hospital in Rochester of complications following an operation for the removal of goitre. The body was removed to Peru for burial. The husband and two children survive.

Thursday, September 4, 1924

Russel Joseph BARTS was born near Plymouth, Indiana, February 3rd, 1902, and departed this life at the City Hospital, Peru, Ind., August 28th, 1924. Aged 22 years, 6 months and 25 days.

He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph K. BARTS, who now reside near Rochester, Indiana. The deceased had been associated with his brother Howard [BARTS], in business near Rochester, Ind., for a couple of years. He grew to manhood near the place where he was born and on December 24th, 1921 he was united in marriage to Pauline PRICE, and to this happy union was born a son, Roger Burdell [BARTS].
Russel confessed Jesus Christ as his personal savior and united with the United Brethren church at Plymouth on March 13, 1921, under the present pastorate of Rev. Cecil R. SMITH.
Russel, with his brother, met with an accident at the August MAUS corner, two miles north of Mexico, Miami county, Ind., on August 22, and he was hurried immediately to the hospital at Peru by Lester ROSENFIELD of Kokomo, Ind. Every effort was made to save his life and he seemed to be improving until Thursday morning he took a change for the worse, and he said to the nurse, "I am getting sleepy," and closed his eyes to this world, to wake on the other shore.
He is survived by his loving and devoted wife, little son, Roger Burdell, his father and mother, three brothers, Howard [BARTS], Ralph [BARTS] and Paul [BARTS], and one sister Ruth [BARTS], all of Rochester, Indiana, besides a host of other relatives and friends.
Russel was a hard working young man and had high hopes for the future, and just when life seemed dearest to him here with his wife and little boy, he was called away. . . . . .
Funeral services were conducted on Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Noah McCOY of Rochester conducting brief services at the home, and the funeral cortege was led to Plymouth where from the United Brethren church the services were conducted by Rev. Cecil R. SMITH, of Fulton, Ind., . . .
The body was laid to rest in the new city cemetery at Plymouth Ind., to await the glad resurrection morning.

Friday, September 5, 1924

Ptomaine poisoning caused the death of [Arthur] ROBBINS, 53, proprietor of a Grass Creek general store for thirty years, Thursday morning at 7 o'clock. The poisoning followed an attack of acute indigestion last Saturday.
Robbins is survived by one daughter, Mrs. George R. MURRAY, of Boonville, Ind.; two sons, Clyde [ROBBINS] and Charles [ROBBINS], both of California; his mother, Mrs. Thomas RAMSEY, of Frankfort, and three brothers, all residing in Frankfort.
The funeral will be held in the residence Sunday morning, Rev. REEDY of Kewanna probably conducting it. Interment will be made [at] the Grass Creek cemetery. If the two sons fail to arrive by Sunday the funeral will be conducted later.

William SHINE, 55, one of the best known farmers of Union township, dropped dead suddenly Friday morning at his farm home north of Kewanna on the Soupbone pike while working in the hay field. Death was pronounced due to a stroke of apoplexy. Mr. Shine had been born and reared and lived all his life on the old SHINE farm where he died. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Nellie SHINE, a daughter, Mrs. C. V. HOFFMAN, and one son, Ernest SHINE, all at home.

Saturday September 6, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, September 8, 1924

Dr. Lee KING, dentist of Williamsport, Ind., and a brother of Dr. Mayor M. O. KING of this city, died very unexpectedly Saturday night while at a hospital at Danville, Ill., where he was taking treatments. While undergoing a test he suddenly expired. Dr. and Mrs. M. O. King left here Sunday morning for Williamsport.
Very little details concerning the death could be learned here Monday as no further word was sent back. It is known, however, that Dr. King had been going to the hospital for treatment but local relatives had no idea of any fatal disease. Just what caused his death is unknown. He was well known in this city, having been born on the old KING farm west of town and later came with his parents to this city. He attended school here and later located at Williamsport. In recent years he had visited his brother here quite often.
He is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Marvin HAMMEL, of Indianapolis; Mrs. Harry KRAUSE, of Chicago; and Mrs. Fanny CLYMER of Ft. Wayne and Dr. KING, of this city, his wife and two sons.
Funeral arrangements were not learned here but it was thought he would be buried at Williamsport on Tuesday.

Tuesday, September 9, 1924

Loit C. CONRAD, 19, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. CONRAD of Richland Center, died Monday at the Epworth Hospital at South Bend as the result of an infection of the brain. He was a well known young man of that community and his death comes as a shock to his friends there
He was born in Fulton County April 17, 1905. Funeral Thursday at the U.B. Church in Rochester with Rev. Noah McCOY officiating.

Sanford ZOLMAN, 78, died Monday afternoon at 3:30 at his home in the Possum Hollow neighborhood northeast of town. He was well known having lived in this vicinity most of his life. He was born Dec. 7, 1845.
He is survived by a wife and five children, Elmer [ZOLMAN] of Long Beach, Cal. John W. [ZOLMAN] of Claypool, Mrs. Dellie LEACH of Akron, Mrs. Clara HARTER of Akron and Mrs. Carrie SEE of Argos.
Funeral Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock with burial at Athens.

The body of Andrew J. DAVIDSON, 81, resident of Rochester forty years ago was brought to this city Tuesday afternoon by his family from Denver, Col., where he died Friday evening of heart trouble. He was born in Rochester and has lived in Denver the last five years.
He is survived by his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Mary D. FRYE of Denver, one sister, Mrs. Martha EMERICK of Rochester and three brothers, Lee [DAVIDSON], Turpie [DAVIDSON] and Frank DAVIDSON all of this vicinity. Funeral Wednesday from Hoover Chapel with Episcopalian service. Burial in I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, September 10, 1924

Harvey MICKEY, [step-son ?] of F. G. MICKEY of this city, and former resident, but who had not been heard of for two years, died August 3rd at Portland, Ore., according to word just received by Mr. Mickey from his sister. The young man succumbed to lober pneumonia and acute

dilation of the heart in the Multnomah hospital in that city. He was well known in this community, as Mr. Mickey took him to raise when he was one and a half years old following the death of his parents.
A letter from the superintendent of the hospital written August 26th to Mrs. June STIMMEL at Decatur, Ill., a sister of the boy, gave the news of the death. She sent the letter on to Mr. Mickey here. The letter stated that he entered the Multnomah hospital July 25th and the only name he gave to call in case of death was W. P. PENNINGTON, Longview, Wash. It is thought that the delay in getting the news here was occasioned by the failure to locate the sister.

Thursday, September 11, 1924

Mrs. Sarah EDINGTON, 62, a resident of the Burton neighborhood for the last forty years, died last night after a lingering illness caused by cancer. The deceased was born in sothern Indiana and was the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth BOWMAN. She is survived by her husband and six children, Clarence [EDINGTON] of this city, Ray [EDINGTON] and Alta [EDINGTON] of Elkhart, Lawrence [EDINGTON] of Grand Rapids, Mich., Minnie [EDINGTON] of New York, N.Y., and Emory [EDINGTON] of Kewanna. Funeral arrangements later.

Friday, September 12, 1924 and Saturday, September 13, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, September 15, 1924

F. E. JACOBS, 32 years old of near Laketon, bled to death at the home of a neighbor late Saturday afternoon when his jugular vein was severed by a buzz saw. Jacobs, who had gone to the home of his neighbor on an errand and found his friends cutting wood in the yard offered to help. Just as he was quitting work to go home the frame on the circular saw broke, the saw striking Jacobs on the head.

Tuesday, September 16, 1924

Russell OLINGER, 18 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Daton OLINGER, formerly of Rochester, met a tragic death at Niles, Mich., Sunday evening when he was shot and instantly killed by a drunken man, Henry STROUP, 49 years old. Mrs. George BIGGS of this city, a cousin of the dead youth, learned of the death Monday night. Relatives also live at North Manchester. Russell was well known here as he lived with his parents on East Ninth street until about six years ago when they move to LaPorte and then to Niles.
The crime is the result of liquor. Both Olinger and his murderer lived in the same neighborhood in Niles.
Henry STROUP, the police story goes, left his home and went to a store not far away for cigars. He was under the influence of liquor, it was charged. He met Olinger's younger brother and, the lad says, showered him with a burst of profanity. The boy ran home.
Stroup, on his way home, aproached an automobile parked in front of the B. D. OLINGER residence. The car was occupied by Russell OLINGER and Ray McBRIDE preparing for a pleasure motor ride with girl friends.
Stroup, it was said, again broke into a profane rage and cursed the boy occupants of the machine. As they stepped from the car with purpose, it was said, to avenge the insults, Stroup drew a revolver and fired three bullets at Russell, all taking effect. The boy died instantly.
While Olinger was being carried into the home of his father, Stroup ran home. He threw away the revolver and then walked to the police station, where he surrendered to officers. He was taken to St. Joseph, Mich., last night several hours after the shooting and is held there for trial on the murder charge.
"Let the jury find the gun," Stroup remarked to officers when searched. The revolver has not been found.
Word from Niles that the funeral would be at the South Pleasant church, North Manchester, Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock.

Mrs. Helen NEW SCHOONOVER, wife of Ray SCHOONOVER, formerly of Argos, passed away at Kenosha, Wisconsin early last Saturday morning. Death resulted from child birth. The baby was still living according to the latest information received. One other baby, 15 months old, is left motherless. The remains arrived in Plymouth at 12:33 Monday and were taken to Bourbon for the funeral and burial.

Wednesday, September 17, 1924

A special short service for the late Russell OLINGER who was shot by a drunken man was held in Rochester Wednesday noon at the court house in order that the youth's friends here might pay tribute to his remains. The procession was halted here during the ceremony and afterwards went on to South Pleasant Church, Silver Lake where the body was buried in the afternoon.

Word has been received in this city of the death of Mrs. Charles LEEBRICK of Long Beach, California, which took place there on September ninth after an illness of several weeks.
Ella WALLACE, daughter of Robert and Elmia WALLACE was born in Rochester 1856 where she grew to womanhood and attended the city schools. In 1879 she was united in marriage to Chas. W. LEEBRICK of Peru and lived in that city until 1908 when they moved to Long Beach. The body was cremated. She is survived by her husband, two sons, Charles W. [LEEBRICK], Jr., of Los Angeles, and Robert [LEEBRICK] of Long Beach, two sisters, Mrs. D. A. MAUK of Sierra Madra, California and Mrs. Vida CORNELIUS of Long Beach.

Thursday, September 18, 1924

Two Bourbon youths were killed Wednesday night in an automobile accident near Plymouth when they failed to make a turn in their speeding automobile truck. Joseph TIPPETT, 19 years old, was instantly killed while Harold SHARPE, son of Marion SHARPE, died later in the hospital the result of a fractured skull and internal injuries.
The two boys had left home in the evening and had driven through Plymouth on their way to Culver. About one mile west of Plymouth at Dixon Lake they attempted to take a turn but the car was going too fast for them to make it, the curve being very abrupt.
The car sumersaulted and was demolished. Tippett's head went through the windshield and his neck was severed by sharp edged glass. Sharpe was found to have a fractured skull, was severely bruised and was found to be bleeding internally. He was taken to the hospital at Plymouth but died later.

Mrs. Ida SOUTHARD died at one-thirty Thursday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Otto SHERBONDY on East Ninth street with ulcers of the stomach. She has been in failing health for some time but had only been confined to her bed for the past week.
She was born at Tyner, Ind, on May 16th, 1859, the daughter of Isaac and Rebecca ALEXANDER. When fifteen years of age she moved with her parents to this city where she has since resided. In 1879 she was married to E. L. SOUTHARD. She was a member of the Christian Science church at Boston and of the Rebecca lodge. She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. SHERBONDY, one son, Harry SOUTHARD of Indianapolis and one sister Mrs. Belle COLLINS, of this city.
Christian Science services will be held Friday afternoon at two-thirty at the Sherbondy home with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Word was received here Thursday of the death of Lawrence B. ANDREWS, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. ANDREWS of Glendale, California. He is the nephew of Mrs. Gus SCOTT and Rollin PONTIUS of this city.

Friday, September 19, 1924

Mrs. Joe SLAYBAUGH, one of the highly respected young ladies of Akron, died at 6:30 Friday morning after suffering a stroke of apoplexy. Mrs. Slaybaugh was preparing breakfast at the time of the attack. She is survived by her husband and two children, Josephine [SLAYBAUGH], 8, and Marjorie [SLAYBAUGH], 4, one sister, Mrs. George SHOEMAKER of Macy and three brothers, William RUNKLE, Denver, and Harry [RUNKLE] and Alfred [RUNKLE] of Macy. Funeral arrangements later.

Saturday, September 20, 1924

Jake POLAY Friday attended the funeral of the late Harry BAREBITSKY of South Bend. Mr. Barebitsky was the father of Abe BAREBITSKY of New York who formerly was in the junk business in this city.

Monday, September 22, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, September 23, 1924

Charles GRIMES, aged 62 years, and his wife, aged 60 years, prominent residents of Denver, Ind., where they were born and raised, were instantly killed Sunday when a cycone swept over the state of Wisconsin, destroying everything in its path. Mr. and Mrs. Grimes are the owners of 300 acres of land in north central Wisconsin and left their home at Denver two weeks ago to look over the property. The message announcing their death was received at Denver Monday morning by Clinton Grimes, a son, but no particulars were given. It is known Mr. Grimes went to Wisconsin to build a shack on his land, and it is surmised both he and his wife took refuge in the shack when the storm broke.
Clinton [GRIMES] and Richard GRIMES, sons of the deceased, left by automobile Monday morning for the scene of the tragedy and are expected to arrive at their destination Tuesday morning. The remains of both father and mother will be brought back to Denver.

Mr. Grimes is one of the substantial citizens of Denver, owning a comfortable home and a number of store buildings in the town in addition to the land in Wisconsin.
Deputy Sheriff Vern ZARTMAN who returned Sunday from a two weeks' fishing trip through Wisconsin, visited with the Grimes family last Wednesday. Clinton and Richard Grimes stopped in Rochester Monday morning on their way to Wisconsin to see Mr. Zartman.

Wednesday, September 24, 1924

Mrs. Charles GRIMES, of Denver, who was killed in a tornado at Roosevelt, Wisconsin, Sunday, was a sister of Samuel FRIEND of this city and Mr. Grimes, who was killed at the same time was a brother of Mrs. Mattie DAVIS of Akron. The Grimes eight years ago were residents of this city at which time Mr. Grimes managed the Groceteria which was in the room now occupied by J. W. Compton variety store. Clinton [GRIMES] and Gordon GRIMES, son of the deceased Wednesday afternoon brought the bodies of their parents back to Denver, the funeral party arriving over the Vandalia at 3 o'clock. The funeral will be held from the Grimes home at two o'clock Thursday afternoon.
[Rochester Sentinel, Wednesday, September 24, 1924]

Thursday, September 25, 1924

John Logan MILLER passed to the higher life Thursday morning, at 1:30 o'clock, his demise bringing to an end a year of suffering. He was the youngest son born to the late Judge Hugh and Phoebe MILLER, his birth taking place in Fulton county, 1853.
He grew to manhood in the place of his birth and was educated in the schools of Rochester and later attended Wabash College and the University of Notre Dame. After several years of travel he returned to Rochester and studied law with the late Judge I. CONNER. He was united in marriage with Marguerite BITTERS and soon after he went into the grocery bueiness and for a number of years was one of the prominent business men of this city. His health then failed and he followed various pursuits.
His demise erases the last of the Miller family who were the first white settlers in Fulton county and had much to do with the making of its history, politically and otherwise. He fashioned his life on the Golden Rule and lived it religiously to the end.
He is survived by wife and one son, Earle A. MILLER. Preceding him to the spirit world are his parents, sisters, Susanna McCARTER, Maria LACKEY, Mary SPOHN, Louise DOWNEY, Emily AGNEW and brothers, Silas [MILLER], Wiley [MILLER], Samuel [MILLER] and James O. MILLER.
Funeral Saturday morning at ten o'clock at the residence at 221 East Ninth street. Rev. N. McCOY and Rev. NIVEN in charge.Burial at the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

William FELTY, 51, of South Bend, brother of Henry FELTY of this city, died Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock following a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered earlier in the day. Mr. Felty had been in failing health for four years which caused him to retire from a farm which he owned near Winamac.
The deceased was born on a farm in Pulaski county and was one of the children born to Jonathan and Nancy Margaret FELTY.
He was a member of the Evangelical church.

Felty is survived by his father, his wife, six children, Geneveive [FELTY], Cleon [FELTY], Jonathan [FELTY], Gertrude [FELTY], Franklin [FELTY] and Devon [FELTY], all of South Bend, two brothers, Henry [FELTY] and Palmer [FELTY] of Fulton and two sisters, Mrs. Polly MOORE of South Bend and Mrs Maude STUBBS of Kewanna.
The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon from the Pleasant Hill church near Bruce Lake. Burial will be in the cemetery adjacent.

Friday, September 26, 1924

Thomas B. BLACKETOR, 73 a life-long resident of the community and well known to hundreds of former students of the old Rochester College and to graduates of Rochester high school, died at his home at 801 E. 17th St., early Friday morning. Death occurred at 1:55 a.m., and was the result of paralysis of which he had been ill two years. He served at the Rochester College for many years as janitor and later was employed in the same capacity in the high school. He was a friend of all the students and was a favorite of theirs.
He was born in Fulton County the son of Joshua and Susannah BLACKETOR, August 13, 1852, and lived in this community all his life. He was married in 1877 and his wife, Nellie B. [CARTER] BLACKETOR, survives him. He was a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge for 45 years.
Besides his wife he is survived by a son, Paul [BLACKETOR], of Kokomo; a daughter, Mrs. Ray WILDERMUTH of Millark; a brother James [BLACKETOR] of this city, two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth MILLER, of Chicago, and Mrs. Sarah ROBBINS of Green Oak.
Funeral at 2:30 at the residence Sunday afternoon with Rev. W. J. NIVEN and Rev. Noah McCOY officiating. Burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, September 27, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, September 29, 1924

Mrs. William WILSON Saturday was notified of the death of her aunt Mrs. William PLUMMER of Hills, Missouri, which occurred Friday evening. Death was caused by complications. Mrs. Plummer until 25 years ago was a resident of this county. She visited with Mrs. Wilson last summer. Burial will be made at Hills.

Tuesday, September 30, 1924

Mrs. Robert MILLER and Mrs. H. W. TAYLOR have received word here of the death of their uncle Allen MILLS, 70, of Thorntown. Mr. Mills is a brother of General Anson MILLS of Washington, D.C. Funeral services will be held at Thorntown on Wednesday afternoon.

Word has reached here of the death of Mrs. Catherina COOK, wife of W. S. COOK, who died at National City, California on September 22nd and was buried there at Vista cemetery. She was formerly Mrs. John GOTTSCHALK of this city where she lived many years. She leaves her husband, a daughter, Mrs. George HARRINGTON, of Santa Clara County, California, and a granddaughter, Mrs. J. E. DRAKE of Santa Ana, and a brother, in Michigan. Cook's father was one of the heirs to the Sir Francis Drake estate of Englend.
John BONFIGLIO, fruit dealer of Elkhart, formerly a fruit store owner in Rochester, who suffered a serious injury to his spine last Thursday in an automobile accident, died Sunday night in the Elkhart hospital. The auto in which he was riding with Peter DESHONE ran into a ditch and overturned near Winamac. He had been in Rensselaer to visit his son, Nicholas [BONFIGLIO]. His wife, seven children and a brother survive.

Thomas B. BLACKETOR, son of Joshua and Susannah BLACKETOR, was born in Fulton county, Indiana, near Ebenezer on August 18th, 1851 and departed this life September 26th, 1924 aged 73 years, 4 months, 13 days.
He was united in marriage to Nellie B. CARTER on November 9th, 1878, and they traveled hand in hand for forty-six years. To this union two children were born, Paul [BLACKETOR], of Kokomo, and Mrs. Rae WILDERMUTH, of near Millark.
Besides the widow, son and daughter, he is survived by a brother, James [BLACKETOR] of this city, two sisters, Mrs. Sarah ROBBINS, of Green Oak, and Mrs. Elizabeth MILLER, of Chicago, Ill.
He united with the Baptist church at Ebenezer at the age of 15 years and had been a member of the I.O.O.F. Green Oak Lodge No. 600 for forty-five years. . . . .

Wednesday, October 1, 1924

Mrs. Ella MARTIN, 70, a resident of this city for many years, died at 10 o'clock Tuesday evening at the St. Joseph hospital in Logansport following an operation for appendicitis which was performed yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Martin has been ill for the past ten days and because of her age she was not able to rally from the operation.
The deceased [Ella WHEELER] was born in Jennings county, Indiana, August 22, 1854, and was the daughter of Robert and Katherine WHEELER. After her marriage to James Milo MARTIN in 1876, she moved to this county and lived here until two years ago when she moved to Logansport. The Martins were the parents of one son, Harry [MARTIN], who was killed in an automobile accident at Defiance, Ohio, four years ago.
Mrs. Martin was a member of the Logansport Baptist church.
She is survived by one grandson Emerson [MARTIN], and daughter-in-law, Alta MARTIN, and two sisters, Mrs. Will GREGORY and Mrs. Thomas KESTER, of Peru. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 10:30 at the Fulton Baptist church with Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge, assisted by Rev. STEINKRAUS, of Logansport. Burial in the Mt. Olive cemetery.

Thursday, October 2, 1924

Mrs. Sarah ORMSBEE, 81, lifelong resident of this county, died Wednesday afternoon at her home near Tiosa. Death was due to complications incident to old age. The deceased was born on a farm near Tiosa, August 15, 1845 and was the daughter of William and Rachael SURGUY. When 20 years old she married Albert DAVIS who died 15 years later and then she married Joseph ORMSBEE.
Mrs. Ormsbee is survived by her husband and four children, Mrs. Dora ANDREWS of Chicago, George [ORMSBEE] and Alla [ORMSBEE] of South Bend and Milo [ORMSBEE] of Ashtabula, Ohio.

The funeral from the Tiosa Christian church, of which the deceased was a member, will be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon. Burial in Sand [Hill] cemetery. [NOTE; Sarah E. DAVIS, Aug. 15, 1843 - Oct 1, 1924; William A. DAVIS d. Mar 29, 1878, ae 40y-11m-8d.]

Friday, October 3, 1924

Henry WELLER, for many years a farmer in Perry township and the father of nine children, died yesterday at the Miami county farm where he had been placed by some of his children. Two of his children live in this county.
Mrs. Sadie KARN, mother of Francis KARN, court reporter here, died last Wednesday at her home in Tyner.

Saturday, October 4, 1924

Mrs. Thomas BECK, 60, dropped dead at her home early Saturday morning. She had been in poor health for about two weeks. At 4:20 when Mr. Beck was at the barn he was called to the house and found her on the bedroom floor. They lived on the Peru road south of the city about three miles.
She was born in Hancock county, Ohio, April 14, 1859 and moved from there to Twelve Mile, in which community she resided for 42 years. She married Perry COOK who died sometime past. Eight years ago she married Thomas BECK. She was a member of the Twelve Mile U.B. church.
Surviving are two sons, Chance COOK of Twelve Mile and Ralph COOK of St. Paul, Minn., and one daughter, Mrs. Minnie TEAMS of Eagle Grove, Iowa.
Funeral at the U.B. church, Twelve Mile with burial at Bethlehem cemetery there. Time to be announced later.

Monday, October 6, 1924

Daniel AGNEW, 87, a pioneer of this community and at one time one of the leading men of the county, died sometime Sunday night at the home of Fred L. MILLER, his nephew, with whom he made his home. Death was due to paralysis. He suffered a light stroke several years ago but recovered and outside of the usual infirmities resulting from old age had been in good health.
On Sunday he had been active about the house as usual and as was his custom went to the bathroom about 2:30 to take a hot bath. Mr. Miller, who came home later, noticed a light in the bathroom but thought nothing of it as it was Mr. Agnew's habit of spending some time bathing. Early Monday morning Mrs. Miller noticed the steam coming out of the bathroom transom and an investigation led to the finding of Mr. Agnew's body. It is thought he must have passed away suddenly shortly after he went into the bathroom.
Mr. Agnew of recent years since his retirement from the Rochester Telephone Company had spent considerable time writing stories of early Indiana history and many newspapers, including those at Indianapolis, had carried his articles. Those of the early days in Winamac and Rochester were particularly interesting and attracted wide attention. He was recognized as an authority on early history of northern Indiana.
Daniel Agnew was born in Ripley county, Indiana, Nov. 27, 1838, the son of Joseph B. and Louisa M. AGNEW. His father was veteran of the Mexican war, having lost a leg at Buena Vista. In 1850 the family removed to Winamac, where he died Dec. 23, 1895. Daniel was the oldest of  twelve children born to the union. He obtained a common school education and until he reached his majority remained upon the farm.
From 1857 until 1860 he was employed as a civil engineer in railway construction and swampland work. He served as surveyor of Pulaski County for one term and then for a year worked in a telegraph office after which in 1864 he came to Rochester and accepted employment as deputy auditor. In 1866 he was elected auditor of Fulton county and re-elected in 1870, serving in the office twelve years altogether.
After leaving the court house he joined a partnership with Charles W. CAFFYN and Samuel KEELY, which firm built the gravel road north and south of Rochester on the Michigan Road and for a number of years ran these as toll roads until they were taken over by the state. Later he was active in the founding and promoting of Rochester College, then became interested in the Rochester Telephone Company, serving as secretary until about two years ago when he resigned.
He married Miss Emily L. MILLER Feb. 25, 1862, in Rochester. She was the daughter of Hon. Hugh MILLER, a teacher and a leader in educational work and politics in the county in its early days.
Mr. Agnew was a democrat in politics, a Mason, and a member of the Presbyterian church, and he and Mrs. Agnew from the first occupied a prominent place among the people of the community. Mrs. Agnew died several years ago at their residence on South Main street. Shortly after her death Mr. Agnew went to the Fred L. Miller home where he lived.
He is survived by a sister, Mrs. Lizzie KEYES, and a brother, Frank AGNEW, both of Winamac and two brothers who live in the southern part of the state. Fred MILLER of this city, Mrs. Marguerite MILLER of this city and Hugh MILLER, formerly of Washington, D.C., were related also.
Funeral Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from the Fred L. MILLER residence with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Rev. D. S. PERRY will officiate.

Mrs. Thomas MOORE, 86, who lived all of her life on a farm two and one-half miles east of the city, until three years ago, died Saturday night in South Bend at the home of her son, Charles [MOORE}. Death was due to old age.
The deceased whose maiden name was Julia Ann ALSPACH, was the daughter of Samuel and Jane ALSPACH and was one of 11 children born to this union.
Mrs. Moore is survived by her son and five sisters, Mrs. Elmer MILLER and Mrs. Arminta BIGGS of this city, Mary [ALSPACH] and Elizabeth ALSPACH of Akron, and Mrs. Sarah MILLER of Peru.
The funeral was held at 1 o'clock Monday afternoon from the United Brethren church in this city, of which organization Mrs. Moore was a member. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, October 7, 1924

Frank BROWN, 64, popularly known in his boyhood days as "Glimmer" [BROWN], died at his home in Warsaw of heart trouble early Tuesday morning. He had been ill for the last two years.
Brown came to this county with his parents, James and Elizabeth BROWN, from Ohio when he was a lad. After finishing school he learned the printer's trade in one of the local shops. Afterwards he traveled all over the country working in various shops returning to work at Rochester often, but for the last fifteen years has resided in Warsaw.

He is survived by his wife and two sons, Frank [BROWN], of Warsaw, and Paul [BROWN], of Chicago, and a sister, Mrs. Newton IZZARD, of this city. Mr. Brown was a member of the Warsaw Baptist church.
Funeral arrangements later.

It was stated in Monday's issue of the Sentinel that the late Daniel AGNEW was a democrat. According to relatives this was wrong as they stated that he had been a Republican for the last 30 years. Mr. Agnew was originally a democrat and was auditor of the county for two terms as such but changed his politics in the campaign of 1896.

Wednesday, October 8, 1924

[no obits]

Thursday, October 9, 1924

Mrs. Martha WELSH, 80, a life long resident of Aubbeenaubbee township died early this morning at her home after three years of illness. She was born in Marshall county July 10, 1844, and was the daughter of James and Patty MINTER. Her only living relative is a daughter, Mrs. Mary MACK of the Burton neighborhood. Interment will be made in Marshall county.

Friends in this city were notified Thursday morning of the death of Mrs. Susie SMITH, aged 82 years and 8 months which occurred at the Methodist Memorial Home for the Aged at Warren, late Wednesday night. She had been ill for several years in the home now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Charles EMMONS. She was the first person to enter the Methodist home at Warren. The funeral will be held at Warren Friday afternoon after which the body will be brought to Rochester where a short graveside service will be held at the I.O.O.F. cemetery Saturday morning at nine o'clock.

Friday, October 10, 1924

Miss Lavora DAY, 24, a niece of Mrs. Bruce LOVE and Mrs. Harry CAPPER of this city, died Thursday afternoon at her home in South Bend of lung trouble. She had been ill for the past 18 months.
Miss Day was born in this city being the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed DAY and lived here until two years ago when she moved to South Bend.
Miss Day is survived by her parents and four sisters, Mrs. Lee CHRISMAN of Star City, Mrs. Zina HILDERBRAND, Mrs. LaFern RINKER and Mrs. Ezra BLACK, all of South Bend, and two brothers, Cecil [DAY] and Fred [DAY] of South Bend. The deceased was a member o the Mt. Zion Methodist church.
The body will be brought to Rochester for burial, funeral services to be Saturday afternoon at 2:30 at the United Brethren Church, Rev. McCOY in charge.

Saturday, October 11, 1924

Mrs. Harriet CHINN, 84, mother of William CHINN, who operates a grocery at 14th and College Avenue, died Thursday night at the home of her daughter-in-law Mrs. Sarah CHINN of Columbus, Ohio. Death was due to diseases incident to old age.

Mrs. Chinn up until 15 years ago was a resident of this city. She is survived by one son, William, and her daughter-in-law with whom she made her home. Mrs. Chinn was a member of the Rochester Christian Church.
The funeral will be held Monday in Columbus with burial. William Chinn is now in Columbus.
Jennings BERGER, aged 19 years, passed away at the Dukes Memorial hospital in Peru Saturday evening at nine o'clock from peritonitis, following an operation for appendicitis the Sunday previous.
Surviving him are the parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. P. BERGER, and four sisters, Mrs. Frank WHISLER, Mrs. Walter CLEMANS, Mrs. Fayne FLENNER and Mrs. Blanche BERGER. He was well known here and was a favorite with all who knew him.
Funeral services were held at the Ebenezer church Tuesday afternoon. Interment in Ebenezer cemetery. - Macy Items by Grace Mullican.

Mrs. Thomas BECK, who resided on the old CAMERER place and who had been ailing since having a stroke of paralysis about three weeks ago, dropped dead at her home Saturday evening. Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 10:30 at Twleve Mile. - Green Oak Items by Mrs. H. M. Michael.

Monday, October 13, 1924

Charles HETZNER, 65, resident of this county for 60 years, died Saturday afternoon at his home three miles west of the Burton school house. On last Thursday, Mr. Hetzner was taken violently ill with gallstones which later caused peritonitis to set in resulting fatally.
Mr. Hetzner was born in Peru, Feb. 27, 1859 and was one of seven children of Paul and Mary HETZNER. He is survived by three daughters, Mabel [HETZNER], Pearl [HETZNER] and Maude [HETZNER], all at home, two sisters, Nettie [HETZNER] and Clara [HETZNER] of Lansing, Mich., four brother, Frank [HETZNER] of Radnor, Ohio, Ben [HETZNER]. George [HETZNER] and Albert [HETZNER] of Chicago.
The deceased was a member of the Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. lodge. Funeral from the Methodist church at Leiters Ford Tuesday at 2 p.m. Burial in the Leiters Ford I.O.O.F. cemetery.

John F. WAGONER, 77, died at the Northern Indiana Hospital for the Insane at Logansport Sunday of bronchial pneumonia. He had only been in the hospital eight days having been sent from this county. Mr. Wagoner was for many years employed by the Abner J. Barrett lumber yard on East 7th street and later bought a farm in the Mt. Olive neighborhood and several years ago a home and store in Tyner which he disposed of six months ago when he moved back to this county.
Mr. Wagoner was the son of Paul and Sarah WAGONER and was born on a farm in Seneca county Ohio, Oct. 1, 1846. He moved to Indiana 69 years ago. Mr. Wagoner is survived by his wife and one son whose present address is unknown, one brother James [WAGONER], and a sister, Mrs. William EMMONS, both of whom live on farms east of this city.
The funeral will be held at one o'clock Tuesday afternoon from the William Emmons home, Rev. FRENCH of South Bend in charge. Burial in the Rochester Citizens Cemetery.

Tuesday, October 14, 1924

Mrs. Arabel DRAYER, 79, passed away Monday evening about 9:30 o'clock at the home of her sister, Mrs. George DAWSON on West ninth street after a lingering illness. She had made her home here for the last 15 years and was well known in this community.
Arabel CAMPBELL, daughter of James and Caroline DENISTON CAMPBELL was born in Preble Co., Ohio near West Alexander, September 10, 1845. She was united in marriage with Dr. S. P. DRAYER on May 26, 1863, who preceded her in death Jan. 10, 1908. The following fall she came to Rochester to make her home.
When a young girl she united with the First Reform Church of West Alexander and remained always a faithful member. She was a member of the Eastern Star at Eaton, Ohio.
Two sisters and three brothers survive.
Funeral services at the George DAWSON residence Wednesday morning at 9:30 with Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial at West Alexander, Ohio, Thursday morning.

Benjamin Franklin YOUNG, seventy-four years old, brother of Jerry YOUNG of this city, died Sunday night about 10:30 o'clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. Amanda KASE of 786 Elm street, Huntington. He had been in ailing condition for ten years and was seriously ill for seven weeks.
Mr. Young was born August 4, 1850, to James and Catherine YOUNG at Dayton, Ohio. He married Emma BROWN at Mt. Etna and lived there two years. The family then moved to Huntington and has lived there since that time.

Wednesday, October 15, 1924

The ashes of Mrs. E. A. COLE were buried at Akron last Saturday afternoon. Death occurrd at Pasadena, California, September 1, and following her death the remains were cremated. She was 90 years old and had formerly lived about Akron.

Thursday, October 16, 1924 to Tuesday, October 21, 1924
[no obits]

Wednesday, October 22, 1924

Word has been received here of the death of Perry COPLEN which occurred Monday at his home in Cincinnati, Ohio after an illness of one week. Mr. Coplen, who is sixty-five years of age, was born in Ohio the son of Isaac and Sarah COPLEN. Until about one year ago he lived around Royal Center and Logansport.
Surviving are the wife, Mrs. Lucetta COPLEN and two daughters, Misses Fern [COPLEN] and Hazel [COPLEN] of Cincinnati, one son, Milo [COPLEN], of Rockford, Maryland, four brothers, James [COPLEN] of this city, Alonzo [COPLEN] of Tiosa, Lorenzo [COPLEN] of Mentone and Frank [COPLEN], of Big Foot, two sisters, Mrs. Malissa WOODS of Rochester and Mrs. Charles TAYLOR of Tiosa. Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at Royal Center and burial here.

Thursday, October 23, 1924

Mrs. Finley MOW has received word of the sudden death of Mrs. Thomas WILSON of Logansport. Mrs. Wilson at one time was a resident of this city.

Mrs. William KING, 50, who until 11 years ago was a resident of the Bethlehem church neighborhood, died very suddenly Wednesday morning in Chicago at 4 o'clock. Relatives here have not heard the cause of her death, but is believed that it was an infliction of the heart as she had several attacks of heart trouble. The deceased is survived by her husband and mother, Mrs. Lavinea KESSLER, who made her home with her daughter. The body will be brought to this city where services will be held Friday afternoon at two o'clock from the Bethlehem church. Burial will be made in the Hamlet cemetery.

Friday, October 24, 1924

[no obits]

Saturday, October 25, 1924

Henry A. BARNHART has gone to Cleveland with Mrs. Marvin BARNHART of Chicago conveying the body of Marvin BARNHART to its last resting place. The remains had been in a receiving vault in Chicago since the death in June.

Monday, October 27, 1924

Funeral services for the late Benjamin WILTFONG, 73 years of age, of Plymouth, a brother of Mrs. W. S. SHAFER of this city, were held Sunday. Mr. Wiltfong died early Friday morning of heart trouble. He had been ill but three days.

Benjamin Franklin GREEN, 79, a Civil War veteran and a resident of this county for 70 years, died at 8 o'clock Monday morning at his home, 1439 South Main street. Death was due to complications incident to old age. He had been ill for the past year.
Mr. Green was born on a farm in Montgomery county, Ohio, February 8, 1845, and was the son of John and Sarah GREEN. When he was ten years of age the family moved to this county settling on a farm in what is now Liberty township. Mr. Green married Rebecca MARTIN when he was 21 years of age. She died 12 years ago.
Mr. Green is survived by three daughters, Elsie [GREEN] and Mrs. Gertrude MEDARY at home, Mrs. Nettie KLINE of Racine, Wis., and one son Ernest [GREEN] who lives on a farm in Liberty township. The deceased was a member of the Baptist church and the McClung post. The funeral will be held at the home at 10:00 o'clock Wednesday morning. Burial will be made in the Fulton cemetery.

Tuesday, October 27, 1924

Mrs. Mary Caroline WOLFE, 78, who has been prominent in social and religious circles for the past half century died at 7:30 p.m. Monday at her home on the corner of Main and 10th streets. Mrs. Wolfe had suffered with heart trouble for the last three years. Three weeks ago while standing on the back porch of her home she suffered a dizzy spell and fell heavily to the floor. She

never recovered from the shock caused by the fall and it is believed this caused her death.
The deceased was born in Rockingham County, Virginia, March 14, 1846, and was one of the seven children born to Adam and Charlotte AWALT. When she was ten years old her family moved to Indiana settling on a farm near Chili in Miami county. They later moved to Inwood in Marshall county and it was there that she met C. C. WOLFE and they were married in 1868. They moved to Rochester six years later where her husband established a jewelry store which is now owned and operated by William HOWARD.
Mrs. WOLFE is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Emma CAFFYN, Mrs. Maria RIDENOUR and Katherine [AWALT], all of whom live in this city, one nephew, Walter CAFFYN, and two nieces, Mrs. Mary HEPPE of Chicago and Mrs. Octavius PHILLIPS of this city. The deceased was a member of the Eastern Star and Pythian lodges. The funeral will be held from the home at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday afternoon, Rev. D. S. PERRY in charge. The burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Wednesday, October 29, 1924

Joseph KLINE, 40, a brother of Ike KLINE of this city and who is associated with him in the junk business in this city, died very suddenly of heart trouble Wednesday morning at his home in Kokomo. Mr. Kline had been ill for the past three years but his death was entirely unexpected.
The deceased is survived by his wife, who was Mary THALMAN, and one son. The Kline Brothers establishment in this city has been closed until after the funeral.

Thursday, October 30, 1924

Helen Gertrude RYNEARSON, 18, a member of the 1924 Senior Class of the Rochester High School, passed away at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, at her home on what is known as the Pierce WILSON farm on the north shore of the lake. Death was due to tuberculosis from which disease she had suffered since last May, and which it is believed followed a heavy cold which she contracted last spring.
Miss Rynearson was born in Pennsylvania, March 9th, 1906, and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lowe RYNEARSON. She moved to this county three years ago, when her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Pierce WILSON, decided to retire from the farm and moved to this city.
The deceased is survived by her parents, five brothers, Earl [RYNEARSON], Ellis [RYNEARSON], Woodrow [RYNEARSON], Reuben [RYNEARSON] and Joseph [RYNEARSON] and a sister, Sarah [RYNEARSON]. She was a member of the Lutheran church. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at the United Brethren church, the cortege leaving the home at 1:30 p.m. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Mrs. George [H.] ADAMS, 70, died of heart trouble at 12:10 p.m. Wednesday at the home of her foster son, Earl Adams, on West Ninth street.
She had been ill for the past eight months. Mrs. Adams was taken to some of the best specialists in the country, in the hope that they might aid her, but their efforts were unavailing.
Mrs. Adams [Mary AULT] was the daughter of Henry and Susannah AULT, and was born in Huntington County, March 30, 1854. She came to this county seven years later, her parents settling on a farm near Richland Center. Forty-nine years ago she was married in this city to Mr. Adams and they moved to a farm in Richland township, a mile west of the Michigan road on the north bank of the Tippecanoe river.
Mrs. Adams is survived by her husband, and foster son, Earl [ADAMS], one brother, Joseph [AULT] of Warroade, Minn., two sisters, Mrs. William BAILEY of Leiters Ford, and Mrs. Frank BARCUS of this city, and two grandchildren, Nadine [ADAMS] and Ruth ADAMS. The funeral will be held at the Adams home in Richland township, Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, the Rev. W. J. NIVEN in charge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

The death of Helen RYNEARSON, Wednesday night at her home east of Rochester, marked the passing of the fourth student in the Rochester High School within the past year. The others were Hugh MURPHY and Robert MOGLE, who died of tuberculosis, and Wilbur TEETER, who drowned at Lake Manitou last February, when the ice gave away beneath his weight.

Friday, October 31, 1924

The funeral of Mrs. George ADAMS will be held at the old home near the river northwest of Rochester, Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock.

Saturday, November 1, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, November 3, 1924

Mrs. Ira BAKER, 21, died Saturday morning at her home one mile northwest of Athens on what is known as the Charles ROUCH farm, of tuberculosis and peritonitis. Mrs. Baker had been ill several years with tuberculosis and last March contracted measles which caused her to have abcesses of the stomach. She underwent two operations but peritonitis set in.
Mrs. Baker, whose maiden name was Mable Leona SMITH, was born in Cass county near Lucerne on April 2, 1903, and was the daughter of William and Minnie SMITH. Seven years ago her family moved to this county to a farm just across the road from Edgewater Park on the Sanders road. The deceased was married on October 7, 1921.
Mrs. Baker is survived by her husband, a daughter, Minerva [BAKER], her parents, two sisters, Virginia [SMITH] and Audra [SMITH], and five brothers, Denzil [SMITH], Melvin [SMITH], Herschel [SMITH], Lowell [SMITH] and Deverl [SMITH], all at home. The funeral was held at the Mt. Hope church Monday afternoon, Rev. FRALEY in charge. Burial was made in the cemetery adjacent.

The will of the late Daniel AGNEW, pioneer citizen of this city, has been filed with county clerk Robert MILLER. It shows that at the time of his death Mr. Agnew was worth between $20,000 and $25,000 which it is said is a mere shadow of his fortune at one time. The will was one of the longest ever recorded in the local court covering eight pages and had three condicils.
Mr. Agnew's last testament was originally drawn on October 27, 1919. After his wife's death he added a codicil and again after the failure of a Rochester business enterprise in which he was heavily interested and just a short time before his death another codicil was drawn in which he bequeathed all of his property to Fred MILLER after a monument had been erected over his grave.
In the original will several nephews were named to receive Mr. Agnew's property. The last testament revealed that at one time Mr. Agnew had had trouble in his family and because of this he cut all of the heirs of the Agnew family. Following is the manner in which Mr. Agnew disclosed his family trouble. "Not unmindful of the fact that I have heirs bearing the name of Agnew, my brothers, Joseph [AGNEW] and Samuel [AGNEW], I now cut them off because of their characteristic unspeakable perfidy in business relations with my father and mother and myself."
Tuesday, November 4, 1924

Charles Fairbanks BAIRD, 22, who was accidentally shot by his twin brother, Beveridge [BAIRD], while hunting ducks at North Mud Lake Monday morning was unable to rally from the shock caused by his wounds and died at 11 o'clock last night at the Woodlawn Hospital. Following the accident, Dr. DIELMAN of Fulton was called and after an examination of the shattered left limb, he had the injured man removed to the Woodlawn Hospital. Because of his physical condition, nothing could be done for the injured man. An artery in the thigh was cut by the buckshot.
The deceased was born on a farm near Fulton March 2, 1902 and was the son of Charles and Laura BAIRD. He was graduated from Fulton high school and on May 5, 1923, married Vera MINTER. They moved to a farm owned by his wife's parents, which is bounded by the banks of the lake on which the fatal accident occurred.
Mr. Baird is survived by his parents, his wife and daughter, Evelyn Edith [BAIRD], three brothers, Beveridge [BAIRD], Walter [BAIRD] and Robert [BAIRD], and one sister, Mrs. Urbin JACKSON, all of whom live near Fulton. The body of Mr. Baird was taken to the home of his parents, who live a mile and one-half west of Fulton, Monday night. The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon either at the home of his parents or in the Unted Brethren church at Fulton. The Rev. MILLER of Lafayette will be in charge. Burial will be made in the Fulton cemetery.

Wednesday, November 5, 1924

[no obits]

Thursday, November 6, 1924

Ellis REED has received word of the death of his aunt, Mrs. Mary WATSON, age 94, of Indianapolis, which occurred Wednesday. Mrs. Watson is well known here where she has often visited.

Mrs. Ruby PAPSDORF, 25, of Chicago, nee Ruby WADE of Akron, died while on the operating table at St. Lukes Hospital, Chicago, Tuesday. Mrs. Papsdorf was injured in an automobile accident just a week after she was married to Dr. PAPSDORF on September 7, 1923. Paralysis followed. Mrs. Papsdorf had been in many hospitals in this country and it was while undergoing an operation for the relief of her trouble that her death came.
Mrs. Papsdorf was born in Akron and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis WADE. She is survived by her parents, one brother Russell [WADE], of Bourbon, and two sisters, Mrs. Robert

BIBLER of this city and Mrs. Robert KNISELY of Warsaw. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon from the Akron Christian church, the Rev. McFADDEN in charge. Interment was in the Akron I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Friday, November 7, 1924

Funeral services for the late Mrs. Myrtle SARBER SIMONDS, who died at Ft. Wayne on Tuesday of this week, were held at the Hammond-Jackson chapel in Peru this morning at 9:30 o'clock. The services were in charge of the Rev. Harry NYCE of the First Presbyterian church and the interment was in the Akron cemetery.
[NOTE: Myrtle SARBER SIMONDS, 1882-1924, buried in Akron Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Henry Township.]

Saturday, November 8, 1924

The Rev. Isaiah IMLER, 71 years old, a retired United Brethren minister, who had lived in the vicinity of Rochester for six years, died suddenly at 7:00 o'clock Friday night of a blood clot on the brain, at his home on West Eighth street. Although of impaired health for two or three years, Mr. Imler had not been bedfast, and it was said that he had been uptown three times on Friday.
Mr. Imler was well known here and in Northern Indiana, having held pulpits at Young America, Frankfort, Williamsport and other places. Since his residence in or near Rochester, he has been retired.
Born in Allen county, Ohio, March 22, 1853, Mr. Imler was the son of Henry and Mary FORBES IMLER. Not long after his twentieth birthday, on April 27, 1873, he married Miss Nancy CONRAD, at Elida, Ohio. He entered his chosen profession, the ministry, and held pulpits in Elida, Lima, and Dunkirk, Ohio, before moving to Frankfort, Indiana.
Membership in the Masonic and Odd Fellows lodges were held by Mr. Imler, who belonged to the Dunkirk, Ohio, chapter F. & A. M., and of the Rochester Lodge I.O.O.F.
Surviving Mr. Imler are the widow, two sons, H. E. IMLER of Logansport, and C. V. IMLER of Cedar Springs, Michigan, and three grandchildren.
Funeral services for the deceased will be held from the United Brethren church here Monday at 2:00 p.m., the Rev. W. E. ROBERTS of Huntington in charge. Burial will be made in the local I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, November 10, 1924

[no obits]

Tuesday, November 11, 1924

George CLAYTON has received word of the death of his brother-in-law, Charles STEIGLITZ, of Kansas City, which occurred on November 6. Mr. Steiglitz, who was a cigar maker will be well remembered by the older residents of this city. He visited here about 30 years ago for the last time. The funeral services were held in Kansas City Sunday, burial being made there.

Wednesday, November 12, 1924

[no obits]

Thursday, November 13, 1924

Mrs. James BURNS has received word of the death of her brother, George HALTERMAN, 61, which took place at his home in Wayne, Arkansas on November 4th.


Evidently with suicidal intent, growing out of a prolonged period of ill health accompanied with the decay of mental facilities, Mrs. George BEEBER of Argos, aged mother of Miss Belle BEEBER of Rochester, Thursday morning stepped in front of a Nickle Plate passenger train bound for Rochester at the Pickle Factory crossing a block from her home, and was knocked down and killed, the cars passing over her body, severing it. The train crew picked up the body and it was taken to an Argos undertaking parlor.
The incident occurred about 6:30 o'clock the time at which train No. 21 would be leaving Argos. The death was unavoidable, as the report of the train's conductor, "Pat" QUIGLEY, stated. According to the report, the woman was waiting behind a box car, and when the engine was only twenty feet or so away, she threw herself in front of it. Piloting the train at the time of the tragedy was Engineer Charles FULTZ.
Mrs. Beeber and her husband had been residents of Argos for ten or twelve years. Their home is in the east part of town close to the Nickle Plate tracks. The Beebers formerly lived in Tiosa.

Friday, November 14, 1924

[no obits]

Saturday, November 15, 1924

Mrs. Elizabeth Sophia COLLINS, 66, who died at Peru Friday, where she had lived twenty-seven years, will be interred in the I.O.O.F. cemetery here Sunday afternoon. The woman was the sister of George NORRIS of this city.
Mrs. Collins, nee NORRIS, was the daughter of George and Mary HUMMEL [NORRIS], and was born at Dayton, Ohio. She married Hezekiah STEVENS, and some time after his death thirty-five years ago, married Robert Paul COLLINS in Fulton county. Mrs. Pearl Emmons of Kewanna, is a sister of the deceased.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Geo. BEEBER of Argos was held Saturday afternoon from her home. Burial was made in the Rochester I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Monday, November 17, 1924

The death at Chula Vista, Calif., a suburb of San Diego, of Mrs. Matilda Ann FISH, 76, widow of John M. FISH, on November 10th, has just been learned here. Mrs. Fish, nee HAMLETT, lived for 59 years in Fulton county and a daughter, Minnie M. BUSENBURG died here March 15th, 1900. Mrs. Fish was the daughter of Thomas and Jane HAMLETT.

The deceased was born in Newcastle township, and lived in this county until January 1, 1907, when she and her husband moved to Guthrie, Oklahoma. In December, 1913, they became residents of Chula Vista. A little more than ten years ago Mrs. Fish's husband passed away.
Carlos M. FISH, a son, of Chula Vista, and William F. HAMLETT of Tefft, Indiana, a brother of the deceased, survives, in addition to five grandchildren.
The grandchildren are: Guy V. BUSENBURG, Pine Bluff, Ark.; Dale O. FISH, Pacific Beach, Calif.; Hulbert D. FISH, Chula Vista, Calif; Mildred L. FISH, Chula Vista, Calif.; and Mrs. Helen J. MITCHELL, Davis, California.

Tuesday, November 18, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, November 19, 1924

Peter SAYGERS of Michigan, a former resident of Akron, died there very suddenly Sunday. Death was due to heart trouble. He was 75 years of age. The surviving relatives are his wife, three sons, Roy [SAYGERS], Wildia [SAYGERS], of Ekhart, and Ralph [SAYGERS] of Warsaw and one daughter Mrs. Grace LaRUE of Akron. The funeral services will be held at Akron.
[NOTE: Peter Ira SAYGERS, 1858-1924; Rosa B. SAYGERS, 1861-1911; both buried in Akron cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Henry Township.]

Samuel White TRACY, 82, native of Preble county, Ohio, and for many years a resident of Gilead, Rochester and Macy, died Monday evening at the home of his son, Alonzo [TRACY], at Indianapolis. He had been in feeble health for some time and four months ago suffered a stroke of paralysis. Mr. Tracy was a Methodist, Mason and an Eastern Star.
The son of James and Catherine CAMPBELL TRACY, the deceased was born January 8, 1843 and came to this county with his parents when he was seven years old. Their home at that time was near Gilead. December 12, 1872, he was united in marriage with Elizabeth BOZARTH. For a number of years they lived in Rochester, later moving to Macy, where he spent the remainder of his life, until after Mrs. Tracy's death. Since that time he has spent the winters with his son, Alonzo and family at Indianapolis.
Besides the above-mentioned son, Mr. Tracy is survived by a son, John [TRACY] of Baton Rouge, La.; a grandson, Robert TRACY, of Indianapolis, and three brothers, Joseph TRACY of Akron, Frank TRACY of Rochester and M. W. TRACY of Macy.
The funeral was held Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at Macy and interment was in Plainview cemetery.

Thursday, November 20, 1924

[no obits]

Friday, November 21, 1924

Mrs. Frederick MEISER, 75, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jay Ginther, 1307 Madison street, Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock after a lingering illness caused by cancer of the liver. The deceased, who has been ill for the past year, was brought to the home of her daughter from her farm home near Leiters Ford just three weeks ago.
Elizabeth Ann PRICHTEL was born in Germany September 2, 1849, and emigrated to this country in 1885 with her parents, Casper and Sarah [PRICHTEL]. They settled on a farm near Royal Center. When she was 16 years of age she married Josiah OVERMYER who died a few years later. She later married Frederick MISER. They moved to this county 25 years ago.
The deceased was one of 11 children, none of whom is living. Mrs. Meiser's survivors are her husband; three sons, Mike OVERMYER of Hammond, William OVERMYER of Roselawn and Charles MEISER of near Green Oak; and three daughters, Mrs. Jay GINTHER of this city, Mrs. Floyd CAMPBELL of Porter and Mrs. Thomas MAY of Cannelton.
The funeral will be held at the Meiser home Saturday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Burial will be made in the cemetery at Leiters Ford.

Oliver J. "Owl" BEARSS, pioneer resident of Miami county, the son of the late Daniel R. and Emma BEARSS died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. L. N. Andrews of Barnabus, W. Virginia, Thursday at 4:00 o'clock, following a short illness. Death was due to heart trouble.
Mr. Bearss was born in Peru July 18, 1841, his age at death being 83 years, 4 months and 6 days. His entire lifetime, with the exception of two years was spent at Michigan City where he was a guard at the Northern prison, was spent at Peru.
He was united in marriage with Miss Alice Victoria IDDINGS, the daughter of the warden at the prison, while he was employed there, and shortly afterwards removed to Peru with his bride. Mrs. Bearss preceded her husband in death in April, 1917.
Two daughters survive, Mrs. L. N. ANDREWS of Barnabus and Mrs. Charles GRISWOLD of Peru. Two granddaughters, Mrs. F. E. COLE of Pittsburgh, Pa., and Harriet Alice GRISWOLD of Peru also survive.
The deceased is an uncle of Gresham [BEARSS] and George BEARSS of this city. For several years he lived on a farm west of this city near a settlement which was known as Bearss.

Saturday, November 22, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, November 24, 1924

Inheritance tax commissioner Jerry BYRER, Saturday filed in open court his appraisement of the estate of the late Joseph SLICK of Kewanna, pioneer resident of Union township and reputed to be one of the wealthy men of the county. The net value of the estate according to the appraisement is $76,554.63, which will be divided equally between his two daughters, Mrs. Etta TEETER and Mrs. Jessie DuBOIS, both of whom live near Kewanna. Each will receive money and property valued at $38,277.31.
The gross value of the Slick estate by Mr. Byrer's report is $80,925.14, divided as follows: Personal property $40,767.64, real estate $40,157.50. Debts and claims against the estate totaled

$4,370.51. The inventory shows Mr. Slick at the time of his death owned 4 lots in Kewanna, 443 acres of land in Union township, 28 promisory notes and 8 chattel mortgages, gold and liberty bonds, eleven $1,000 Treasury certificates, Stock in the First State Bank in Kewanna, 25 shares of Winona Telephone Company stock, six-twenty-fifths of the common stock of the Kewanna Butter and produce company besides a large sum of money on deposit in several banks.
The inheritance tax on the Slick estate alone amounted to $991.10. The value placed on the real estate by the commissioner is at current figures for farm land. It is believed that the farm land will greatly increase in value within the next few years which will in proportion increase the wealth of his two daughters. Mr. Slick for many years was a justice of the peace in Union township where he earned the title of Justice "Joe" SLICK.

Tuesday, November 25, 1924

Mrs. Maria ALSPACH Tuesday morning received word of the death of her son-in-law, Dr. Clarence M. HART of Salt Lake City, Utah, 55, from her daughter Ollie [HART]. Death occurred sometime Monday afternoon presumably from heart disease from which trouble he had suffered for many years.
Dr. Hart was born near Akron. He attended the Indiana Dental College and after graduation opened an office in Akron. Twenty years ago he moved to Boulder, Colo., later to Spanish Forks, Utah and in 1914 to Salt Lake City.
He is survived by his wife and a sister-in-law, Mrs. Ray LAMOREE of Akron. It had always been Hart's request that his body be cremated and the ashes strewn over a certain mountain near Salt Lake City.

Wednesday, November 26, 1924

Milton HENDERSON, 70, retired farmer living one mile south of Fulton, died at 2:30 o'clock Wednesday morning after an illness of approximately a year from liver trouble and complications. He had lived near Fulton for six or seven years, and in the county for a longer period. He was a member of the Presbyterian church of Rochester and a regular attendant while here, and since living near Fulton and has been an active worker of the Fulton Baptist church.
Surviving the deceased are the widow and five sons, Charles [HENDERSON] and Walter [HENDERSON] of Indianapolis, Carl [HENDERSON] and Cecil [HENDERSON] of Battle Ground, and Hugh [HENDERSON] of Fulton.
The funeral will be held Saturday morning from the residence, the Rev. WHITSELL of Fulton officiating. Burial will be in the Mt. Hope cemetery.

Mrs. John SNELL, 73, died at her home south of Disko Saturday evening, death coming after an illness of some time from cancer. The funeral was held Monday afternoon from the Niconza church. Her husband survives. The deceased was an aunt of Mrs. Frank STEFFY and Mrs. Charles PIPER of this city.

The body of the late Dr. Clarence HART of Salt Lake City, Utah, was taken to Denver, Colo., Tuesday night for cremation. The funeral probably will be held in Denver Friday afternoon. Guy ALSPACH, a brother-in-law of the deceased, left Tuesday afternoon for Denver. He will meet Mrs. Hart there and will accompany her to Salt Lake City.

Mrs. Laura BABCOCK has received a letter from Indianapolis lawyers employed by the Anaake Jans BOGARDUS Heirs Association in which they request that she send in her genealogy so that they can establish her claim as one of the direct heirs to the New York property which is valued at many billions of dollars. The lawyers in their communication state that they expect to win their suit, which is now before the New York Supreme Court, and are so confident that they expect to be abe to distribute the money within the next six months.
The land in question is in the heart of New York City and compirise 62 acres which was deeded to Mrs. Bogardus by one of the early Dutch governors of that colony, and which is now estimated to be worth $85,000,000,000. On the land Trinity church is located. The heirs of Mrs. Bogardus are located in all parts of the United States. Three years ago they formed an association in Indianapolis and hired lawyers to prosecute their claims.
Other Rochester people who claim to be related to Mrs. Bogardus are Mrs. B. F. KRATZER, Mrs. Mary TOBEY and L. K. BROWER. Only Mrs. Babcock has received a letter from the Indianapolis law firm. Other heirs of Mrs. Bogardus live in Peru, Logansport, Plymouth, Wabash and Warsaw.

Robert GREEK has received word from Indianapolis of the death of his cousin, Fred BOSTON which occurred Monday. The deceased was traveling for the Del Monte company and had often visited in this city. He is survived by his wife and two sisters. The funeral was held today.

Thursday, November 27, 1924

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, November 28, 1924

Word was received in this city Friday morning of the death of Mr. Arthur LEVIS, husband of the former Miss Bess HOLZMAN, of this city. She is the youngest daughter of Mrs. E. HOLZMAN who resides on North Main street.
According to the letter received by Miss Rosa MEYER, death occurred suddenly last Monday from a heart attack. Mr. Levis had suffered from asthma, and had been unwell for some time. They were living at their country home in Elmsford, N.Y., at the time. No information was given as to the funeral.

Mrs. George DOWNS, 56, died at her home at 1217 Bancroft avenue early Friday morning from the effects of a stroke of paralysis which she suffered last Sunday. The deceased, who weighed nearly 400 pounds, has been in failing health for the past two years.
Mrs. Downs was born on the farm four miles west of the city in what is known as the Burton neighborhood and was one of seven children born to Jonas and Lavina GILBERT. She was united in marriage with George DOWNS thirty-five years ago. She was a member of the Christian church.
The deceased is survived by her husband and an adopted daughter, Mrs. Clark EVANS, who made her home with her parents; five sisters, Mrs. Marian RICHTER, Mrs. Tom WILSON, Mrs. Effie HUNTER, all of this city, Mrs Peter FURY of Cincinnati, and Mrs. Fred WARE of California, and one brother, Charles [GILBERT], of this city. As soon as word has been received from relatives at distant points, the funeral arrangements will be made.

Saturday, November 29, 1924

Mrs. Katharine HARTMAN, 83, who lived in Rochester 30 years ago, on South Main street, died Friday morning at her home in New Paris, Indiana. Death resulted from complications attending old age.
W. H. DEARDORFF of Athens, a brother of the deceased, now is the last surviving member of the family of five children. He has lost by death two brothers and a sister within the last eight months.
Funeral arrangements could not be ascertained Friday afternoon, and it is not known whether the body will be returned here for burial or not.

John W. McGUIRE, prominent Mexico resident, died Thursday afternoon at his residence following an illness of several months caused by multiple neuritis.

Mrs. Andrew FRIEND of Denver, who was well known here died Friday morning at her home of a complication of diseases resulting from old age.
[NOTE: Andrew FRIEND, 1843-1921; Almira FRIEND, 1854-1924; both buried in Weasaw cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Miami County Indiana Cemeteries, Union Township.]




The News-Sentinel


Monday, December 1, 1924

Stricken in the morning by an attack of paralysis, Mrs. Hattie REESER, 86, widow of the late Wiett REESER and a resident of Fulton for 25 or 30 years, died at her home there Saturday evening. The funeral will be held from the residence at 1 p.m. Monday, the Rev. HOME officiating. Burial will be in the Macy cemetery.
Mrs. Reeser was born near Logansport and has lived in this section of the state practically all of her life. Her husband preceded her in death about 25 years ago. She was a member of the Logansport Presbyterian church.
Five children survive Mrs. Reeser. They are Mrs. Sam VESTAL, Mrs. Susie SIBERLING and Mrs. Alice THURSTON of Fulton; James REESER of Fulton, who made his home with his mother, and Charles REESER of near Kewanna.

Tuesday, December 2, 1924

Mrs. Sarah L. BARKMAN, 68, wife of Henry BARKMAN, 1023 Elm street, died Monday at 3:15 p.m. at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William KISER, in Mishawaka. She had been ill four years, following a stroke of paralysis.
The body will be returned to this city for burial. The funeral will be held from the United Brethren church at 2 p.m. Thursday, and interment will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. The deceased had been a member of the Mt. Hope U.B. church.
Sarah L. EMMONS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John EMMONS, was born April 18, 1856, in Fulton county. After her marriage to Henry Barkman she became the mother of several children who survive her.
The surviving children are "Kerg" BARKMAN of Mishawaka, O. R. BARKMAN of Gary, L. J. BARKMAN of Oceola, J. H. BARKMAN of Mishawaka, Mrs. Roscoe COPENHAVER of South Bend, and Mrs. William KISER of Mishawaka. She leaves two sisters, Mrs. Daniel FULTZ of this city and Mrs. Marguerite ANDERSON of Tiosa and a brother, William EMMONS, who lives north of here.
[NOTE: William H. H. BARKMAN, 1855-1937; Sarah L. BARKMAN, 1856-1924; both buried Rochester, I.O.O.F. cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Rochester I.O.O.F.]

Wednesday, December 3, 1924

Dan RANS, about 70 years old, farmer living on the west edge of Grass Creek, was killed almost instantly, and Omer PRATT, 28, grandson of Mrs. Elizabeth CLAYBORN who lives west of Rochester, was injured so seriously that he is not expected to live, Wendesday when a truck in which the two were going to Rans' home for some poultry was struck by the southbound Vandalia passenger train due at Kewanna at 10 a.m. on a crossing near the Rans' home.

Meager reports of the tragedy came to this city late this afternoon from Fulton by way of Grass Creek and Fletchers Lake. Whether the truck stalled on the tracks or whether the accident resulted from some other cause was not given in the message, but it is said that the crossing was not a "bad" one with no obstructed view. This makes the accident unaccountable, by present information.
At the time of the crash, Pratt was driving the truck, it was stated.

Thursday, December 4, 1924

Mrs. Dollie PUTMAN, 37, wife of Audrey PUTMAN of near Akron, died at her home at 1:30 a.m. Thursday morning, after an illness of several years duration. She had been gravely ill since Monday. Death is believed to have been casued by a stroke of apoplexy.
The widower and four children, three boys and a girl, survive the deceased. The children range in age from nine years to 16.
Born in Fulton county Jan. 28, 1887, Dollie SMITH, the daughter of James and Eliza SMITH, who also live near Akron, had been a constant resident of the county.
Awaiting the arrival of a sister from California, relatives of the deceased have made no arrangements for the funeral. It is known however that interment will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery in Akron.

Fred MEISER, 75, prominent farmer residing near Kewanna, died Tuesday following a paralytic stroke suffered a few days ago. Besides the widow he is survived by three sons - George [MEISER] who resides at home, Joe [MEISER] of Sheridan, and Eli [MEISER] of near here, and two daughters, Mrs. K. G. EVANS of Kewanna, and Mrs. Ike OVERMYER of Monterey. Funeral services were held Thursday morning at the Reform church near the Meiser home. Burial was made in the adjoining cemetery.
[NOTE: Frederick MEISER, 1849-1924; Caroline MEISER, his wife, 1856-1932; both buried in Bruce Lake Cemetery. - Jean C. & Wendell C. Tombaugh, Fulton County Indiana Cemeteries, Union Township.]

Friday, December 5, 1924

Mrs. George BIGGS, 23, died at her home 1224 Elm street at 4:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon of tuberculosis. She had been ill with the disease for the past two years and had been bedfast for eight months.
Hazel Marie [HARSH] was the daughter of Harry and Cora HARSH and was born on a farm in Henry township, November 4, 1901. When she was 18 years of age she was married. The deceased is survived by her husband, son Raymond [BIGGS], and daughter, Dorothea [BIGGS], two sisters, Mrs. Mary SMITH of North Carolina, and Mrs. Ida MAIN of this city, and one brother, Don [HARSH], of Mishawaka.
Mrs. Biggs was a member of the Church of God of this city. The funeral will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. from the residence, the Rev. SLAYBAUGH in charge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Saturday, December 6, 1924

Frederick Leon KEWNEY, born in Rochester 64 years ago and reared here, died Friday in a hospital at his home, Denver, Colorado.
Kewney was the youngest surviving son of the late John and Harriet KEWNEY. He has been absent from this community for a number of years. He never married.
Surviving are one sister, Mrs. E. VonEHRENSTEIN of Rochester, and a brother, J. F. KEWNEY of Pittsburgh.
Burial will be in Denver.

Mrs. Mary NICODEMUS, 86, a pioneer resident of this county, died at 3 o'clock Saturday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Emma Bowen, near Millark. Death was due to cancer and complications incident to old age. Mrs. Nicodemus has been in ill health for the past three years and has been bedfast for six weeks.
Mrs. Nicodemus [Mary WEIRICK] was born on a farm near Perrysville, Ohio, April 29, 1838, and was one of six children born to the union of William and Margaret WEIRICK. In 1866 she moved with her parents to Warsaw and a year later to a farm in the Chippewanauck neighborhood east of Rochester. Three years after moving to this county she married Abraham NICODEMUS.
The deceased is survived by two brothers, Thomas J. [WEIRICK] of this city, and Henry [WEIRICK] of the McKinley school neighborhood, two sons,William [NICODEMUS] of this city and Simeon [NICODEMUS] of near Akron and a daughter, Mrs. Emma BOWEN, of Millark; 22 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Mrs. Nicodemus was a member of the Athens Church of God. Funeral arrangements will be made later.

Funeral services for the late Daniel F. RANS, retired farmer and business man of Grass Creek, who was killed Wednesday when a truck in which he was riding with Ralph PRATT ran into a Pennsylvania switch engine, will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the Grass Creek Seventh Day Adventist church. The services will be conducted by the Rev. C. F. WEIST of Indianapolis. Burial was made in the Grass Creek cemetery. Mr. Rans' son and daughter from the northwest returned for the funeral.
Mr. Rans, a prominent farmer, formerly of Fulton county, established the first elevator at Grass Creek and just prior to the death conducted a hardwars store in that village. Ralph Pratt, who was driving the truck which ran into the train, is slowly recovering from his injuries.

The Rev. W. T. KESSINGER, pastor of the United Brethren church at Elkhart and former pastor of the Brethren church at Fulton and the one at North Manchester, died at his home Friday night as the result of injuries which he received in an automobile accident last Monday afternoon, when a car in which he was riding turned over. The funeral will be held Monday at Huntington.

Monday, December 8, 1924

The funeral services for the late Mrs. Mary NICODEMUS were held from the Hoover Chapel Monday afternoon. Burial was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Harley DENTON, 33, son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Ira BASTOW of this city, died of heart failure Sunday at 2:10 a.m., at his farm home seven miles west of this city. Mr. Denton had suffered with heart disease for a number of years. Saturday, however, he appeared to be in the best of health and accompanied his wife to this city and to Fulton on a shopping tour. Just after supper he compleined of pains in the region of his heart and at 8 o'clock lapsed into unconsciousness in which state he remained until he passed away.
Mr. Denton was born in Camelsburg, Indiana, November 29, 1891, and was the son of Oscar and Hattie DENTON. His parents died while he was quite young and he was reared by his relatives, Mr. and Mrs. John STONE, of near Kewanna. For several years he worked as an express messenger in Chicago.
Six years ago he married Iola BASTOW and then moved onto a farm west of the city. He had decided to move back to the city, and Saturday afternoon placed an advertisement in the News-Sentinel announcing a farm sale.
The deceased is survived by his wife, and four brothers, Herman [DENTON],George [DENTON] and John [DENTON], all of whom live on farms near Kewanna, and Clade [DENTON] of Covington, Indiana. Mr. Denton was a member of the Rochester Baptist church of which organization he was an active member. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon from the local Baptist church. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rev. NIVEN in charge.

While arrangements were being made at Galveston, Ind., by William TROUTMAN for the funeral of his wife, Mrs. Isabelle TROUTMAN, 70, for years a resident of Fulton county, who died at noon Thursday after an illness of several weeks, a telegram came telling of the death Friday at Wyandotte, Michigan, of his oldest son, Alva [TROUTMAN], 49, following an operation necessitated by a rupture of the bladder.
The funeral of Mrs. Troutman was held Friday morning at Galveston U. B. church and burial was made Saturday at Metea.
Alva Troutman's funeral will be held at Wyandotte Monday at 1 p.m. Surviving him are a wife, Florence [TROUTMAN], and three children, aged 18, 13 and five. Mr. Troutman did not know of his mother's death and had left her bedside last week in apparent good health. His illness was sudden.
Mr. Troutman and members of the family will go to Wyandotte for his son's funeral.

Amos MURPHY, aged 80 years, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Della FLOYD, east of Macy, Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, of diseases incident to old age.
He was the son of Joshua and Tacy MURPHY and was born in Indiana, August 15, 1844. His first wife was Elizabeth ANTRIM and died twelve years ago. Later he married Katharine ANDREWS.
He was a member of the Church of the Brethren at Mexico.
Surviving him are two children, Wallace MURPHY and Mrs. Della FLOYD; ten grandchildren and six great-grandchildren, and two brothers, Amos [sic] [MURPHY] and Nelson MURPHY.
His funeral will be held at the Pleasant Hill M.E. church Tuesday morning at ten o'clock. Interment in the Massability cemetery, north of Wooleytown.

Jonathan BIXLER, 73, life-long resident of Union township and a highly respected farmer, was found dead Monday morning in a cow barn at the rear of his farm home, three and one-half miles west of Kewanna near the Dunkard church, by his son. Death, according to Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH who was called following the discovery, was caused by heart trouble.
Mr. Bixler arose early Monday morning as was his custom and appeared in his usual good health. After eating a hearty breakfast he went out to do his morning chores and when he did not return his wife became alarmed and called her son who then made the discovery of his father's death.
Mr. Bixler was born on a farm in Darken [sic] county, Pennsylvania, May 8, 1851, and was the son of Peter and Katherine BIXLER. When he was four years old his parents moved to Indiana, settling on a farm near Kewanna. He has continued to reside in that community where he built up a reputation for fair dealing with his many neighbors.
The deceased is survived by his widow, two sons, Daniel [BIXLER] and Sidney [BIXLER], and a daughter, Mrs. Nolan TRIMBLE, all of whom live near Kewanna; one brother, Daniel [BIXLER] of Bruce Lake, and a sister, Mrs. Nora GREER of Beaverton, Mich. Mr. Bixler was a member of the Kewanna Methodist church. While the funeral arrangements had not been made up until press time the services will probably be held Wednesday afternoon.

Albert F. BASH, of Macy, received a message Saturday stating that his brother Otis BASH, a bachelor, 52, of DePew, Oklahoma, had lost his life in that city early Friday morning in a fire that destroyed the DePew hotel where he resided.

Tuesday, December 9, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 10, 1924

Mrs. Ralph SHONK, 29, mother of three small children, who lives on a farm one and one-half miles northwest of Bruce Lake Station, committed suicide about noon Wednesday by taking strychnine. Despondency over ill health is given by relatives as the cause for the rash act. Mrs. Shonk had had trouble with her stomcah for the past year, which did not seem to improve with treatment.
The strychnine had been purchased by Mr. Shonk to kill rats. It had been placed in a cabinet in the kitchen out of the reach of the children. Mrs. Shonk had a bad spell Wednesday morning, and despite the requests of her husband not to wash she continued with her labor. About 10:45 she suffered another attack and she then decided to end it all.
Taking the strychnine from its resting place at 11 o'clock Mrs. Shonk drained the vial and calmly walked into the sitting room where her husband was reading and told him of her act. A doctor was called immediately. Emetics were given but to no avail. Before the doctor arrived Mrs. Shonk had passed away.
The deceased [Marie WILSON] was born in Montgomery county on April 9, 1895, and was one of seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. John WILSON. Twenty-two years ago her parents moved to this county and settled on a farm near Kewanna. Mrs. Shonk had been married 10 years. She is survived by her parents; husband; three children, Harold [SHONK], John [SHONK] and Katherine [SHONK]; five brothers, George [WILSON], and Clifford [WILSON] of Kewanna; Herbert [WILSON] of Fulton; James [WILSON] of Royal Center and Earl [WILSON] of Akron; and one sister, Carol [WILSON], of Kewanna.
Mrs. Shonk was a member of the Prairie Grove United Brethren church. The funeral arrangements have not been made. Dr. Dow HAIMBAUGH, coroner, was called after the demise of Mrs. Shonk, but has not as yet rendered his report concerning her death. Mr. Shonk Wednesday stated that the amount of poison taken by his wife must have been very small as he had used some of it out of the ten cent bottle on two different occasions to kill rats.

Thursday, December 11, 1924

Logansport, Dec. 11. -- (By I.N.S.) -- Frank BERRY, 42, salesman, is in a serious condition at a local hospital and John L. DOWNS, 46, proprietor of a soft drink parlor, is dead as a result of an automobile driven at a fast rate of speed by Berry hitting a tree. Downs suffered a fracture of his skull, crushed ribs and pierced lung due to flying glass and died without regaining consciousness. Police said the two had been drinking intoxicating liquor. Downs long lived at Grass Creek.
The accident occurred near the west end of Riverside Park. Traveling at a fast rate of speed the Overland touring car owned and driven by Berry, approached the park from the west out of Race street, failed to complete the turn to the right onto the park drive and skidded sidewise into the tree. Downs died four hours after his injury, and Berry suffered in the carsh numerous cuts and bruises, including a long gash across his right thigh which severed the muscles.
Claude WOLF, employed at Seybolds dry goods comany, his wife and two sons, Paul [WOLF] and Bert [WOLF], were driving home and passed the spot immediately after the crash occurred although they had not seen or heard it. They drove by, noticed the car against the tree and turned to see how badly the car was damaged, thinking the wreck had occurred some time previous.
They found the two injured men in the front seat, one unconscious and the other talking delirously.

Mrs. Adolph HUNNESHAGEN, 73, life-long respected citizen of Union township died of kidney trouble at 12 o'clock Wednesday night at her farm home four miles north of Kewanna on what is known as the Bruce Lake road. Mrs. Hunneshagen had been in ill health for the past six years and on several occasions suffered uremic convulsions which greatly weakened her physically.
Wilhelmina SMITH, daughter of Jonathan and Lucy SMITH was born on a farm in Union township southeast of Bruce Lake on December 2, 1851. She attended the grade and high schools at Kewanna. Mr. and Mrs. Hunneshagen celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary on February 24. They have lived on the same farm during their entire married life.
The deceased is survived by her husband who is a Civil War veteran; two sons, Eugene [HUNNESHAGEN], who lives on the farm adjoining the Hunneshagen home place and Clarence [HUNNESHAGEN] of Kokomo; one daughter, Mabel [HUNNESHAGEN] of Chicago; a brother, Silas [SMITH] of Bruce Lake; six grandchildren and one great-grandchild. The SHORE, HUNNESHAGEN and SMITH families of this city are related to Mrs. Hunneshagen.
Mrs. Hunneshagen was an active member of the Reformed church at Bruce Lake. She was also a member of the Women's Relief Corps at Kewanna. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Sunday from the Bruce Lake Reformed church, the Rev. TAPY of Culver in charge. Burial will be made in the cemetery adjacent to the church.

Friday, December 12, 1924

[no obits]

Saturday, December 13, 1924

Mrs. Susan S. ALSPACH, 70, widow of the late Ed ALSPACH died at four o'clock Saturday morning at the home of Mrs. Mahlon BAIR on East Ninth street from the results of a stroke of paralysis which she suffered at 10 o'clock Thursday evening. Mrs. Alspach had been in her usual good health prior to the stroke.
Mrs. Alspach [Susan S. YOUNG] was born in Allen county, Indiana, on August 23 1844, and was one of seven children born to the union of Levi and Jane YOUNG. When she was 21 she married George WAGONER and they moved to Frankfort. Twenty years ago Mr. Wagoner died and she then married Mr. Alspach, they later moving to this county to live.
The deceased is survived by one brother, Levi [YOUNG], of this city, and a son, Amazon WAGONER, of Marion, and three grandchildren. Mrs. Alspach was a member of the Frankfort Adventist church.
Short funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Levi Young residence at 924 South Monroe street.
The body will then be taken to the home of her son, Amazon, at Marion. Services will be held there Tuesday afternoon with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery at Marion.

Monday, December 15, 1924

The Rev. Noah McCOY officiated at the funeral of Mrs. Joseph SMALLEY of Burket at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon. Burial was made in the Mentone cemetery. Mrs. Smalley is a sister or Mrs. J. LATTIMER of Mentone who is a patient at Woodlawn hospital.
[NOTE: Joseph D. SMALLEY, Jan 31, 1843 - Apr 11, 1920; Mary C. BYBEE SMALLEY, his wife, Dec 4, 1843 - Dec 13, 1924; both buried in Mentone Cemetery. - Jean C. and Wendell C. Tombaugh, Kosciusko County Indiana Cemeteries, Franklin Township.]

Adolph HUNNESHAGEN, whose wife was lying dead in his home near Lake Bruce, Saturday, received word of the death of his nephew, Harry HUNNESHAGEN, of Pittsburgh, Pa., who was killed in an automobile accident in Pittsburgh when a machine in which he was riding skidded and went over a 30 foot embankment pinning him under the car.
Harry Hunneshagen was one of the prominent men of Pittsburgh, having held office there for the past twenty years, and at the time of his death was city controller.

Friends in Kewanna have received word of the death of John WARD, 23, son of Dr. and Mrs. WARD, former residents of Kewanna, which occurred in Panama a few days before Thanksgiving when he was drowned.
John had attempted to ford a swollen stream on horseback but the current being too strong both were drowned, and according to the last news received by his mother his body has not been recovered. Young Ward was a wireless telegrapher and had been in Panama for several years. The young man's father died in Tennessee several years ago and his mother now resides in Chicago.

Tuesday, December 16, 1924

[no obits]

Wednesday, December 17, 1924

The death of Charles SNYDER of Galveston last Friday, was the third brother of that family to die within the last 21 months, Samuel [SNYDER] of Walton dying in April of 1922, and William [SNYDER] of Rochester in July of the same year. Out of 14 children in the Snyder family but five remain, four sisters and one brother. Mr. and Mrs. Howard SNYDER, Mr. and Mrs. William SNYDER and Mrs. Elizabeth SNYDER attended the funeral of Charles Snyder which was held at Galveston Monday.

Thursday, December 18, 1924 and Friday, December 19, 1924

[no obits]

Saturday, December 20, 1924

Thomas Jefferson PARTRIDGE, 77, a life-long citizen of Newcastle township, was found dead about 7:15 Friday evening in a barn by his son, Earl, with whom he lived. The PARTRIDGE farm is located six miles northeast of this city in what is known as the Lutheran church neighborhood. Coroner Dow HAIMBAUGH was called and pronounced death due to heart failure. This is the fourth person to drop dead in Fulton county during the past month.
Mr. Partridge had suffered with heart trouble and dropsy for the past two years and at times his mind was slightly deranged. He spent last winter in Texas with a daughter in hope that the climate might benefit him. He had for the past few days seemed much better and was in Rochester Friday afternoon.
After eating his supper Mr. Partridge went out of the house about 5:30 without telling his family where he was going. When he did not return in half an hour his son Earl became alarmed and went to several neighbors homes and not finding his father retraced his steps and out to the barn where he made the discovery.
Mr. Partridge was born on the same farm on which he died, on March 24, 1848, and was the son of Edwin and Rachael PARTRIDGE. He lived on this farm all of his life with the exception of a few years in Clinton county, and one in Missouri. Fifty years ago he married Lydia HISEY, who preceded him in death and they were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living. They are two sons, Earl [PARTRIDGE] and Frank [PARTRIDGE] of near Tiosa and four daughters, Cora McKEOWN of Kankakee, Ill., Mrs. Evaline ROBBINS of Roseburg, Tex., Mrs. Mabel SULLIVAN of Argos and Mrs. Leora SULLIVAN who lives on a farm near Tiosa.

Monday, December 22, 1924

A message from Peru tells of the death of the Rev. Silas FISHER formerly of Rochester. He is a cousin of Henry A. BARNHART, of this city. The Rev. Fisher had recently passed through the ordeal of losing his youngest son from an attack of spinal meningitis, and not long ago two of his daughters were taken by tuberculosis. Added to this his wife has been an invalid for several years

and was recently a patient at Woodlawn hospital. All of this and an attack of the flu overwhelmed him and he passed away before it was considered that he was in a dangerous condition.
The Rev. Fisher was pastor of the Brethren church in Peru, grew to manhood at Mexico, Miami county, was widely known in that vicinity and was about sixty years old.

Tuesday, December 23, 1924

Al MURPHY and Mrs. Millicent KARN of this city have received word of the death of their brother, Edward [MURPHY], of Peru, who for a number of years was a resident of this county. He died at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon at the Logansport from a stroke of paralysis. [sic] He had been undergoing treatment there for ulcers of the brain.
Edward was the first to die of the ten children, whose ages at the present time total 652, born to Charles and Anna MURPHY. The deceased besides his four brothers and five sisters is survived by his wife and two children, Robert [MURPHY] and Nellie [MURPHY], of Peru. The funeral services will be held in Peru.

Wednesday, December 24, 1924

Dr. Charles Vernon GOULD, 65, who has been a practicing physician in this county for 42 years and who has been prominent in the business and social circles of this city for a half century, died at 7 o'clock Wednesday morning at his home 317 West Ninth street. Death was due to chronic lymphatic lukemia and organic heart trouble.
The deceased has been ill for the past three years but continued to practice until six months ago when because of his physical condition he was forced to retire. He had consulted the best doctors in the middle west in the hope of obtaining relief but to no avail. He also spent many months in sanitariums without receiving any benefit.
Dr. Charles Gould was born in this county on June 13, 1858 and was one of five children born to Dr. Vernon and Almira RANNELLS GOULD. After graduating from Rochester High school he entered the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati from which institution he received his diploma in 1882. He immediately engaged in the practice of medicine entering the office of his father in this city.
On February 20, 1859 he was married to Rose I. KEITH who with a son, Dr. Lyman GOULD of Fort Wayne, a granddaughter, Muriel GOULD and a sister, Mrs. Web STINSON of this city survive. He was a member of the Rochester Masonic lodge, the council at Huntington, the commandery at Plymouth and the consistory at Fort Wayne. He was also a member of the Fulton county and Indiana Medical societies in which organization he was an active member.
The funeral will be held from the home on Friday afternoon at two o'clock. Rev. Daniel PERRY will be in charge of the services. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Thursday, December 25, 1924

[no paper - holiday]

Friday, December 26, 1924

Mrs. Eliza ROGERS, 79, who was a resident of Richland township for 63 years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Artella DOLLEY of Lewis Creek in Shelby county, at 6 o'clock last Tuesday evening. Death was due to dropsy and cancer of the liver. The deceased had been ill for several years but had only been bedfast five weeks. The body was sent here, arriving Christmas eve, and was taken to the home of her son, Tola [ROGERS], who lives four miles east of Rochester on the Akron road.
Mrs. Rogers [Eliza ZERBE] was born in Schuylkill Co., Pa., Nov. 4, 1845 and was one of 10 children born to the union of Jacob and Rosanna ZERBE. When she was 16 years old her parents moved in wagons overland to this county, settling on a farm in Richland township. When she was 28 years old, the deceased married Eli ROGERS and moved to a farm a mile and a half west of Walnut, where she continued to reside until three years ago when she decided to spend the winters in Lewis Creek with her daughter, and her summers here with her son, Tola.
Mrs. Rogers is survived by two brothers, George [ZERBE] of Monticello and Peter [ZERBE] of Tiosa; three daughters, Mrs. Alice WYNN and Mrs. Sarah WYNN of Tiosa, and Mrs. Artella DOLLEY, and six sons, William [ROGERS] of Tiosa, J. Frank [ROGERS] of Muncie, Harry V. [ROGERS] of Peru, Clayton M. [ROGERS] and Harley G. [ROGERS] of Cincinnati and Tola [ROGERS] of near Rochester.
In early life Mrs. Rogers united with the church of her parents, the Lutheran, but five years ago joined the Methodist church at Walnut The funeral services were held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon from the Walnut Methodist church with the Rev. FRALEY of Rochester in charge. Burial was made in the Richland Center cemetery.

Saturday, December 27, 1924

[no obits]

Monday, December 29, 1924

Mrs. Elizabeth KENNELL, 64, a life-long resident of the Burton neighborhood, died at her home six miles west of this city at 8 o'clock, Saturday night. Death was due to Bright's disease. She had been ill for the past year but had been bedfast but 36 hours.
Elizabeth [WALES], daughter of Michael and Susannah WALES, was born in this county January 18, 1860. In 1880 she married John KENNELL who survives her as do a daughter, Mrs. William MATHIAS of the Burton neighborhood, and a son, William [KENNELL] of this city, manager of the Stehle and Shively hardware.
The deceased was a member of the Evangelical church at Burton. The funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Burton church, the Rev. KISTLER in charge. Burial will be made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Claude "Dewey" EDWARDS, 52, who until 20 years ago was a resident of this city, died at his home, 502-1/2 Division street, South Bend, Saturday night at 11:45 o'clock. Death was due to cancer from which he had suffered for the past six months.
The deceased was a son of David and Marie EDWARDS. At the time of his death, Mr. Edwards operated a commission house in South Bend, [employed by Sam ROSENTHAL].
Mr. Edwards, while a resident of this city was a member of the famous Red Fellows baseball nine, which held the semi-pro championship of Northern Indiana during the years of 1897-8-9.
He is survived by his wife, who was Nellie CALDWELL and one brother, Edward [EDWARDS], of this city. The funeral services will be held from the Hoover chapel at 10:30 Tuesday morning with burial in the I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Tuesday, December 30, 1924

Richard VanDIEN has received word of the death of his brother, John [VanDIEN], 84, of Ridgewood, N.J., which occurred last Friday. Mr. Van Dien visited with his Rochester relatives last summer, which was their first meeting in 50 years although they corresponded regularly. He was a veteran of the Civil war.

Within five days after giving birth to a boy and a girl, twins, Mrs. Arminta MAIN SURGUY, 25, wife of Geroge Dewey SURGUY who is a son of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. SURGUY of near Talma, died at 10 a.m. Monday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. O. L. MAIN, at Kokomo. The cause of death was given as bronchial pneumonia.
Surviving the deceased are the widower, the babies, the parents, and a sister, Hazel [MAIN].
Funeral services will be held from the Kokomo Methodist Episcopal church Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, the Rev. P. E. GREENWALT in charge. Burial will be made in the Crown Point cemetery, Kokomo.
Born October 6, 1899, near Russiaville, the deceased had lived in Kokomo thirteen years, being graduated in 1919 from the Kokomo high school. For three years she was employed as stenographer in the law office of Clipe and Wills. On her twenty-third birthday anniversary, Oct. 6, 1922, she married George Dewey Surguy of this city.

Wednesday, December 31, 1924

Mrs. George SMITH, 66, died at her home 1217 Madison street at 11 o'clock Tuesday night. Death was due to cancer it is thought. She had been ill since last summer, but her death was entirely unexpected as she seemed to be better Tuesday.
Nancy Jane PRITCHARD was born in Lockport, New York, on Nov. 13, 1858. When quite young she was adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Elias A. MORGAN of North Collins, Erie county, New York, and lived with them until 1878 when she went to Emporia, Kansas to make her home. While there she met George SMITH of Logansport and was married to him in 1879. The Smiths lived in Michigan and New York state and Lafayette and Gary, in Indiana, and ten years ago moved to this city.
The deceased, who was a member of the Methodist church at North Collins, N.Y., is survived by her husband, mother, Mrs. A. M. COOK, of North Collins, and a daughter, Mrs. Mary RHODA, and son, Morgan [SMITH], both of this city, and two grandchildren, Jack ADAMS and Donamay RHODA. Funeral arrangements have not been made.